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36TH CONGRESS,

2d Session.

) HOUSE. OF REPRESENTATIVES. ^ Ex. Doc.
\
\ No. 2.

REPORT

SECRETAEY OF THE TREA-SUM,

STATE OF THE FINANCES;

THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1860.




WASHINGTO.N:
THOMAS H. FORD, PElNTERo
I86O0




^50
REPORT

THE SECRETAEY OF THE TREASURY.
T H E S T A T E OP T H E

FINANCES.

DECEMBER' 5, 1860.—Laid upon the table and ordered to be printed.
DECEMBER 24, 1860.—Resolved, That 15,000 extra copies of the Annual Report of the
Secretary of the Treasury on the state of the Finances be printed for the use of the House,
and 1,000 copies for the use oif the Treasury Department.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Decemher 4,

1860.

SIR: In compliance with the act of Congress entitled *^An act sup^
plementary to an act to establish the Treasury Department/' approved
May 10, 1800, I bave tbe honor to submit the fbllowing report:
On the first day of July, 1859, being the commencement of the fiscal year 1860, the balance in the
treasury was....
„
..o
|4,33^,275 54
The receipts into .the "treasury during the fiscal year
1860 were as fbllows :
^
For the quarter ending September 30,1859—
Fromcustoms
$15,947,670 62
From public lands...
470,244 62
From miscellaneous sources . . . . . . j ^ . . . . .
379,650 61
•
From treasury notes, per act December 23, 1857
3,611,300 00
From loan, per act June 14, 1858....
210,000 00
~
-.
20,618,865 85
For the quarter ending December 31, 1859-^ *
Fromcustoms..
10,785,849 93
From public lands
:..
445,535 36
From miscellaneous sources
149,392 76
From treasury notes, per act December 23, 1857
4,064,500 00
From loan, per act June 14, 1858....
60,000 00
. ^ — _ . . . _ - 15,505,278 05
Carried for ward. 0....0




:., .ooo........

40,463,419 44

4

REPORT .ON)THE FINANCES.

•fi r Broughtforward............
.v
$40,463,419 44
- For/tfte"quarter ending March 31, 1860 —
Fromcustoms...:.:............-....;....... fl4.962,783 68
Frompubliclandsw...::..... .;..-;.'.:;.
505,591 83
From miscellaneous sources....C.-......
245,44736
From treasury notes, per act December 23,1857....;.:
.V
5,588,200 00
Frorn loan, per act June 14,'1858.:..
1,110,000 00
\ f i \ > f i ' ' r ^ f i f i : - . ^ ] - ^ '''•'''• ,
-—•
- • — 22,412,022,87
For "thequarter ending Jurje 30, 1860—
From Customs....;..,
....:. 11,491,207 64
F p m piiblic lands:......,
357,185 90
'
: IVom iiiis^^^
.
23B,273 58
From-treasury n6
.
: !.ber'2S,I857....;.o..o....
....;^...
6,131,200 00
fifi-/'':
fi^fi":•"•;:
^
— — - 18,215,867 12
MaKing the.aggregate means for the service of the fis- c a l year endiEig Jun
I860,..,...
,,
81,091,309 43
.The°expenditures during the fiscal year ending June
30,-ISeO, were as follows :
.For the quarter ending September 30, 1859
20,007,174 76
For th^.quarter ending December 31, 1859
]6,0>!5,52n 69
.F6r*the4uarter eiiding March 31. I860..:
20,877,502 70
,Fc)i^:the.(parter ending June 30, 1860
21,051,898 57
77,462,102 72
;' •'Whictf a^^
^^
applied to the respective branches
. of ihepublic^^^^^^^
follows:
• To civil, foreign intercourse, and miscel]|ineous ser; •v;:yi#8'..\.:..
;.,.....
,
^. To^^s^^^^
Department (Indians and pen.{ .sions).:..... ......•.:..!..
:.
.^^^; .T^^^
; To service of Navy Department.. —
; To the public debt .....,..,..,
V 'V:As p^^

in detail in statement No. L




3,955,686
16,409,767
11,513,150
17,613,628

59
10'
19
00

775462,102 72

Deducting the expenditures for the fiscal year 1860
from the aggregate receipts during'that year, there
.remairied in the treasury'on the 1st July, 1860, the
; ;;i)ala4ce of..
„>...........:.;.
......,.„
. T h e receipts for the" first quarter of the fiscal year
1861, from July 1 to September 30,' 1860, were:
From; cnstoms...:..................,....^ f 16,119,831 22
.vjv;: Carrier

27,969,870 84

.,..,,

3,629,206 71

3,629,206 71

REPORt ON THE FINANCES.

• ' . >.^

O;

Brought forward .^......:
From publiciands
,
From m iscellaneous sou rees

». $16,119,831 .22 /|3,629V206f^7l
..,.
| 2 8 1 , 1 0 0 84 • fi y^.>•••/:.r.
'
318,857 98^ ;;; ;• •' ; :." r \ ^ /
— - ^ ^ 16^715,790iOf
The estimated receipts during the three remaining . ,N\;J^ I
'V
quarters ofthe current fiscal year 1861, are :. • , ''"'< -^ .- ,.'>• f ? v.'
From custoras
„, $40,000,000 00 .f^i^.-^^i^^^^^
From public lands
2,250,000 Q •'-firyhfifi?^^:.'
O
From miscellaneous sources
.750,0.00 .00,, l^' -^ >.'•;•; \
^
From loan authorized June 22, I860.. 21,0'0(),00O::66'
.^^ > '^ '":' • °
Making the total of ascertained and estimateel meajis; ' /fi'^-,fiy-^-^''-ifi
iov the service of the current fiscal year l861::.U:..,V'^34^348,996 75
The expenditures of the first quarter of the currepit/
fiscal year, that ending 30th September, I860,-yere'
asfollows:
•. . •
-; /./r%fi''
For civil, fbreign intercourse, and liiisr „ .. • ; ' % , • • . A
cellaneous services
•.fi..,fi.\.^^. '"$6,44O30;O3JflT
For service of Interior Department.
. . .. •.
(Indians and pensions)
1,679,575 24
For service of War Department.....,,
5^352,771 42.
For service of Navy Departnie,nt...V.v
2,578,678 88
For payment of creditors of Texas/per
act 28th February, 1855.......;...... •. :.' -1',282 81
For redemption of treas.ury notes,,..,.
, 375,400 00
For interest on publicdebt.......
"' 115,560 47
16,543^473 5?>
The estimated expenditures from appropriations here-;
tofore made by law, during the three remaining' \ . ;
quarters of the current fiscal year 1861, according- ^
' :* ;
to the report ofthe Eegister, are
............o".:..; 46,9!^5:,232 58
The loan of 22d J u n e , 1860, the amoumt of whichis
: .: :
stated among the means of the fiscal year 1861, is
expressly required to be applied to the redemptiono
\
* .
of treasury notes; the amount of those notes and
interest thereon, deducting $375,400 redeemed dur. ,
ing the first quarter, as stated in ,the expenditures
fii
of that quarter, is..o..oo..c...
..o.......,.....;.. 20,624,600 G
O
Making the aggregate expenditure ascertained and
^
estimated for the current fiscal year 1861 ,.„..,.,.... 84,103,105 17
Which amount, deducted from the total of ascertained
and estimated means for the service of the current
fiscal year 1861^ as before stated, leaves a balanee
.'r-"'
in ihe treasury on the 1st July, 1861, being the
>:
commencement of the fiscal year 1862, of.....o«......
245,891 58




6

REPORT ON THE FINANCES«

, The foregoing statement assumes that the whole sum' embraced in
the estimated expenditures for the remaining three quarters of the
current fiscal year will be actually called for within the year. The
amount stated, $46,935,232 58^ does not include the entire balance
of the appropriations heretofore made by law, but such sums as the
respective departments have indicated may probably be required.
But in practice, for many years past, the sums drawn from the treasury during any year have been much lees than the aniounts estimated
as required within such year, according to the character ofthe appropriations and the exigencies of the public service. It may be therefore fairly anticipated that should the operations of the government
proceed in their ordinary course, at least four millions of dollars
more may be deducted from the estimated expenditures ofthe current
fiscal year, increasing the balance in the treasury on the Ist July,
1861, to that extent.
Estimates fior thefiscal year from 1st July, 1861^ to ZOth June, 1862.
Estimated
Estimated
Estimated
Estimated

receipts
receipts
receipts
balance

from customs
..........o..,.,. $60,000,000 00
from public lands
3,000^000 00
from miscellaneous sources ..«
1,250,000 00
in treasury on 1st July, 1861......
245,891 58

Aggregate estimated means for fiscal year 1862

6i,495,891 58

Estimatedexpendituresfrom permanentappropriations
9,626,386 20
Estimated expenditures from balance of former appropriations not before required
.,.,.,... 12,198,112 62
' Estimates now submitted by the executive departments for appropriation by Congress..........o.
46,539,227 29
Aggregate estimated expenditures for fiscal year 1862 68,363,726 11
Showing a deficit of estimated means for the service
ofthe fiscal year ending 30th June, 1862, of......;^.
3,867,834 53
The suggestions above made, as to not drawing from the treasury
dutring the year the whole amount of the appropriations authorized
b y l a w , will apply to these estimates, so that instead of the above
deficiency of $3,867,834 53, there will probably remain the treasury
on the 1st July, 1862, a balance ofabout $8,000,000.
The correctness of this estimate of expenditures, for the present
^ n d next fiscal years, may be illustrated in another and simpler form.
The entire expenditure of the governraent for the fiscal year ending
the SOth June, 1860, exclusive of the redemption of treasury notes,
which are otherwise provided for^ and the interest on the public debt,
was $59,848,474 72, and in that sum was included $4,446,009 26, to
meet a deficiency in the Post Office Department, produced by the
failure of the post office appropriation bill at the second session of the
thirty-fifth Congress, thereby causing this amount to be paid and
charged in the expenditure of the fiscal year ending the 3i)th June,
1860, though in point of fact the service was rendered and the liability

k




REPORT ON THE iFINANCES.

.

7

incurred in the preceding year. I t should be borne in mind'that this
sumof $59,848,474 72, included not only payments growing out of
such appropriations as had been estimated for by the department, but
all other sums appropriated by Congress. There is no reason why
the expenditure for the present or next fiscal year should exceed that
o f t h e last year. Allowing, however, a margin for,an increase, it
. lb ay be safely stated that the expenses for the two years will not
exceed $60,000,000 each, making the amount to be provided for
$120,000,000. The estimated means of the treasury for the same
period are, for the present fiscal year, $63,348,996 75, and for the
year ending the 30th June, 1862_, $64,250,000^ which would leave au
excess of estimated means over estimated expenditure of $7,598,996 75.
The estimate of receipts into the treasury have been made without
reference to the financial and commercial panic which has assumed
so threatening an aspect within the last few days, and of which I
shall speak more fully hereafter. The country was never in a more
prosperous condition. Our planters and farmers have been blest, as
a general rule, with abundant crops, and were realizing remunerative
prices for all kinds of products. The exports of the last fiscal year
had reached the enormous sum of $400,122,296, and the imports for
the same peribd were $362,163,941, yielding a revenue from customs
of $53,187,511 87. The exports of domestic produce for the present
fiscal year, as far as they have been received, indicate an increase fully
equal if not greater than that of preceding years, thus authorizing
the estimate of increased revenue from that source. Apart, therefore,
from the threatened embarrassments in the trade and business of the
country, these estimates, both of expenditure and receipts, would be
submitted to Congress with great confidence that they would hot vary
very far from the actual results.
It is impossible to anticipate the elfeots which this threatened revulsion will produce upon the business of the country. The absence of
all the ordinary causes Tor such a state of things, leaves no data upon
which to make calculations. All the elements of prosperity are in
existence. Abundant crops, with remunerative prices, money seeking
safe investments, and, indeed, everything to indicate more than the
usual increase in trade and business. The causes which have so suddenly arrested this tide of prosperity must be looked for outside of the
financial and commercial operations of the country. They are of a
political character, and therefore so dependent for their ultimate effect
upon future developments, that it is impossible at present to say what
will be the extent of their influence. If, as some suppose, they are
merely temporary and will soon pass away, then there will be no
necessity for any action of Congress, except to provide for the embarrassments already existing in consequence of them. If, on the other
hand, the effect should prove more permanent, the fact will be made
manifest during the present session of Congress^ and in time for such
action as will provide the necessary means to carry on the operations
pfthe government and preserve the public credit.
Already has the treasury been seriously affected by these causes.
The receipts from customs for the last few days have greatly fallen
off, and the limited amount received is composed, each day, of an in


5

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

creased proportion of treasury notes not yet due. The indications are
that such will, at least for the present, continue to be the case. Not
only 80, but in consequence of the failure of bidders for the late loan
to comply with the terms of their bid,- a portion of the ordinary revenues has been withdrawn frorn the ordinary sources of expenditure to
meet the payment of treasury notes past due and the interest thereon.
This condition of things demands the immediate attention of Congress, and its early action will be require^ to enable the department
to carry on the operations of the government and at the same time
pre^serve unimpaired the public credit.
The permanent public debt on the .30th of June, 1860, was
$45,079,203 08, and the outstanding treasury notes at that date
amounted to $19,690,500, as will appear by reference to table No, 3,
hereto appended. .
'
By the act of June 22, 186,0, provision was made for the redemption
of treasury notes and payment of the interest thereon. This act provided for the issuing of stock for an amount not exceeding twenty-one
millions of dollars, at a rate of interest ^'^ not exceeding six per centum
per annum, and to be reimbursed within a period not beyond twenty
years and not less than ten years.'' I t was the policy of the department to negotiate this loan for such amounts and at -such times as
would place the money in the treasury to meet these treasury notes as
they should fall due. To have negotiated the whole amount thereof,
or any portion, in advance of the notes falling due^ would have subjected the government to the unnecessary payment of interest during
the time the money would have remained in the vaults ofthe treasury
uncalled for. There was no power in the department to call in the
treasury notes uiitil they became due. Besides, the withdrawal of
such an amount of specie frDm the public would have been attended
with the most injurious effects upon the financial operations of the
country. For these reasons, no negotiation of any portion ofthe loan
was attempted until the 8th day of September, 1860, when proposals
were invited for ten.millions of the loan, which was ample to meet all
the treasury notes that would fall due before the 1st of January, 1861.
The rate of interest was fixed at five per centnm per annum, under
the conviction that the loan could be readily negotiated at that rates,
for at that time the five per cent, stock of the United States was selling
in the market at a premium of three per cent. The result realized
this just expectation, and the whole amount offered was taken either
at par or a small premium. Before, however, the time had arrived
for payment on the part of the bidders, the financial crisis, to which
I have already referred, came. Some of the bidders promptly complied with their proposals, and others were willing to do so, if required
by 'the department, though it would be at a considerable sacrifice.
Under these circumstances, an additional term of thirty days was
given to all bidders who would deposit one-half of the amount of their
bids within the time originally prescribed: Most of the bidders
availed themselves of this extension, and made their deposits accordingly on or before the 22d of November, 1860. A portion, however,
failed to do so, and to them the additional thirty days has been offered
on condition that they would increase their forfeit deposit of one per



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

9

cent, to five per cent. To this proposition no response has as yet been
received. The amount of the loan awarded to this last class of bidders is $1,099,000.
The question presents itself. W h a t action shall be taken in reference to the stock which may be thus forfeited? There is no power in
the department, as the law now stands, to meet the case. It is
recommended that Congress should immediately authorize the department to dispose of this stock upon the best possible terms, holding
the defaulting bidders responsible, for the difference between their
bids and the amount for* which the stock can now be negotiated. The
necessities of the treasury demand prompt action on this subject.
Not only are the treasury notes past due—rapidly coming in for redemption—but, as already stated, those not due are being paid in for
customs, thereby withdrawing from the regular operations of the
government its principal source of revenue.
The particulars in regard to the negotiation of the loan authorized
by the act of June 22, 1860, required to be reported to Congress by
the 3d section of the act, are contained in statement marked No. 48.
To meet the remaining outstanding treasurynotes and interest
thereon there is yet to be negotiated eleven millions of the stock authorized by the act of June 22, 1860. The statement just made of
the diflSculties attending the payment for the stock already sold-—in
connexion with the fact that capitalists, in the present condition of
the country, seem unwilling to invest in United States stock at par—
render it almost certain that this remaining eleven millions cannot
now be negotiated upon terms acceptable to the government. The
condition of the treasury is such that no serious delay can be indulged.
I recommend, therefore, a repeal of so much of the act of June 22,
1860_, as authorizes the issuing of this additional eleven millions of °
stock, and that authority be given for the issuing of treasury notes to
the same amount, to be negotiated at such rates as will command the
confidence of the country.. To create that confidence, I recommend
that the public lands be unconditionally pledged for the ultimate redemption of all the treasury notes which it may become necessary to
issue. 1 make this recommendation of substituting treasury notes for
stock the more readily from the,conviction that there should always
exist in the department power to issue treasury notes for a limited
amount, under the direction of the President, to meet unforeseen contingencies. It is a power which can never be abused, as the amount
realized from such source can only be used to meet lawful demands
upon the treasury. No Secretary of the Treasury or President would
ever exercise it except compelled to do so by the exigencies bf the
public service. On the other hand, it would enable the government
to meet without embarrassment those sudden revulsions to which the
country is always liable, and which cannot always be anticipated.
I have aiready stated that provision should be made at once to
relieve the treasury from its present embarrassments, produced by the
causes rei'erred to. To do this, Oongress should authorize the issuing
of an additional amount of treasury notes, not less than ten millions
of dollars. With tjiese means the departnient will be enabled to meet
all lawful demands upon it for the present. The extent bf the finan-




10

REPORT ON THE FINANCESo

cial .crisis through which the country is now passing cannot now be
determined, and until it is better known no policy can be recommended of a permanent character.
No change in the revenue laws can be made in time to meet these
difficulties, and if it could, the same causes would produce the same
results under any laws that might be passed. If Congress, however,
should determine upon such a policy, either with a view to meet existing difiiculties or for the purpose of providing for the payment of any
portion of the public debt, I can only refer them for the views of the
department to my former reports on that subject.
The attention of Congress is again called to the bill for the revision
and consolidation of the revenue laws, prepared by the department
and submitted at the first sessipn of the last Congress, in compliance
with a resolution of the House of Eepresentatives. The importance
of adopting the changes and modifications contained in this measure
cannot be too strongly urged upon the consideration of Congress.
They would facilitate the operations of the department, reconcile
conflicting provisions of law, and greatly reduce the expenditure in
this branch of the public service. As stated in a former report, the
department has already reduced the expense of collecting the revenue
from customs, and with the aid which the passage of this law would
afford, still further and greater reductions could bemade witH^benefit
to the public service.
In this connexion the attention of Congress is called to the condition of the revenue marine service. With the exception of the Harriet
Lane, there are none but sail vessels employed in the service. Steam
vessels are so rapidly supplanting sail vessels in the commercial business of the country, that the present sail vessels of the revenue service,
however well adapted to a former state of things, are becoming almost
useless tor the purposes for which they are employed. I have before
represented to Congress that this service could be transferred to the
Navy Department with benefit to the public interest, and I entertain the
game opinion still. If this should not be done, the policy should, at
all events, be adopted of substituting as rapidly as possible steam for
-the sail vesselsnow used. It is due to the officers employed in this
branch of the reveriue service to say, that their pay does not correspond
with the compensation paid to oflScers engaged in similar and less
laborious duties. In the bill alreacly referred to, an increase of their
pay was recoramended, and in my opinion it should be proraptly
carried out as an net of simple justice to a worthy class of public
oflScers.
In each of my former annual reports I called the attention of
Congress to the provisions bf the act of March 3, 1857 on the subject
of deposits by the disbursing agents of the government. The impossibility of executing those provisions has been so fully discussed in
those reports, that I deem it unnecessary at this timeto do more than
to refer to the subject, and repeat the recommendations of former
reports. Congress should not permit a law to stand upon the statute
books which cannot be executed, when by a few simple modifications
the objects of the law can be fully effected, and-the public interest
protected against the apprehended evil.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

11

The report ofthe director ofthe mint is herewith transraitted, marked
No. 9. It appears that the amount of bullion received at the several
mint establishments during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, was
$22,673,192 21 in gold, and $3,152,437 15 in silver ; and that the
coinage during the same period was $23,447,283 35 in gold, and
$3,250,636 26 in silver, together with $342,000 in cents.
The report of the acting engineer in charge of the Bureau of Construction is herewith submitted. It furnishes full details of the
progress of the public buildings in course of construction.
The policy adopted by the department in reference to works of this
character, and presented in former reports to Congress, has been continued during the past year. My views in reference to these works,
and especially on the subject of marine hospitals, have been so often
urged upon Congress, that it is deemed unnecessary to do more at this
time than to say that each year's observation and experience confirm
and strengthen former convictions. Accompanying the reportof this
bfficer will be found the action of the department, under the act of
March 3, 1857, authorizing the, analysis of iron ores. It will be found
to be an instructive document on this great material interest of our
country.
On the 16th February, 1857, Congress passed a joint resolution
authorizing the '^Secretary of the Treasury to ciuse inquiries to be
.made, by two competent commissioners, into processes and means
claimed to have been discovered by J . T. Barclay, for preventing
abrasion, counterfeiting, and deterioration of the coins of the United
States.'' Under the authority of this law. Professors Henry, Vethake,
and R. E. Rogers, were appointed to act as such commissioners. On
the 22d June, 1860, an additional appropriation of five thousand
dollars was made to carry out the joint resolution of 1857, I herewith communicate the report of these comraissioners, and the action
of the departraent on the subject. If the objects which Dr. Barclay
proposes to accoraplish can be effected, it is difficult to.estimate the
advantage which would be derived by the government and the public
from his discovery. The experiments already made have been attended
with such results as to induce the opinion that it will prove entirely
successful. Such is the strong conviction of ray own mind to that
effect, t h a t I do not hesitate to recoraraend a sufficient appropriation
be made to test fully the practicability of the measure, and at the
same time to compensate Dr. Barclay liberally for his discovery.
There should be placed under the control of the Secretary of the
Treasury for this purpose the sum of one hundred thousand dollars.
Congress at its last session authorized the appointment of delegates
to represent this government in the International Statistical Congress,
which met in London in July last. I had on two occasions called the
attention of Congress to the iraportance of establishing uniforra standards of weights and measures, a uniform unit of currency, and a
uniform mode of preparing and keeping commercial statistics, among
the comraercial countries of the world. I t was with a view to these
results that the authority was given for the appointment of delegates
to this International Congress. Its action was therefore looked to
with much interest, and the most beneficial results were anticipated



k

12

REPORT ON THE FINANCESo

from it. I regret to say that these expectations v/ere all disappointed,
antl frora a cause which it is not the province of this report to discuss.
The honorable A. B. Longstreet, of South Carolina, was the only
delegate from the United States who took his seat in the congress. I
herewith subrait his report, showing the reason of his withdrawal therefrora on the first day of its session. It is only necessary to say that
the withdrawal of Judge Longstreet frora the congress, and his refusal
to return to its deliberations, received the entire approval of his governraent.
s
The report of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey, presenting
the operations of this service for the last year," will be subraitted to
Congress at an early day.
The accompanying /reports from the various bureaus of the department, marked from A to L, contain a detailed statement of their
operations during the last fiscal year.
The general operations of the Treasury Department since my last
annual report have been of the most satisfactory character. The
country had gradually recovered from the revulsion of 1857^ and its'
healthy and prosperous condition was felt in the relief thereby afforded
. to the public finances. Until within a short period, I. had confidently
expected to present to Congress at its present session a gratifying
statement of the financial condition of the government. A different
result, however, has been brought about by causes which could not be
foreseen, and if foreseen, could not have been averted by any action of
the department.
All which is respectfully submitted. ^
H O W E L L COBB,
Secretary of the Treasury,
Hon.

WILLIAM PENNINGTON,

Speaker ofi the House of Bepresentatives.

V




INDEX TO REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

•^

Page.

The Secretary's report
3
Statement No. 1, of the receipts and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1860.
17
Statement No. 2, of the receipts and expenditures for the quarter of the iiscal year
1861, ending September 30, 1860
.»
-»22
Statement No. 3, showing the amount of the public debt on July 1, 1860
22
Statement No. 4 exhibits the quantity and value of iron and steel, and manufactures thereof, imported into the United States during the fiscal years ending
June 30, 1856,^857, 1858, 1859, and 1860 . . .
23
Statement No. 5 exhibits the value of merchandise iraported during the fiscal years
ending June 30, 1856-'57, 1857-58, 1858-'59, and 1859-'60, respectively, ,
with the duties accruing thereon; also the value of articles imported free of
duty during the sarne period, including those made free by the act of March
3, 1857
„
,
24
Statement No. 6 exhibits the value of foreign merchandise imported into, and the
value of foreign merchandise and domestic produce exported from, the United
States during the years ending June 30, 1859 and 1860
40
Statement No 7 exhibits the imports and exports of specie and bullion ; thc imports
entered for consumption, and specie and bullion ; the domestic exports, and
specie and bullion ; the excess of specie and bullion exports over specie and
bullion imports, and the excess of specie and bullion imports over specieand
. bullion exports 1
„
_,
42
Statement No. 8 exhibits the values of articles of foreign production imported into
the United States from, and the exports of foreign merchandise and domestic
produce to eertain countries during the fiscal year ending June 30, I860-.-43
Statement No. 9. Annual report of the director of the mint for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, and accompanying tables---°.
.
49
Statement No. 10. Eeport of the acting engineer in charge on construction of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, marine hospitals, and other public
buildings confided to the charge of the Treasury Department; also report
upon the result of the analysis of iron and iron ores
1
85
Statement No. 11 exhibits the receipts and expenditures of the marine hospital fund
for the relief of sick and disabled seamen in the ports of the United States
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860
«->„
212
Statement A. Report of the First Auditor on the operations oi" his office
221
Statement B. Report of the Second Auditor on the operationn'of his ofiice
222
Statement C. Eeport of the Third Auditor on the operatic;' i of his ofiice
223
Statement D. Eeport of the Fourth Auditor on the operatj ms of his office
231
Statement E. Eeport of the Fifth Auditor on the operations of his office..-.
233
Statement F. Eeport of the Sixth Auditor on the operations of his bffice
247
Statement G. Eeport of the First Comptroller on the operations of his office - - _ - . ,
248
Statement H. Eeport of the Second Comptroller on the operations of his office
250




14

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Page.

Statement I. Eeport of the Commissioner of Customs on the operations of his office.
Statement J. Eeport of the Treasurer on the operations of his office
,
Statement K. Eeport of the Solicitor on the operations of his office
Statement L. Eeport of the Eegister on the operations of his office . . .
Statement No. 12. Eeport of supervising inspectors of steamboats
..
StatementNo. 13. Eeport of the Light-house Board
Statement No. 14. Amount due under treaties with various Indian tribes, payable
on time
..„-„-.._.
Statement No. 15. Amount of stock held in trust by the United States for the
Chiclsasaw nalional fund and Smithsonian Institution
.....
Statement No.. 16. Balance of various other trust funds
-._-.,..-„
Statement No. 17 exhibits the gold and silver coinage at the mint of the United
States, annually, from its establishment in 1792, and including the coinage
• of the branch mints and the assay office, (New York,) from their organization
toJune 30, 1860
,...
Statement No. 18 exhibits the amount of coin and bullion imported and exported
^ annually, from 1821 to 1860, inclusive; also the amount of importation over
'
exportation and of exportation over importation duriog the same years
Statement No. 19 exhibits the gross value of exports and imports fromthe beginning of the government to June 30, 1860
.,----.._
Statement No. 20 exhibits the amount of the tonnage of the United States annually, from 1789 to June 30, 1860 ; also the registered and enrolled and
licensed tonnage employed in steam navigation each year

252
253
255
308
333
363
372
384
385.

386

388
389

391

Statement No. 21 exhibits the revenue collected from the beginning of the government to June 30, 1860, under the several heads of customs, public lands, and
miscellaneous sources, including loans and treasury notes; also the expenditures during the same period, and the particular tariff and price of lands
under which the revenue from those sources was collected
.,
393
Statement No. 22 exhibits the value of manufactured articles of domestic produce
exported to foreign countries from June 30, 1846, to June 30, 1860 — .
396
Statement No. 23 exhibits the value of foreign merchandise imported, re-exported,
and consumed annually, from 1821 to 1860, inclusive, and also the estimated
population and rate of consumption joer capita during the eome period..
« 398
Statement No. 24 exhibits the total value of imports and the imports consumed in the United States, exclusive of specie, during each fiscal year from 1821 to
^1860; showing also .the value of foreign and domestic exports, exclusive of
specie, and the tonnage employed during the same period
399
Statement No. 25 exhibits a summary view of the exports of domestic produce, &c.,
of the United States annually, from 1847 to 1860, inclusive
401
Statement No. 26 exhibits the value of certain articles imported annually from
June 30, 1844, to June 30, 1860, (after deducting re-exportations,) and the
amount of duty which accrued on each during the same periods, respectively.
402
Statement No. 27 exhibits the value of foreign merchandise and. domestic produce
exported annually,from 1821 to 1860, inclusive
-...
„
-407
Statement No. 28 exhibits the quantity of wine, spirits, &c., imported annually,
from 1843 to 1860, inclusivef.
,
409
StatementNo. 29 exhibits the value of imports annually, from 1821 to 1860, inclusive --»«
, = .„o
413




REPORT ON THE FINANCESo

15
Page.

Statement No. 30 exhibits the value of dutiable merchandise re-exported annually, "^
from 1821 to 1860, inclusive ; and showing also the value re-exported from
warehouse under act of August, 1846
..„414
StatementNo. 31 exhibits the aggregate value of breadstuffs and provisions exported annually from 1821 to I860-.
415
Statement No. 32 exhibits the quantity and value of cotton exported annually, from
1821 to 1860, inclusive, andthe average price per pound.
'
416
Statement No. 33 exhibits the quantity and value of tobacco and rice exported
annually,from 1821 to 1860, inclusive
,
.--.
418
Statement No. 34 exhibits the value of iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and
steel, steel, wool, and manufactures of wool, manufactures of cotton, silk
and manufactures of silk, flax, linen, and linen fabrics, hemp and manufactures of hemp, manilla, sun, and other hemps of India, and silk and worsted
goods, imported from and exported to foreign countries from 1840 to 1860,
° I
inclusive; and also showing the domestic exports of like articles for the same
periods
-«-i
420
Statement No. 35 exhibits the value of iron, manufactures of iron and iron and steel,
steel, sugar, wines, and all fabrics of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp
is a component part, imported annually from 1847 to 1860, inclusive ; withthe duiies which accrued thereon during each year, respectively, and brandies,for the years 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, and 1860
'
.-.
428
StatementNo 36 exhibits the exports to, and the imports from, Canada and other
British possessions in North America, from July 1, 1851, to June 30, I860-433
Statement No. 37 exhibits the amount of goods in warehouse on July 1, 1859, and
on the first of each succeeding month until June 30, 1860
.. = .-..
434
Statement No. 38 exhibits a synopsis of the returns of the banks in the different
States at the dates annexed
— -.437
Statement No. 39 exhibits a comparative viewoof the condition of the banks in different sections of the Union in 1856-'57, 1857-'58, 1858-59, and 1859-60.
443
Statement No. 40 exhibits a general statement of the conditi()n of the banks according to returns dated nearest to January 1, 1860
«
,
446
Statement No. 41 exhibits a general view of the condition of the banks in the United
States in various years from 1851 to 1860, inclusive
448
Statement No. 42 exhibits the amount of moneys in the United States treasury,
amount of drafts outstanding, amount subject to draft, amount of receipts,
and amount of drafts paid, as shown by the Treasurer's weekly exhibits rendered during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860
449
Statement No. 43. Value of exports of the growth, produce, and manufacture of
the United States during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860
450
Statement No. 44 exhibits the value of goods in warehouse in New Yorkx)n December 1,1859, with the duties thereon, and the estimated amount of duties due
on warehouse bonds December 1, 1860
----452
Statement No. 45. Eeport of commissioners appointed to examine the methods
proposed for preventing counterfeiting, &c., of coins
..453
Statement No. 46. Eeport of the United States delegate to the International Statistical Congress.-.-.
-o--.--c>.-.o--^470




16

REPORT ON T H E FINANCESo
Page.

Statement No. 47 exhibits the amount of treasury notes (issued under act of December 23, 1857) outstanding on December 1, 1860 ; the amount under the
different per ceniums, and the amount past due or falling due at ths close of
each month and year, respectively, from 1859. to 1861, inclusive
Statement No 48 exhibits a copy of official notice of September 8, 1860, inviting
proposals for loan of ten millions under actof June 22, 1860; together with
the names of bidders, amounts bid, rate of premium, and amounts accepted
of each offer; with expenses paid on account of said loan
Statement No. 49. Letter from the Secretary of the Interior, giving the estimated
cash receipts from the sales of public lands during the fiscal years 1861 and
1862._-_..,___„___„„...,„v.-,.,-..-.=c.»«»».»~---«.-o.oo-c«.




L

479

480

484

REPORT ON THE FINANCESe

17

No. 1,
Statement of duties, revenues, and public expenditures during the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1860, agreeably to warrants issued, exclusive
of trust funds and treasury notes funded.
The receipts into the treasury during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860,
were as follows :
From customs, viz:
During the quarter
During the quarter
During the quarter
During the quarter

ehding September 30, 1859
ending December 31, 1859
ending March 31, 1860
ending June 30, 1860

$15, 947,670
10,785, 849
14, 962, 783
11,491,207

From sales of pnblic land, viz :
During the quarter endirig September 30, 1859 - . - .
During the quarter ending December 31, 1859
During the quarter ending March 31, 1860
-.-.
Duriog the quarter ending June 30, 1860
From miscellaneous and incidental sources..
From treasury notes issued per act of December 23, 1857
From loan under act of June 14, 1858
«

470, 244
445, 535
505,691
357,185
• —
»
..»„

62
93
68
64
-$53,187,511 87
62
36
83
90
r 1,778,557
1,010,764
19,395,200
1,380,000

71
31
00
00

Total receipts
Balance in the treasury July 1, 1859

„

76,752,033 89
4,339,275 54

Total means

„

81,091,309 43

-

The expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, were as follows :
CIVIL.

Legislative, including books
- . . . $2,619,629 43
Executive
. - . . - . 1,826,804 68
Judiciary
*.
1,181,667 93
Governments in the Territories
.183,421 49
Surveyors and their clerks...109,080 24
Officers of the mint and branches, and assay office in New
York
106,625 00
Assistant treasurers and their clerks...
38, 900 65
Supervising and local inspectors, &c
82,626 19
Total civil list

-

-.

6,148,655 41

FOBEIGN INTERCOUBSE.

Salaries of ministers
-Salaries of secretaries and assistant secretaries of legationIntercourse with the Barbary powers
Salaries of consuls
.Salary of secretaries of legation to China and Turkey as
interpreters
-Interpreters to consuls in China
Interpreters, guards, and other expenses of the consulates
in the Turkish dominions
-Contingent expenses of all the missions abroad
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse
-Loss by exchange on drafts of consuls and commercial
agents
--.
Office rent of those consuls who are not allowed to trade .
Purchase of blank books, stationery, &c., for consuls

2



276,527
28, 205
1,270
252,304

6835
12
01

9,00,9 89
3,300 64
2,878 22
40,802 74
25,545 00
8,256 92
22, 247 77
23,856 38

18

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Eelief and protection of American seamen
$212,023
Expenses in acknowledging the services of masters and
crews of foreign vessels in rescuing American citizens
from shipwreck
w_5,000
Salary of commissioner to China and consuls to five ports.
2, 500
Salary of commissioner of claims in China
1,875
Contingent expenses of the commissioner to China . . .
165
To defray the expenses of the Japanese embassy
60,000
Adjustment of difficulties with the republic of Paraguay.4, 097
Expenses under 1st article of reciprocity treaty with Great
Britain
.--.9,135
Compensation to commissioner, &c., to run and mark the
boundary between the United States and British provinces bounding the Washington. Territory
150, 000
Expenses attendant in the execution of the neutrality act. "
4, 997
Suppression of the slave trade
-._
28,303
Awards under 15th article of treaty between the United
Statesand Mexico
1,000

29
00
00
00
46
00
04
00
00
35
42
00

1,163,291 28
From which deduct excess of repayments above expenditure in account of the appropriation for * preservation
*
of the archives of the several consulates"
Total foreign intercourse

,

83 77
$1,163,207 15

MISCELLANEOUS.

Mint establishment
467,179 89
Contingent expenses under the act for the safe-keeping of
the public revenue
10,334 11
Compensation to persons designated to receive and keep
the public moneys
1,388 46
Building vaults as additional security to the public funds
in sixty-six depositories
3,594 01 Preventing the abrasion, counterfeiting, and deterioration
of the coins of the United States
-•
1,084 55
Expenses of engraving, &c., treasury notes and certificates
of stock
4,332 34
Survey of the Gulf and Atlantic coast of the United States.
268, 500 00
Survey of the western coastof the United States
159,600 00
Survey of the Florida reefs and keys
'
40, 000 00
Eunning a line to connect the triangulation of the Atlantic
with that on the Gulf of Mexico
2,000 00
Fuel and quarters of the officers of the army serving in the
CoastSurvey
5,000 00
Publishing observations made in the progress of the survey of the coast of the United States .
12,000 00 •
Pay and rations of engineers of seven steamers used in the
CoastSurvey
12,000 00
Eepairs ofthe Crawford, &c., used in the Coast Survey
13,000 00
Payment for horses and other property lost or destroyed in
.
the military service of the United states
42, 022 29
Claims not otherwise provided for
743 86
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, per act of August
10,1846
^
.;
.30,910 14
Eesults and accounts of the exploring expedition
4, 320 00
To replace the works of the exploring expedition destroyed
by
fire
1,000 00 Payment per act of July 4, 1848, on account of Cherokee
Indians remaining in North Carolina
20,484 46
For mail services performed for the several departments of
government, per section 12, act of March 3, 1847
200,000 00
For further compensation to the Post Office Department for
mail service performed for the two houses of Congress,
. .
&c., per act March 3, 1851
500,000 00
To supply deficiencies in the revenues of the Post Office
Department
8,196,009 26



REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
./
Interest due to contractors for carrying the mails, &c
$150, 000
Transportation of mails from New Orleans, via Tehuantepec, to Ventoza and back
120,914
Transportation of mails between San Francisco and Olympia
.92,399
Ti-ansportation of mails between the United States and foreign countries
-431,096
Transportation of mails from Panama to California and
Oregon, and back
174,125
Transportation of mails across the isthmus of Panama
25,000
Expenses of transmitting blanks and other matter by the
United States mail connected with the census, per 17th
and 23d sections act May 23, 1850
12,000
For blanks and other printing, &c., required for taking
the eighth census22,482
Ornamenting the Capitol with works of art . 1,700
Continuation of the Treasury building
248, 023
Lighting and ventilating the upper story of the Treasury
building, &c
3,568
Building post offices, court-houses, &c
110,307
Public buildings in Territories
„..16,745
Settlement of the claims of the State of Maine, &c
„.-2,300
Amount expended by State of Missouri in repelling an invasion of the Osage Indians
19,084
Payment of mortgage and interest on property in Pine
street, NewYork
10,362
Expenses of collecting the revenue from customs
3, 324,430
Eepayment to impbrters of excess of deposites for unascertained duties
814,826
Debentures or drawbacks, bounties or allowances
585,158
Eefunding duties on foreign merchandise i m p p r t e d . . . „ . .
3,275
Eefunding duties under act to extend the warehousing
system
463
Refunding duties on fish and other articles under reciprocity treaty with Great Britain
82
Eefunding duties collected in Mexico from military contributions
--3,902
Debentures and other charges, per act of October 16,1837.
8,186
Proceeds of the sales of goods, &c., per act of April 2, 1844.
843
Salaries of special examiners of drugs and medicines
5,916
Additional compensation to collectors, naval officers, &c.
5,467
Support and maintenance of light-houses, &c
..-836,373
Building light-houses, and for beacons, buoys, &c
-«138,165
Life-boats, compensation of keepers of stations, &c
-36,963
Marine hospital establishment
465,693
Building marine hospitals
-150,547
Building custom-houses
— ..
455, 276
Annual repairs of marine hospitals
..
12,013
Annual repairs of custom-houses
-. 6,875
Eelief of sundry individuals....
-256,175
Expenses of collecting revenue from sales of public lands..
298, 385
Survey of the public lands
287,273
Survey of public and private land claims in California —
118,938
Survey of such bf the private claims in New Mexico as shall
have been confirmed by Congress, &c
13,070
Resurvey of public lands in States where the offices are
closed
2,000
Preparing unfinished records of public and private surveys.
11, 038
Eent of surveyors general's offices, & c —
19,079
Eepayment for laiids erroneously sold
67,592
Indemnity for swamp lands sold to individuals
69,080
Three per centum to the State of Illinois
3,927
Five per centum to the State of Louisiana
12, 615
Two and three per centum to the State of Alabama
4, 614
Two and three per centum to the State of Missouri
431,518
Eunning and marking boundary line between the United
States and Texas
30,000



1900
86
76
84,
00
00
00
30
00
84
00
35
05
36
08
40
53
87
39
35
84
36
00
92
05
67
28
52
79
29
10
70
72
62
06
79
66
97
82
35
00
13
22
84
43
12
04
62
54
00

,.

^

20

'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Running and marking western boundary line of Minnesota
$4, 657 48
Special conncil, &c., in defending the title to public property
in California . . . . . . - - . .
38,560 44
Expenses preparatory to taking the eighth census
.8,000 00
Expenses of packing and distributing Congressional journals - - . . - _ . .
...-.-..„..-.
12,000 00
To purchase 2,000 copies of the l l t h volume of Statutes
at Large
5,612 50
Patent Office building, north front
108,000 00
Alterations and repairs of public buildings in Washington,
improvement of grounds, &c
30,157 00
Compensation of public gardener, gate-keepers, laborers in
public grounds, &c
_
16,73150
Compensation of auxiliary guard and policemen, &c
18, 833 33
Lighting the Capitol, President's House, &c., with gas
47,000 00 .
Fuel for the President's House.:.
1,800 00
Eefurnishing the President's House
..,
7,950 98
Making cases in Patent Office to receive bobks
3, 600 00
Preservation of collections of exploring expeditions
4,000 00
Collections of agricultural statistics
40,000 00
Drawings to illustrate the report of the Commissioner of
Patents
_
6,000 00
Equestrian statue of Wa.shington
19,000 00
Transporting and placing statue of_Washington on pedestal
10, 000 00
Asylum for insane of District of Columbia, &c., purchase of ,
site„&c.---.
84,173 00
Support, &c., of insane paupers of District of Columbia, ^
^
army and navy of United States
24,500 00
Support, &c., of transient paupers in Washington Infirmary
6, 000 00
Columbian Institute for the deaf, dumb, and blind of the
District of Columbia
'_
5,67156
Penitenciary in the District of Columbia
22,290 00
Potomac and Eastern branch bridges, compensation to drawkeepers, &c
11,362 14
Patentfund
219,573 63
Sundry items
8,358 76
Total miscellaneous

-.--.-.

-

/

$20, 658,007 92

UNDER THE DIREOl'ION OF TKK DEPABTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.

Indian department
.Pensions, military
Pensions, naval
Eelief of sundry individuals

-

--

-

2,727,655
956,828
135,898
135,304

Total under the Interior Department

28
44
52
35

.-..-

3,955,686 59

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT.

Armyproper
Military Academy - . . . Arming and equipping the militia
Armories, arsenals, &c
'
Fortifications and other works of defence
Constructionof roads, bridges, &c
Improvementof rivers, harbors, &c
Pay of militia and volunteers
Extension of the Capitol of the United States
Eemoving the dome of the Capitol
Continuation of General Post Office building
Eelief of sundry individuals and miscellaneous
Total under the War Department




13,044,559
177,921
.-.-.194,324
- . 1,182,265
930,245
163,933
221,973
25,664
213,700
'
140,000
65,000
60,178

80
10
92
61
99
44
23
61
00
00
00
40
16,409,767 10

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

21

UNDER THE DIRECTION 0 3 THJE NAVST DEPARTMENT.

Pay and subsistence, including medicines, &c
- $5,126, 547 20
Increase, repairs, ordnance, and equipment
—
1,390,041 23
Contingentexpenses-.
-853,100 34
Navy yards
634,005 46
Magazines
»
108,300.61
Hospitals
67,546 73
NavalAcademy
.„
61,334 41
Steam mail service
»^196,154 09
Six steam frigates
91,115 39
Five sloops-of-war
669,812 09
Seven steam sloops and one steamer
811,792 51
Marine corps, including marine barracks
,
...
609,651 77
Eelief of sundry individuals and miscellaneous...-.:
903,748 36
Total under the Navy Department

-...-

-;

$11,513,150 19

PUBLIC DEBT.

Old public debt
50Q
Eedemption of bouiity land stock
300
Eedemption of stock, loan of 1846
2,100
Eeimbursement of treasury notes .issued prior to December
23, 1857, paid in specie..-.
160
Payment to creditors of Texas, per act of September 9,1850
6, 563
Payment of treasury notes, per act of December 23, 1857. 14,426, 700
Interest on public debt, including treasury n o t e s - . .
3,177, 314
Total public debt
Total expenditures.---.Balance in the treasury July 1, 1860

00
00
00
00
38
00
62

.,----

17,613,628 00
-

-o.—

77,462,102 72
-

3,629,206 71

F. BIGGEE, Uegist^.'
TRIIABVBY BEPA^TUENT, Register's Office^ Novernber 2lj ISQO.




22

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 2.
Statement of the receipts and expenditures of the United States from
July 1 to Septemher 30, 1860, exclusive of trust fiunds.
RECEIPTS.

From customs .
From sales of public lands
From niiscellaneous and incidental sources

.
-.

„..,
,
--„...

$16,119,831 22
281,100 84
318,857 98
16,719,790 04

EXPENDITURES.

Civil—foreign intercourse and miscellaneous
Interior, (pensions and Indian)
„
,
War
Navy
_.
Payment to creditors of Texas
.
$1,282 81
Payment of treasury notes, per act of December 23, 1857_ 375,400 00
Interest on public debt, including treasury notes
- - i l 5 , 660 47

6,440,003
1,679,575
5,352,771
2, 678,678

77
24
42
88

492,243 28
16,543,272 69
F. BIGGEE, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, N'ovemher 21, 1860.

No. 3.
Statement showing the amount of puhlic deht of the United States on
July 1, 1860.
Loanof 1842
Loan of 1847
Loanof 1848
1
Loanof 1858.
-:
Texan indemnity
----Loanof 1846--.Texas debt
Old funded and unfunded debt
Treasury notes issued under acts prior to 1857
Treasury notes issued under act of December 23, 1857

$2,883,364
9,415,250
8,908,341
20,000,000
3,461,000
1,000
191,016
114,118
105,111
19,690,600

11
00
80
00
00
00
99
54
64
00

64,769,703 08
F. BIGGEE, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register'S Office, Novemher 27, 1860.




No. 4.
. Statement exhihiting the quantity and value qf iron and steel, and manufactures thereofi, imported into the Vnited States during the
fiscal years ending June 30, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, and 1860.
1857.

1856.

1858.

1859.

Articles.
Quantity.

Bar i r o n . . . .
•
Eod iron
«
Hoop irnn
^
Sheet iron
»
o ..
Pig iron
Old and scrap iron
Railroad iron
W i r e , cap and bonttet
Nails, spikes and tacks
Chain cables
Anchors and parts
Anvils and parts
, Manufactures of iron and s t e e l .
Steel

>...cwt..
....do...
.pounds.
....do...
,..,cwt..
....do...
....do...
.pounds.
....do...
...do...
....do...
....do...
.cwt.

Value.

Ciuantity.

Value.

Quantity.

Value.

Quantity.

2,163,449
193,820
13,223,639
31,387,353
1,180.239
24?;769
3,109,916
155,376
2,292,696
15,850,788
921,123
960,809

$5,352,785
478,523
345,094
814,342
1,171,085
185,112
6,179,280
4,b92
127,879
485,568
39,866
46,828
6,810,685
2,538,323

1,734,041
315,735
12,070,543
36,047,576
1,035,882
165,006
3,586,107
162,914
3,550,329
9,874,762
842,828
1,173,877

M , 423,935
809.901
324,675
1,082,389
1,001,742
111,680
7,455,596
6,168
188,756
293,124
32,980
67,926
7,521,625
2.633,614

1,314,628
167,709
9,519,581
29,523,002
839,717
145,153
1,514,905
174,067
1,483,697
5,246,722
190,109
800,620

$3,318,913
426,499
373,326
945,073
739,949
87,113
2,987,576
6,900
100,481
155,408
8,072
45,275
.5,360,343
1,873,111

1,904,534
137,454
13,765,795
27,868,353
1,450,346
203,372
1,399,312
231,822
fc60,366
6,613,280
301,379
836,750

27J,079

292,154

214,317

284,108

Quantity.
M , 184,331
332,801
.387,198
752,975
1,049,200
107,702
2,274,032
14,299
84,804
174,701
13,510
50,805
5,574,508
2,047,730

2,116,575
e37,220
19,22<>,984
30,173,670
1,429,956
182,782
2,443,491
236,144
1,349,846
4,932,904
286,860
740,331
409,966

Value.
$4,473,866
576,720
518,087
839,065
1,005,865
108,227
3,709,376
11,556
122,936
130,580
9,804
47,894
7,248,255
2,724,353

O
O
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i25

24,580,262

T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E H T , Regiaterh Office^ November 28,1860,




25,954,111

16,328,039

17,048,596

21,526,594

F , BIGGER, Register*

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to

ISP

No. 5. ^
Statement exhibiting thevalue of merchandise imported during the fiscal years ending June 30, 1856-^57-'58, a?id '59,
respectively, with the duties accruing thereon; also, the value of articles imported firee ofi duty during the same period,
including those made free hy the act of March 3, 1857.
FEEE UNDEE ACT OF 1846.
1856.

1867.

1868.

1859.

1860.

Yalue.

Value.

Talue.

Value.

Value.

$99,263
114,289
103,961
876,016
3,113,376
127
1,953
6,893,891
21,514,196
377,655
695,740
71,335
9,206
94,385
3,801
646,984
61,466
115,165

$48,346
151,685
335,114
6,503,051
6,472,049
247
2,997
5,757,860
22,386,879
351,311
1,440,314
62,172
20,156
93,002
3,240
748,372
53,714
90,168

$81,331
2,286,09a
408,879
9,279,969
7,299,549
14
3,866
6,777,295
18,341, 081
111,698
1,131,362
41,356
10,843
504,634
2,092
183,394
S7,i:81
82,313

$705,787
741,608
323,478
1,383,789
4,985,914
386
762
7,306,916
25,063,333
156,891
1,346,601
52,046
56,490
363,816
4,420
376,996
63,006
78,996

$1,441,665
493,187
499,943
2,015,599
5,541,406
273
6,895
8,803,771
21,768,939
87,577
1,031,493
140,387
46,549
564,764
9,405
345,151
64,572
99,423

321,831
62,331
392,440

332,924
32,332
573,889

197,973
112,203
448,309

Species of merchandise,-

Animals for breed . . ; . - - „ . - . . o
,
»
,.-.»
Bullion, gold
^
,...
Bullion, silver . , , .
„.-..«..........
..,.-.
•-Specie, gold
.,
,
^
„.^
o.,
„
Specie, silver
...
.^
Cabinets of coins, medals, &c
.
„.
....,.-,.
Models of inventions and improvements in the arts
-.
Teas
Coffee
...I
:
Copper in plates suited to sheathing vessels = = ,-.„-^..-,
......
Copper ore
-,
«
,
Cotton, unmanufactured
.
.„.,-...-_.,..„
..
Adhesion felt, for sheathing vessels
.,«
«
Paintings and statuary of American artists.....
.=.
Specimens of natural history, &c_„„«..,-..
.....,..,.
-.
Sheathiog metal
,^--.v=,.-»^
.--»..^,^..^^.,«^.,^.,,
Platina, unmanufactured .
..,.
;
-....-,
-Plaster, unground
.
i-.
.
.
..-,
"Wearing apparel and other personal effects of emigrants and citizens
dying abroad
.
^
...........
--Old junk and o a k u m . . . . . .
....
Garden seeds, trees, shrubs, plants, & c . - . . - 


362,872
37,012
371,264

413,780
85,469 .
386,504

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o

Articles the procjuce of the United States brought back
Guano
--...
.
-— ,.„-..
Articles specially imported for philosophical societies, college^, seminaries of learning, &c
— ^
All other articles not subject to duty
. . . . . . - , . — o,..„..
Oil, and products of American fisheries—r
Oils—spermaceti, whale, and other
fish
,..,0.^.^.,...,Other products of
fisheries..,„.,..,»-.-----»..-.p^,.„,,^p..-




1,287,831
331,676

1,201,476
279,026

1,^44,692
626,376

1,440,497
429,685

1,157,625
625,307

51,462
19,730,891

61,074
^0,781,411

64,341
15,225,696

34,761
16,915^,92.5

66,399
20,934,364

199,258
137,654

591,901
139,817

643,077
112,040

64,756,975

63,502,865

67,136, 286

66,965,706

66,729,306

V - — . • t - V ^ " ^ - S . " . * »'•
.-

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IN3

No. 5.—STATEMENT—Oontinued,

05

FREE UNDER ACT OF 1857.
1856.

1858.

1867.

1859.

1860.

Value.

Value.

Value.

Species of merchandise.

Argols or crude t a r t a r . .
Articles in a crude state used in dyeing or
tanning
=
-— -.
Bark, Peruvian
.„
Bells, old, and bell-metal
_.
Berries, nuts, &c., including nutgalls, safflower, weld, &c., used in dyeing or composing dyes
Bismuth
.
o......
Bitter apples
•.
-^
Bolting cloths ..
.
Bone-black
...
Bone, burnt
Bone dust
.»..,
.
Brass, old
»
=.-..-.
Brass, pigs
Burr-stones, unmanufactured
Copper, in bars or pigs
Copper, old —
Dragon's blood ,^
...
..
Dyewood in sticks
...
Flax, unmanufactured
.
Glass, old, and fit only to be remanufactured.
Hair of the alpacai goat or other like animal..
Ivory, unmanufactured - - . .
Linseed.not embracing
flaxseed
«..



Rate.

Value.

Duty.

Rate.

Value.

Duty.

$66,785

16

$402,926

$60,438 76

15

$386,252

25
20

70,146
145

17,536 60
29 00

25
20

67,602
289

5
10

26,887

1,344 35

6

18,163

8,697 90

10

111,211

6

86,979
1,388,812

69,440 60

5

1,669,513

6
16

796,802
132,461

39.840 10
191869 15

6
16

866,048
220,738

6
20

320,100
1,741,260

16,005 00
348,252 00

6
20

507,483
3,003,824

$67,937 80

14,400 50
. 57 80

$144,999

$109,703

322,466
813,184
473

174,829
315,292
109

198,095
449,575
289

12,828
3,266
1,575
i07,612
619
9,296

76;062
4,771
1,606
76,257
960

60,168
5,786
1,618
89,554
834
28,336
15,325

w.

17,930

Ul

12,490
13,465
470
66,738
65,423
11,121 10
801,482
745,932
82,975 65
124,006
322,619
356
223
729,596
43,302 40
887,486
146,707
197,934
33,110 70'
301
364
•500
401,387
374,037
25,374 15
600, 764 '80 ,243,174 2.415,243
907,65

67,247
196,996
291,027
255
838,186
213,687
718
14
413,421
,753,411

o
H
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il
z

Madder root
-..--..--.
Madder, ground or prepared
Manures, substances expressly used for
Maps and charts
Palm-leaf, unmanufactured
-Rags of every material except wool'.
Ratans and reeds, unmanufactured
Shingle-bolts and stave-bolts
Silk, raw, or reeled from the cocoon
,
Tin, bars
Tin, blocks
„
Tin, pigs
Wool, sheep's, unmanufactured, in value not
exceeding 20 cents per pound
....




44,138
68,773 60 f 78,144
j 643,642 2,156,403
56
2,258
6,562
6,969
34,880
30,674
971,126 1,376,777
72,406 26
171,813
400,315
3,8
10,109
143,060 10 1,300,085 1,330,890
228,426
457,032
470,023
51,160 5,0
415,303
594,258
167,446

35,911
784,671
572
7,160
99,557
1,540,244
113,122
14,793
1,235,976
90.594
3, 228
1,036,777

637,723 20 3,843,320 4,363,121

4,450,658

13,767,398 1,843,076 20 15,562,300 16,218,251

15,165,328

1,671,805

83,590 25

1,375,472

1,239,168

61,958 40

1,448,125

16

991,234

148,686 10

15

953,734

5

1,163,735

68,186 75

6

1,023,210

30

1,665,064

499,519 20

30

2,125,744

11,697,523 1,433,393 06

-

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to
•-a

28

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 5,—STATEMENT—
1857.
Species ofmerchandise.
Value.
Manufactures of wool—
Piece gpods, including wool and cotton.
Shawls of wool, wool and cotton, silk,
and silk and cotton
Blankets
Hosiery and articles made on f r a m e s . . . .
Worsted piece goods, including cotton
and worsted
Woollen and worsted, yarn
Manufactures of, not specified
Flannels
Baizes and bockings
Carpeting—
'^
Wilton,Saxony, Aubusson, Brussels, &c.
Not s p e c i f i e d . . . . . .
''Manufactures of cotton—
Piece goods . ;
Velvets
Cords, gimps, and galloons
Hosiery and arlicles made on f r a m e s . . . .
Twist, yarn, and t h i - e a d . . . . . .
Hatters' plush, of silk and cotton
'.
Manufactures of, not specified
Cottons bleached, printed, painted, or d y e d Piece goods wholly of cotton
All other manufactures wholly of cotton.
Silk and manufactures of silk—
Piece goods
Hosiery and articles made on f r a m e s . . . .
Sewing silk
;
Twist
Hats and bonnets
Manufactures of, not specified
Floss
Baw
Bolting cloths
Silk and worsted piiece goods. - . - : . . . . . .
Goats' hair or mohair piece goods
Manufactures of flaxLinens bleached or unbleached
Hosiery and arlicles made on frames —
Manufactures of, not specified
Manufactures of hemp—
Ticklenburgs, Osnaburgs, and b u r l a p s . .
Articles not specified
Sail duck, Russia, Holland, and r a v e n s .
Cotton b a g g i n g . . . . •
ClothingReady-made
Articles of wear
Laces—
Thread and insertings
Cotton insertings, trimmings, l a c e s ,
braids, &c
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and
linen
Floor cloth, patent paiiited, &c
Oil-cloth of all kinds
Lastings and mohair cloth for shoes and
buttons .
Gunny cloth and gunny bags
Matting, Chinese and other, of flags....
Hats, caps, bonnets, flats, braids, and
plaits of leghorn, straw, chip, or
30
grass, &c
Ditto of hair, whalebone, or other m a terial not otherwise provided for
Manufactures of iron and steel—
Muskets and rifles
Fire-arms not specified
Side-arms
.,
Needles
.Cutlery
Other manufactures and wares of, not
specified
Cap or bonnet wire
Nails, spikes, tacks, &c
Chain cables




Value.

Duty.

f11,683,476 1^3,505,042 80

Duty.

$11,009,605 i$3,302,881 50

2,529,771
1,205,300
1,173,094

758,931 30
241,060 00
351,928 20

2,246,351
1,630,973'
1,740,829

673,905 30
326,194 60
522,248 70

12,236,275
198,746
505,004
100,248
117,551

3,059,068 75
49,686 50
151,501 20
25,062 00
29,390 25

11,365,669
192,147
693,640
105,779
119,835

2,841,417 25
48,036 75
308,092 00
26,444 75
29,958 75

1,929,196
283,122

578,758 80
84,936 60

1,784,196
397,094

535,258 80
119,128 20

19,110,752
565,883
194,005
2,516,848
1,276,760
26,468
2,227,283

4,777,688 00
113,176 60
58,201 50
'503,369 60
319,190 00
5,293 60
556,820 75

21,441,082
678,294
213,824
3,2l0,2fi7
1,401,153
11,473
1,729,613

5,360,270 50
135,658 80
64,147 20
642,057 40
350,288 25'
2,294 60
432,403 25

25,200,651
611,298
250,138

6,300,162 75
183,389 40
75,041 40

22,067,369
839,299
211,723

5,516,842 25
251,789 70
63,516 90

102,827
3,974,974
16,498
991,234
70,146
1,335,247
307,328

30,848 10
993,743 50
4,124 50
148,685 10
17,536 50
333,811 75
76,832 00

45,357 60
151,192
4,442, .522 1,110,630 50
30,612
7,653 00
953,734
143.060 10
57,602
14,400 50
1,580,246
395.061 50
503,993
125,998 25

9,849,600
4,921
1,334,942

1,969,920 00
1,476 30
266,988 40

9,975,338 1,995,067 60
6,912'
2,073 60
1,459,292
291,858 40

88,051
124,833
12,850
27,996

17,610 20
24,966 60
2,570 00
5,599 20

130,864
360,469
14,180
14,069

404,133
1,574,211

121,239 90
472,263 30

347,471
1,571,517

26,172 80
72,093 80
2,836 00.
2,813 80
104,421 30
471,455 10

410,591

82,118 20

321,961

64,392 20

1,091,019

297,754 75

1,129,754

282,438 50

4,664,353
8,091
30,050

1,399,305 90
2,427 30
9,015 00

4,443,175
9,524
34,761

1,332,952 50
'2,857 20
10,428 30

106,618
1,249,167
221,795

. ' 5,330 90
249,833 40
55,448 75

99,034
2,139,793
207,587

4,951 70
427,958 60
51,896 75

1,935,254

580,576 20

2,246,928

674,078 40

40,946
576,435
3,0i5
246,060
1,698,094

12,283 80
172,930 50
904 50
49,212 00
509,428 20

61,170
541,175
5,294
. 250,320
2,140,824

13,351 00
162,352 50
1,588 20
50,064 00
' 642,247 20

4,191,147
4,892
127,879
485,568

1,257,344 10
1,467 60
38,363 70
145,670 40

4,475,545
6,168
188,756
293,124

1,342,663 50
1,850 40
56,626 80
87,937 20

I 30
30
30
30

29

. EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.
Continued.
1858

1859.

1860.
<i3

Duty.

2

Value.

Duty.

1

Value.

$1,830,439 20

24

$11,259,693

$2,702,326 32

24

$12,788,074

$3,069,137 76

480,636 72
236,207 40
441,014 64

24
15
24

2,877,352
1,697,386
719,415

690,564 48
254,607 90
172,659 60

24
15
24

2,806,987
1,665,181
831,627

673,676 88
249,777 15
199,590 48

01
15
28
53
52

19
19
24
19
19

12,289,574
386,824
1,853,463
101,911
136,174

06
56
12
09
06

19
19
24
19
19

15,018,351
593,371
1,311,603
178,890
200,683

1,542,600

370,224 00

24

2,200,164

528,039 36

24

2,542,523

610,205 52

19
15
24
15
19
15
19

"741,077
298,134
40,969
• 2,120,868
1,080,671
4,818
966,017

140,804 63
44,720 10
9.832 56
205,327 49
722 70
183,543 23

19
15
24
15
19
15
19

784,964
338,712
25,570
3,228,036
1,913,417
9,395
2,383,955

149,143
50,806
6,136
484,205
363,549
1,409
452,951

16
80
80
40
23
25
45

19
15
24
15
19
15
19

1,163,399
363,774
55,862
4,310,369
1,775,314
68,965
2,401,.526

221,045
54,566
13,406
646,555
337,309
10,344
456,289

24
24

12,391,713
320,863

2,974,011 12
77,007 12

24
24

16,564,533
1,106,499

3,975,487 92
265,559 76

24
24

20,933,904
1,485,003

5,024,136 96
356,400 72

19
24
24
24
24
19
19
12

16,121,395
417,168
111,912
11,992
94,396.
3,207,043
16,067
242,130

3,083,065
100,120
26,858
2,878
22,655
609,338
3,052
29,055

19
24
24
24
24
19
19
12

21,182,188
460,034
171,683
75,539
89,158
4,463,833
14,825
288,267

4,024,615
110,408
41,203
18,129
21,397
848,128
2,816
34,592

19
24
24
24
24
19
19
12

24,876,075
546,845
154,572
. 80,414
95,529 t
5,001,406
12,903
104,700

4,726,454
131,242
37,097
19,299
22,926
950,267
2,451
12,564

Value.

24

$7,626,830

24
15
24

2,002,653
1,574,716
1,837,561

19
19
24
19
19

10,780,379
196,285
663,372
137,687
124,008

24
24

I

*i9* *"*i,'249,'385'
515,641
19
15
24
15

5,598,571
5,316
953,436

15
15
15
15

78,749
520,029
7,592
8,296

24
24

322,024
961,514

2,048,272
37,294
159,209
26,160
23,561

31B:130

20

05
39
88
08
04
17
73
60.

237*283" i s '19* "**i,'623,'i66"
613,248
97,971 79 19
15
24
15

8,958,977
26,529
1,355,099

35
35
80
40

15
15
15
15

107,159
297,998
3,387
24,202

77,285 76
230,763 36

24
24

284,849
1,252,435

839,785 65
1,275 84
143,015 40
11,812
78,004
1,138
1,244

^
'

2,335,019
73,496
. 444,831
19,363
25,873

72
16
92
36
92
27
75
04

308,'390* i V 19* " " 2 , * 193; 376'
909,371
116,517 12 19
1,343,846 55
6,366 96
203,264 85

15
24
15

9,245,816
35,526
1,454,993

85
70
05
30

15
15
15
15

78,405
657,520
20,952
12,258

• 68,363 76
300,584 40

24
24

345,721
1,756,237

16,073
44,699
508
' 3,630

Duty.

2,853,486
112,740
314,784
33,989
33,129

69
49
72
10
77

81
10
88
35
66
75
94

25
80
28
36
96
1457
00

4i6;74i*44
172,780 49
1,386,872 40
. 8,526 24
- 218,248 95
11,760
98,628
3;142
lj838

75
00
80
70

82,973 04
421,496 88

15

189,494

28,424 10

15

276,292

41,443 80

15

397,542

59,631 30

19

619,680

117,739 20

19

621,300

118,047 00

19

656,517

124,738 23

24
24
24

2,845,029
1,336
21,549

682,806 96
320 64
5,171 76

24
24
24

3,288,408
3,385
27,943

788,737 92
812 40
6,706 32

24
24
24

2,963,616
3,253
26,787

711,267 84
780 72
6,4-28 m

4
15
19

65,090
1,437,767
216,441

2,603 60
215,665 05
41,123 79

4
15
19

111,760
1,618,866
263,133

4,470 40
• 242,829 90
49,9^5 27

4
15
19

194,010
2,082,643
303,461

7,760 40
312,396 45
•57,657 59

•

'

24

1,182,837

283,880 88

24

1,113,810

267,314 40

24

1,603,237

384,776 88

24

14,352

3,444 48

24

32,755

7,961 20

24

44,047

10,571 28

24
24
24
lo
24

17,024
382,610
4,747
202,163
1,489,054

4,085
91.826
i;139
30,324
357,392

76
40
28
45
76

24
24
24
15
24

16,851
314,519
5,716
254,794
1,762,103

4,044
75,484
1,371
.38,219
422,904

24
56
84
10
72

24
24
24
15
24

20,389
342,642
11,043
336,559
2,240,905

4,893
82,234
2,650
50,483
537,817

36
08
.32
85
20

24
24
24
24 1.

2,260,402
6,900
100,481
155,498

542,496
1,656
24,115
37,297

48
00
44
92

24
24
24
24

2,150,625
14,299
84,804
174,701

516,159
3,431
20,352
41,928

00
76
96
24

24
24
24
24

2,682,881
11,556
122,936
130,SCO

^43,886
2,773
29,504
31,339

64
44
64
20




30

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

No. 5.—STATEMENT1857.
Species ofmerchandise.
Value.
Manufactures of iron and steel—
Mill saws, crosscut and pit s a w s . . . . . . . .
Anchors and parts thereof
Anvils and parts thereof ...-.
Bar iron
Rod
Hoop
Sheet
Pig
Old and scrap
Railroad
' Steel, cast, shear, and German
All other
Manufactures of steel, all other
Copper and manufactures of c o p p e r In pigs, bars, and old
Wire ,
Braziers'
......
Copper bottoms
Manufactures of, not specified
Rods and bolts
Nails and spikes. .,
Brass and manufactures of brass—
In pigs, bars, and old
Wire...:
Sheet and rolled
Manufactures of, not specified
Tin and manufactures of t i n In pigs and bars
In plates and sheets
Foil
Manufactures of, not specified
L e a d and manufactures of l e a d Pig, bar, sheet, and old
Shot
Pipes
..
Manufactures of, not specified
Pewter, old
Manufactures of
Zinc and manufactures of—
In pigs
In sheet
In nails
Spelter
. Manufactures of, not specified
Manufactures of gold and s i l v e r Epaulets, wings, lace, galloons, tresses,
tassels, &c
Gold and silver leaf
Jewelry, real or imitations of
Gents, set
Gems, otherwise
Manufactures of, not specified
Glaziers' diam mds
Clocks
Chronometers
W a t c h e s and parts of
W^atch materials and unfinished parts of
watches
Metallic pens
Pins in packs or otherwise
Buttons, metal
All other, and button moulds
Glass and manu factures of glass—
Silvered
Paintings on glass, porcelain and colored
Polished plate
Manufactures of, not ppecified . . . . . . . . .
Glassware, cut
Glassware, plain....W a t c h crystals
Bottles
Demijohns
Window glass, broad, crown, and cylinder!
Paper and nianufactures of paper—
Writi ng paper
,
Sheathing paper
Playing cards




$54,988
39,866
46,828
5,352,785
' 478,523
345,094
814,342
1,171,085
185,112
6,179,280
1,698,355
839,968

Duty.

$16,496
11,959
14,048
1,605,83.5
143,556
. 103,528
244,302
351,325
55;533
1,853,784
254,743
167,993

Value.

$47,297
32,980
67,926
4,423,935
809^901
324,675
1,082, .389
1,001,742
111,680
7,455,596
1,775,292
858,322

1,388,812
* 130
1,350
2,356
235,752

69,440 60
39 00
270 00
471 20
70,725 60
161 60

1,659,513
681
1,355
4,390
166,704
20
1,723

26,887
4,359
71
192,892

1,344 35
1,307 70
21 30
57,867 60

18,153
4,563'
68
199,928

1,163,735
4,469,839
25,778
24,176

58,186 75
670,475 85
3,866 70
7,252 80

1,023,210
4,789,.538
21., 426
31,922

2,528,014
24,056
330
1,834
7,739
135

505,602 80
4,811 QO
66 00
550 20
386 95
40 50

2,305,768
15,437
128
2,076
3,874570

10,158
357,536
4,597
• 527,024

507 90
53,630 40
1,.379 10
26,351 20

41,764
546,250
2,453
447,812

54,784
16,402
475,685
7,263
368,955
77,743
1,251
52,036
'
20,246
3,800,754
116,155
40,2.55
24,672
816,383
330,720
43,578
473,205
108,416
, 80,978
74,976
30,036
95,292
19,414
488,437
272,010
5,530
10,577

16,435 20
2,460 30
142,705 50
2,178 90
36,895 50
23,332 90
187 65
15,610 80 I
2,024 60
380,075 40

40,438
29,509
503,653
4,437
390,357
78,131
898
79,147
• 16,442
3,823,039

Duty.

$14,189
9,894
20,.377
1,327,180
24^^,970
97,402
324,716
300,522
33,504
2,236,678
266,293
171,664

10
00
80 I
50
30
50
70
60
90
80
80 I
40 I

82,975 65
204 30
271 00
878 00
50,011 20
4 00
344 60
907 65
1,458 90 I
20 40
59,978 40 I
51', 160 SO
718,430 70
3,213 90
' 9,576 60
461,153 60
3,087 40
25 60
6-22 80
193 70 I
171 00
2,238 20
81,937 50
735 90
22,390 60

12,131 40
4,426 35 I
151,095 90
- 1,331 10
39,035 70
23,439 30 j
. 134 70
23,744 10
1,644 20
382,303 90

34,846 50
12,076 50
6,168 ( O
i
204,095 75

108,661
56,110
13,178
912,871

32,598 30
16,833 00
3,294 50
228.217 75

99,218
13,073
141,961
32,524
32,391
22,492
9,010
28,587
5^824
'97,687

243,762
33,783
525,061
142,904
112,940
79,738
32,170
39,2-25
30,399
641,093

73,128 60
10,134 90
157,518 30
42,871 20
45,176 00
23,921 40
9,651 00
11,767 50
9,119 70 i

128.218 60 I

343,240

102,972 00

"i7,'28l"

5,184 30

81,603 00
1,106 00
3,173 10

31

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.
Continued.

Value.

24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
12
15
24

$34,210
" 8', 072
^
45,275
3,318,913
426,499
273,3-26
945,073
739,949
87,113
2,987,576
. 1,147,773
725,338
970,133

$8,210
1,937
10,866
796,539
102,;359
65,598
226,817
177,587
20,907
717,018
137,732
108,800
231,831

6
ca

Duty.

Free

40
28
00
12
76
24
52
76
12
24
76
70
92

Value.

24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
12
15
24

$26,495
13,510
50,805
4,184,331
332,801
387,198
•7.52,975
1,049,200
107,702
2,274,032
1,141,871
905,859
1,043,405

a5

58*32' 24'

24

243

'is'

5^194" " "
104,032
' 8
68

779
24,967
1
10

2,'i36'
281
166,935

5i2*e4' *24
67 44
40,064 40 24*

24
15
15

1860.

1859.

1858.

5,'278'

io" is'
68 24
20 15
20 15- *"

6,*69i"
109,443
358*

1

Duty.

$6,358 80
3,242 40
12,193 20
1,004,239 44
. 79,872 24
92,927 52
137,514 00
251,808 00
25,848 48
545,767 68
1.37,024 52
135,878 85
. 250,417 20

Value.

24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
12
15
24

$7,385
9,804
47,894
4,473,866
576,720
518,087
839,065
1,005,865
108,227
3,709,376
1; 530,897
1,193,456
1,606,481

i,'266*72* '24'

gi.s'es"

is'

26,266 32 24

""ss'io*

..
..
15

Duty.

$1,772 40
' 2,352 96
11,494 56
1,073,727 84
138,412 80
124,340 88
201,375 60
. 241,407 60
25,974 48
890,250 24
183,707 64
179,018 40
385,555 44

'602'

144*48

i^ooe"

"*i56*96

21,756

5,221 44

1*87" "[

28*05

"ieo*

" " " • " " 3 8 * 4 6 ' *24*

2*877

576*48

136,'139'

2
32,'673*36* ' 4

186;igi'

*"***'43,'245*84

8 ""3'842,'968 """307*437*44 **8' *"*5,'33[,*i47' * *"426,'49i'76 "8* ****4,636,*655'
3,168 12 12
3.038 04 12
26,401
37,003
25,317
12
6,873 12 24
6,642 00 24
28,638
26,939'
24
27,675

376^452*4*0
4,440 36
6,465 36

24

Free

80 4
60 12
72 24
44 4
52 24

20,873
504,744
1,602
276,352
787

834 92
60,569 28
380 48
11,054 08
188 88

13,060 08
8,794 80
115,281 12
3,077 28
' 34,519 40
9,960 24
269 64
17,132 40
633 68
184,746 96

24
12
24
24
4
24
12
24
8
8

14,947 92
9,010 56
126,469 44
4,613 04
37,194 76
11,571 12
108 96
23,166 96
326 72
223,093 68

86,845
114,817
50,161
15,462
715,670

3,473
27,566
12,038
2,937
135,977

80
08
64
78
30

4
24
24
19
19

290,198•
44,625
350,.561
135,941
99,823
66,006
26,944
38,730
34,262
696,586

69,647
10,710
84,134
32,625
29,946
15,841
6,466
9;295
8,222
104,487

52
00
64
84
90
44
56
20
88
90

24
24
24
24
30
24
24
24
24
15

62,283
75,088
526,956
19,221
929,869
48,213
908
96,529
4,084
2,788,671
101,2-21
106,147
49,224
25,402
'640,229
427,290
• 69,476
440,129
166.043
lis; .530
94,769
33,885
37,185
33,479
755,107

102,549 60
16,674 24
105,630 96
39,850 33
34,659 00
22,744 56
8,132 40
8,924 40
8,034 96
- 113,261 05

299,915
256
19,238

71,979 20
38 40
4,617 16

392,665
401
.52
202
31
385

04 4
32 12
44 24
92 4
60 24

117,420
556,155
878
657,986
•
673

4,696
66,738
210
26,319
161

56
44
80
60
64
68
96
92
20
04

24
12
24
24
4
24
12
24
8
8

54,417
73,290
480,338
12,822
862,985
41,501
2,247
71,385
7,921
2,309,337

56
20
68
72
79

4
24
24
19
19

3-2,'016
626,747

47,646 16
8,730'96
9.5,354 40
33,179 76
30,448 80
15.283 44
8,433 84
7,161 84
7,683 84
94,012 05

24
24
24
24
30
24
24
24
24
15

256,322

61,517 28 24

2,543
2,062

295,836
1,219
225
205
101
494

4

28,701
209,736
1,156
212,823
4,865

1,148
25,168
277
8,512
1,167

24
12
24
24
4
24
12
24
8
8

35,294
40,087
385,945
3,915
339,241
55,282
1,523
54,058
9,090
2,118,838

8,470
4,810
92,626
939
13,569
13,267
183
12,973
727
169,507

4
24
24
19
19

44,139
83,630
33,132
12,788
483,141

1,765
20;071
7,951
2,429
91,796

24
24
24
24
30
24
24

198,109
36,379
397,310
138,249
101.496
63,681
35,141
29 841

4
24

275,380 20
934 45
622 20
175 20
25 64
144 96

2,617,770
2,677
350
844
784
1,605

1,972,243

12
24

1,835,868
6,231
4,148
730
• 641
604

15
15
15
24
4
24

15
15
15
24
4
24

'

8 132
1,501

855

45
80
15
20
72
88

SO
55
50
56
36
20

15
15
15
24
4
24

•

24
24
15
24
15
24

is,'595'

4,'462'so* '24'




164,929

i8,*i65'

39,582 96 24
4,'345*26* '24'

4,048 84
7 4 ' 28
,75
11,813 76
4,826 38
121,643 51

32

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

No. 5.—STATEMENT1857.

1856.
Species of merchandise.
Duty.
Paper and manufactures of p a p e r Papier m a c h e , articles and wares of . . .
Paper hangings
Paper boxes and fancy boxes
Paper and manufactures of, not specified
Blank books.
Parchment
Frinted books, magazines, &c.—
In English.
In other languages
Periodicals and illustrated n e w s p a p e r s . .
Periodicals and other works in course of
republication
Engravings
Mathematical instruments
Musical instruments
Daguerreotype plates
Ink and ink powders.
Iveather and manufactures of leather—
T a n n e d , bend, sole, and upper
,.
Skins tanned and dressed
Skivers
'
Boots and shoes
Gloves for men, women, and children...
Manufactures of, not specified
.Japanned leatner or skins of all k i n d s . .
Wares—
China, porcelain, earthen and s t o n e . . .
Plated or gilt
Japanned
Britannia
Chemical earthen or pottery, o f a capacity exceeding ten gallons
Silver plated metal.
Silver plated wire
Saddlery— .,
Common tinned or japanned
Plated, brass, or polished steel
FursUndressed on the skin
,
H a t t e r s ' , furs, dressed or undressed,
upon the skin
Dressed on the skin
Manufactures of fur
W o o d , manufactui'es of—
Cabinet and household furniture . . . ..
Ceaar, mahogany, rose, and satin w o o d .
Willow.....
Other manufactures of..
Wood, u n m a n u f a c t u r e d Cedar, granadilla, mahogany, & c . . . . . . .
Willow
Fire-wood and other, not specified
Dye-wood in stick
Bark of the cork t r e e : corks
manufactures of.
unmanufactured.
IvoryManufactures of
^Unmanufactured
Marble—
Manufacturesof
Unmanufactured
Burr-stones . . ,
Quicksilver
Brushes and brooms
Black lead pencils
Slates of all kinds
Raw hides and skins
Boots and shoes other than l e a t h e r . . . .
India-rubber—
Manufactures of
Unmanufactured
HairManufactured
Unmanufactured
Grass cloth
.*




Value.

Duty.

$25,051
- 228,577
36,700
135,167
12,940
6,049

$7,515 30
45,715 40
11,010 00
40,5.50 10
2,588 00
1,814 70

$33,948
254,591
36,900
,178,228
18,884
5,750

$10,184 40
50,918 20
11,070 00
53,468 40
3,776 80 I
1,72,'S 00 '

560,147
180,755
26,263

56,014 70
18,075 50
2,626 30

663,597
179,084
30,497

66,359 70 j
17,908 40 I
3,049 70 ]

143
16-2,439
33,826'
431,684
104,057
26,793

28 60
26,243 90
11,647 80
86,336 80
31,217 10
8,037 90

326
182,369
34,925
494,374
10,968
47,734

65 20
18,236 90
10,477 50
98,874 80
3,290 40
14,320 20

1,913,987
758,758
69,212
138,372
1,344,550
310,243

382,797 40
151,751 60
13,842 40
41,511 60
403,365 00
93,072 90

1,606,458
809,273
68,194
127,651
1,559,332
459,161

3,347,884
160,198
39,605
8,198

1,004,365 20
48,059 40
11,881 50
2,459 40

2,218
7,084

665 40
2,125 20

1,993
2,948

65,359
154,054

13,071 80
46,216 20

82,731
195,164

321,291 60
161,.854 60
13,638 80
38,295 30 1
467,799 60
137,748 30 I

4,037,064 1,211,119 20
48,247 20
160,824
13,899 90
46, .333
2,695 20
8,984
597 90
884 40
16,546 10
58,549 20 I

665,607

66,560 70

518,792

51,879 20

1,755,704
157,200
41,924

175,570 40
31,440 00
12,577 20

1,572,388
214,405
49,9.55

157,238 80
42,881 00
14,986 80

46,781
22,307
125,808
429,915

' 14,034 30
8,922 80
37,742 40
128,974 50

47,696
15,185
175,484
391,179

14,308 90
6,074 00 I
52.645 i
117,353 70 I

440,246
36,554
25,157
796,802
202,567

88,049 2b
7,310 80
7,547 10
39,840 10
60,770 10

518,251
41,773
29,457
866,048
209,572

10.3,650 20
8,354 60
8,837 10
43,302 40
62,871 60

9,130

1,369 50

17,692

2,653 80

18,520
320,100

5,556 00
16,005 00

17,2.39
507,483

. 5,171 70
25,374 15

, 38,054
177,987
86,979
3,625
252,643
72,687
86,248
8,083,292
32,742

11,416 20
35,593 40
8,697 90
725 00
75,792 90
21,806 10
21,562 00
404,164 60
9,822 60

25,253
201,978
111,211
961
283,968
88,089
96,176
10,010,090
30,525

97.796
1,045;576

29,338 80
104,557 60

180,585
832,058

53,175 50 I
83,205 80 I

129,860
427,870
29,387

38,958 00
42,787 00
7,346 75

129,571
453,705
43,804

38,871 30
45,370 50 \
10,951 00 1

.

7,575 90
40,395 60 '
11,121 10 I
192 20
85,190 40
26,426 70
24,044 00
500,504 SO
9,157 50 '

33

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Continued.
1858.

1860.

1859.
Value.

Duty.

-Duty.

Duty.

$22,9.54
104,758
33,.523
123,169
18,343
4,340

$5, .508 96
15,713 70
8,045 52
29,560 , 6
5
2,751 45
1,041 60

$16,218
143,722
29,505
232,876
13,465
5,150

$3,892
21,5.58
7,081
5.5,890
2,019
1,236

32
30
20
24
75
00

144,400
29,968
191,332
18,770
5,528

$4,772
21,660
7,192
45,919
2,815
1,326

456,4.50
175, .508
21,964

.36,516 00
14,040 64
1,757 12

427,280
261,925
25,565

34,182 40
20,954 00
2,045 20

.599,675
295,811
31,449

47,774 00
23,664 88
2,415 92

158
133,059
21,437
378,928
1,828
23,410

23 70
10,644 72
5,144 88
56,839 20
438 72
5,618 40

132,844
18.975
393,715
14,168
36,773

10,627
4,554
59,057
3,400
8,825

.52
00
-^5
.32
52

120,790
13,9.50
489,952
15
49,113

5
9,663
3,348
73,492
3
5,787

16
00
32
68
50
72

40
20
00
80
60
12

1,259,711
806,412
35,976
87,101
1,449,672
278,946
226,142

188,956 65
120,961 80
5, .396 40
20,904 24
347,921 28
66,947 04
42,966 98

2,358,794
1,994,777
ri?0,978
12.3,666
1,.337,993
386,722
226,022

353,819
299,216
18,146
29,679
321,118
92,813
42,944

10
.55
70
84
32
28
18

• 1,454,687
1,120,481
157,762
134,520
1,543,429
551.605
149^208

218,203 05
168,072 15
23,664 30
32,284 80
370,421 96
132,385 20
28,349 52

3,215,236
95,991
29,863
4,275

771,656
23,037
7,167
1,026

64
84
12
00

3,416,714
122,078
25,673
7,966

820,011
29,298
6,161
1,911

36
72
52
84

4,387,838
131,728
30,125
1,353

1,053,081 12
31,614 72
7,230 00
.324 72

18,959
6,731
8,439

2,843 85
1,615 44
2,025 36

17,318
1,296
26,203

2,597 70
311 04
6,288 72

19,974
" 329
43,188

2,992 05
78 96
11,365 12

56,669
138,490

8, .500 35
33,237 60

59,653
138,814

8,947
33,315

78,419
177,083

11,762 85
42,499 92

29,377 76

297,414

23,79i 12

195,171
195,171
122,437

15,613 68
29,295 65
29,384 88

321,935

25,7.54 80

366,722

876,156
199,714
54,412

70,092 48
29,957 10
13,058 88

2,448,127
150,076
91,996

195,850
22,511
22.079

51,958
25,348
112,725
288,334

12,469 92
7,604 40
27,054 00
69,200 16

43,171
28,846
125,677
239,057

10,361
8,653
30,162
57,373

I
i
'
(

50,680
17,872
143,495
297,768

12,163 20
5,361 60
34,438 80
71,464 32

384,274
35,141
5,057

30,741 92
5,271 15
1,213 68

48.5,912
38,359
758

38,872 {
5,753 I
181 !

658,834
39,556
3,834

52,706 72
5,933 45
920 16

167,181
86
13,922

40,122 44
20 64
656 88

40,294 I

"*34,'i74"

'*i*366'!

260,928
b9
52,357

62,622 72
14 16
2,094 28

15,094

3,622 56

15,456

3,709 -

14,071

3,377 04

16,491
167,634

3,957 84
25,145 10

27,750
171,753

6,660 00
25,762 95

33,808
223,436

8,113 92
33,515 40

1,029
170,078
93,779
85,775
9,884.358
30^754

154 35
40,818 72
22,506 96
16,297 25
395,374 32
7,380 96

93,217
231,781
129,312
92,088
13,011,326
22,077

13,982 55
55,627 44
31,034'88
17,496 72
520,453 04
5,298 48

16,742
3-23, ,322
132,399
205,244
9,524,706
29,764

2,511 30
77,597 28
31,775 76
38,989 36
380,988 24
7,143, 36

89,245
666,583

21,418 80
26,663 32

190,314
971,489

45,675 36
38,859 56

243,296
1,426,326

58,391 04
57,053 04

67,725
268,472
32,144

' 16,254 00
21,477 76
6,107 36

111,958
378,050
9,917

26,869 92
30,244 00
1,884 23

97,615
3111,764
7,441

23,427 60
31,341 12
1,413 79




167,892

34

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

No. 5.—STATEMENT1856.
Species of merchandise.
Value.
Umbrellas, parasols, and sunshades of silk
and other
Flaxseed or linseed
Angora, Thibet, and other goats' hair, and
mohair
Wool
\yines, in casks—
liurgundy
Madeira
,
Sherry and St. Lucar
Port
Claret..;
.Teneriff'e and other Canary
,.'.
Fayal and other Azores
Sicily and other Mediterranean
Austria and other of Germany
Red wines not enumerated.
White wines not enumerated
W i n e , in b o t t l e s Burgundy
Madeira
Sherry
Port
Claret
Champagne
All other
Spirits, foreign distilled—
Brandy
From grain
From other niaterials
,
Cordials
Beer, ale, and porter—
In casks
In bottles
Honey
Molasses
Oil and bone of foreign fishingSpermaceti
Whale and other fish
Whalebone ,
OilOlive, in casks
,..
Olive, in bottles
Castor
i..
Linseed
Rapeseed and hempseed .
Palm
Neatsfoot and other animal
Essential oils
T e a and coffee from places other than those
of their production, and not excepted
by treatv s t i p u l a t i o n s Tea
'.
Coff'ee
Cocoa
SugarsBrown
White, clayed or powdered
Loa^ and other refined
Candy
Sirup of sugar cane
Fruits—
Almonds
Currants
Prunes
Plums
Figs
Dates
Raisins
,.
Oranges, lemons, and limes
Other green fruit
Preserved fruit
Nuts not specified
Cocoanuts, (N. E.)
Spices—
Mace
Nutmegs
Cinnamon




Duty.

$69,274
1,741,260

• $20,782 20
348,252 00

$65,360
3,003,824

$19,608 00
600,764 80

13,184
1,665,064

2,636 80
499,519 20

575
2,125,744

115 00
637,723 20

5,863
32,031
270,317
1.58,729
561,440
3,380
7,795
61,954
19,749
279,248
158,575

2,345
12,812
108,126
63,491
224,576
1,.352
3,118
24,781
7,899
111,699
6.3,430

5,715
3,597
16,893
9,590
305,912
970,706
292,946

2,286
1,438
6,757
3,836
122,364
388,282
117,178

Duty.

21,627
65,830
364,906
407,564
669,403
565
4,704
1.33,894
27,259
500,527
252,584

8,6.50
26,352
145,962
163,025
267,761
228
1,881
53,557
10,903
200,210
101,033

80
00
40
60
20
0060
60
60
80
60

00
80
20
00
80
40
40

7,064
2,7.34
11,139
16,837
365,807
1,148,469
273,242

2,825
1,093
4.455
6,734
146,3-22
4.59,387
109,296

60
60
60
80
80
60
80

2,859,342
772,276
288,494
• 81,463

2,859, .342 00
772,276 C
O
288,494 00
81,463 00

2,527,262
1,125,160
218,907
92,398

2,527,262
1,125,160
218,907
92,396

00
00
00
00

190,554
520,343
169,643
4,334,668

.57,166
156,102
50,892
1,300,400

90
90
90
40-

221,290
628,550
202,436
8,259,175

66,387
188.565
60,730
2,477,752

00
00
80
50

14 60
1,594 20
122 00

413
17,280
251

73
7,971
610
94,163
376,356
96,371
1,063,771
26,156
416,317
276
119,438

39,323
59,362
116,076

28,248
112,906
19,274
212,754
5,231
41,631
55
35,831

90
80
20
20
20
70
20
40

74,028
347,396
102, .502
958,200
11,601
337,881
1.53
146,872

7,864 60
11,872 40
11,607 60

17,315
39,879
187,016

22,400,353
61,.504
68,109
4,239
4,448

6,720,105
18,451
20,432
1,271
1,334

334,529
127,089
56,494
84,873
233,181
21,399
864,219
640,670
117,889
124,480
157,801

133,811
50,835
22,597
25,461
93,272
8.559
345;687
128;134
23,577
49,792
47,340

23.909
326,ld3
21,145

9, .563 60
120,453 20
6,343 50

90
20
70
70
40

• 82 60
3.456 00
50 40
22,208
104,218
•20,500
191,640
2, .3-20
33,788
30
44,061

40
80
40
00
20
10
60
60

3,463 00
7,975 80
18,701 60

42,614,604 I 12,784,381
88,820
26,046
20,671
68,906
.566
1,887
1,285
4,284

20
00
80
10
20

209,605
151,418
108,994
118,059
212,207
17,048
937,460
640,544
151,587
102,557
183,144

83,842
60,567
43,597
35,417
84,882
6,819
374,984
128,108
30,317
41,022
54,943

00
20
60
70
80
20
00
80
40
80
20

26,754
254,637
18,865

10,701 60
101,8.54 80
5,659 50 I

35

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.
Continued.
1859.

]858.

§

Value.

Duty.

di

§

Value.

1860.

Duty.

tf

24

24
15

$47,790

$67,420
549

205 65 15
43,035 60 24

52,892
81,833
17,782
52,902
262,849
88,217
524,023

$11,469 60

a
;

Value.

tf
$16,180 80
82 35

24

Duty.
•

15

$68,882
649

$16,531 68
97 35

7,9.33 80 15
19,639 92 24

1,219
391,494

182 85
93,958 56

5,334 60
15,870 60
78,854 70
26,465 10
157,206 90
51 90
26 40
11,129 70
.34,941 90
88,603 10
89,738 30

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

23,881
63,338
430,799
214,925
809,7.57
2.404
36,395
118,935
486,999
462,415

7,164 30
18,001 40
129,239 70
64,477 50
242,927 10
84 00
721 20
10,918 50
35,680.50
146,099 "70
138,724 50

15
24

1,371
179,315

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
.0
3

• 10,864
72,429
343,100
2-26,781
385,750
.3,377
10,409
56,612
46,733
421,368
285,125

3,259 20
21,728 70
192,930 00
68,034 30
115,725 00
1,013 10
3,122 70
16,983 60
14,019 90
126,410 40
85,537 50

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
30
30

2,714
1,600
10,059
7,901
227,246
860,942
273,378

814 20
480 00
3,017 70
2,370 30
. 68,173 80
258,282 60
82,013 40

30
30
30
30
30
30
30

3,788
1,702
11,743
•
14-, 453
262,682
1,385,760
240,616

1,136 40
510 60
3, .522 90
4,335 90
78,804 60
415,728 00
72,184 80

30
30
30
30
30
30
30

7,043
7,275
9,496
15,072
419,983
1,345,812
320,310

2,112 90
2,182 50
2,848 80
4,521-60
125,994 90
403,743 60
96,093 00

30
30
30
30

2,232,452
1,158,517
324,905
104,269

3
669,735 60 . 0
347,555 10 30
97,471 50 30
31,280 70 30

3,262,058
1,465,243,
444,207
138,173

978,617 40
439,572 90
13.3,262 10
41,451 90

30
30
30
30

3,937,698
1,211,335
3.50,209
169,071

1,181,309 40
363,400 50
105,062 70
50,721 30

24
24
24
24

146,095
485,039
149,915.
4,116,759

35,062 80
116;409 36
35,979 60
988,022 16

138,2-24
632,975
196,751
5,062,850

33,173 76
151,914 00
47,220 24
1,21/^,084 00

24
24
24
24

102,541
688,229
163,027
5,214,321

24,609 84
165,174 96
40,126 48
1,251,437 04.

15
15
15

15
525*66' 15
133 20 15

144
41,759

.

24
24
15
15
15
4
15
24

75,530
373,141
139,647
402,908
28,866
599,355
'l52
258,815

18,137 20
59,553 84
20,947 05
60,436 20
4,329 90
23,974 20
22 80
62,115 60-

157
18,470
13,475

24
24
24
24

23 55 15
2,770 50 15
2,021 25 15

173
88
37,099
116,473
288,677
299,121

.

3, .504
'888

280

345

21 60
6,263 85
51 75

24
24
15
15
15
4
15
24

110,172
199,615
143,458
164,7.57
14, .531
405,681
4,127
231,738

26,441 28
47,907 60
21,518 70
24,713 55
2,179 65
16,227 24
619 OS
55,616 64

24
24
15
15
15
4
15.
24

146,485
389,490
133,135
695,172
18, .343
453,538
308,126

35,156 40
93,477 60
19,970 40
104,275 80
2,751 45
18,141 52
98 40
73,950 24

15
15
4

484, .520
28,7.59
213,644

72,678 00
4,313 85
8,545 76

15
15
4

81,825
. 22,696
389,839

12,273 75
3,404 40
15,593 56

15
15
4

111,556
114,858
333,242

16,733 40
17,228 70
13,329 68

24
24
24
24
24

23,317,435
109,887
1,001
2,205
6,185

5,596,184 40
26,372 88
240 24
529 20
1,484 40

24
24
24
24
24

30,471,,302
78,229
8,087
1,243
19,717

7,313,112 48
18,774 98
1,940 88
298 32
4,732 08

24
24
24
24
24

30,959,985
59,816
S3, .580
3,035
5,589

7,430,396 40
14,355 84
12,859 20
728 40
1,341 36

63,943 50 30
27,429 52
8
10,681 92
8
12,686 40
8
24,677 76
8
2, .525 36 8
115,317 68
8
62,416 80
8
18,886 88
8
36,317 40 30
56,857 68 24
1,706 24
4

444,757
319,326
193,297
169,197
140,282
91,060
1,420,980
959,431
227,381
120,977
177,349
43,564

133,427 10 30
'25,540 08
8
15,463 78
8
13,535 76
8
11,222 56
8
, 7,284 80 8
113,678 40
8
76,754 48
8
18,190 48
8
36,293 10 30
42,563 76 24
1,742 58
4

247,025
284,642
276,939
220,284
382,369
241,31)5
1,475,880
1,183,267
234,138
169,771
236,568
45,706

74,107 50
22,771 36
22,154 12
17,622 72
28,989 52
19,304 40
118,070 40
94,661 36
18,731 04
50^931 30
56,676 32
1,828 24

4
4
4

12,895
186,212
8,727

515 80
7,448 48
349 08

30
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
30
24
4

213,145
342,869
133,524
1.58, .580
308,472
31,567
1,441,471
780,210
236,086
121,058
236,907
42,656

4
4
4

29,923
378,257
18,419

1,198 92
15,130 28
736 76




4
4'
4

656

16,473
385,480
15,336

658 92
14,619 20
613 44

36

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 5.—STATEMENT1856.

1857.

Species of merchandise.
Value.

SpicesCloves
Pepper, black
Pepper, red
Pimento
,
Cassia
Ginger, in root . . . . . . .
Ginger, ground
Camphor—
Crude
Refined
Candles—
Wax and s p e r m a c e t i . .
Stearine
.
'Cheese
...
.SoapPerfumed
Other than perfumed ,
Tallow
Starch
...
Arrowroot
• Butter
.%
Lard.
Beef and pork
.Hams and other bacon.
Bristles
SaltpetreCrude
Refined
Jndigo
'.
»Woad or pastel
Cochineal
Madder
•Gums—
Arabic, Senegal, &c
Other gums
Gum benzoin, or benjamin, (N. E . ) . .
Borax
-..
Copperas.
Verdigris
Brimstone—
Crude
iRefined
Chloride of lime, or bleaching powder . . .
Soda ash
Soda sal
Soda carb
rfiarilla
.Sulphate of barytes
,...
Acids, acetic, &c
Acetous, chromic, nitric, &c., (N. E ) . . .
VitriolBlue or Roman
Oil of
White, (sulphate of zinc,) (N. E . ) . . .
Sulphate of quinine
>»Licorice—
Root
Paste
vBark—
Peruvian* and Quilla
Other
Ivory and bone-blackf
Opium
• Glue .
Gunpowder
Alum
• Gutta-perchaManufactures of, (N. E.)
Unmanufactured, (N. E.)
^Tobacco —
. Unmanufactured
Snuft'
Cigars
Manufactured, other than snuff and cigars
wPaints—
Dry ochre
* Peruvian free.




Duty.

Duty.

$.53,077
313,552
5,849
352,022
169,705
22,713

$21,230 80
94,065 60
1,754 70
140,808 80
67,882 00
9,085 20

$65,332
279,287
2,460
241,503
201,883
44,123

$26,132 80
83,786 10
738 00
96,601 20
80,753 20
17,649 20
'
9 60

50,611
694

12.652 75
277 60

56,314
34

14,078 50
13 6b

8,388
50,811
141,189

1,677 60
10,162 20
42,350 70

9,667
62,187
143,821

1,933 40
12,437 40
. 43,146 30

42,177
221,778
3,022
1,6.55
17,490
16,443
109
622
9,551
243,964

12.653 10
66,533 40
302 20
331 00
. 3,498 UO
3,288 60
21 80
124 40
1,910 20
12,198 20

51,597
139,926
12,507
6,695
25,751
18,654
420
. 2,614
7,204
289,581

15,452 10
41,977 80
1,250 70
1,339 00
5,150 20
3,730 80
84 00
522 80
1,440 80
14,479 05

1,199,243
27,499
1,0*63,743
682
249,057
1,671,805

59,962 15
2,749 90
106,374 30
68 20
24,905 70
83,590 25

1,156,463
382
1,010,509
1,201
440,707
l,375j472

57,823 15
36 20
101,050 90
120 10
44,070 70
68,773 60

295,515
233,016

29,551 SO
46,603 20

143,380
456,432

14,338 00
91,286 40

153,276
2,628
57,939

38,319 00
525 60
11,587 80

94,844
6,446
9,690

23,711 00
1,289 20
1,938 00

163,500
6,100
210,877
997,309
143,-936
318.387
14,575
86,193
190,049

24,525 00
1,220 00.
21,087 70
99,730 90
28,787 20
63,677 40
1,457 50
17,238 60
38,009 80

152,3.30
12,305
320,895
l,084,02i
86,483
424,024
31,018
48, .567
78,271

22,849 50
2,461 00
32,089 50
108,402 10
17,296 60
84,804 i
3,101 80
9,713 40
15,654 20

934
39

186 80
3 90

5,834
98

1,166 80
9 80

253,771

50,754 20

249,964

49,992 80

9,974
301,425

1,994 80
60,285 00

42,091
392,552

8,418 20
78,510 40

402,925
227,007
145
485,846
30,745
5,043
29,849

60,438 75
45,401 40
29 00
97,169 20
6,149 00
1,008 60
5,969 80

386,252
258,605
289
463,452
23,571
9,683
24,536

57,937 80
51,721 00
57 80
92.690 40
4,714 20
1,936 60
4,907 20

1,009,044
4,078
3,741,460
35,962

302,713 20
1,631 20
1,496,584 00
14,384 80

1,358,835
2,626
4,221.096
18:898

21,033

6,309 90 1 30
16,253
t Bone-black free.

407,650
1,050
1,688,438
7,559

50
40
40
20

4,875 90

37

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Continued.
1859.

1858.

s 1

Value.

6
a
tf

Duty.

Value.

$2,559 12
4
25,268 92
219 72
8,125 72
14,264 56
7,971 15 15
24

$45,807
401,791
3,130
118,683
209,600
64,244
7,201

8
30

92,953
4

7,436 24 ' 8
1 20 30

82,959
19

15
15
24

8,731
34,466
152,272

1,309 65 15
5,169 90 15
36,545 28 24

24
24
8
15
15
15
15
15
IS
4

37,515
52,788
7,413
4,308
19,573
5,757
522
12,201
9,054
265,720

9,003 60
12,668 64
.593 04
646 20
2,935 95
863 55
78 30
1,830 15
1,358 10
10,6-28 80

24
24
8
15

4
8

1,270,251
383
945,083
1,203
221,332

8
8
24
4
15
15

389,402
118,277
6,803
67,890
2,414
21,142

4
15
4
4
8
8
4
15
4
15

249,317
9,639
387,101
1,211,305
37.3,599
123,083

IS
4
15

15

5,438
25
1,515
54,166

15
15

18,217
477,995

12
8
15
15
15
IS
15

600
26,963
. 45
447,534 i
14,637
4,458
3,514

15
4

588
41,648

24
30
30
30

1,255,831
5,153
4,123,208
22,898

4
4
free

15

39,958
113,736
592

12,534 1

Duty.

6
rt

Value.

Duty.

tf

$63,978
631,723
5,493
203,143
356,614
S3,141

15
24

1860.

$1,832 28
4
16,071 64
4
125 20
4
4,747 32
4
8,384 00
9,636 60 15
1,728 24 24

$26,970
487,213
5,022
82,445
245,695
65,359
6,399

$1,078 80
19,488 52
200 88
3,297 80
9,827 BO
9,803 85
1 535 76

8
30

6,318
209

505 44
62 70

5,819
. 8,248
155,685

872 85 'IS
1,236 90 15
37,384 40 24

5,791
12,187
174,437

868 65
1,828 05
41,864 88

15
15
15
15
4

75,777
393,7.58
9,577
3,968
41,288
4,060
54
4,421
12,197
222,179

18,186 48
94,501 92
766 16
595 20
6,192 90
609 00
8 10
663.15
1,829 55
8,887 16

24
24
8
15
15
15
15
15
15
4

62,437
183,516
13,129
1,400
18,908
325
278
918
16,020
437,450

14,974 88
44,043 84
1,050 32
210 00
2,836 20
48 75
41 70
137 70
2,403 00
17,498 00

50,810 24
30 64
37,803 32
48 12
.8,853 28

4
8
4
4
4

864,432
49,9.36
1,441,429
2,056
498,931

34,5'7 28
3,994 88
57,657 16
82 24
19,957 24

4
8
4
4
4

1,086,972
13,185
1,413,790
1 495
225,555

43^478 88
1,0.54 80
56,551 60
,59 80
9,022 20

31,1.52 16
9,462 16
1,632 72
2,715 60
.362 10
3,171 30

8
.8
24
4
15
15

•371,876
277,290
4,895
101,515
9,268
39,478

297,674
.188,209

23,813 92
14,896 72

9,972 68
4
1,445 85 15
15,484 04
4
48,4.52 20 4
29,887 92
8
9,846 64
8
4
5,993 70 15
4,549 44
4
88 80 15

324,178
10,741
385,963
1,708,444
218,140
823,464
9,341
22,502
237,302
14,040

815
1
227
8,124

15 1

5,399
S3

70 15
00
4
25 15
90 15

2,732 55
71,699 25

15
15

72 00
• 2,157 04
6 75
67,130 10
2,195 55
668 70
527 10

12
8
15
15
15
15
15

87 90 15
1,665 92 4
301,399 44 24
1,545 90 1 30
1,236,962 40 30
6,869 40 30

1,880 101 15
1




6,542
•

41,569
512,529
759
. 1,845

6,636 72
5 70

29,750 08
8
22,183 20
8
1,174 80 24
4,060 60
4
1 . 9 20 15
,30
5,921 70 15
12,967 04
4
1,611 15 15 i
14,638 52
4
68,337 76
4
8
17,451 20
8
65,877 12
373 64 4 1
3,375 30 15
4
9,492 08
2,106 00 15
809 85 15
2 12
4
15
981 30 15

1,688
12,455
1,686,113
5,006
4,581,742
46,712

17,578 1

2.286 48
2;861 55
4,848 00

394,896
12, .549
437,707
1,801,980
170,305
569,001
10,038
40,017 1
235,271
16,943

15,795 84
1,882 35
1,748 28
72,079 20
13,624 40
45,520 08
401 52
6,002 55
9,410 84
2,541 45

8,220
27

1,233 00
1 08

3,617

542 55

74,722
561,312

11,208 30
84,196 80

15
15
15
15

SO
3,822
359
540, .543
26,539
2,140
54,308

6 00
289 76
-53 85
81,081 45
3,980 85
321 00
8,146 20

253 20 15
498 20 4

494
916

7,410 00
36 64

1,365,625
7,110
4,581,559
125,615

327,7.50 00
2,133 00
1,374,467.70
37,684 SO

6,235 35
76,879 35

15
15

91 08 12
147 60 8

1 ^5
304,910
21,873
4,042
3^,808

57,162
19,077
32,320

45,736 50
3,280 95
608 30
5,221 20

404,667 12
1,501 80
1,374,522 60
14,013 60
2,636 70

24
30
30
30
'
1 15

26,465 1

3,969 70

38

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 5.—STATEMENT—
1857.

1858.
Species of merchandise.
Value.
PaintsRed and white lead
Whiting and Paris white
Litharge
Sugar of lead
Water colors, (iV. E.)
Paints not spe, ified, (N. E.)
Cordage —
Tarred and cal Ies
Untarred
T w i n e and sei es
Hemp, unujanufac ured
Manilla sun, and o her hemp of India .
J u t e , Sisal grass, coir, &c
Codilla, or tow of liemp or flax
Flax, unmanufact red
Rngs of all kinds.*
Salt
,
Coal
Coke, or culm
,
Breadstuffs—
Wheat
Barley
Oats
Rye, (N. E.)
W h e a t flour
Rye meal
,
Oat meal
Indian corn aiid corn meaf, (N. E . ) . . . . .
Potatoes
Meats, game, potJitry, and vegetables, prepartid in cans or otherwise, (N. E.)
Fish, dried, srnokid or pickled —
Dried or smolced
Salmon
" —
^
, Mackerel
,....
Herrings and shad
All other
Fish in oil—sardines and all other, (N. E . ) .
Extracts and decoctions of logwood & other
dyewoods not otherwise provided for,(N.E )
Extract of madder, (N. E.)
.'
Extract of indiyo, (N. E.)
Feathers and flowers, artificial and ornamental, ((V. E.)
Dolls and toys of all kinds
Machinery exclusively designed and expressly imported for the manufacture of
flax and linen goods.
Value of merchandise not enumerated
Do
do
Do
do
Do
do
Do
do
Do
do
Do.
;
do

$174,125
23,823
17,058
45,312

$34,825
4,764
3,411
9,062

79,122
53,050
53,821
' 57,676
1,945,044
205,889
11,271
1.32,461
1,239,168
1,991,065
604,187
2,535

Value.

Duty.

19,780
13,262
16,148
17,302
486,261
51,472
1,690
19,869
61,958
398,213
181,2.^8
760

$113,075
29,169
17,7-21
55,795

$22,615 00
• 5,833 80
.3,544 20
11,159 00

92,099
64,43.W
59,957
423,533
2, .353,891
334,3-28
92,520
220,738
1,448,195
2,032,583
772,663

23,024 75
16,108 25
17,987 10
127,059 90
588,472 75
83,582 00
13,878 00
33,110 70
72,406 25
406,516 60
231,798 90

509 20
410 80
107 60

909
3,068'
110

181 80
613 60
22 00

754 40

i86*66

477
2,070
559

95 40
414 00
111 80

*2i,*355*46

87,572

26,271 60

96,607
3,949
144
49,213
4, 63:i

19,3-21 40
789 80
28 80
9,842 60
926 60

2,546
2,054
538
3,772

•

* "966
71,218

Duty.

00
60
60
40

158,233
3,106
138
22,808
2,658

31,646
621
27
4,561
531

60
20
60
60
60

1,416,190
449,9.52
6,704
3,604,863
151,784
2,101,090
303,980

70,809
44,995
1,005
720,972
37,946
630,327
121,592

50
20
60
60
00
00
00

1,347,024
646,016
• 1,698
3,604,767
183,493
2,624,645
541,815

67,351 20
64,601 60
254 70
720,953 40
45,873 25
787,-393 50
216,726 00

257,684,226 65,341,510 40 ....-294,160,835 75,445,426 25

RECAPIT
1856.

1857.

Value.

Value.

$257,684,238
Paying duties
66,955,706
Free under act of 1846....
Free under act of 1 8 5 7 . . . .

$294,160,835
66,729,306

314,639,942

360,890,141

Total
T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T , Register's Office, November .30,1860.




39

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Continued.
1858.

1859.

2
rt
tf

Value.

15
15
15
15
24
15

$109,426
25,770
7, t39
12,642
29,012
227,508

$16,413
3,865
1,130
1,896
6,962
34,126

90
50
85
30
88
20

19
19
24
24
}19

73,6-27
96,632
73,989
331,307
2,298,709

13,989
18,360
17,757
79,513
436,754
8,474

13 19
08 19
36 24
68 •24
71 19
64 12

. Duly.

rt

1860.

Value.

i

Duty.

70,622
12
free
free
15 * " i " 124"926*
772,925
24
26,651
10,368
95
772
19,818
9
3,305
34,936
97,160

15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
24

i68,'738"66
18.5,502 00

15
15
15
15
24
15

'is'
24

65
20
25
80
70
35
75
20
40

15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
24

13,596 00

3,997
1,555
14
115
2,972
•
1
495
5,240
23,318

**'*i,*295*.534*
933,200

2;78i"
47.2 8
94;378

4,038
40,567
382

161 52
1,6-22 68
15 28

4
4
4

24
24

654,452
350,486

157,068 48
84,116 64

21
24

741,438
352,899

8
4
8
12
15
19
24
30

1,643
1,367,4-25
291,633
8,576
2,314,055
169,254
1,495,074
35,017

131
54,697
23,330
1,029
347,109
32,1,58
358,817
10,505

8
4
8
12
15
19
24
30

^

28,791
152,8(8
1,050

17,891
2,436,685
410,674
12.268
3,339,108
154,976
1,564,621
32,378

4
4
4

202,293,875

44
00
64
12
75
26
76
10

38,671,242 10

$25,530
4,482
1,1,35
3,393
6,130
68,921

75
60
95
45
56
40

22
01
44
52
05

19
19
24
24
19
12

98,386
.34,541
49,968
325,846
1,820,137

18,693
6.562
11;992
78,203
354,826
1,117

34
79
32
04
03
80

i94,*336*i6'

259,047,014

"is*

8,315

****i^43i^l46' •**."• 214,* 67i* 60

24

839,334

201,440 16

15
15
15
15
15
15
417* 5* 15
7,082 70 15
22,650 72 24

• 10,133
3,898
2,973
.
57
932

1,519
584
445
8
139

5,448
1,823
197
21
1,810

107,615
6,763
6,661
39,001
8,673
251,278

16,756
366
65
2,835
•781
• 82,241

$170,205
29,884
7,573
22,623
25,544
459,476

223,968 00

47,497

15
15
15
15
15
30

111,709
2,446
369
18,905
5,209
274,137

15
15
15
15
24
15

1,667 76

" '^.

36,324
12.159
1,318
140
12,097

.....

70
70
75
50
28
80

9,336
2,295
13,4-29
97,241
410,000

49,135
12,079
55,956
405,173
2,157,895
13,898

30

45,320

15
15
15
15
15
30

Duty..

$32,447
4,001
1,699
13,246
8,507
54,424

$216,318
26,678
10,665
88,310
35,417
362,833 I

35
90
35
75
35
10

30

Value.

tf

.Pi

60
85
70
00
50

14,249 10

3*40i
29,051
50,962

sio'is

4,3.57 65
12,230 88

,30

80,660

15
15
15
15
15
30

149,217
111
258
38,308
4,990
299,679

22,382
16
38
5,746
748
89,903

1,151 64
6,112 32
42 00

4
4
4

25,317
585,698
1,324

1,012 68
23,427 92
52 96

177,945 12
84,695 76

24
24

776,743
472,907

186,418 32
, 113,497 68

28
8
4
40
8
92
16 12
20 15
44 19
04 1 24
40 30

4,602
2,124,Sb4
445,253
10,825
3,21.5,398
135,452
1,786,999
59,911

16,142
1,014
999
5,8.50
1,300
75,383

1,431
97,467
32,853
1,472
500,866
29,445
375,509
9,713

25
45
15.
15
9.5.
40

48,809,879 21

279,872,327

24,198 00

363
84,982
35,620
1,299
482,309
25,735
428,879
17,973

1859.

1860.

Value.

Value.

Value.

$202,293,875
< 64,756,975
15,562,300

$2.59,047,014
63,502,865
16,218,251

$279,872,327
67,136,286
15,155,328

282,61.3,150

338,768,130

362,163,941




55
65
70
20
50
70

16
56
24
00
70
88
76
30

53,979,570 09

ULATION.
1858.

95
70
95
55
80

F. BIGGER, Register.

No. ^6.

o

Statement exhihiting the value ofi foreign merchandise imported into, and the value ofi fioreign merchandise and domestic
produce exported firom, the United States during the year ending on the 30th ofi June, 1869.
EXPORTS.

IMPORTS.

^

Countries.

Foreign merchandise.
Domestic produce.

Free.

Dutiable.

Total.

Free.

Dutiable.

Total
foreign
and domestic.

. Total.

Great Britain—England
Scotland
Ireland

$3,850,089
23,201
1,765

$114,065,880
7,056,704
756,782

$117,915,969
7,079,905
75.8,547

$1,931,668
14,168

,.$775,850
33,281
35,100

$2,707,518
47,449
35,100

$166,078,734
2,704,596
3,372,456

$168,786,252
2,752,045
3,407,556

Total Great Britain
France
British East Indies
Philippine Islands
Cuba
Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
Hayti
.
New Granada
."
Venezuela
Brazil,. „ . .
China
.„
All other countries

3,875,055
2,723,428
3,561,024
64,073
1,959,509
30,210
280,338
2,441,205
820,221
1,868,371
18,443,466
7,963,028
35,691,188

121,879.366
38,577,719
5,136,205
2,802,681
32.094,915
4,790,115
1,900,291
225,041
2,027,920
2,362,660
3,996,376
2,828,353
40,425,372

125,754,421
41,301,147
8,697,229
2,866,754
34,054,424
4,820,325
2,180,629
2,666,246
2,848,141
4,231,031
22,439,842
10,791,381
76,116,560

1,945,836
1,088,619
119,303
68,302
674,335
285,068
33,110
5,908
33,969
2,826
199,561
2,724,572
4,633,618

844,231
179.526
12,419

172,155,786
43,031,473
1,231,893

376,599
50,808
19,451
223,201
144,801
73,402
128,411
169,611
6,857,590

2,790,067
1,268,145
131,722
68,302
3,050,934
335;876
52,561
229,109
178,770
76,228
• -327,972
2,894,183
11,491,208

11,217,268
1,699.326
523,210
2,255,655
1,384,194
1,644,271
5,929,004
4,233,016
90,589,289

174,945,853
44,299,618
1,363,615
68 302
12,268,202
2,035 202
575,771
2,484,764
1,562,964
1,720,499
6,256,976
7,127,199
102,080,497

79,721,116

259,047,014

338,768,130

11,815,027

9,080,050

20,895,077

335,894,385

356,789,462

Total



- . .:

..

o
H
O
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tatement exhibitin the value ofi fioreign merchandise imported into, and the value ofi fioreign merchandise and domestic
produce exported firom, the United States during the year ending June 30, 1860.

Foreign merchandise.

Countries.

Domestic produce.
Free.

Dutiable.

Total.

Free.

Dutiable.

Total.

Great Britain—England
Scotland
Ireland-

$2,621,780
45,664
9,171

$130,442,933
4,661,523
914,555

$133,064,71.^
4,607,187
923,726

$3,906,368
5,176
12,490

S,l, 924,880
132,030
99,221

$5,831,248
137,206
111,711

Total Great Britain.
France
«....,
British East Indies
Philippine Islands „
Cuba
_
Porto Kico._
Two Sicilies.-.Hayti
New Granada
Yenezuela»-.--- . .
Brazil
China
All other countries
„

2,676,615
1,526,875
4,147,109
90,427
1,966,403
47,438
193,497
_-L,-9-68-,-0671,589,763
1,398,336
17,127,121
9,867,946
39,692,017

135,919.011
41,691,219
6,545,233
2,795,739
32,065,874
4,464,750
2,191,080
—:
94r65-62,253,805
1,485,128
4,087,682
3,698,641
42,579,509

138,595,626
43,218,094
10,692,342
2,886,166
34,032,277
4,512,188
2,384,577
—270'62772"3
3,843,568
2,883,464
21,214,803
13,566,587
82,271,526

82,291,614

279,872,327

362,163,941

Total foreign
and domestic.

Total

3,924,034
2,561,165
91,051
70.552
272,334
242,875
25,_314_
12,281
14,877
50,888
223,650
1,581,155
5,879,653
14,949,829

6,080,165
3,158,047
128,953
73,265
634,956
263,913
21,038
^^6y-458l,_L4-4231,777
219,496152,699
137,822
91,650
40,762
335,020
. 111,370
1,735,334
154,179
8,141,132 14,020,785
2,156,131
596,882
37,902
2,713
362,622

11,983,193

26,933,022

B187,095,952
4,867,218
4,297,586

$192,927,200
5,004,424
4,409,297

196,260,756
58,048,231
1,111,697
368,209
11,747,913
1,517,837
-48471902,441,905
1,642,800
1,056,250
5,945,235
7,170,784
85,393,467

202,340,921
61,206,278
1,240,650
441,474
12,382,869
1,781,750
^5X0, 648
2,673,682
1,795,499
1,147,900
6,280,255
8,906,118
99,414,252

373,189,274

O
H
®

400,122,296

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F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 30, 1860.




^^.

No. 7.

1:0

Statement shoiving the imports and exports ofi specie and hullion, the imports entered fior consumption, and specie and
hullion, the domestic exports and specie and bullion, the excess of specie and bullion exports over specie and bullion imports, and the excess ofi specie and bullion imports over specie and bullion exports.
Imports of specie Iraports for con- Exports of specie Domestic exports
and bullion.
and bullion.
and specie and
sumption, and
bullion exports.
specie and bullion imports.

Excess of specie
and bullion exports over specie
and bullion imports

1848
1849'..
1850
1851
1852
1853
_.
1854
1855
1856
1857.
1858
1859..,..„-.
1860

$6,360,224
6,651,240
4,628,792
5,453,592
5,505,044
4,201,382
6,958,184
3,659,812
4,207,632
12,461,799
19,274,496
7,434,789
8,550,135

$147,012,126
139,216,408
168,660,625
205,929,811
200,577,739
255,272,740
282,914,077
235,310,152
299,858,570
345,973,724
261,952,909
324,258,421
335,230,919

$15,841,616
5,4
7,522,99429,472,252
42,674,135
27,486,875
41,436,456
56,247,343
45,745,485
69,136,922
52,633,147
63,887,411
66,546,239

$154,032,131
145,755,820
151,898,720
218,387,511
209,658,366
230,976,157
278,241,064
275,156,846
-326,964,908
362,960,682
324,644,421
342,279,491
382,788,662

95,347,121

3,202,168,221

524,035,523

3,403,744,779

429,934,994

o

$9,481,392

I'otal

Excess of specie
and bullion imports OA^er specie
and bullion exports.

$1,246,592
2, 894, 202
24, 018, 660
37, 169, 091
23, 285, 493
34, 478, 272
52, 587, 531
41, 537, 853
66, 675, 123
33, 358, 651
66, 452, 622
57, 996, 104

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1,246,592

:^. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novernher 28., 1860.




izj
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No. 8.
Statement exhibiting the values ofi articles ofi fioreign ptroduction imported into the United States firom, and the exports ofi
fioreign merchandise and domestic j^roduce to, certain countries during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859.
IMPORTS.

Free of duty.

Paying duty.

Countries.
Coffee.

British East Indies
Thilinnine Islands
Cuba
Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
...
Hayti
Brazil
China . . .
Total




-. . . . . . ...
- _..-....
-...
--.

.

......

$271,662
22,148
13,077
25,552

Tea.

$24,873

Linseed, not embracing flaxseed.
$2,388,786

730
2,120,627
115,292
1,727,523 .
18,352,654
759

7,227,960

22,649,294"

7,252,833

2,389,516

Fruits.

Indigo.

$292,687
41,045
9,297
3, 146

$1,982
124,950
8,094
829,355
1,191
549
226
1,215
10,788
978,350

Jute, Sisal grass,
coir, &c.

$1,859,539

"'93^277""
66,890.

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"
$16,483
123
128,915

124
'"

Nuts.

•

12

18
25
1,865

13,657
1,840
44 354
1, 131

506,354

1,861,571

206,503

o
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No. 8.—STATEMENT—Continued.
IMPORTS.

Paying duty.
Countries.
Molasses.

British East Indias.
Philippine Islands
.
Cuba
Porto Rico
.....
Two Sicilies.
.
Hayti
New Granada
Venezuela
Brazil
..
China
Total




Raw hides.

Saltpetre.

$761,861
$30,253
36,193
36,376

$3,961,503
791,255
4,430
_

.
..„.

83,044
663,893
2,048.796
1,568,953

4,357,508

$148,,074
627,425
23,119,474
3,865,891
288 •
41
32,737
1,367.218
602,849

o

53
4,757,241

Sugar..

761,861

29,663,997

Spices.

$294,927
14,593
1,905
104

Coffee.

Tea.

$18

$58,001

6,981
1,334

744

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303
6,483
44
378
156,906
468,159

16,966

I

2,150
68,745

Ul

No. 8.—STATEMENT—Continued.

Paying duty.
Countries.
Tobacco,
cigars, &c.

Foreign exports.

All other articles imported.

Total imports.

$8,697,229
2,866,754
34,054,424
4,820,325
2,180,629
2,666,246
2,848,141
4,231,031
22,439,842
10,791,381

$131,722
68,302
1,050,934
335,876
52,561
229,109
178,770
76,228
327,972
2,894,183

$1,231,893
11,217,268
1,699,326
523,210
2,255,655
1,384,194
1,644.271
6,929,004
4,233,016

$1,363,615
68,302
12,268,202
2,035,202
575,771
2,484,764
1,562,964
1,720,499
6,256,976
7,127,199

95,696,002

5,345,657

30,117,837

35,463,494

Domestic
exports.

Total exports,
including sj;^O

British East Indies .
Philippine Islands Cuba
Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
Hayti
New Granada.
Venezuela
Brazil __
China

$3,298
93,480
4,415,424
6,453
2,046
664,218
4,784
211
35,041

$4,461,060
278,271
2,348,393
81,997
1,221,629
454,193
1,400,731
348,173
1,104,834
2,752,868

Total-

6,224,955

14,442,149

H
O
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O




CQ

Statement exhibiting the values qf articles ofi fioreign production imported into the Uniied States firom, and the exports ofi
fioreign merchandise and domestic produce to, certain countries during thefisccd year ending June 30, 1860.

^

IMPORTS-. '

/

Paying duty.

Free of duty.
Countries.
Coffee.

British East Indies
..
Philippine Islands
.
Cuba
Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
Hayti
New Granada _
...
Venezuela
...
Brazil
China
Total




$245,654
49,134
11,491
44,958

Linseed, not embracing flaxseed.

Teas.

$400
11

$2,753,194

91

8,799,141
8,799,643

2,753,194

Indigo.

Jute,Sisal grass,
coir, &c.

Nuts.
O

$73
126,685
12,09'5
961,562
25
52
149
388
7,022

12,890
206,387
1,291.339
16,984,136
18,845,988

Fruits.

1,108,061

$621,449
167,092
4,896

$138,157
1,631,984
43

253
120
181,754
9,0.65
135
984,644

32
10,435
1,780,771„

§
$12,146
170,978
747
16,555
16
35,386
934

^S

236,761

t=3

O
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STATEMENT—Continued.
IMPORTS..

Paying duty.
Countries.
Molasses.

Raw hides.

Sail tpe tre.

Sugar.

Spices.

Coffee.

$126,810
781,676
23,279,100
3,656,841

$569,353
12,748
2,377
81

$30,301

113
921
28,621
1.104,205
630,930

396
16
246.830

4,843

679

29,609,217

831,801

37,0-90

103,435

Tea.

o
British East Indies
Phil ippine Isl ands.
Cuba
Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
Hayti
New Granada .
Venezuela
Brazil
China
.
Total...




.'^-.
$4,063,021
767,932
13
.-

„
18
.
4,830,984

$1,288,482
44,318
615
8,354
289
22,690
597,136
1,218,508
1,066,689
3,677

$999,897

4,250,753

999,897

$102,736
20

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-5

STATEMENT—Continued.

oo

IMPORTS.
EXPORTS.

Paying duty,
Countries.
Tobacco,
cigars, &c.

All other articles imported.

Total imports.

Foreign exports.

Domestic
exports.

Total exports,
including specie.

o
British East Indies
Philippine Islands
Cuba
Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
Hay ti
New Granada
Venezuela . .
Brazil
China
.
Total

. .i..-.
.-,.-,
._
..

-

286
612,533
1,698
79
49,260

$2,666,897
57,871
456,157
18,173
1,057,998
70,266
842,892
227,071
1,880,886
2,743 906

$6,545,233
2,795,739
32,065,874
4,464,760
2, 191-, 080
94,656
2,253,805
1,485,128
4,087,682
3,698,641

$128,963
73,266
634,956
263,913
26,458
231,777
152,699
91,650
3,35,020
1,735,334

. $1,111,697
368,209
11,747,913
1,517,837
484,190
2,441,906
1,642,800
1,056,250
6,945,235
7,170,784

$1,240,650
441,474
12,382,869
1,781,750
510,648
2,673,682
. 1,795,499
1,147,900
6,280,255
8,906,118

4,887,062

10,022,117

59,682,588

3,674,025

33,486,820

37,160,845

$1,078
100,030
4,120,834
1,274

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 30, 1860.




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02

REPORT ON THE FINANCES^

49

No. 9.
MINT OF THE UNITED STATES,

Philadelphia, Novemher 3, 1860.
SIR : I have the honor to present the following report of the operations of the mint of the United States and its branches for the year
ending June 30, 1860.
The amount of gold and silver received during the year, that is to
say, from the 1st of July, 1859, to the 30th of Jiine, 1860, inclusive,
was as follows: Gold deposits, $22,673,192 2 1 ; silver deposits and
purchases^ $3,152,437 15; total gold and silver bullion received,
$25,825,629 36. The coinage operations during^ the same period
were as follows: Gold coins issued, $16,445,476; fine gold bars,
$7,00i;807 35 ; silver coins, $2,769,920; silver issued in bars,
$480,716 2 6 ; cent coins, $342,000. Total coinage operations,
$27,039,919 61, comprised in 43,885,721 pieces of all denominations
of coins.
The operations during the year were distributed as follows : At the
mint in Philadelphia the deposits of gold amounted to $4,266,018 93;
the gold coinage,including$ 170,275^34 in fine bars, was$4,354,576 84.
Silver bullion received, $756,505 41 ; silver coins struck, $835,420;
silver bars made and issued, $21^656 30; cents coined, $342,000.
Total deposits of gold and silver, $5,022,524 34. Total coinage,
$5,553,653 14, comprised in 38,099,348 separate pieces or denominations of coins.
At the branch mint at New Orleans the amount of deposits of gdld
was $153,731 71, and of silver, $1,381,113 40. The coinage amounted
to $169,000 in gold, and $1,598,422 33 in silver coins, including
$25,422 33 in bars.' Total deposits of gold and silver, $1,534,845 11.
Total coinage, $1,767,422 33, comprised in 4,322,550 pieces.
The branch mint at San Francisco received during the year gold
deposits to the value of $11^319,913 83, and depositsof silver ofthe
value of $480jl39 75. The coinage amounted to $11,889,000 in gold,
and $572,911 52 in silver, including $211,411 52 in bars. Total
deposits at this branch of the mint ofgold and silver, $11,800,053 58,
and total coinage, $12^,461,911 52, composed of 1,417,475 separate
pieces or denominations of coins.
At the branch mint at Dahlonega the sum of $67,085 21 in gold
was deposited'for coinage. The amount of coinage was $69,477, comprised in 15,87:4 pieces.
The deposits and coinage at the branch mint at Charlotte were as
follows: gold deposits, $134,491 17; gold coinage, $133,697 50, com-,
prised in 30,474 pieces.
The assay office at New York received during the year gold deposits
to the amount of $6,731,951 36, and silver bullion to the value of
$534,678 59. • The same establishment melted and refined, and made
into fine bars, gold bullion of the value of $6,831,532 01; and silver
bars of the value of $222,226 11. Total deposits of gold and silver,
$7j266,629 95. Total amount of fine bars of gold and silver made
during the yiear, $7,053,758 12.
4



50

'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The amount of gold produced from the mines in the United States
deposited during the year was $18,971,041 75; and of silver the
sum of $293,797 05. The sources from whence these supplies of the
precious metals have been obtained for the last year, as well as previous years, are stated in the statistical tables attached to this report.
Within the last year some new mines of silver have been brought
to our notice/ the most important of which are those situated in the
Washoe region in the Territory of Utah, about three hundred and
thirty miles northeast from San Francisco. At the branch mint in
that city upwards of $80,000 were received from those mines.during
the last fiscal, and they promise a considerable and increasing supply
of silver for that institution and the other mints. I t has, however,
given some troubl^e when used as an agent or assistant for parting
silver from native gold, on account of the presence of antimony; a
very small portion of which induces brittleness in the gold. A similar
annoyance has, we are infbrmed, occurred in the British mint, in its
operations upon Australian gold.
The gold mines in Kansas have produced during the year the sum
of $622,000, and there are indications that the supply of gold bullion
from thence will hereafter be increased. This enlargement in the
production of gold from Kansas is interesting from the fact that the
supply from the mines of California to the mints have been for years
past declining. In 1853 the mints received deposits of California
gold to the value of nearly fifty-six millions of dollars; during the
last year the amount was somewhat below twenty millions.
In the gold producing regions of Kansas, namely, at Denver, a
private minting establishment has been set in operation by Messrs.
Clark, Graham & Co., from which pieces of ten and five dollars are
issued. They are of various grades of fineness; our assays show them
to be from 815 to 838 thousandths, and the pieces are evidently made
direct from native gold with its silver alloy, without any attempt to fix
or maintain any exact standard. The weight is greater than in corresponding pieces of the national coinage, in order to make up fpr the
deficiency of fineness. The ten dollar pieces vary from 273 to 283^
grains. On the average, and adding the value of the silver alloy,
and deducting the mint charges, the pieces are found to be of professed value, or slightly over. The devices on the ten dollar piece
are appropriate and distinctive; but on the five dollar piece they are
made in close imitation to the legaUcoin, a reprehensible and illegal
practice, countenanced by previous similar emissions in California.
Within the last year fraudulent practices upon our gold coins have
greatly increased. The mint is giving the most earnest attention to
devising the best remedies against these practices; and the same subject is undergoing a careful investigation by scientific men not connected with the mint, under an appropriation made by Congress.
The new cents have heretofore been issued in exchange for the
fractions of the Spanish and Mexican dollar, and for the old copper
cents. As the Spanish and Mexican pieces were received at their
nominal values, large amounts of these coins have been brought to
the melting pot, and thus the community has been relieved from an:
irregular and depreciated currency. But it has required the issue of



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

51

a large amount of cents, and induced a temporary redundancy of
that coin in some of the eastern cities. They are gradually, however.
being distributed tc all parts of our country, including a portion of
the southern States. where the copper cent was scarcely known as a
circulating medium, Since the passage of the act of June 25, 1860,'
the issues have been[.limited to exchanges for the copper/Cents, except
the supplying of the government offices with the new issues, and
distant parts of the country in limited amounts. In order to accelerate the process of relieving the community from the cumbrous
a t d inconvenient copper cents, the mint now pays the expenses of
transportation on tnera, and will make returns in the new issues.
This arrangement wi 11 tend to relieve the country from a burdensome
currency without increasing the amount of circulation of that denomination of coins.
The third section of the act of Congress approved February 21,
1857, makes it '^ the duty of the director, of the mint to cause assays
to be made from time to time of such foreign coins as may be known
to our commerce, to determine their average weight, fineness, and
value; and embrace in his annual report a statement of the results
thereof.'' In previous reports I have presented the results of the
assays which have been made of such foreign gold and silver coins as
ame within our notice, or could be procured for examination and
assay. Since the last annual report several varieties of coins, not
heretofore noticed, hsve been assayed. The result of these assays,
ogether with those Dreviously made, will be found in the tabular
statements of the weight, fineness, and values of foreign gold and
silver coins, which are attached to this report. Some remarks in
reference to the coins not heretofore reported upon, may, however, be
properly presented.
The coinage of Tuais has recently emerged from barbarism and
assumed a civilized as3ect. As late as 1839 there were no gold coins
issued, and the professedly silver coins were nearly three-fourths copper. The new gold p.ece of twenty-five piastres, dated A, H. 1276—
corresponding to A. D. 18,59—weighs .161 ounce, or 77.3 grains, is
900 thousandths fine', and consequently v^fy. nearly of the value of
three dollars; after deducting mint charges for re-coinage, $2 98.5.
The silver coin of five piastres, A. H. 1268, (1851) weighs .511 ounce,
or 245.3 grains, is 898^ thousandths fine, (intended for 900,) and
therefore worth 61.8 cents. These results make the gold piastre twelve
cents, and the silver piastre nearly twelve cents and four-tenths of a
cent for exchange calculations.
The eighty real gold piece of Spain, 1845, not received here until
recently, will be found in the tabular statements above referred to;
It has been superseded by the new series of Spanish coinage, but is
still current.
The half and quarter of the silver 2^000 reis piece of Brazil have
not hitherto been assayed at the mint
They prove to be of the same
standards of the principal piece, and are proportional in value.
A new silver dollar has been issued in Bolivia^ greatly reduced in
weight and value as compared with the former issue. A number of
the pieces of the date 1859 average .648 ounce, or 311 grains; and



52

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

being 992 thousandths fine^ are worth 78.6 cents. They are closely
adjusted to the depreciation of the half dollar^ which has been issued
by that government for a number of years past.
The envoys from the empire of Japan who were accredited to the
.government of the United States visited the mint on the 13th and
14th of June last. In compliance with their wishes and your instructions, I caused, several assays to be made in their presence ofthe coins
of Japan and of our own issues, conforming to their request to have
an entire cobang assayed, instead of a small piece as is our usual
method. The annexed tables will show the result of these assays.
The valuation there given ofthe cobang includes the silver contained
as alloy. Although the new cobang does not quite come up to $3 60,
it was conceded to the embassy to make that valuation the basis of
-commercial rates. ' This makes the itzetu (the unit of Japan) 90
cents, which is a convenient figure and sufficiently exact. In order to
present this subject more fully I have deemed it proper to annex to this
report a copy of the certified statement, which was furnished to the
envoys, of the result of the assays made in their presence, and also a
.copy of my communication to them, through the department, under
date of the 20th of June last. Subsequently to these transactions we
ihave obtained, and placed in the cabinet ofthe mint, a Japanese, otan;
it weighs 5.30 ounces; is 667 thousandths fine, and of the value of
$75 24, including the silver alloy. This piece does not appear to
have any definite relation to the cobang, or to the itzetu. It is probably used as a commercial bar. I t is, however, properly ranked
among the coins, and is certainly the largest one which has come under
our notice. It is of an oval shape, the larger diameter being six
inches and one-eight of an,inch, the smaller three inches and threefourths of an inch.
Since the close of the fiscal year there has been a Tecoinage by the
order ofthe department of a portion of the thick gold dollars which
had accumulated in the treasury of the United States. As there is
some misapprehension on this subject in the public mind, a few re,marks respecting it may not be inappropriate at this time. The first
issues of the gold dollar, the coinage of which was commenced in
1849, were less in diameter than those issued since 1853, the latter
tbeing larger than the former to the extent of the one-tenth of an inch.
This enlargement of the coin is a decided improvement, especially as
i t is more conveniently handled. But there is certainly an inconvenience in having two pieces in circulation of the same value but of
difi'erent sizes and devices. In view of this inconvenience, and ofthe
fact that a large amount of these gold dollars had accumulated at the
assistant treasury in New York, and could not be used, the depart.ment directed the recoinage referred to. There are yet in circulation
upwards of fifteen millions of gold dollars, of which $9,590,000 are
ot the thick, or first issues, and $5,440,000 are of the enlarged
diameter.
^
It is to be regretted that the system of banking adopted in most of
,the States tends to exclude small gold coins from circulation, . It is
certainly the true policy of the country to extend the uses of gold,
iind drive out of existence that which circulates in the place of it.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

53

On this subject I beg to renew some suggestions which I presented
in the mint report for the year 1855. There is one poirit connected
with this subject and with the general management of the national
coinage which, although left by law to the discretion of the director
of the mint, in subordination to the Secretary of the Treasury^ and
cannot be made the subject of particular legislation, yet it is of so
much importance to the community generally that this occasion seems
appropriate to give it a fair and generaV understanding. The thirtieth section ofthe general mint law—act of January 18, 1837—provides that '^ in the denominations of coin delivered, the treasurer
shall comply with the wishes of the depositor, unless when impracticable or inconvenient to do so ; in which case the denomination of
coin shall be designated by the director.'' In view of the fact that
depositors are always paid before their bullion is operated upon, out
of a stock of coins previously made ready, it is evident that in the preparation of such a supply of coins the director is to use his discretion
in regard to the denomination before conferring with depositors,
and they' may or may not be exactly suited in the paynient. Undoubtedly, in the issue of coins every proper attention should be given
to the probable demand, and especially in the silver coinage, which
it is to be presumed is wanted for immediate use, and not for storage
in vaults. Heretofore the general practice has been to pay depositors
in the coin they have desired, and it is not intended by these observations to give notice that this usage will be entirely abandoned. But
the chief design of a national mint is to subserve the interests of the
people at large preferably to a few large owners of bullion or coin.
The interests of the public and of depositors are not always concurrent
in the matter under discussion. Depositors of large amounts call for
coin in a form which gives the least trouble to count, and banking
institutions, in addition to that, may prefer it in a form not likely to
be drawn out. Many who present their checks at these institutions
would, doubtless, ask fbr specie, but are deterred from doing so by the
expectation of receiving double eagles instead of half or quarter eagles.
In a word, the plain efi'ect of issuing gold coin of a large size is to
keep down the circulation of specie and increase the use of paper
inoney. This remark, of course, does not apply to such localities
where paper money is prohibited, as, for example, in the State of
California, because in such cases the different currencies cannot come
in conflict. Before the act of Congress authorizing the issuing of gold
in stamped bars there was, it is true, a necessity for the issue of
large coins, as well to meet the demands for shipment to Europe as,
in some measure, to relieve the pressure upon the mint. There was
no kind of propriety in going through the manipulations and bearing
the expenses of making sniall gold coins to be directly melted down
in foreign mints or refineries. But since the important change in our
mint laws, before referred to, a distinction has been made to meet
the demands of trade, by which gold intended for exportation is cast
into fine bars, whilst that which is needed for home currency is converted into coin. If we look to the. example of the wealthiest and
most civilized nations of the globe we shall find that their largest
gold coin, to speak in a general way, does not exceed our half-eagle



54

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

in value. Such is the case in Great Britain, France, Russia, the
Netherlands, and other countries. There are pieces of ten thalers—
about eight dollars of our money—coined in Germany, but apparently
for international use. The same may be said ofthe N'orth and South
American doubloon, ofwhich the amount coined is small. Itwould
no longer be an embarrassment to the principal mint, nor to the
branches, excej)t perhaps the branch at San Francisco, (and to that
institution these views are not intended particularly to apply,) to coin
all the gold that is likely to be off'ered in pieces of five dollars and
less. It is true that nearly as much labor is expended in the manufacture of a gold dollar or a quarter eagle as of an eagle or double
eagle, and in thus offering to make the smaller demominations a large
increase of work is assumed ; but this consideration is met by another
—that the division of labor and the present efficiency of the mint
establishments will enable us to meet such increase without additional
expenditures. The manufacture of fine bars at the assay office in
New Yorkj and the coinage at the branch mint at San Francisco, have
so divided the work upon gold bullion as to remove all apprehension
of difficulty or delay. It is not by any raeans assumed that the coinage of the eagle and the double eagle should be discontinued. On
the contrary, they'will be indispensable at San Francisco ; they may
in some emergencies be required to be coined at Philadelphia and at
New Orleans ; but as a general rule, adapted to the principal mint
and to the branches in the Atlantic States, it is believed that the
time has come to return to the smaller denominations of gold coin,
issuing almost the whole in pieces not larger than the half-eagle ; and
this upon the ground already adverted to—particularly applicable to
a country so favored with the original production of the precious
metal—that the people at large are entitled to a greater portion of
real, imperishable money, and that a cardinal point, at which this
refoivm is to be begun or aided, is the place where the gold is putinto
shape and size for circulation. As our larger gold coins are the most
exposed to the fraudulent practice of splitting and inserting other
metals, a contrivance which has recently increased in our country,
the suggestions herein made acquire additional importance. I t may
also be found useful, as a further means to prevent such nefarious
practices, to increase the diameter and reduce the thickness of several
of the denominations of our coins, as has been done in that of the gold
dollar and three-dollar piece.
The tabular statements attached to this report are as follows: A,
the deposits and coinage at the mint and its branches and the assay
office, during the year ending June 30, 1860 ; B, statement of the
amount of gold and silver of domestic production deposited at the
institutions above named, during the same period; C, the coinage
operations of all the minting establishments of the United States frpm
their respective organizations to the 30th of June, 1860, numbered
from one to seven inclusive ; D, the entire deposits of domestic gold
at these institutions for the same period, numbered from oneto seven,
inclusive ; E, statement of the production of domestic silver from the
1st of J&nuary, 1841, to the close of the last fiscal year ; F , the amount
of silver of less denomination than one dollar, coined since the passage



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

55

of the act of February 21, 1853, reducing the weight of such coins ;
G, .the amount and denominations of fractions of the Spanish and
Mexican dollar deposited at the mint at Philadelphia, fbr the new
cent; H, a statement of the amount of fractions of the Spanish and
Mexican dollar purchased fbr silver coinage, sin'ce the passage of the
act of February 21, 1857, entitled ^^ An act relating to foreign coins,
and to the coinage of cents at the mint of the United States ; " I, the
amount of cents of fbrmer issue deposited at the mint at Philadelphia
for the new cent; J , a statement of the weight, fineness, and value of
foreign gold coins; K, a similar statement of the weighty fineness,
and value of foreign silver coins.
I have the honor to be, with great respect, your faithful servant,
JAMES KOSS SNOWDEN,
Director of the Mint.
Hon. HOWELL COBB, Secretary ofthe Treasury,
Washington City.




A.
Statement ofi deposits and coinage at the Mint ofthe United States and its branches during thefiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
DEPOSITS.
Description.

•

MintofU. States, Branch mint,
Nevv Orleans.
Philadelphia.

Branch mint,
San Francisco.

Branch mint,
Dahlonega.

Branch mint,
Charlotte.

Assay office,
New York.

Total.

GOLD.

Foreign coin
Foreign bullion
United States coin, ( 0 . S.) . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States bullion

,

$7,352
53,599
4,207
4,200,859

^24,855 83
39,308 96

50
31
50
62

$67,085 21

$134,491 17

153,731 71 . 11,319,913^83

4,266,018 93

Totalgold...-

$11,319,913 83

67,085 21

134,491 17

89,566 92

33
27
50
11

w
o
w

6,731,951 36

22,673,192 21

O

2,858,640 10
293,797 05

$114,405
301,404
4,338
6,311,804

00
00
00
36

.

$146,613
394,312
8.545
22,123;721

«

SILVER.

United States bullion

,

Total silver

1,380.412 0 8 .
701 32

756,505 41

336,030 86
144,108 t 9

409,299 99
125,278 60

1,381,113 40

7:^,897 17
23,608 24

480,139 75

534,678 59

Total gold and silver

5,022,524 34

1,534,845 11

11,800,053 58

67,085 21

134,491 17

7,266,629 95

Less redeposits at the different institutions: gold, (United States
bullion,) ^3,152,679 36 ; silver, $398,373 30
Total deposits




3,152,437 15

-

-

O

25,825,629 36

Ul

3,551,059 66

-

22,274,576-70

COINAGE.
•

Mint o f t h e United States,
. Philadelphia.

Branch mint, Nevv
Orleans.

Branch mint,
. Dahlonega.

Branch mint, S a n
Francisco.

Branch mint,
Charlotte.

Assay office, N e w
York.

Total.

Denomination.
Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Pieces.

Value.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

GOLD.

188.615 $3,772,300 00
160,130 00
16;013
98,620 00
19,724
13,402
40,206 00
13,721
34,302 50
78,743
78,743 00
170,275 34

T)niililp p f i p l p s i . . .

Eagles
Half eaerles
...
T h r p e dollara
Quarter eagles
Dollars

4,350
8,200

$87,000 00
82,000 00

579,975 $11,599,500
10,000
100,000
16,700
83,500
7,000
21,000
28,800
72,000
13,000
13,000

00
00
00
00
00
00

12,800 $64,000
1,602
1,472

4,005
1,472

15,874

69,477

23,005 115,025 00
7,469 18,672 50
$6,831,532 01

772,940 $15,458,800
34,213
342 130
72,229
361,145
20,402
61,206
51,592
128 980
93,215
93,215
7,001,807

00
00
00
00
00
00
35

o

fTnnarfPfl h a r ^

330,218

Total gold

4,354,576 84

12,550

169,000 00

655,475 11,889,000 00

.

30,474 133,697 SO

6,831,532 01 1,044,591 23,447,283 35

SILVER.

Dollars
Half dollars
Quarter dollars
Three-cent pieces
Bars

315,530
349,800
909,800
~ .576,000
870,000
548,000

' T n t n l Bilvpr

3,569,130

280,000 280,000 00
00
00 2,212,000 1,106,000 00
388,000
97,000 00
00
370,000
37,000 00
00
00 1,060,000
53,000 00
00
30
25,422 33

5,000
693,000
24,000
. 40,000

857,076 30 4,310,000 1,598,422 33

762,000

315,530
174,900
227,450
57,600
43,500
16,440
21,656

. .

Total copper

34,200,000

600,5.30
3,254,800
1,321,800
986,000
1,930,000
548,000

222,226 11

600, .530
1,627,400
330,450
98,600
96,500
16,440
480,716

i

00
00
00
00
00
00
26

. 222,226 11 8,641,130

3,250,636 26

O

34,200,000

342,000 00

Ul

34,200,000

572,911 52

342 000 O
U

,

342,000 00

34,200,000

00
00
00
00

211,411 52

COPPER.

Cents . . . .
•Half centa

5,000
346,-500
6,000
4,000

342,000 00

" °

RECAPITDLATION.

Total eold
Tftfnl c i l u p r

T o t a l coinage . . .

655,475 11,889,000 00
572,911 52
762,000

330,218
3,569,130
34,200,000

12,550 169,000 00
4,354,576 84
857,076 30 4,310,000 1,598,422 33
342,000 00

38,099,348

5,553,653 14 4,322,550 1,767,422 33 1,417,475 12,461,911 52




*

15,874

69,477

30,474 133,697 50

6,831,532 01 1,044,591 23,447,283 35
222,.226 11 8,641,130 3,250,636 26
342,000 00
34,200,000

15,874

69,477

30,474 133,697 50

7,053,758 12 43,885,721 27,039,919 61

Ol

B.—Statement ofi the amount of gold and silver of domestic production deposited at the mint of the United States and its
branches during the fiscal year ending June ^0, l^^O.
From whence derived.

MintU. States,
Philadelphia.

Branch mint,
San Francisco.

^Branch mint.
New Orleans.

Branch mint,
Dahlonega.

$87,135 00
1,770 39

$1,097 37
24,908 86

Branch mint,
. Charlotte.

Assay office.
New York.

g

Total.

GOLD.

California
Kansas
.......-.._......
Virginia
Georgia _.
.......
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
1
Oregon
..
Alabania .
.._._.
...
Utah
Arizona . . „ . . ,
Nebraska
Total

$663,389
346,604
17,402
7,556
8,450

02
05
62
41
11

$11,319,913 83

35,588 92
3,485 70
2,004 36

36 $18,095,163 68
622 264 30
00
21 604 62
00
62,513 33
00
156.181 98
00
2,004 36
595 88
2,780 16
661 53
4,680 00
4,680 00
1,190 00
1,190 00
^ lj402 01

$6,023,628
248,981
4,202
19,368
9,755
$134,491 17

595 88
2,780 16
661 53
•

1,402 01
1,048,180 26

11,319,913 83

89,566 92

67,085 21

134,491 17

6,311,804 36

O
H
O
W

18 971 041 75
O

SILVER.

California, (parted)
Utah, (Washoe)
Lake Superior
Arizona - . - . • . . . - - . - . . , . . ,
North Carolina
Sonora
Total
Total gold and silver



Ul

63.226 12
80,882 77

23,608 24

144,108 89

701 32

1,071,788 60

11,464,022 72

90,268 24

62,432
21,658
15,674
13,357
12,257

701 32

12,201 Q
Q
10,206 58
..

60
00
00
00
00

1,200 00

138,561
102, 540
25,880
13,357
12,257
1,200

70
77
58
00
00
00

125,378 60
67,085 21

134; 491 17

293,797 05

6,437,182 96

19,264,838 80

Coinage of the mint and hranches f^om their organization to the close of thefiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
1. MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA.
GOLD COINAGE.

Period.
Double eagles.

Total .




Half eagles.

1,170,261
2,087,155
2,053,026
1,261,326
757,899
364,666
329,878
98,315
468.504
98,196
188,615

1,227,759
145,484
653,618
291,451
176,328
263,106
201,253
54,250
121,701
60,490
2,916
13,690
8,600
16,013

Pieces.
845, 909
3,087, 925
3,269, 921
260, 775
133, 070
64, 491
377, 505
573, 901
305, 770
160, 675
117, 098
197, 990
69, 115
32, 633
20, 718
19, 724

8,877,841

3,369,251

9,537,220

Pieces.
1793 to 18171818 to 18371838 to .18471848
1849
18501851
1852
1853
18541855
1856-.1857
1858
1859
1860

Eagles.
Pieces.
132,592

Three dollars

Quarter eagles,

Dollars.

Fine bars.

Pieces.

Value.

138,618
50,55526,010
7,832
13,059
11,524
13,402

Pieces.
22,197
879,903
345,526
8,886
23,294
252,923
1,372,748
1,159,681
1,404,668
696,258
235,480
384,240
106,722
113,097
76,562
13,721

688,576
481,953
3,317,671
2,045,351
4,076,051
1,639,445
758,269
1,762,936
578,356
208,724
231,873
78,743.

261^000

6,995,906

15,867,939

Pieces.

O
H
O

w
hH

$15,835,997
17,643.270
16,298
80,412
36,161
21,088
49,286
170,275

94
58
14
12
68
10
59
34

>
o
Ul

33,852,790 49

CD

COINAGE OF THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Contmued.

o

1. MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA—Continued.
SILVER COINAGE.

Period
Dollars.
Pieces.

Quarter dollars.

Pieces.

Pieces.

Dimes.
Pieces.

Half dimes.
Pieces. '

73,600
316,530

1793 to 1817
1818 to 1837
1838 to 1847
1848
18491860
1851
1852 1853 . - - - 1854
1865 -- 1856
1857
1858
1869
1860
Total

Half dollars.

.

-




13,104,433
74,793,560
20,203,333
580.000
1,262,000
227,000
200,750
77,130
3,532,708
2,982,000
759,500
938,000
142,000
4,028,000
2,636,000
349,800

650,280
6,041,749
4,952,073
146,000
340,000
190,800
160,000
177,060
15,254,220
12,380,000
2,867,000
7,264,000
2,304,000
10,600,000
4,996,000
909,800

1,007,151
11,854,949
11,387,995
451,600
839,000
1,931,600
1,026,600"
1,635,500
12,173,010
4,470,000
2,075,000
5,780,000
4,890,000
690,000
1,760,000
676,000

266,543
14,463,700
11,093,236
668,000
1,309,000
955,000
781,000
1,000,600
13,345,020
5,740,000
1,750,000
4,880,000
3,940,000
4,000,000
2.840,000
870,000

3,059,670

126,806,214

68,222,982

62,448 106

67,900,998

1,439,617
1,000
879,873
16,000
62,600
7,600
1,300
1,100
46,110
33,140
26,000
63,500
94,000

Three cents.
Pieces.

Bars.
Value..

c
H
O

6,447,400
18,663,600
11,400,000
671,000
139,000
1,458,000
1,266,000
1,380,000
548,000
40,972,900

W

$31,028
1,327
843
9,341
21,656

09
46
37
08
30

64,196 30

t
O
CQ

COINAGE OF THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Contiaued.
1. MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA—Continued.

COPPER COINAGE.

Period.
Cents.

Pieces.

1793 to 1817
1818 to 1837
1838 to 1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
.1854
--1855
1856
1857
1858
1859^...„
I860Total

-

„




Half cents.

TOTAL COINAGE.

No. of pieces coined.

Value of gold.

Value of silver.

$5,610,957
17,639,382
29,491,010
2,780,930
7,948,332
27.756.445
62.143.446
51,605,638
52,191,618
37,693,069
10,610,752
11,074,388
3,245,853
10,221,876
2,660,616
4,354,576

$8,268,296
40,666,897
13,913,019
420,050
922,950
409,600
446,797
847,410
7,852,671
5,373,270
1,419,170
3,246,268
1,428,327
4,971,823
3; 009, 241
8.57,076

Value of copper.

Total value
coined.

$319,340
476,574
349,676
64,157
41,984
44,467
99,635
60,630
67,059
42,638
16,030
27,106
63,510
234,000
307,000
342,000

$14,198,593
68,682.863
43,753,705
3.265 137
8.913 266
28,210,613
62,689,878
52 403 679
60,111 249
43,108,977
12,045,952
14,346,762
4,737,691
15,427,699
5,976,887
5,553,653

Pieces.

29.316,272
46;564, 830
34,967,663
6,415,799
• 4,178,600
4,426,844
9,889,707
5,063,094
-.
6,641,131
4,236,166
-1,574,829
2,690,463
6,333,456
23,400,000
30,700,000
34,200,000

5,235,613
2,205,200

250,588,744

7,985,223

39,864
39,812
147,672
.

129,694
55,358
56,500
40,430
35,180

62,019,407
168,882,<«16
88,327,378
. 8,691,444
9,519,613
10,039,535
24,985,736
32,612,949
69,775,537
33,919,921
10,885,619
25,876,288
18,602,020
44,833,766
44,833,111
38,099,348
671,904,388

60
50
00
00
00
50
00
60
94
68'
14
12
68
60
69
84

326,928,924 49

76
15
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
09
46
37
08
30

93,951,766 20

28
30
63
99
32
60
43
94
78
35
79
78
46
00
00
00

2,546,813 55

53
96
63
99
32
00
43
44
72
93
93
99
60
97
67
14

O
W
H.

i
•w
t?3
5^5
O
Ul

423,426,504 24

<>
x

COMAGE OF THE MINT AND BEANQHES—Continued.
2. BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO.

-'

GOLD COINAGE.

Period.
Double eagles.
Pieces.

1864
1855
1856
1867
1858
1859
1860

'.>

Total




Eagles.
Pieces.

141,468
869,175
1,181.750
604,500
886,940
689,140
579,975

123,826
9,000
73,500
10,000
27,800
2,000
10,000

4,941,948

256,126

Half eagles. Three dollars. Quart'r eagles
Pieces. •
268
61,000
94,100
47,000
58,600
9,720
. 16,700
287,388 *

Pieces.
246

Pieces.

6,600
34,500
6,000
9,000

Pieces.

14,632

Unparted bars.

Fine bars.

Value.

Value.

-

24,600
20,000
15,000
13,000
87,232

12,775,396 92

O

w

816,295 65

177,366

$6,863 16
88,782 60
122,136 66
19,871 68

$6,641,604 05
3,270,594 93
3,047,001 29-

71,120
20,000
49,200
8,000
28,800

7,000
62,100

Dollars.

o

236,653 89
!2J

QQ

COINAGE OF TflE MINT AND BEANOHES-Oontinued.
2. BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO—Contmued.
TOTAL COINAGE.

SILVER COINAGE.

Period.
Dollars. Half dolls. Qr. dollars.

Pieces.
1854
1866
1856
1857
1858
1859
I860

Total




Pieces.

Bars.

J ieces.

No. of pieces.

Value.

15,000
5,000

121,950
211,000
86,000
218,000
463,000
693,000

412,400
286,000
28,000
63,000
172,000
24,000

30,000
90,000
40,000

19,752 61
2 9 , 4 6 9 87
2 1 1 , 4 1 1 52

282,712
1,471,272
1,977,559
800,500
1,362,028
1,463,893
1,417,475

20,000

1,792,950

985,400

160,000

2 8 4 , 2 4 3 45

8,775,439

_

Pieces.

Dimes.

$ 2 3 , 6 0 9 45

^ Silver.

Gold.

Value.
$9,731,574
20,957,677
28,315,637
12,490,000
19,276,095
13,906,271
11,889,000

Total.

Value.
21
43
84
00
66
68
00

1 1 6 , 6 6 6 , 1 5 6 81

$164,075
200,609
50,000
147,502
327,969
572,911

00
45
00
61
87
62

1 , 4 6 3 , 0 6 8 45

Value.
$ 9 , 7 3 1 574
21,121,752
28,516,147
12,540,000
1 9 . 4 2 3 598
14 234 241
12.461,911

21
43
29
00
26
55
52

o
H
O

1 1 8 , 0 2 9 , 2 2 5 26

o
QQ

COINAGE OF THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Continued.
3. BRANCH MINT NEW.ORLEANS.
GOLD COINAGE.

Period.
Double eagles.




Half eagles.

21,500
4,000
8,200

.

.

. .

806,860

1,694,292

831,026

84,000
148,000
140,000

41,000
46,000
11,100
10,000

Quarter eagles.

Dollars.

650,628

13,000

_
-

....

Three dollars.

709,925

141,000
315,000
190,000
71,000
3,250
8,000
2,250

1,026,342
35,850
23,900
57,500
263,000
. 18,000
61,000
62,500
18,000
14,500

47,500
24,500
4,350

1838 to 1847-.
1848 - - - .
1849
1850.
1851 .
- -'-1852
1863
1854 :
1855 -1856 . 1857
1868
1859...
1860
Total

Eagles.

24,000

O

215,000
14 000
290,000
140,000
290,000

153,000

H
O
tzi
H

w

fel

65,000
21,100

HH

34,000

a

fej

Ul

24,000

1,130,628

1,004,000

COINAGE OF THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Continued.
3. BEANCH MINT, NEW ORLEANS—Continued.

cn

TOTAL COINAGE.

SILVER COINAGE.

Period.
Dolla.-s.

1838 to 1847
1848
]849
1850
1851
1852....
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
. 1858
18.59
I860
Total




Half dollars. Quarter dollars.

Dimes.

Halfdimes.

13,509,000
.3,180, O O
U
2,310,000
2,456,000
402,000
144,000
1,328,000
5,240,000
3,688,000
2,658,000

3,273,600

1,180,000

2,789,000
600,000
140,000
690,000
860,000
260,000
2,360,000
1,560,000
600,000
1,100,000

200,000
2i-0,000

4,614,000
4,912;000
2,212,000

1,416,000
544,000
388,000

1,540,000
440,000
370,000

2.540,000
1;060.000
1,060,'000

579,000

46,653,000

10,177,600'

14,513,500

15,619,000

Three-cent
pieces.

59,000
40,000

412,000
88,000
96.000
1,332; C O
O
1,484,000
176,000
968,000

6,473,500
300,000
510,000
400,000
430,000
1,100,000
,1,770,000

•

720,000

Number of
pieces.

Value of gold.

28,390,895
3,81.5,8.50
2,985,900
4,404.500
3;527,000
1,418,000
. 6,532,000
10,332,750
4,566,100
5,9.53,850

Bars.

$15,189,355
358,500
454,000
3,619,000
9,795,000
4,470,000
2,220,000
1,274,500
4.50, .500
292,750

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Value ofsilver.

Total value
coined.

$8,418,700 00
$23,608,065 00
1,620,000 00
1.978,500 00
1,192,000 00
1;646,000 00
1,456, .500 00
5,075,500 00
327,600 00
10,122,600 00
. 152,000 00 / 4,622,000 00
1,225,000 00
3,445,000 00
3,246,000 00
4,520,500 00
1,918,000 00
2,368,500 00
1,744,000 CO
2,036,750 00

'^334,* 996'47'
25, 422 33
720,000

10,226,000
7,184.500
4,322;550

1,315,000 00
530,000 00
169,000 00

2,912.000 00
3,223;996 47
1,598,4-22 33

93,652,895

40,137,615 00

29,064,218 80

69,201,833 80

H
O

4,257,000 00
3,753,996 47
1,767,422 33

360,418 80

fei

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COmAiiE OF THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Continued.
4. BRANCH MINT, DAHLONEGA.
GOLD COINAGE.

Period,
Half eagles.

Three dollars.

Quarter eagles.

Dollars.

Total pieces.

Total value.

w

fel

1838 to 1 8 4 7 . : . . . .
•1848
1849.._
1850...
1851
1852
1853
1854
1856
1856
1867
1858
1859..
1860
Total




676,653
47,466
39,036
43,950
62,710
91,452
89,678
66,413
22,432
19,786
6,470
19,256
11,404
12,800

....

.

„

1

1,098,405

1,120

1,120

134,101
13,771
10,945
12,148
11,264
4, 078
3,178
1,760
1,123
874
1,464
900
642
° 1,602

21,588
8,382
9,882
6,360
6,583
2,935
1,811
1,460
1,896
1,637
6,957
1,472

710,654
61,236
71,569
64,480
83,866
101,890
99,439
62,228
26,366
22,120
8,830
21,793
19,003
15,-847

197,860

70,963

1,368,3.38

$3,218,017
271,762
244,130
258,602
361,692
473,816
462,918
292„760
116,778
102,675
32,906
100,167
66,582
69,477

50
60
60
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
00

6,060,973 00

O
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W
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COINAGE OP THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Continued.
6. BRANCH MINT, CHARLOTTE.
GOLD COINAGE.

Period.
, Half eagles.

1838 to 1847
1848
1849
.-.
1860
...
1861..
1852..
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
Total




Quarter eagles.

Pieces
269 424
64 ,742
64 ,823
63 ,691
49 ,176
72 ,574
66 ,571
39 ,283
39 788
28 ,457
13 137
31 ,066
39 500
23 ,005

Pieces.
123,576
16,788
10,220
148
14,923
9,772

863,867

219,837

295
677
913

Dollars.

Total pieces.

Total value.

393,000
81,260
86,677
79,705
105,366
91,780
77,086
46,678
63,268
36,370
26,417
40,122
44,736
30,474

$1,656,060
364,330
' 361,299
347,791
324,454
396,734
339,370
214,652
217,935
162,067
78,965
177,970
202,736
133,697

Pieces.
11,634
6,966
41,267
9,434
11,516
9,803
13,280

056
"'6,235
469*
109,134

1,192,838

00
00
00
00.
50
00,
00
50
50
50
00
00
00
50

4,978,061 5,0

fel
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COINAGE OF THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Continued.

QO

6. ASSAY OFFICE, NEW YORK.
Period.

1854
1865-- .
1856
1857.
1858..
1869...
I860
Total




Fine gold
bars.
Pieces.
822
6, 182
4,727 •
2, 230
7,052 1
3,295
24,308

Silver bars.

Value.

Total pieces.

Value.

Total value.

Pieces.
$2,888,059
20,441,813
19,396,046
9,836,414
21,798,691
13,044,718
6,831,532

18
63
89
00
04
43
01

62
550
894
1,986

$6,792
123,317
171,961
272,424
222,226

93,736,275 18

3,481.

796,721 68

63'
00
79
06
11

822
6,182
4,779
2,780
7,946
6,280
27,789

$2,888,059
20,441,813
19,402,839
9,458,731
21,970,652
13,317,142
7,053,758

18
63
52
00
83
48
12

94,632,996 76

fel
•TO

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W

fel

iz;fel
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COINAGE OF THE MINT AND BRANCHES—Continued.
7. SUMMARY EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF THE MINTS TO THE CLOSE OF THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1860.
Commencement
of coinage.

Mints.

Philadelpbia
San Francisco
New Orleans
Charlotte
Dahlonega
Assay offi.ce, New York .
Total




,

1793.
1854.
1838.
1838.
18381854.

Gold coinage.

Value.
$326,928,924
-^116,566,156
40,137,615
4,978,061
6,060,973
93,736,276

Silver coinage.

49
81
00
50
00
18

588,408,005 98

Copper coinage.

Value.
$93,951,766 20
1,463,068 45
29,064,218 80

Value.
$2,545,813 65

796,721 68
125,276,776 03

2,545,813 56

Entire coinage.

Pieces.
671,904,388
8,776,439
93,652,895
1,192,838
1.368,338
27,789

Value
$423,426,504 24
118,029,225 26
69,201,833 80
4,978,06150
6,060,973 00
94,632,996 76

776,921,687

716,229,694 56

fel

o
H

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iz;

fel
23

>

'25
O

fel
Ul

D,
Statement of gold of domestic production deposited at the mint ofthe United States and its hranches to the close ofthe year
ending June 30, 1860.

'-a
o

1. MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA.
r-rr

Virginia.

Period.,

North Carolina.

South Carolina.

:

Tennessee.

Georgia.

Alabama.

New Mexico.

w

fel

1804 to
1828 to
1838 to
•1848
1849
1850
1851..
1852
1853
1854.
1856
1856
1857..
1858
1859
1860.

1827
1837
1847

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
62

$110,000 00
2, 6l'9, 500.00
1,303,636 00
109,034 00
102,688 00
.
43,734 00
49,440 00
65,248 00
46,690 00
9,062 00
22,626 00
12,910 00
' 6,805 00
15,175 00
9,305 00
8,450 11

. 1,631,286 12

4,433,303 11

. . . .

i
. .
..--.-..

„„.'.
Total




$427,000
618,294
67,886
129,382
65,991
69,052
83,626
62,200
23,347
28,895
^21,607
2,505
18,377
15,720
17,402

$327,500
152,366
19,228
4, 309
759
12,338
4,505
3,522
1,220
1,200
5,980
2,565
300
4,676

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

540,467 00

$1,763,900
566,316
3,370
10,526
5,114
2,490
3,420
1,912
- 7,561
1,733
4,910
3,542
18,365
20,190
7,556

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
60
00
00
00
00
41

2,420,904 91

$12,400
16,499
3,497
2,739
307
126

00
00
00
00
00
00

^.
o
$45,493
3,670
2,977
1,178
817
254

00
00
00
00
00
00

245 00
310 00

$682
32,889
5,392
890
814
3,632
738
- 900
2,460

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

o

w

fel
izl

o
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GQ

275 00

240 00
595 88
36,403 88

64,944 00

48,672 00

STATEMENT OF GOLD OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, &c.^Continued.
1. MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA—Continued.
Oregon.

California.

Period.

Kansas.

Nebraska.

Utah. Arizona. Other sources.

Total.

•

1804 to 1827
1828 to 1837.-1838 to 1847-.1848
1849
I860
1861
-.
1852
1853
1854.
1855
1856
1857-.
1858
1859'
^^--I860----.
-..-

Total...--




-.

^
•

$13,200 00
21,037 00
$44,177
5,481,439
31,667,605
46,939,367
49,663,623
52,732,227
35,671,185
2,634,297
1,440,134
565,566
1,372.506
959,191
663,389

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
63
58
41
07
79
02

229,834,608 60

144 00
326 00
$13,535 00

6,213 00
1,635 00

40,760 00
3,600 00
2,960 00
2,780 16

$146 00
346,604 05

$1,402 01

63,626 1.6

346,749 05

lj402 01

41,455 00

$110,000
5,063,600
2,623,641
241,544
6,767,092
31,790,306
47,074,620
49,821,490
52,857,931
35,713,358
2,691,497
1,628,751
580,983
1,428,323
1,012,701
1,048,180

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
63
58
41
07
79
26

239,353,819 74

fel

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fel
iz5
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STATEMENT OF GOLD OP DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, &c.—Continued.

to

2. BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO.
California.

Period.
1854 . —1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860

.1

-:
---

Total.




-.

—...

- - - --

-

---

---

$10,842,281
20,860,437
29,209,218
12,526,826
19,104,369
14,098,564
11,319,913

Total.
23
20
24
93
99
14
83

117,961,611 56

^

$10,842,281
20,860,437
29,209,218
12,526,826
19,104,369
14,098,564
11,319,913

23
20
24
93
99
14
83

117,961,611 56

fel
13

o
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STATEMENT OP GOLD OP DOMESTIC PEODUCTION, &c.—Continued.
3. BRANCH MINT,- NEW ORLEANS.
North Carolina. South Carolina.

Period.

$741 00

1838 to 1 8 4 7 . . . .
1848
1849

$14,306 00
1,488 00
423 00

Georgia.

Tennessee.

$37,364 00
2,317 00

$1,772 00
947 00

ia50

1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
] 857
1858
1859
I860
•^

Alabama.
$61,903
6,717
4,062
3,560
1,040

00
00
00
00
00

;

,

'

Total




,,,
1,560 00

,

164 12

41,241 00

2,883 12

661 53

<

,.

741 00

.

16,217 00

77,943 53

California.

Kansas.

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
24
91
39
84
41
00

1,770 39

$119,699
12 593
67?'18Q
4,580,030
8,"?70,722
3 777 784
2,006,673
qgi 511
411.517
283,344
129,328
450 163
93 272
89;566

$1,770 39

22,235,308 79

Total.

$3,613 00
$1,124
669,921
4,575,576
8,769.682
3,777,784
2,006,673
981,511
411,517
283.344
129,328
448,439
. 93,272
87,135

Olher sources.

2,783 00
894 00

7,290 00

00
00
no
00
00
00
00
00
24
91
39
96
41
92

22,383,394 83

fel

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05

STATEMENT OF GOLD OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, &c.—Contiimed,
4. BRANCH MINT, CHARLOTTE.
Period.
1838 to 1847
1848
1849
1850
1861
1862.-.t ...
18531854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860

Total.




North Carolina.
$1,529, 777
359, 075
378, 223
307, 289
276, 472
337, 604
227, 847
188, 277
196, 894
157, 355
75, 376
170, 560
182, 489
134, 491

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
03
18
47
33
61
17

4,620,730 79

South Carolina,
$143,941
11,710
i2,609
13.000
25,478
64,934
61,845
19.001
14,277

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
17

California.

$15,111
28,362
15,466
6,328
5,817
16,237

Total.

00
00
00
00
66
35

5,607 16
22,762 71
394,965 04

87,321 01

$1,673,J18
370,785
390,732
320,289
316,061
430,900
305,157
213,606
216,988
173,592
75,376
176,067
'205,262
134,491

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
86
53
47
49
32
17

6,003,016 84

fel
^
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STATEMENT OF GOLD OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, &c.—Continued,
5. BRANCH MINT, DAHLONEGA.
North Carolina. South Carolina.

Period.
1838 to 1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860.

$64,351
.5,434
4,882
4,500
1,971
443
2,085
5,818
3,145

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
82

2,656 88
3,485 70

Total

98,772 40

$95,427
8,151
7,323
5,700
3,236
57,543
33,950
15,988
9,113
'25,723
8,083
32,322
4,610
2,004

CO
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
27
75
89
28
35
36

Georgia.
$2,978,353
251,376
225,824
204,473
154,723
93,122
56,984
47,027
56,686
44,107
25,097
57,891
57,023
35,588

Tennessee.
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
36
99
63
45
12
92

4,288,277 47

309,175 90

$32,175
2;717
2,441
1,200
2,251
750
149
223

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Alabama.
$47,711
.4,075
3,661
1,800
2,105

00
00
00
00
00

277 92
106 42
107 33

'
42,119 75

59,629 92

California.

$30,025
S14,072
324,931
359,122
211,169
47,428
31,467
6,498
5,293
699
1,097

Kansas.

00
00
00
00.
00
70
10
02
52
19
37

$82 70
24,908 86

1,231,802 90

Other sources.

24,991 56

$951 00

•

951 00

Total.
$3,218,017
271.753
244,131
247,698
379 309
476,789
45'>.290
.380'225
116 652
101 405
39,679
95 614
65,072
67 085

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
07
26
54
58
24
21

6,055,720 90

W
fel
ns

o
o

w

fel
fel
iz;

STATEMENT OF GOLD OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, &c.—Continued.

o

6. ASSAY OFFICE, NEW YORK.

fel
QQ

Virginia.

Period.

1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
I860

$167
2,370
6,928
1,531
501
436
4,202

..."
...
,
Total

,...




00
00
00
00
00
00
00

16,135 00

N. Carolina. 3 . Carolina.

00
00
07
00
00
00
00

$395 00
7,620 00
4,052.29
2,663 00
6,3.54 00
700 00

47,044 07

21,784 29

$3,916
3,750
805
1,689
7,007
20,122
9,755

Georgia.

Alabaraa.

$1,242
13.100
41.101
10,451
12,951
14,756
19,358

$350
233
1,545
2,181
593

00
00
28
00
00
00
00

112,969 28

00
62
00
00
00

4,902 62

Kansas.

California.

$9,221,457
25,025,896
16,529,008
9,899,9.57
19,660,531
11,694,872
6,023,628

Utah.

Arizona.

00
11
90
00
46
25
36

.%3.Mi 00
248,981 00

$4,680 00

252,925 00

4,680 00

1,190 00

Other
sources.

$1,190 00

98,055,351 08

Oregon.

$1,600 00
$5,581 00
2,866 (JO

27,523 00
405 00

8,447 00

29,528 00

Total.

$9,227,177
25,054,686
16. .582,129
9^917,836
19;722,629
11,738,694
6,311,804

00
11
16
00
46
25
36

98,554,956 34

STATEMENT OF GOLD OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTION, &c.—Continued.
7. SUMMARY EXfllBlT OF THE ENTIRE DEPOSITS OF DOMESTIC GOLD AT THE UNITED STATES MINT AND BRANCHES TO JUNE 30, 1860.
Virginia.

Mint.
Philadelphia
San Francisco
N e w Orleans
Cbarloite
Dahlonet^a...

$1,531,285 12
....
'.....

•

16,135 00
1,547,420 12

Total

North Carolina. South Carolina.
$4,433,303 11
741
4,520,730
98,772
47,044

00
79
40
07

9,100,591 37

Tennessee.

$2,420,904 91

1,282,609 23

$36,403 88

77,943 53

2,883 12

'•'4,'288,277*47
112,969 28

00
04
90
29

$54,944 00

41,241 00

$540,467 00
16,217
394,965
309,175
21,784

Alabama.

Georgia.

59,"629*92
4,902 62

42,'ii9'75

6,863,392 65

197,420 07

81,406 75

California.
$229,8.34,608 50
117,961,6ir56
22,235,308 79
87,:i21 01
1,231,802 90
98,0.55, .351 08

fel

469,406,003 84

o

i
W
fel
fel
H-i

7. SUMMARY EXHIBIT OF THE ENTIRE DEPOSITS OP DOMESTIC GOLD AT THE UNITED STATES MINT AND BRANCHES TO JUNE 30, 1860-Continued.
Mint.

Kansas.

Utah.

Arizona.

Nebraska.

N e w Mexico

Oregon.

Other sour'ces.

iz;

o

Total.

fel
Ul

Philadelphia..-.
San Francisco
N e w Orleans
Charlotte
Dahlonega
Assay oftice

$346,749 05
,

.....*
.

,
,
.,...,..,..,

Total




..
.
i..... ^ *

..,.
....

$1,402 Ol

$48,672 00

$63,625 16

$41,455 00
7,290 00

1,770 39
24,991 56
252,925 00

$4,680 00 •

626,436 00

4,680 00

8,447 00

$1,190 00
1,190 00

1,402 01

48,672 00

951 00
29,528 00

72,072 16

79,224 00

$239,353,819
ll7,96i;611
22,383.394
5,003,016
6,005,720
98.554,956

74
56
83
84
90
34

469,312,520 21

Statement of the amount ofi silver ofi domestic production deposited at the mint^ofi the United States and its branches from
January', 1841, to June 30, 1860.
Year.

1841 to I85I
1852
--1853
-.-_1854
„
18551856
1867
1858.'1859
I860
Totals.




Parted from California gold.

?.
-

$768,609
404,494
417,279
328,199
333,053
321,938
127,256
300,849
219,647
138,561

Utah.
(Washoe.)

Arizona.

00
00
G
O
00
00
38
12
36
34
70

$102,540 77

$13,357 00

3,359,786 90

102,640 77

13,357 00

Sonora.

North Carolina. Lake Superior.

»
$1,200 00

$23,398 00
.12,257 00

$15,623 00
30,122 13
25,850 58

1,200 00

36,655 00

71,625 71

Total.

$768,509
404,494
417,279
328,199
333,053
321.938
127,256
316,472
273,167
293,797

00
00
00
00
00
38
12
36
47
05

o
H
O

w

fel
fel

3,584,166 38

iz5
o
fel
Ul

^5

78

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement of the amount of silver coined atthe mint of the United States
and the branch mints at San Francisco and New Orleans, under the
actof February 21, 1^^^.
Mint U. States, Branch mint,
Philadelphia. San Francisco.

Year.

$164,075
177,000
50,000
127,750
283,500
356,500

2,942,000
• 2,689,000
1,293,000

1,158,825

15,057,000

43,656,61)6

„

27,440,771

Total

Total.

$9,031,461
8,686,130
' 3,475,246
6,071,740
1,383,000
8,040,730
6,898,900
2,169,390

$7,806,461
5,340,130
1,393,170
.-„--.
3,150,740
.-.-..
1,333,000
4,970,980
' '
2,926,400
519,890.

1853
1854
1865
1856
1857
1858
1859
I860

Branch mint.
New Orleans.
$1,225,000
3,24*6,000
1,918,000
1,744,000

Statement of the amount and denomination of fractions of the Spanish
and Mexican dollar deposited at the mint ofi the United States fior
exchange fior the neio cent to June 30, 1860.
Year.
1857
1858....
1859
I860
Total

Quarters. •
.1

Eighths.

Sixteenths.

Value by tale.

-

$78,295
68,644
111,589
182,330

$33,148
64,472
100,080
51,630

$16,602
32,085
41,390
24,105

$128,045
165,201
263,069
258,065

• 4,41,858

-„--

249,330

114,182

814,370

H.
Statement ofi the amount ofifiractions ofi the Spanish and Mexican dollar
purchased at the mint ofi the United States, the branch mint. New
Orleans, and the assay office. New York, and p a i d fior in silver coins,
to June 30, 1860.
.^
Year.

1857
1858
1859
I860

MintU. States,
Philadelphia.

---

Total




$174,486
326,033
165,115
58,353

00
00
00
74-

723,986 74

Branch mint,
New Orleans.
$1,360
17,355
19,825
9,075

00
00
00
00

47,615 00

Assay office.

$112,502
147,453
110,564
62,072

00
00
00
00

432,591 00

Total.

$288,347
490 841
295 504
129 500

0,0
do
O
O
'
74

1,204 192 74

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

O

.

79

I.

Statement of cents of former issiie deposited at the mint of the United
States for exchange fior cents ofi the new issue to June, 30, 1860.
^ear.

.

f857
1858
1859
I860

Value by tale.

0
0

Total....

,.

$16,602
31,404
47,235
37,500
,,.

132,741

A statement offoreign gold and silver coins, prepared hythe director of
the mint to accompany the annual report-, in pursuance of the act of
February 21, 1857.
EXPLANATORY REMARKS.

The first column embraces the names of the countries where the
coins are issued ; the second contains the names of coin, only the
principal denominations being given. The other sizes are proportional ; and when this is not the case, the deviation is stated.
The third column expresses the weight of a single piece in fractions
of the Troy ounce, carried to the thousandth, and in a few cases to
the ten thousandth, of an ounce. This method is preferable to expressing the weight in grains, for commercial purposes, and corresponds better with the terms of the mint. I t may be readily transferred
to weight in grains by the following rule : Remove the decimal point)
from one-half deduct four per cent., and the remainder will be grains.
The fourth column expresses the fineness in thousandths ; i. e., the
number of parts of pure gold or silver in 1,000 parts of the coin.
The fifth and sixth columns of the first table express the valuation ,
of gold. In the fifth is shown the value as compared with the legal
content, or amount of fine gold in our coin. In the sixth is shown
the value as paid at themint, after the uniform deduction bf one-half of
one per cent. The former is the value for any other purposes than
recoinage, and especially for the purpose of comparison ; the latter is
the value in exchange for our coins at the mint.
For the silver there is no fixed legal valuation, the law providing
for shifting the price according to the condition of demand and supply.
The present price of standard silver is 121 cents per ounce, at which
rate the values in the fifth column of the second table are calculated.




80

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

^

J.
Gold coins.
Country.

Denominations.

Australia
Do
Austria
Do
Belgium
Bolivia
Brazil
Central Am erica .
Chili
Do
Denmark
Ecuador
England,
Do
France
Do . . . . . . . .
Germany, north.
Do
Do
.south.
Greece
Hindostan
Japan'Do
Mexico
Naples
Netherlands . .
New Granada .
Do
Do
Peru
Do
Portugal
Rome
Russia . . .
Sardinia
Spain
Do
Sweden
Tunis
Turkey.......
Tuscany

Pound of 1852
Pound of 1856
Ducat
Sou verain
..
Twenty-five francs
Doubloon
„
20,000 reis
Two escudos
Old doubloon
Ten pesos.
Ten thaler
i
Four escudos.
Pound or sovereign, n e w . . .
Pound or sovereign, average
Twenty francs, new
Twenty francs, average . .
Ten thaler
Ten thaler, Prussian .
Ducat
Twenty drachms
Mohur'
Old Cobang
New Cobaog
Doubloon, average'
Six ducati, new
Ten guilders
Old doubloon, Bogota
Old doubloon, Popayan . .
Ten pesos, new
Old doubloon
New, not ascertained
Gold crown
2^ scudi, new
Five roubles
Same as France
100 reals
80 reals
Ducat
25 piastres.100 piastres
Sequin
'

Weight. Fineness.

Oz. dec.
0.281
0. 256
0. 112
0.363
0. 254
0. 867
0.575
0.209
0.867
0.492
0. 427
0.433
0. 256.7
0.256
0. 207. 6
0. 207
0. 427
0.427
0.112
0; 185
0. 374
0.362
0.289
0. 867. 5
0.245
0.215
0.868
0.867
0.525
0. 867

Thous.
916.5
916.5
986
900
899
870
917.6
853. 5
870
900
895
844
916.6
915.5
899.6
899
895
903
986
900
916
568
572
866
996
899 .
870
858
891.5
868

Value.

$5
4
2
6
4
15
10
3
15
9

16
5
3
15
15
9
15

32. 0
85.0
28. 0
77. 0
72.0
58.0
90.5
68.0
67. 0
15.3
90.0
60.0
86.3
84.8
86.0
84.6
90.5
00.0
28.3
45.0
08.0
44.0
57.6
53.4
04.0
99.0
61.7
39. 0
67.5
66.0

0.308
0. 140
0.210

912
900
916

5 81.3
2 60.0
3 97. 6

0.268
0.215
0. I l l
0.161
0. 231
0.112

896
869.6
975
900
915
999

4
3
2
2
4
2

96.3
87.0
26.7
99.5
37.4
30.0

Vame after
deduction.

$6
4
2
6
4
16
10
3
15
9
7
7
4
4
3

15
5
3
15
15
9
16

29.3
82.6
26.9
73.6
69.7
50.2 '
85. 1
66.2
49.2
10.7
86.1
56.2
83. 9
82.4
84.1
82.6
86.1
96.0
27.2
43.3
04.5
41.8
55.8
45. 6
01.5
97.0
53.9
31.3
62.7
48. 2

5 78.4
2 58.7
3 95.7
93.9
85.1
26.6
98.0
35.2
28.9-

^ A single ohan, not of recent coinage, weighed 5. 30 ozs., and by assay was 667 thoussandths fine; value, $75 24.




:8I

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

K.
Silver coins.
Denomination.

Austria
'.
Do
,
= Do
Belgium
.,
Bolivia
Do
Do
Do....
Brazil
Canada
.
Central America
Ciaili
Do
Denmark
.England
Do...
France
: Germany, north
•Germany, south
Germany, north and
south
Greece
_
Hindoostan
Japan
Do

•-.

Mexico
Naples - . . ^ - - .
-Netherlands
Norway
.
,
New Granada
-.
• Peru
- Do
Do
Portugal
Prussia
Rome
Russia. Sardinia
—.
Spain 1
Sweden
Switzerland
Tunis
Turkey
Tuscany
...-..-.

Weight.,

Fineness.

Oz. dec.

Country.

Thms.

Rix dollar
Scudo of six lire
New union d o l l a r . . . .
Five francs
Dollar
New dollar
Half-dollar, 1839 . . . .
Quarter-dollar, 1830 .
2,000 reis
20 cents
Dollar.
1...
Old dollar
New dollar
Two rigsdaler
Shilling, new
Shilling, average . . . .
Five Iranc, average . .
Thaler
Gulden or florin

0.902
0. 836
0.596
0.803
0.871
0. 648
0.433
0.216
0.820
0.150
0.866
0.864
0. 801
0. 927
0. 182.5
0. 178
0.800
0.712
0. 340

2 thaler or 3j| guld . .
Five drachms
.
Ptupee
-.
Itzebu
New itzebu
Dollar, average
Scudo
-.
2^ guild
Specie, daler
Dollar of 1857
Old dollar
.-..
Dollar of 1858
Half-dollar, 1835-'38
Silver crown
,..
New union dollar
Scudo
Rouble
Five lire . . . „ - '.
New pistareen
Rix dollar-..-.
Two francs
-.
Five piastres
Twenty piastres
Florin

1.192
0.719
0. 374
0.279
0. 279
0. 866
0.844
0.804
0.927
0.803
0.866
0.766
0.433
0.950
0.596
0:864
0.667




0. 800'
.0.166
1. 092
0. 323
0.511
0.770
0.220

833
902
900
897
900,
902
670
670
918.5
925
850
908
900.
877
924.
925
900
750
900
900
900
916
991
890
901
830
944
877
896
901
909
650
912
900
900
875
900
. 899
750
899
898.
830
925

Value.

$1 01.3
1 01.5
- 72.0
96.8
1 05.4
78.6
38.5
19.2
1 01.3
18.6
97.3
1 04.7
97.0
1 09.4
22.7
22.2
96.8
71.7
41.2
1 44.3
86.9
46.0
37.0
33.3
1 04 9
98.8
1 02.3
1 09.4
96.8
I 04. 9'
93,6;
37. 77
1 16; 6
72,0
1 04.7
78.4
. 96.8
20.1
1 10.1
39.0
61.8
86.5
27.4

82

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

Copy ofthe certificate of assays given to the envoys from Japan,
MINT OF THE UNITED STATES,

Philadelphia, Jt^ne 14,^1860.
For the satisfaction of their excellencies of the Japanese embassy,
the undersigned, director of the mints of the United States, certifies
to the results obtained by assay of gold coins of Japan and of the
United States, made in their presence by the proper officers of
the mint.
One cobang weighed 138|-|- grains, and the gold extracted from it
weighed 79|^f grains.
One other cobang weighed 1 3 8 ^ , grains, and the gold extracted
from it weighed 79yV gi^ains.
One other cobang weighed 139^2" grains, and the gold extracted
from it weighed 79|-f grains.
So, on the average of these three^ the cobang contains 79|- grains
of gold, which makes the proportion of fineness 572 thousandths.
This result agrees so well with our report of assays made in our usual
way (by taking only a half gramme, or about 7f grains) that we
trust it will give additional confidence to the embassy in our regular
method of. assay.
A gold dollar of the United States weighed 25|f grains, ^nd the
gold extracted from it weighed ^^i-^ grains, which agrees as nearly
as may be to 900 thousandths, our legal standard.
Therefore, for comparison, the cobang contains 79|- grains of gold,
and the dollar contains 23^V grains of gold. But i t w i l l be more
strictly accurate to say that the proportion of gold in a cobang is 572
thousandths, and in the dollar 900 thousandths ; and it is necessary
to add that the actual weight of the gold dollar is 25iV grains by
Ikw, which is a more exact basis of calculation than the single piece,
which weighed 25yVoVo3 ^^^ ^^s therefore a little too heavy.
The silver being extracted, with the necessary allowance for absorb-tion, showed almost 59 g'rains of silver in each cobang, and the copper was only \ l oi one grain in each cobang.
To recapitulate the average composition ofthe cobang is asfollows,
ingrains:
-Gold
79M
Silver.....
.«...
59
Copper
.,.;.....
OH
138|f
.JLII

of which is very respectfully submitted,
^ JAMES ROSS SNOWDEN,
Director ofi the United States Mints,




REPORT ON THE FINANCEB.

^ 83

Communication from the director of the mint to the envoys from Japan.
MINT OF THE UNITED STATES,

'

Philadelphia, June 20, 1860.
To their excellencies the ambassadors firom the empire ofi Japan io the
United States of America :
The undersigned, the director of the mints of the United States,
begs leave to refer your excellencies to the last conference held with
the officers of the mint, in regard to the assay and the currency ; at
which time it was asked whether it would not be proper that the officers of the treasury of Japan should rate the new gold itzebu at 90
cents^ and the new gold cobang at 3.60, in exchanging fbr Mexican
dollars or for gold and silver dollars of the United States, because
that is an even decimalfigure, and the real value is very near thereto ;
such valuation to be temporary, until the Japanese government shall
have instituted certain reforms in its currency and coinage? to which
it was replied—-and 1 have now to repeat the same in writing, as you
requested—that we consider it altogether propex, and a convenient
rate for calculation.
' The officers of t h e m i n t do not presume to enter upon the subject
of the proposed reforms any further than to make a few suggestions,
which, if not acceptable, may simply be laid aside. It is probable that it would be just as difficult in Japan as in any other country to
introduce great and radical changes in the currency, especially in the^
unit of moneys, with which the people are familiar. Now, it is to
be observed that while the old silver itzebu was rather too high in
its real value to be exchanged at the rate of three to the Mexican silver dollar, or United States gold dollar, yet the change introduced
lately has brought it down to a very near adjustment to that valuation ; and three new silver itzebus exchange very well with either of
the dollars above mentioned—not to the very last fraction, but near
enough—so that this need not be altered; and thus we have the
basis that*three itzebus are equal to one dollar.
The next point is, to make the gold itzebu and the gold cobang to
correspond to that basis, according to the general relation of value between gold and silver, so that the Japanese may understand their real
wealth, and no longer be defrauded by the artful exchanges of foreign
merchants ; and as you have already alloyed the silver itzebu so as to
make it near the standard fineness of nine-tenths, (according to the
rates in the Uriited States, Mexico, and other countries,) we suggest
that the same standard should be used forthe gold. Whether the
remaining one-tenth should be silver or copper, or both, is a minor
matter, with which we shall not concern ourselves. The great point
is to get the right quantity of gold ; then the cobang, being four
itzebus, should contain as much gold, as 1\ of our gold dollar. I t
should contain 30.96 grains, or 5.2632 condarines^ of fine gold ; and
being nine-tenths fine, its actual weight should be 34.4 grains, or
5.848 condarines. This coin would be small, but a little larger than
our gold dollar ; and you would do well to coin also a piece of ten.




84

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

cobangs, which would be equal to 1 3 | dollars. The gold itzebu would
be quite too smallfor a coin, and seems to be of no use while you
have a silver itzebu.
-Inasmuch as some confusion might arise from continuing the name
^' cobang'' for a coin so difFerent in value from that previously known
under that name, it would be better, it sesms to us, to introduce into
the currency a gold dollar, to berated as equal to three silver itzebus.
This dollar, if equal to our own, should weigh 25.8 grains nine-tenths
fine, containing, therefore, 23,32 grains of pure gold ; or, in your
own weight, about 4.39 condarines nine-tenths fine, equal to 3.95
condarines of pure gold. This suggestion, we think, should receive
your careful consideration, especially as your people are somewhat'
acquainted with the silver dollar of Mexico, which conforms very
nearly to the gold dollar herein recommended ; and as the dollar is a
coin and money of account, adopted by nearly all the American na-^
tions, and is familiar to many others, it possesses advantages which
commend it to your consideration.
As to the shape of the coins, it is very obvious that a circular form
would greatly facilitate the work at your mint. A round. piece is
always right when laid on the die ; but a square or oval piece must
be carefully adjusted, and this is a loss of time and labor.
I cannot close this communication without expressing the favorable
opinion of the officers of the mint as to the accuracy of your assays.
If, as you s.tate, the intention was to make the cobang consist of 573
parts gold and 42'7 parts silver, then the fact that it actually contains
,572 parts gold shows a close approximation, and it further shows that
your assayers understand their business. At this day the coins of
France are one-thousandth less than they are intended to be, and all
the doubloons of North and South America are five to ten thousandths,
and even more, below their professed fineness. In these remarks we
refer strictly to the new cobangs, because those which were coined a
few years ago did not show the same accuracy. Your new silver coin
should be about one per cent, finer than it is, according to the single
piece we assayed ; but the assay of silver, if it is done by the furnace,
can never be so exact as the gold. We therefore recommend the
*' humid assay" for silver.
It may be useful for your mint officers to have a small piece of absolutely fine gold to compare with their own, and I therefore beg you
to accept what is enclosed for that purpose.
I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,
JAMES ROSS SNOWDEN,
Director ofi the Mints of the United States,




REP.ORT ON THE FINANCES.

85

No. 10.
Report of the acting engineer in charge.
Q

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Office of Construction, September 30, 1860.
SIR : I have the honor to subniit the following report upon the
various public buildings constructed and constructing under the
charge of this office, showing in detail the operations for the year
ending September 30, 1860, with a tabulated resume of former operations.
On the 30th of September, 1859, the aggregate balance of appropriations not withdrawn from the treasury, and in the hands of disbursing agents, was $2,672,484 43.
The last Congress appropriated, in addition, the sum of $498,911,
making an available aggregate of $3,171,395 43.
The appropriations of the last Congress were for the continuance
or completion of works already in progress. No appropriation having
been made for any new works.
Of the above aggregate amount $1,051,458 25 is for works authorized by Congress at its former sessions. These works were : Customhouses at Ogdensburg, New York; Perth Amboy, New Jersey; Knoxville, Tennessee; Nashville, Tennessee, and Cairo, Illinois, with one
previously authorized, at Astoria, Oregon; and court-houses and post
offices at Boston, Massachusetts; Baltimore, Maryland; Columbia,
South Carolina; Kaleigh, North Carolina; Key West, Florida; Tallahassee, Florida ; Memphis,. Tennessee ; Springfield, Illinois, and
Madison, Wisconsin, and the post dffice at Philadelphia.
The appropriations for many of these works were insufficient for
<Jthe purposes contemplated, and will not complete suitable structures,
while many of them were without any appropriation for sites, and all
were without the customary ten per centum for contingent expenses.
These omissions it will be necessary for Congress to supply before the
works can properly be undertaken, unless their size is largely reduced
from that which the proposed accommodations require.
Your directions to commence no new works having been continued
in force during the past year, no preliminary^ action has been had in
reference to them, (with the exception hereinafter noted for Baltimore;)
and in pursuance of your repeated instructions the disbursements upon
works in progress have been limited to the smallest amount which-circumstances admitted. In pursuance of this policy but $898,264 11
have been expended during the past fiscal year, against an expenditure
of $1,871,316 37 for the fiscal year of 1858-'59, and of $2,902,014 75
for the fiscal year of 1857-'58.
Under instructions from the President the preliminary steps have
been taken for the construction of the new court-house at Baltimore.
The work is iiot yet commenced and the disbursements to this date
have been confined to the contingent expenses of preparation. A
contract has been made for its construction under the President's
direction in the sum of $112,808 04.




8G

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Under your specific orders, repeated at the close of the last session
of Congress, (in accordance with what seemed to be the policy indicated
by Congress in its appropriations,) directing the operations in all the
buildings ^^to be kept strictly within the available means at the
department's disposal, and when those means were exhausted to stop
the work," no expenditures, present or prospective, have been authorized which were not covered by appropriations. The work upon the
New Orleans marine hospital has thus been entirely stopped in consequence ofthe expenditure of the appropriation, w^hile that upon the
custom-houses at Charleston and New Orleans has been limited to the
available amount and will soon cease altogether. It is anticipated
that the appropriations will be exhausted for these two last-named
works "by or before the coming session of Congress. The work upon
the treasury extension has also been very limited under your orders,
no progress having been made upon the west wing, and the disbursements having been confined to partial payments on accountof
delivered materials and in the completion of the south wing.
The only expenditures from appropriations for new works during
the past year have been for the purchase of sites at Memphis, Tennessee, Kaleigh, North Carolina, and Madison, Wisconsin, and these were
purchased under your instructions based upon the representation from
reliable sources that suitable sites in these places would either pass
entirely from the reach of purchase, or their value be so largely enhanced as to make their present purchase a matter of economy.
During the fiscal year ending September 30, 1860, the following
buildings have been completed, viz: Custom-houses at Portsmouth,
New Hampshire; New Haven, Connecticut; Chicago, Illinois; quarantine warehouse below New Orleans; Wilmington, North Carolina,
marine hospital.
The total number of buildings and the uses for which they were;
designed, or for which unexpended balances remain of former appropriations, is as follows:
Custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices.
Marine hospitals
Mints and branch mints and assay offices
Territorial public buildings
Extension of treasury
Yentilation of old treasury building
Warehouses...
Fire-proof vaults..*
•
Total

.„...,.,,,......I

,
„...,
,...,,...

.,;....,

80
24
6
5
1
1
4
67
188

The amount available for the prosecution of these
works on September 30, 1859, not withdrawn from
thetreasury
$2,476,812 18
Amount of appropriation last session.....
498,911 00
Amount repaid by disbursing agents and due from
them.
•.,
195,6'72 25
Amount available for the year 1859-'60



.,o..

3,171,395 43

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

87

Amount expended from September 30, 1859, to September 30, 1860
,
'Total amount available September 30, 1859

$900,764 11
2,270,031 32

The course of experiments upon the various samples of iron and
iron ores transmitted to the department, which were confided to Professor Antisell, of the Patent Office, has been completed, and that
officer has made elaborate returns of his labor, with carefully compiled extracts from the various authorities,upon the properties of iron
which will be made the subject of separate report from this office for
transmission to the parties in interest. The small amount appropriated for the service has not been sufficient for as ample an analysis of
the various specimens exhibited as could have been desired, and the
practical advantages of the investigatioti are therefore necessarily
limited, but sufficient data is established whereon to base a course of
experiments which will largely aff'ect the value of this material as an
important adjunct for permanent works constructed by the government.
The experience of this office for the past year has tended more
strongly to confirm the reports hitherto made upon the present method
of appropriating a portion ofthe government revenue for public buildings, and reference is now made to former reports and their correctness respectfully reiterated.
BANGOR, MAINE.

The appropriation for bridging the Kenduskeag river at Bangor,
3Iaine, still remains undrawn from the treasury, the city having still
omitted to provide its quota for the required work.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, I860.....
Bailance available

,
o

$118,100
112,800
5,300

ELLSWORTH AND BELFAST, MAINE.

The work upon the custom-houses and post offices at Ellsworth
and Belfast is completed and the buildings occupied. A balance of
$448 79 is still due the contractor, for which there is no applicable
appropriation.
•
.

PORTSMOUTH^ NEW HAMPSHIRE.

The building designed for the use of the customs, courts, and post
office a t Portsmouth, New Hampshire, has been completed in a manner creditable to the superintendent, who has, under the department's
orders, completed the work upon the contractor's default.
No steps have been taken to collect the excess of cost from the origi-




88

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

nal contractor, who, with his sureties, is represented to be entirelyirresponsible, and it is not probable that anything will ever be collected from them. The building is an ornament to the place and
creditable to the department, but is largely in advance of the wants
of the city, and it will be a long time before its available space will
be required for the public service.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860

..•

Balanee available

$166,300 00
163,884 11
2,415 89

BRISTOL, RHODE ISLAND.

'

The grading^ fencing, and paving of the grounds about the new
custom-house at Bristol, Rhode Island, have been commenced, and.
will probably be completed during the present season.
Total amount of appropriation
.,...,
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860...........
Balance available

,

$31,400 00
30,031 30
1,368 70

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT.

The custom-house, post office, and court-house, at New Haven,
Connecticut, has been completed and occupied. It is a sightly brown
gtone structure, built from the sandstone of Connecticut valley, and
highly ornamental to the city.
It has been completed by the government for account of the original
contractor, but as he is without property it is not probable that any
redress can be had by the department. One of the securities died j leaving only debts without estate, and as the other is represented to
be alive in similar pecuniary circumstances there is little prospect of
the department being reimbursed for its outlay over and above contract price upon the work. .
Total amount of appropriation...:
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

.o.....

coco.*.,

$190,800 00
183,913,29
6,886 71

NEW YORK.

No action has been taken during the past year upon the appropriation for erecting the custom-house and post office building at Buffalo,,
NewYork. The citizens of Buffalo have petitioned Congress thatthe sum so appropriated may be used for the construction of another
building, for which it is sufficient, but Congress having taken no



REPORT ON THE FINANCES/

89

action thereupon, and the present building being apparently ample
for the present and prospective use of the goyernment, it has not
been deemed advisable to recommend any expenditure. Reference is
respectfully made to the report from this office of September 30, 1859,
^upon the matter.
Total amount of appropriation,...
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860

,....,./

Balance available

$290,800 00
195,476 31
95,323 69

OGDENSBURG, NEW YORK.

Nothing has been done in reference to the construction of a building authorrzed at Ogdensburg, New York, for the accommodation of
a custom-house, post office, and court-room.
Parties in interest have made application that the site purchase4
be abandoned and a new one, more favorably to individual interests,
be purchased. As the necessity for such a change is not apparent,
no action uppn the application has been recommended.
Total amount of appropriation
ooo«o«., $118,000 00
Amount withdrawn to September 30, I860.......
9,141 75
Balance available.

108,858 25
PLATTSBURG, NEW YORK.

The grading of the grounds about the,new custom-house a t Platts-'
burg, New York, has been completed, and the building is furnished
and occupied throughout.
Total amount of appropriation
,
Amount withdrawn to September 30, I860................

$79,900 00
79,900 00

PERTH AMBOY, NEW JERSEY.

Keference is respectfuily made to' the report of last year upon this
work, no change having taken place and no action had in reference
to its construction since the date of that report.
Total amount of appropriation
•..
,
Amount withdrawn to September 30, I860.,.
Balance available....

..o.c

,,..........,..

$24,000 00.
3,354 66
.«.

20,645 34'

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.

The contract for repairing the damage occasioned by fire to the Baltimore custom-house has been executedj the work commenceid, and, ife.;




90=

REPORT ON THE FINANCES

is expected, will be completed by or before January next. In preparing the plans for repairs, some changes have been made in the
arrangement of rooms, which it is believed will promote the convenience of the offi.ce while it has lessened the cost of the work. The
original estimate for these repairs was $15,000, but a contract has
been made on the remodelled plan for $7,800, which will make the
work strictly fire-proof in that portion which is under repair.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860

,.

Balance available

$15,000 00
15,000 00

WHEELING, VIRGINIA.

The new custom-house at W^heeling, Virginia, has been furnished
during the past year from.the appropriation made for the purpose at
the recent session of Congress, at a total cost of $698 75.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available
Q

*
.

$118,711 00
117,936 17
.,

774 83

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA.

No appropriation was made at the last session of Congress for the
continuation of the work upon the new custom-house at Charleston,
South Carolina, but $5,000 was appropriated fbr preserving the work
and $15,000 for the payment of materials delivered.
In accordance with the policy indicated by this action, instructions
were issued to the contractor to deliver no more materials except such
as might be in process of shipment at the time of the receipt of such
instructions, and payment has been confined to the cargo then in
transit, of about thirty tons, which was delivered at Charleston dn
the 7th of August. No payments have been made on previous, deliveries. Instructions were also issued to the superintendent to confine
the work to the available means. His project of operations under,
these instructions was approved, and if the directions of the department are carried out the appropriation will be exhausted upon the
date of the commencement of the coming session of Congress, (December 3, I860.)
The act of appropriation directed the Secretary of the Treasury to
state, in his ^* next annual report on the finances, the amount of "further appropriations that may be required to finish this custom-house,
and the time necessary to complete the same, and whether any changes
can be made, consistent with the purposes for which the building is
intended, which will reduce the cost of completion." In accordance
with this direction I received your instructions to inspect this work,
as well as the one at New Orleans*, and obtain the necessary data to



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

91

enable you to make the required report, and to accompany it with
such recommendations as this, office would deem desirable after such
inspection ; but, as you are aware, it has been impossible for me, up
to the present date, to be absent a sufficient time for the purpose. I,
however, anticipate being able to make the journey as soon as the
active out-door operations cease fbr the season, in time for the matter
to be made a subject of special report to Congress during its present
session.
A general summary of the work done during the year is as follows :
The marble masonry has been carried up to the modillion course on
the east side of south front, and the columns and architraves set on
the north side of east front; the girders and beams for ceiling over
court-room in west wing, the iron columns and girders in east wing,
and the beams in north wing for attic floors, have been set and the
arches turned between them ; the heating and ventilating flues in basement nearly completed ; part of the foundation and arch for western
steps built, with other small details of construction.
The total number of pieces of marble set, which had been received
from contractors, is forty-three pieces, and of granite four pieces, only
four of these forty-three piece-i of marble being from the shipment
received August 7. These four enabled the superintendent to set
thirty-nine of those already in hand, which had been kept from place
waiting this shipment.
146,900.bricks have been laid during the year, while 30,190 feet
of lumber have been used, with 4,909 pounds of iron.
There are now on hand fit for use at Charleston 649 pieces of marble and 100 pieces of granite, which, from their nature, cannot be set
until further deliveries are made by the contractor. This cannot be
done until authority of Congress is obtained therefor^ by additional
appropriation for continuing the work.
If it be the policy of Congress to have the work cease altogether
upon this building, no appropriation will be required for its preservation, as provision has already been made for such preservation as is
practicable. This, at the best, is but partial, from the nature of the
case.' More or less injury must undoubtedly ensue from a stoppage
of the work, as has already been fully detailed in former reports and in
. the various communications to Congress, which are here respectfully
referred to, and their arguments reiterated, as the experience of the
past year gives them additional weight, and fully certifies the truth
of the conclusions therein presented.
If Congress should, at its next session, make an appropriation to
continue the work, the marble and other material required could be
obtained and the work brought to a speedy completion ; and to effect
this an immediate appropriation for continuing the work during the
coming year of $500,000 would be required.
Total amountof appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available...




..,.

......,..».,......,,....,.,.

'

$2,073,000 00
2,029,438 36
43,566 64

92

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

MOBILE, ALABAMA.

Nothing has been done during the past year in reference to repairing the damage, to the new custom-house at Mobile occasioned by fire,
for which an appropriation has been raade. The work not b;dng of
immediate necessity, the action has been deferred until the state of the
revenue would better warrant its expenditure.
Some repairs and alterations are reported by the collector to be ne^
cessary, which will be reported upon in detail after an opportunity
occurs for inspecting the work.
Total amount of appropriation...
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860...
Balance available...

,

,

$402,600 00
392,054 94
10,545 06

Congress, at its last session,,omitted to make any appropriation for
continuing the work upon the New Orleans custom-house, but appro-,
priated $20,000 for fitting up the post office porlion, $25,000 to pay
for materials delivered, and $5,000 for preserving the work.
In accordance with the policy indicated by these appropriations the,
contractors for materials were notified to ship no more after the date
of the receipt of the notice, except such as might be in process of
shipment, and payments have been confined to such deliveries. The
superintendent^ was also instructed to confine his operations to the
amount available, which, it is expected, will be exhausted before the
commencement of the coming session of Congress.
At the end of the first quarter of the present fiscal year the marble
work of the collector's room had been advanced to the dentil course.
under the corona, one-half of which had been set. The setting of the
long beams over the Uriited States court-room (sixty-four feet long by
four feet deep) had been commenced, and the iron floors on the fourth,
story generally well advanced. The brick work also of these floors,,
and of intersecting walls, and backing up of marble entablature_, were
in good progress.
Since the end of the first quarter tho works have been prosecuted in
strict accordance with the policy of Congress, incurring no obligations
beyond the actual necessities of the work, in placing materials already
purchased, and keeping the contingent expenses require 1 for that object down to an extreme minimum figure, applying also the v/orkmanghip in the meanwhile to the most imperishable parts of the structure,
in the event of the means being long withheld by Congress for the
construction of the permanent roof cover, which result would neces' sarily be attended with serious and rapid deterioration to-many parts
of the interior.
In the collector's room the corona course has been nearly completed,
and the brick backing brought up to that level.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

93

The granite work ofthe exterior fronts has been set complete up to
the architrave line of the entablature, except the part injured by the
fire of December 16, 1859.
All the iron floors and segmental arches of the fourth story have
been finished up except around the hoist-ways, and the first section of
upright iron beams forming the frame ofthe clear-story ofthe collector's room have been set complete.
The party walls of brick o n t h e fourth floor have been advanced
with the rest of the interior work of that floor, but are not yet completed.
The scaffolding around the building was sold at public auction on
the 25th of January, and the whole was taken down by the contracting purchasers June 8, 1860, and by the end of themonth nearly
all the old material removed from the ground. The front of the
buildirig thus entirely opened to view is reported to present a solid
and impressive architectural effect, comporting admirably with the
color and nature of the material employed. This effect will be greatly
enhanced by the addition of the entablature and massive projecting
Cornice, whenever the funds for that object are supplied by Congress.
During the year the force of mechanics and laborers has been
necessarily kept down to a low mark, owing,to the failure of Congress.
to make provision for tlie active prosecution of the work.
^
The balance of appropriations on hand being of srnall amount, and
the new appropriations made by the late Congress being for special
objects, the general operations of the work are reduced to the lowest
minimum, at a point where the absence of the roof cover of iron subjects the entire work to great injury, the whole iron system within the
walls to corrosion, and the health of the government officers occupying
its partially finished rooms to jeopardy; for every rain that falls
penetrates to the greater part of the structure, while the temporary
roofs cover but a comparatively small area, and the sunshine only
reaches the water pools in small patches. The damp thus generated
is ofthe most injurious character, hence it is of the highest importance
to this work that an early appropriation should be made by Oongress
for its active prosecution.
504,494 bricks have been laid during the past year, 775 tons of
tnarble and 651 tons of granite put in place, and the consumption of
iron for the same uses of the building has been 506,085 pounds.
The arguments submitted in j)i'evious reports of the real econoniy
to be attained by prosecuting the work to rapid completion, it is not
deemed necessary to now repeat. The experience of the past year
strengthens and confirms the opinions then submitted, and they are
respectfully referred to as embodying the opinion of this office, con-^
firmed by experience.
If the work is to be economically pushed to completion, I deem an
immediate appropriation of $500,000 desirable; but if the work is to
be entirely suspended, (as it must be if no new appropriations are
made,) no sum is asked for for its preservation, for no expenditure
for less than the construction of the entire roof would be of any avail,
arid this would only be a partial protection.
A similar direction by Congress to that given for the work at



94

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Charleston accompanies the appropriation, directing the Secretary of
the Treasury to state, ^^ in his next annual report on the finances, the
amount of further appropriations that may be required to finish this
custom-house, and the time necessary to complete the same; arid
whether, any changes can be made, consistent for the purposes for
which the building is intended, which will reduce the cost of completion;" but, for reasons hereinbefore stated in reporting upon the
work at Charleston, the necessary data have not yet been obtained.
I t is expected the opportunity will be made to report in detail, in
compliance with this direction, by special report during the present
session of Congress.
No report has been received from the local isuperintendent in
reference to the settlement of the foundation walls of this building
during the past year, but to correct a typographical error in the last
report from this office the table then submitted is here reproduced.
Inches.

Maximum settlement since December, 1851
Minimum settlement since December, 1851
Mean settlement since December, 1851
Maximum settlement in 1857-'58
•
Minimum settlement in 1857-'58
Mean settlement in 1857-'58
Maximum settlement during the past pear
Minimum settlement during the past year
Mean settlement during the past year

,

,

Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

—

22.57
15.63
18.90
3.50
66
2.05
2.63
Nil,
1.52
$2,975,258 00
2,912,143 54

,

,,.

63,114 46

QUARANTINE WAREHOUSE, BELOW NEW ORLEANS.

The new warehouse directed by Congress to be constructed at the
quarantine station below New Orleans, has been completed during
the past year, and turned over to the collector. The work is reported
to be well done, and creditable to the contractor, who undertook the
work at a rate which involved him in a pecuniary loss. The superintendent, however, reports that he has faithfully fulfilled his contract.
The wharf for the use of the warehouse has not yet been completed.
The work is under, contract, but the contractor has, at three different
times, had his collected materials scattered by the violent storms of
the coast, and additional time has therefore been given him fbr completion.
•
The selection of this site was an unfortunate and injudicious one,
but was designated by act of Congress. No option of selection was
with the department. The act of appropriation required it to be
located at the quarantine station. It has thus been exposed to the
violent storms from the southeast, so common in the autumn upon



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

95

that coast, and which are comparatively inocuous upon the other or
east side of the river. These storms during the present season have
entirely destroyed the levee about the building, and measurably
injured the building itself, entailing a cost for repairs and an abandonment of the levee. The superintendent reports that a location on the
other side ofthe river would have avoided these disasters, and adds
that he very much doubts if the building will ever be iised for the
purposes desired, as the temporary one made there by the State was
never used as a warehouse. It may be that a sufficiently costly levee
can be constructed around the entire building at the proper season of
the year to protect it froiri'the storms to which that side of the river
is exposed, but in view ofthe opinion expressed by the superintendent
of its probable nori-use, no recommendation is made for such construction. Such repairs as are necessary to the building have been authorized, the levee abandoned, (except the front levee and revetment,) and
the contractor for the wharf is again at work collecting the neces^
sary materials for the completion of his work under his contract.
Total amount of appropriation...
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

$50,000 00
33',706 94
16,293 06

GALVESTON, TEXAS.

The work upon the new custom-house and post office at G-alveston,
Texas, remained in the same condition as detailed in the last annual
report from this office, until the close of the fiscal year, no work
having been done by the contractor during that period.
In the month of June, 1860, the contract was, with the assent of the
depai^tment, assigned to contractors of ability and experience, who immediately put the work in hand, and have prosecuted it with conimendable vigor to this date. The entire materials for the work have been
provided, and the main portions put together at the north. These
have since been taken down, and the entire work shipped to Galveston.
I t is confidently expected that the building will be made ready for
occupancy by the close of the present fiscal year.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30,1860
Balance available.....

,

$116,000 00
26,401 04.
89,598 96

ST, LOUIS, MISSOURI.

Reference is r^espectfully made to the report from this office of last
year for important facts and particulars relating to the new qustomr
house and post office at St, Louis, Missouri, which are unchanged at
the date of the present report. The'Outstanding claims are still



96

-REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

unpaid, and cannot be discharged until an appropriation shall be
made by Congress for the purpose,
Upon a recent inspection the building was found in a very filthy
condition, and the entire interior work, particularly the wood work,
to be of a very in fierier character. A janitor has since been appointed
to take charge of the building and keep it in proper order. Manyrepairs are needed, and other work, necessary either to complete alterations which have been begun, or to restore portions of it to its original
design. Both alteration and original design are now imperfect.
It
is neither the one nor the other, and a portion of the vestibule was
open during the past season, exposed to the elements. This work
caunot be done until there is an appropriation by Congress for the
purpose. The premises were also found encumbered and disfigured
with booths and signs, and orders have been issued for their removal.
The owners of the building next adjoining the custom-house property having built close up^to their line, had encroached for areas upon
the government property, and preparations had been made for further
encroachment. This has been stopped, and when the custom-house
grounds are enclosed it will preclude access to that side of their building. If the new work had been placed as far from the line as the
custom-house has been placed, there would ha-ve been sufficient area
for light to both buildings. As it is tbe adjoining building has shut
off so much light from the custom-house rooms on this side as to
eeriously impair their usefulness, and render them disagreeable to thd
occupants.
Total amount of appropriation $361,000, which has all been withdrawn from the treasury,
LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY.

The, new custom-house building at Louisville, Kentucky, was reported finished and occupied at this date last year. At that tinfe the
holding of the courts in the city of Louisville had not been authorized ;
but, Congress at its last session directed that a term of the circuit and
district courts ofthe United States for the district of Kentucky should
be held in that city. ID accordance with the detail of that act the
court took possession of the rooms in the building designed for the
purpose; but finding the large court-room inconveniently furnished,
and too open to the noise from the street, the court was held in the
marshal's room. Changes are now desired, which it is expected wiil
be made a subject of application by the officers of the courts at the
coming session of Congress.
This result adds another to the proofs already in existence of the
impolicy of combining a court-house and post.office under the same
roof in a large city. The post office from its nature requires a^ location in or near the business part of the city, and consequently the
noisest, while a court-house should be in the most centrally quiet location that can be procured. At Louisville, as at other places, the noise
of drays and carriages, constantly passing and repassing, obstructs
the business of the courts, rendering it difficult for many witnesses to




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

97

be heard, and seriously embarrassing the action of grand juries in
their sessions.
In locating such buildings it has always been the aim of the engineer in charge to procure sites, whenever purchased, near to, but not
on, great thoroughfares, in order not to disturb the courts, or place
the post office too far from a business centre. But the very location
of the post office necessarily draws business about it, and this in a
great degree neutralizes his care in the selection.
In large cities the business of the post office and the holding of the
courts should be provided for in separate and distinct buildings in different localities.
The .appropriation for the work is entirely exhausted.
KNOXVILLE AND NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.

Nothing has been done towards commencing the works authorized
at Knoxville and Nashville since the last annual report. Offers of
sites have been made at Knoxv^ille, but no action has been had upon
them. The site at Nashville was purchased two years since, and is
now rented and occupied as a wood and coal yard.
Nashville,
Totalamount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860

$124,500 00
20,284 31

Balance available...

104,215 69
. Knoxville.

Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

$96,800 00
231 81
..•..

96,568 19

DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

The custom-house building at Detroit is nearly completed and partially occupied.
At the date of the last annual report the building was enclosed, and
for the most part furred; the basement and first stories were lathed in
readiness for plastering. The works were ordered to be completed so
far as the necessities of the post office seryice only were concerned.
Since that time the ppst office portion of the,building has been entirely completed, and the postmaster opened it for public business on
the first day of February last. Owing to the very large amount of
business transacted in his office beyond that originally contemplated,
it became necessary to provide more room for majling purposes. The
rear portion ofthe basement was therefore floored, a dumb waiter put
7



98

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

up for conveying matter above, and the mailing is all done on the
lower story.
. .
On the 24th of February last, instructions were given to fit up the
stoiage room in the basement for a bonded warehouse. This has been
done, and the room so used for some months past. An iron derrick
has been erected on the north side for raising and lowering goods/and
the door under staircase leading from the first story has been protected
by a proper iron strap, with hinged hasps at the ends secured by two
strong padlocks.
The custom-house portion of the building is now completed, and
orders have been issued to complete the third story or court-house portion. I t is expected the whole will be ready for occupation by the 1st
of January next.
This work was taken from the contractor at an early period, under
a clause in the contract providing for such a course in certain emergencies, and has since been prosecuted by days' work under the immediate inspection of the local superintendent.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860..,',.,.o
Balanee available....

$217,071 17
203,305 88
,

13,765 29

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

The new custom-house building at Chicago is entirely completed.
Upon inspection it was fo.und to be finished in every respect (Teditably
fco the contractors; its accommodations ample for all the uses for which
it was designed; and the entire work a permanent ornament to the city.
The building will challenge comparison, with any similar structure in
the country,
; It is to be regretted that its approaches are unsightly and inconvenient. Through some unexplained action, or lack of action, on the
part of the city government. Dearborn street is permitted to be encumbered with old buildings, which not only obstruct the access of the
public, but make a marked and unpleasant contrast to the beauty of
the work, detracting largely from its general effect; and they will, if
not removed, be likely to harbor a class of busineas and occupation
riot in keeping witb the proper surroundings of a government work.
The building is on a corner lot, and has at present ample light on
all sides; but as the government owns only ten feet of way on the
rear, opposite Dearborn street, the light upon that side is liable to be
obscured whenever the adjoining land is built upon, and the usefulness of the rooms on that side ofthe building seriously impaired.
The adjoinirig lot should be the property of the government for its
own protection. If built upon, it may not only obstruct light, but
be devoted to uses which would be detrimental to government interes tfi.
Orders have been issued for furnishing the building, and it is expected that it will be occupied in all its parts by the coming sessioii
of,Con gress.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

Total amount of appropriation,

o..,.

Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
,

Balance available..

«,.......

99

$447,733 88
'...,...,....

351,165 53
96,568 35

CAIRO, ILLINOIS.

Nothing has been done in reference to the building authorized to
be erected at Cairo, Illinois. A site has been gratuitously tendered
by the Illinois Kailroad Company, but it has never been examined by
an agent of the departraent.
Total amount of appropriation
$50,000 00
Amount withdrawn to September ;iO, 1860
...,.,,^
Balance available

50,000 00
DUBUQUE, IOWA.

The fear expressed in the last annual report from this office, that
the contractor for the new custom-rhouse building at Dubuque would
abandon the work, has been realized. Ih April last the acting contractor voluntarily abandoned the work, and, with one of his sureties,
requested the government to prosecute it to completion. A formal
notice was therefore served upon the contractor, pursuant to the clause
in the contract providing for such an emergency, and, at the expiration
of the period prescribed therein, the work was (on the 25th of April,
1860) taken in hand by the department, to be completed at the ultimate cost of the contractor and his securities.
This adds another to the list of proofs in this office of the bad policy
of accepting the lowest bid for a work, irrespective of its being a fair
or remunerative price to the bidders. It is sirnilar to the cases at
Portsmouth, New Haven, Richmond, Indianapolis, and other places.
Experience proves it to be an unwise practice. There is nothing in
the law or acts of appropriation making it a necessity. I t is only a
practice, not a law; and the department, in its advertisement inviting
proposals, expressly *' reserves the right to reject the proposals invited,
or any part thereof, if the interest of the United States requires i t ; "
but, so far as I am aware, it has never availed itself of this right,
always giving the work to the lowest bidder, if, indeed, that bidder
did not refuse to perform after his bid was accepted.
I am aware that a contrary practice would be attended with many
difficulties, but I think none so great as grow out of the present
practice. If a contrary rule obtained, unscrupulous 'bidders would
very likely put in proposals at a low rate, (as I think is already done,)
with the express object of their being rejected, that they might, upon
such rejection, found a claim upon which to go before Congress for
relief. But it would be better to encounter an ill-founded or unjust
claim than to meet the large pecuniary loss and building difficulties
which grow out of the acceptance ofa bid below a fair price.
It has been supposed that this evil could be guarded against by a
rigid scrutiny of the sufficiency of the securities offered, but practice



100

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

proves this precaution of no avail. In no single instarice in the his- .
tory of this office have contractors' bonds been prosecuted to a successful issue, and I am not aware that any now pending give promise
of a better result. However careful the department may have been
in its scrutiny of securities' sufficiency, different causes combine to
neutralize its caution.
In some instances, parties who were abundantly responsible when
accepted, have, before the liability ripened, passed to the other extreme of the pecuniary scale, making judgments, if obtained, literally
worthless; in others the department has either been deceived in its
preliminary inquiries, or' the securities have placed their property
beyond its reach. These bonds are too often given as a mere friendly
act to the bidder, the responsibilities assumed not considered, and
treated as merely matters of form; and, not unfrequently, when ripened .
to liability, they are considered of such a nature that no means, however unworthy, are deemed disreputable for the obligor to adopt to
avoid their payment.
y
There is no doubt whatever on my mind that the practice alluded
to is an unwise one, and. that the sooner it is abandoned and a proper
discrimination exercised in making an award, the sooner will the
treasury be benefited, the buildings be better constructed, and the
difficulties of prosecuting the work be largely lessened.
It being fouud that the remainder of the appropriation was insuffi- o
cient to complete this work according to the original design, changes
have accordingly been made, and certain portions omitted, so that the
building can be made ready for occupancy within the means at the
department's disposal. These changes consisted mainly in bringing the court-room and its auxiliary accommodations from the third
floor to the second, and transferring the customs room to the third
story, with the omission of finishing some parts ofthe baseraent story.
The department had directed that the stone for this building should
be taken from the Nauvoo quarries, and the contractor had, in consequence, opened and worked quarries at Nauvoo for that purpose.
These were taken possession of by the department when it assumed
the work, and the value of the tools placed to the contractor's credit.
Work on the building was not resumed until May 28, and it has been
uninterruptedly prosecuted up to the present time. The walls are
carried up and levelled around the building to the springing line of
the third story windows, or six courses of ashlar above the top of the
second belting, leaving only four courses to reach the cornice. For
want of Nauvoo stone, the further setting was suspended on the 27th
of September. Work at Nauvoo was suspended on the 24th of
August, and a custodian employed to take charge of the stone, tools,
and machinery. The second and third story beams, girders, and
columns, have been set and thoroughly secured in their places. The ^
cellar partition walls have been completed, and nine of the brick
arches of the first floor laid; doors and exterior sash about half completed, and all the window frames, besides other carpentry work, on
hand. Sonae Nauvoo dressed ashlar is on hand, and some chimney
3tone.
Upon a recent inspection of the building it was found that the work



liEPORT ON THE FINANCES-

101

would be seriously delayed, and its cost largely enhanced by continuing the use of the Nauvoo stone, and its use was consequently abandoned. The balance of the stone (being t h a t required for the frieze
and cornice) has been purchased from the Athens quarries, of a much
better and more suitable quality, at about one-fifth of the cost of the
Nauvoo stone; and as it will only be used above the ashlar, the
slight difference in color is not objectionable.
The building wouldi have been l3y this time completed if the Athens
stone had been originally selected; but^as it is, it will be completed
long in advance of any necessity for its construction.
This work is one of a number directed by Congress of a given size
and prescribed materials. The necessity for its construction does not
exist. The business of the port is transacted by one person only, and
he has nothing to do to transact it. He requires no office—he has not
collected a dollar of revenue during the last year—has enrolled or
licensed no vessels, and registered no seamen. The present post office
appears to be ample for immediate and prospective wants, and the^
holding of the courts requires no such accommodations as are provided
for them.
i
To build this costly and substantial work would seem, therefore, a
work of supererogation'. W h a t the ultimate wants of the port may
be is purely conjectural; but judging from the retroaction of its
growth the past year, it will be a long time before the building will
be a necessity or its ample accommodations be needed.
It is expected that it will be ready for occupancy by the close ofthe
present fiscal year.
;
Totalamount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available
MILWAUKIE,

».

,,.
,

$138,800 00
93,513 41
45,286 59

WISCONSIN.

The damage occasioneli to the new custom-house at Milwaukie by
fire, noted in the last report from this office, remains unrepaired, no
appropriation having been made by Congress for the purpose. The
original appropriation for the work is entirely withdrawn.

MAKINE HOSPITALS.
Reference is respectfully made to former reports from this office, in
which the small necessity that exists for many appropriations for marine hospitals has been forcibly presented, and their impolicy, as well
as injustice to the searaen, earnestly argued. Each additional year's
experience with organized marine hospitals adds to the proof of the
correctness of the views heretofore presented, and they cannot be too
often recommended to the attention of Congress. The present method
of appropriation is manifestly unjust ond cruel to sick and disabled
seamen.
The hard-earned pittance of the sailor, from which a



102

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

morithly tax is collected, forms a common fund, which is exhausted in the
costly support of a few organized hospitals, leaving the care of many
unfortunates to the chance legislation made to cover the deficiency.
Many hospitals receiving this costly support, with an organized corps
of physicians^ stewards, nurses, &c., are without patients, but are
supported from the common fund', although the port to which they
belong may not contribute a dollar towards maintaining the establishments. Some hospitals are provided for in malarious localities, where
it is positive cruelty to remove a seaman with a broken limb or other
injury, to contract and probably die of a miasmatic disease; thus, at
a sacrifice of the common fund, and at a cost to the government, exposing him to results perhaps more fatal than would be his entire
neglect. I cannot too earnestly call attention to the ,evils of this improvident and unjust system.
BURLINGTON, VERMONT.

Nothing has been done during the past year to the new marine
hospital at Burlington, Vermont. It has never been furnished or
occupied ; arid so long as the disabled seamen at this point can be
cared for at so much less annual cost than the annual cost of an organized hospital, it is not probable that any steps will be taken for its
occupation. Meanwhile the building is taking injury_, and must suffer
constant deterioration while unoccupied.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

,

,

$43,650 00
36,993 02
6,656 98

PORTLAND, MAINE.

The marine hospital at Portland^ Maine, is reported to need a new
roof and some other minor repairs, but no opportunity has been offered
for its inspection by this office during the past year, and the particulars ofthe work required cannot therefore be detailed or their approximate cost ascertained, until opportunity occurs for such inspection.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available
CHELSEA,

$99,000 00
94,048 19
...^.

4,951 81

MASSACHUSETTS.

All the remaining \york upon the marine hospital at Chelsea, Mas- sachusetts, that could be done with the remaining balance of the
appropriation, has been performed, and the amount to the credit of
the construction is exhausted.




(1

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

103

PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA.

The repairs upon the marine hospital at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania,
have all been finished, and the building is reported to be in complete
order,
OCRACOKE, NORTH CAROLINA.

The repairs upon the Ocracoke marine hospital have been completed during the past year,
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA.

The marine hospital authorized at Wilmington, North Caroliria,
has been corapleted during the past year, but it has not been furnished or occupied. Upon a recent inspection, it was found to be
taking injury from neglect. The collector was authorized to place a
careful person there as keeper, with no other compensation than the
rent, but the department is not yet advised that it has been done.
He was also instructed to make an estimate of the cost of supplying
some ofthe contractor's omissions, and for the better protection ofthe
work^ but no report in reply is yet received.
Nothing has been done in reference to enclosing the grounds. The
land is not worth the cost of enclosure, and while the building remains unoccupied a fence is not a necessity.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

$51,324 00
42,155 19
9,168 81

PENSACOLA AND KEY WEST.

Nothing has been done in reference to the buildings authorized to
be constructed at- Pensacola and Key West, Florida, since the last
annual report from this office.
Amount of appropriation at Pensacola
Amount of appropriation at Key West

$22,000 00
27,100 00

NBAV ORLEANS, LOUISIANA.

The work upon the New Orleans marine hospital is entirely suspended, as the appropriation for the purpose has been exhausted.
The original contract for this work was largely within the amount
appropriated for the purpose, and it was supposed it could be entirely
completed without additional means. But the nature of the work
being entirely novel—that is, an iron exterior, with filling' of unburned pressed clay—much of it was experimental, and, upon trial,
the original design was found impracticable in many of its details.
After the work upon the walls had been some time in progress, the



104

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

project of filling with pressed clay blocks was abandoned, and a brick
filling substituted.
In addition to this, numerous changes and extras were adopted,
which, altogether, have swelled the cost of the work far beyond the
amount originally contemplated. The movable property has been
stored within the building, and an inventory thereof filed in the
superintendent's oflSce^ who reports that he has taken every means
to secure the premises from injury during the cessation of the work.
The whole has been placed under charge of a watchman, and will
thus remain until means are provided for its completion,
I am unable to make an estimate of the amount required for conipletion, inasmuch as the superintendent's report does not clearly advise
me of its present state, and the annual photographic views of the work
have been countermanded, while no opportunity has been had for its
personal inspection. It is expected that such an estimate can be seasonably furnished for Congress, if it is decided to continue the work
upon the building by further appropriations. The building is now
underroof; the iron work reported by the contractor to be completed
with some minor exceptions, and the interior ready for the wood.work,
whieh they report to be partly in place, and all delivered. But from
these meagre outlines, and these only in part official, it is obvious that
I can make no reliable estimate ofthe cost of completing the work. I t
was reported last year by the superintendent that $100,000 more would
be required to complete the.edifice and grounds '* after the contractors
had completed their work," but as the contractors are not yet fully
paid, and other changes have since occiirred, it is probable the super^
intendent will augment his estimate in restating it.
Total amount of appropriation
$521,459 20
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
,505,248 68
Balance available

,

*16,2i0 52

ST. LOUIS^ MISSOURI,

No work has been performed upon the sewer at the St. Louis marine
hospital during the past year. It is a work of great necessity and
should be completed. There is now no outlet for the hospital, and
everything is required to be carried from it by hand. The effect of
accumulated offal upon the grounds seriously affects the sanative usefulness of the hospital. The resident officers are doing all in their
power, and fbr the facilities they possess, the hospital is in a very creditable condition; but this, and a few other equally needed repairs^
should be made. The entire building requires painting, both for the
comfort ofthe patients and the preservation ofthe work.
Application has been made by the owner of the adjoining property
for an exchange ofa small triangular part ofthe front of the hospital
grounds for an equal area of land upon the rear of the lot. From a
^ This balance has since been absorbed by paj-ments to the contractors, except a smaU
^
sum retained for payment of watchman, wages, &c.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

105

personal inspection ofthe premises, I cannot recommend this exchange.
The rear land that would be so acquired would not, for hospital uses,
be worth enclosing; while the triangular front corner, though not
needed for the hospital, has a value which may be made available for
its repair. I respectfully recommend that Congress be asked fbr
authority to sell this portion before it is enclosed, and apply the avails
ofthe sale to the much needed work upon the building.
Nothing has been done during the past year in reference to enclosing the grounds. The appropriation for the work (represented by the
available balance herewith reported) will probably be sufficient, but
it cannot be economically or judiciously expended until the city of St.
Louis completes the grading of the street on the rear of the hospital
lot. One of the conditions of the compromise by which the title to
this lot was established in the government, was that the city should
grade this street, which, by the coraproraise, was opened. This condition was not fulfilled, and the teraporary culvert built by the city
across this road has fallen in, thus creating a noisome deposit upon
the hospital lot.
Total amount of appropriation
$118,574 00
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
93,397 96
Balance available

25,176 04

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY.

The roof of the marine hospital at Louisville, Kentucky, was partially destroyed by a violent gale in the month of May last. It has
since been repaired at a cost of $1,734 90, and the repaired portion is
as good as the remainder; but it was originally constructed in an injudicious manner, not having been properly anchoied to the walls or
upper floor, and is liable to like injury upon the recurrence ofa similar gale.
Total amount of appi"opriatiou
$63,500 33
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
63,500 33
OHIO.

The same gale which unroofed the Louisville marine hospital, stripped off a portion of the marine hospital at Cincinnati.
This has been well repaired at a cost of $1,831 71.
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.

Keference is respectfully made to the report from this office of last
year, upon the necessity of protecting the river front of the site of the
marine hospital at Evansville. Upon examining the premises the
past season, and carefully noting the additional loss of land since that
report was rendered, the opinion then expressed, was confirmed of the
imperative necessity of the work, but that it would be of compara


06

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES,

tively little use to slope and grade the bank until the owner of the
adjoining property should do the same. The work should be concur^
rent upon the whole exposed portion within the bend, below the city,
to be of permanent benefit.
The available balance of the appropriation for this work I do not
deem sufficient tor properly protecting the bank. It would probably
require from $7,000 to $8,000 to perform the work thoroughly and
make it permanent.
f
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860.

$62,500 00
58,0-^0 74

Balance available.

4,459 27
DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

The grounds about the new marine hospital at Detroit have been
fenced and drained during the past season in a thorough manner, and
authority has been given for finishing the grounds, by transplanting
trees, shrubs, &c.
Total araount of appropriation
Araount withdrawn to September 30,1860
Balance available

$113,000 00
102,663 21

,

10,336 79

CUSTOM-HOUSES, POST OFFICES, ETC.
RUTLAND, VERMONT.

The grading and fencing of the grounds about the new court-house
and post office at Kutland, Vermont, is reported to be finished ; but,
upon inspection, it was not found to be done in accordance with the
contract, and payment is consequently delayed. The other out-door
work is completed, and the building is occupied.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

c

$75,900 00
67,939 57
7,960 43

WINDSOR, VERMONT.

. The grading and enclosing of the grounds about the Windsor courthouse and post office—a work of sorae magnitude—has been completed
in a thorough and workmanlike manner, and the building is occupied
by the different officers for whom it was designed.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES,.

Total araountof apprppriation
'Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860

..,.., $76,000 00
75.439 62

Balance available

560 38

BALTIMORE COURT-HOUSE.

A contract has been executed, under the direction of the President,
for the construction of the new court-house at Baltimore, Maryland,
after plans of his approval, for the sum of $112,808 04.
The building is designed to be of hammered granite of massive
proportions, with ample accommodations for all the uses contemplated,
and it is expected that it will be finished, should no unforeseen contingencies occur, within two years from the date of its commencement.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount expended to September 30, I860....

$200,000 00
54,270 83

Balance available

145,729 17

BALTIMORE POST OFEICE.

The work upon the authorized change—to convert the property
bought of the Baltimore Exchange Company to the uses of the post
office—was reported completed in the last annual report. The accounts are still unsettled. Some work was performed by the enterprising contractor which he deemed a necessity, but which, the department could not authorize, as the appropriation fbr the work was insufficient for its performance! This has been made the subject of a
claim, upon which a special report has been rendered.
Totalamount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available...

,

$S00,000 00
299,726 11
273 89

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.

The original contractor for tbe court-house and post office at Indianapolis failed to comply with his proposals, and the assignees of his
bid, after" making an atterapt, also abandoned the work; and new
contractSj at an advanced rate, were made with difierent parties for
its construction.
In the last annual report the fact of encountering quicksand in
placing the foundation was reported, with the details of means adopted
to make the work stable, and the hope was confidently expressed that
such desideratum had been attained. The work was only then advanced one story. Subsequent addition to .the superstructure has



108

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

proved that the hope was delusive. The foundations prove to be inadequate—the building has settled, cracking the lintels of the windows, breaking the door thresholds, &c., &c. Orders have been
issued to replace the broken thresnolds, a.nd protect the work so far
as circumstances will permit; but it is feared that it will never be a
structure of permanent stability.
The work upon it has not progressed satisfactorily, either in promptness or style of execution, ' T h e superintendent has labored under
extraordinary difficulties in its prosecution, but has. devoted himself
laboriously to his duties, and accomplished as much as could be expected under the adverse circumstances with which he has had to
contend.
One of the contractors has presented various claims for extra work,
and fbr alteration of his contracts, which have been passed upon, and
such portion of them as were deemed in any inanner proper and
equitable have been allowed ; thus swelling the cost o,f the work not
only beyond the offer of the original bidder, but beyond what it was
supposed would accrue underthe new detailed contracts.
The stone work has been corapleted, the iron work nearly done,
and heating arrangeraent finished. The plurabing is well advanced,
and nearly all "but the entrance story plastered. The carpentry is
well in hand, and such as is ready has been painted. The superintendent expects to coraplete the work by the 1st of Marchj 1861.
Total araount of appropriation
$163,700 00
Amount withdrawn to September 30,1860
.\,
134,897 26
Balance available

28,802 74

Proposals for sites havebeen invited by advertiseraent, and received,
for the new court-houses at Columbia, South Carolina, and Tallahasse,Florida, but no action has yet been taken upon them.
Your attention has heretofore been called to the necessity for special
legislation in reference to the new court-houses authorized at Memphis,
Tennessee, and Springfield, Illinois, before the works can be commenced. At Memphis, the appropriation is for a court-house. It was
doubtless designed to be for a custom-house, as no UnitedStates courts
are held at Memphis, but it is a port of entry. The original appropriation was $50,000; $15,000 of this amount has been absorbed by the
purchase of a site, and the remaining balance is entirely insufficient
to build a fire-proof building in any way adequate to the present wants
of the service in this growing place. An additional appropriation of
$100,000 would be required for such a work as is called for by the
growth and future prospects of the city.
Total araount of appropriation
$50,000 00
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
,,,.,.
15,124 90
Balance available

.,

34,875 10

At Springfield, Illinois, a further appropriation will be required, or
the plans which are already published and bids received thereupon
under advertisement must be largely reduced in size and cost.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES

Total amount of appropriation..
,
Amount withdrawn to September 30^, 1860
Balance available

109

,

$R1,000 00
7,113 40
53,886 60

TERRITORIAL BUILDINGS.

An appropriation of $60,000, for the completion of the capitol in
the Territory of New Mexico, was made by th-; last Congress, conditioned that * no part thereof should be expended until detailed plans
^
and estimates for its entire completion had been prepared, submitted
to arid approved by the Secretary of the Treasury."
As the so far construction of the work has not been under the immediate direction of this office, but under the governor of the Territory, the
necessary data did riot exist in its archives to comply with the conditions of the act of the appropriation. Application was therefore made
, to the governor of the Territory for such details of it present condition
and supply of material as will enable me to prepare the necessary
plans and estimates fbr your approval.'
Total amount of appropriation
.,
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
j>

Balance available....^,..

$130,000
70,000
^

60,000

TREASURY EXTENSION.

The economy of a vigorous prosecution of the work upon the
Treasury extension was earnestly brought to your attention in the
last annual report from this office ; but as Congress only appropriated
$350,000 for the payment of delivered materials and for the construction of the work, you decided that comparatively so small an amount
would remain for prosecuting the work, after paying for materials, as
to render it impolitic to commence active operatioris upon the west
wing. The disbursements have therefore been confined to payment
for materials and the completion of the south wang and its approaches.
Under this decision the araount paid for work done upon the building
has been small, and will continue to be until means are more liberally
provided. The working force has been reduced, and its contingent.
expenses restricted to the narrowest practicable limit.
The roof of the building has recjuired renewal during the year.
The plan adopted was an experiment, which proved a failure, as it
leaked in every portion, materially injuring and defacing the interior
wbrk of the building. It has been reconstructed (in part) on wellestablished principles ; and so far as progressed is entirely impervious to
water, and will probably be permanently satisfactory. The balance of
it is in progress of construction, and will be completed before winter."
The cost has been largely greater than it would have been if properly
built at the outset, independent of the cost of repairing the injury to
the plaster work.



110

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

During theyear the Attorney General, with his assistant and clerks,
have moved into the apartments segregated for their use, which havebeen furnished from the appropriation for the purpose made by the
last Congres.8.
.
The officers of the Light-house Board have also moved into their
apartments, which have been partially furnished from the contingerit
fund of the board.
The rooms.designed for the First Auditor and his clerks are ready
for occupation whenever they shall be furnished. No appropriation
has yet been made for the necessary furniture and fixtures.
The portion designed for the Secrefary of the Treasury and clerks
has also beeu some time ready, but no appropriation has been made for
furniture.
The granite work of the extension of the south wing had been laid
at the date of the last report, with the exception of the steps and
buttresses of the east casement doorway, and the buttress caps of the
south portico, all of which, has since been properly executed. The
properly securing the joints of the granite cornice, balustrade, &c.,
against leaking, the cleaning'off the granite work, and pointing the
joints, has been going on as rapidly as possible. A design for a marble
pavement for the floor ofthe south portico and entrance vestibule has
been made, approved, and a contract entered into for its construction-,
which is being satisfactorily carried out. The plastering and the
painting, sanding and granitozing of the ceilings of the above portico
and vestibule have been done^ and when the new roof is completed
will be repaired and put in order, if not recoated with stucco, as will
also the two ceilings over the interior stairways, which are badly
injured.
A design has been made for fencing and grading the grourids immediately south of the Treasury extension, combining proper entrances
to theTreasury Building, the President's Mansion, and the President's
park south of it, and made to conform, as far as needful, to the grounds
of that park already laid out.
'.
This design was approved by the President on the 6tk instant, and
is now being carried out.
All the old buildings used for offices, shops, &c., that were immediately south of the building have been removed to a more appropriate
position for use when the work of the west wing shall be carried on ;
' and the premises are being put in order for executing in the raost
rapid manner the work on the west wing when it shall have been
decided to proceed with it. This involved the removing the President's
greenhouse to aimore eligible site on the opposite or west site of his
mansion, which isnow being done.
During the past year there has been used upon the Treasury extension 4 2 4 | tons of granite, 261,134 bricks, and 288,015 pounds of
wrought and cast iron.
The value of the materials, machinery, teams, tools, &c , on hand
* amounts to $365^103 81. Of this there are about 4,597 tons of granite,
costing $322,655 74 ; 214,655 bricks, costing $2,111 90 ; and 228,037
pounds of wrought and cast iron, costing $11,542 62.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Total amountof appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

Ill

$2,117,500 00
1,789,934 98

,.

^

327,565 02

A portion of this balance will be absorbed in payments for delivered
materials, the contractor having been but partially paid to tkis date ;
and the monthly disbursements will still further reduce it, so that the
amount available at the close of the season will be insufficient to go
on with the work in the spring. •
* If it shall be the policy of Congress to continue the.work, the amount
to be'appropriated will depend entirely upon the rapidity with which
the work is to be done.
The material fbr the exterior of the west wing being all in hand,
the necessary bricks and iron for the interior could be procured at
very brief notice, and such force be put upon it as the appropriation
would warrant. During the coming year probably $750,000 could be
judiciously expended towards completing the entire structure, vvhile
$500,000 would enable it to go on with good economy, and give work
to a large number of operatives, who only await the necessary appropriation to put in place the purchased materials, and such others as
are required for the placement of that in hand.
The following is a recapitulation of the works noted in the report
for which appropriations are necessary or desirable :
Charleston custom-house
Mobile custom-house
NewOrleans custom-house
St. Louis custom-house
Memphis custora-house.*.
Louisville custom-house
',,.,.
Mil waukie custom-house
Portland marine hospital
New Orleans marine hospital....
St. Louis marine hospital
Evansville marine hospital....
•
Treasury extension
:
Arinual repairs of custom-houses...
Annual repairs of marine hospitals.

,
„...,.....
\

,

.,,.....
"

$500,000 00
Indefinite.
500,000 00
Indefinite,
100,000 00
Indefinite,
Indefinite.
Indefinite.
,.
Indefinite,
Indefinite.
5,060 00
500,000 00
10,000 00
10,000 00

Appended to this report will be found seven tables exhibiting in
tabulated form various details of the business of this office, viz:
TABLE 1. Listof custom-houses and marine hospitals built or purchased
prior to 1850.
2. List of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, marine hospitalsj and miscellaneous works constructed since 1850,
together with those nov/ in course of construction, and
thode for which appropriations have been made, but the
work not yet commenced..
3. Shows the amount disbursed in each year since 1807 for the
various public works under the Treasury Department.



112

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

4. Shows the cost of public buildings finished since 1850, and
prior to September 30, 1857, with the amount of revenue
collected at eacb, and the cost ofits collection.
5, Gives the places where custom-houses, court-houses, and post
offices have been asked for prior" to Septeraber 30, 1857, but
not authorized, the araount of revenue collected at such
place, its cost of collection, and the probable cost of the
buildings asked for.
6, Shows the places where custom-houses, court-houses, and
post offices have been authorized, but not comraenced, with
the amount of revenue collected at each place, its cost of
collection, and the'probable cost of the building.
7, Shows the location and nature of each work purchased, constructed, or constructing, the total appropriations foreach,
date of purchase and cost of sites,-amount expended,
amount available, and amount required for completion of
each, date and amount of each contract, tirae of corapletion, and total cost.
All of which is respectfully subraitted.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
S. M. CLAKK,
Acting Engitieer in Charge, Treasury Department,

TABLE

Hon. HOWELL COBB,

Secretary ofi the Treasury.




113

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TABLE 1.
List qf custom-houses and marine hospitals purchased or huilt prior to
1850, with date ofi purchase or completion, and cost ofi purchase or
construction.
Location.

Uses of buildings. How acquired.

Purchased - .
Castine, Maine
, Custom-house
Built
Eastport, Maine
-, ....Jido
.do
..
Kennebunk, Maine
Purchased _.
-do.
Portland, Maine
.do.-_
-do.
Wiscasset, Maine
..,..-do..-.
-do.
do
Portsmouth, N. H
-do.
Salem, Mass
_-.
do....
,do.
Built
New Bedford, Mass
-do.
Purchased . .
Newburyport, Mass . . .
-do.
Built
Boston, Mass -_
-do.
Purchased . Providence, R. I
do----do.
Newport, R. I
-do.
-do.
New Haven, Conn
-do.
-do.
Middletown, Conn
.do.
-do.
New London, Conn
.do.
Built
New York city, N. Y-,
-do.
Purchased
Philadelphia, Pa
,
-do.
......do..,
Erie, Pa
Built
.doBaltimore, Md
Purchased ._
-do.
Alexandria, Va .-„
do
-do.
Norfolk, Va.
-dodo..,
Wilmington, N. C . - . .
-do.
do-.
Charleston, S. C
-do.
Built
Savannah, Ga
i.
-do.
Purchased
Mobile, Ala
-do.
do..
Key West, .Fla . . _ . . .
-doBy conquest.
Monterey, Cal
Marine hospital - Purchased _.
Pittsburg, Pa
do
Built
Louisville, Ky
do
do.--.
Cleveland, Ohio—•
Purchased ,
-doCharfeston, S. C
do...
-doNorfolk, Va.
-dodo...
NewOrleans, La
.do.
-do
Mobile, Ala
..-,
.do.
-do.
Ocracoke, N. C
,
.do.
.do-.
Key West, Fla.
-do.do.
McDonough, La
,
.do.
Built ,
Paducah, Ky
-do.
-do.
Napoleon, Ark
-do.
-do.
Natchez, Miss
.do.
Chicago, 111
-.
-doTotaL




Date.

Cost.

May 26,. 1849
$1,950 00
July 3, 1847
32,509 60
Nov. 19, 1832
1,575' 00
July 5, 1849
150,400 00
Nov. 3, 1848
2,2 0 00
Aug. 21, 1817
8,000 00
June 23, 1818
19,271 77
April 13, 1833
31,740 00
Aug. 9, 1833
23,188 40
Aug. 29, 1837 1,101,110 00
Nov. 26, 1817
13,395 00
Sept. 16, 1828
10,000 00
Jan. 2, 1818
8,381 88
Feb. 8, 1833
15,676 64
Feb. 18, 1833
20,337 37
Dec. 2, 1816
928,312 90
Aug, 27, 1844
256,987 82
July 2, 1849
29,000 00
June 10, 1833
341,397 00
Nov. 25, 1820
7,319 26
1818
March 9, 1819
1818
Dec. 16, 1845
1830
1833
1847
1845 to 1850
.1817
-1834
.1836
.1837
-1838
.1845
.1845
.1849
-1849
.1849
-1849

38,002
67,039
70,000
173,407
30,775
6,125

33
75
00
97
07
00

82,513 64
38,735
9,060
65,077
63,140
8,927
25,600
58,003
48,625
62,250
62,250
49,689

77
01
03
00
07
00
97
00
00
00
43

3,931,974 68

114

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TABLE 2 :
List ofi custom-houses, court-houses, post ofiices, marine hospitals, and
miscellaneous works, constructed since 1850, together loith those now
in the course ofi construction and those for lohich appropriationsMave
been made, but ivork not yet commenced.
\,ocation.
Bath, Maine . Belfast, Maine
Bangor, Maine
Ellsworth, Maine--Portlaud, Maine
Wahiuboro', Maine .
Portsmouth, N. H . Burlington, Vt
.
Barnstable, Mass . - .
Gloucester, Mass . - .
Bristol, R. I -Providence, R. I
New Haven, Conn,.
Buffalo, N Y
Oswego, N. Y
Ogdensburg, N. Y . .
Plattslmrg, N. Y . - .
Newark, N. J
.-Perth Amboy, N. J .
Wilmington, D e l - . Pittsburg, Pa _ . . . . .
Georgetown, D. C . Alexandria, Va
Norfolk, Va
Petersburg, Va
Richmond, V a . .
Wheeling, Va
Chariestun, S. C . - - Mobile, Ala
Pen>acola, Fla .
New Orleans, La
Galveston. Texas. ..
St. Louis, Mo...
Louisville, Ky
Knoxville, Tenn
iSTashville, Tenn
Cleveland, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Saudusky, Ohio
Toledo, Ohio
Detroit, Mich
Chicdgo, I I I . . . . . . . .
Cairo. III..
.---.Galena, 111
Dubuque, Iowa
Milwaukie. Wis
Ban Francisco, CaL.
Astoria, Oregon
Rutland, V,t
Windsor. Vt
iBoston, Mass..



Uses.
Custom-house, &c.
,
do . . . .
,
do
-do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
-do.
.do.
-do„do.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
-do.
-do.
-do.
.do.
-do,
..do.
-do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
-do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
-do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
Court-house and post office.
Court-house

Present condition.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Fuinished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
F'inished.
Finished,
Not, commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Finis ed.
Finished.
F'inished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Constructing.
Finished.
Finished.
Constructing.
Oonstructing.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Fini'-hed.
Finished.
Constructing.
Fin itched.
>Jot com nienced.
Finished.
Constructing.
Fuinished.
Finished.
Not coa.menced.
Fini.sht^d.
Finished.
Not commenced.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

115

TABLE 2.—List of custom-houses, court-houses, &c.—Continued.
Location.
Baltimore, Md
Do
...-.
:
Columbia, S. C
Raleigh, N. C
Key West, Fla
Tallahassee, Fla
Memphis, Tenn
Springfield, IU
Indianapolis, Ind
Madison, Wis
---..
Portland, Maine
.
Burlington, Vt^
Chelsea, Mass
Wilmington, N. C
Pensacola, Fla
St. Mark's, Fla
New Orleans, La
Vicksburg, Miss
St. Louis,.Mo
Cincinnati, Ohio
. •°..
Evansville, Ind
Detroit, Mich
Galena, 111
Burlington, Iowa
...
San Fraacisco, Cal
Philadelpia ia. Pa
New Orleans, La
:
Charlotte, N. C . . .
Dahlonega, Geo . - - - - .
San Francisco, Cal
.;j..
'New York city.
Pass a rOutre, La
San Francisco, Cal
Utah Territory
Minnesota
J. ...'.
'.^^..^.^
New Mexico
\ .1.-^
Washington, D. C




Uses.
Court house
Post office
....
Court house and post office.
do
do
..,
.do.
.do.
.do.
do...
do...
Marinehospital.
do.--do.
-do.
-do.
.do.
.do.
-do.do.
-do.
.do.
.do.
do......
.do..
do
United States Mint.
Branch mint
do
do
do
Assay office
Boarding station . . .
Appraiser's store _.
Penitentiary
Public buildings..;Treasury extension .

Present condition.
Constructing.
Finished.
Nbt commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Constructing.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Constructing.
Finished.'
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
F'^inished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Constructing.
Constructing.

116

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TABLES.
Statement showing the amount disbursed in each year, from 180^ to
1860, onthe various public buildings purchased, constructed, or constructing, under the Treasury Department.
[Froin 1843 to 1860 the disbursements in this table are for the fiscal year ending June 30.]

Year.

Amount.

Year.

Amount;

Disbursements. $7,200 00 1834
Disbursements.
$119,853 32
1807
do
10,000 00 1835
. ...do
328,208 44
1808 . .
2,000 00 1 8 3 6 . . .
do
379,816 21
1809..-.
do
None.
1837...
do
144,200 00
1810.--. . - - - . d o
None.
1811
do
1838...
do
259,725 00
1839...
1812.-..
None.
do.
304,716 32
do
do
:
None.
•1813
1840...
do
286,697 00
do
1841. do
None.
. 159,451- 13
1814
1842
do
do.
None.
123,273 14
1815---132,500 00 1843
1816
do
. - do
30,428 69
166,650 00
1817.-... . . . _ . d o
1843 to 1844
do
99,648 08
1818-..do
144,000 00 1844 to 1845
^do
337,663 36
1819...do
75,100.00 1 1845 to 1846
do
• 198,815 31
1820.-..
do
131,191 31 1 1846 to 1847
do
68,587 22
1821.--.
do
None.
1847 to 1848 .-„
do
72,319 28
1822-...
do.-.-.None.
i 1848 to 1849
do
273,402 27
1823..-.
do
None.
j 1849 to 1850
do......
707,300 09
1824...do..
None.
1850 to 1851
do
453,365 64
18-25....
»do
-.
None.
1851 to 1852 - - - - - d o
572,124 67
1826.-..
do
None.
1852 to 1853
do
.650,929 20
1827..-.
do
None.
1853 to 1854
do
1,293.907 71
1828....
.do
6,400 00 1854 to 1855 -^
do.
• 2,044,402 09
1829..-.
do..-.„.
9,131 93 1855 to 1856
do
2,213,396 87
1830....
do
30,740 54 1866 to 1857
do
3,250,429 93
1831.-..
do
12,780 20 1857 to 1858
d o . . . . . . 2,902,014 71
1832.--.
do......
3,355 64 1858 to 1859
do......
1,871,316 87
1833,-..
do
250,054 92
1859 to 1860 . . . . . . d o - , . . . .
894,003 98




21,021,001 07

TABLE 4.
Statement shoioing the places where cudom-houses, court-houses, and j^ost offices have heen finished since 1850, or in process of construction, the revenue collected at each, and cost ofi collection, fior thefiscal year ending June 30, 1857, d)G., with total cost ofi huilding.

IH

Location.

8

1'

"o

S 5

B
o
o

0

1

C

^5,052
34,094
11,131
288,967
Portland. Me .
....
1,368
W a l d o b o r o ' , Me
l.MO
8,581
Burlington, Vt
1,462
58,461
Gloucester, Mass
17,301
Bristol, R. t
54,750
17,792
Plattsburg, N. Y
2,004
Wilmington, Del
Pittsburg, P a
.3,599
Cincinnati, Ohiof
81,380
Sandusky, O h i o . . . . . . . . .
587
103,773
Toledo, Ohiof
1,581,926
San Francisco, Cal
Ellsworth, Me
954
Portsmouth, N . H
5,530
N e w Haven, C o n n . . . . . .
252,259
Buffalo, N . Y
10,140
Oswego, N. Y
...
6,149
Newark, N. J
384
Georgetown, D. C
25,527
Alexandria, Va
7,297
Norfolk, Va
61,370
Belfast Me
Bath, Me*

............

05
$6,012 87
8,593 53
08
7,049 03
36
28
32,941 04
7,547 14
02
93
7.359 09
70
16,285 47
75
11,953 20
7,717 09
61
4,137 17
74
14,008 12
36
13,829 35
52
9 5 - 15,848 38
68.
2.360 54
34
1,423 89
4,372 66
84
3,995 69
28
96 402,401 76
5,032 09
96
10,984 49
54
20,425 14
31
16,896 51
53
18,214 58
09
30
1,595 55
90
4,077 89
17
5 , 2 i l 91
68
49,070 98

$960 82
$25,500 55
4,082 33
256,026 24
6,179
7,228
7,703
10,490
50,744
13,764
40,742
3,953

52
57
24
17
"is," 843*43

1,239 14
79,954 45
•'*3,'864*82*
"'99,'777'59"
1,179,525 20
4,077 13
5,453 95
231,834 17
6,7.55 98
12,065 49
1,211 25
21,4.50 01
2,085 26
12,299 70

*.$18,594 60, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.




12
16
77
55

.f2,002
4,784
8,966
19,675
'
588
1,110
5,745
745
2,190
1,579
33,155
2,251
9,3.52
35,575
87,719
5,722
8,631
134,821
1,156
4,999
22,334
46.827
9;120
18,902
5,268
9,209
10,089

•-3

I

0

0
CU

30
36
03
46
34
78
65
48
77
85
38
89
10
82
30
61
10
01
39
53
42
67
29
71
51
14
83

li

1

B

Sit

I?!

0

1

Aggregates.

Court-houses.

Post offices.

Custom-houses.

- ja
0

0

.S

: ll

(U

a

g

o
Hi

0 0

OJ

0

O
$1,203
2,501
3,237
12,273
480
586
2,523
394
1,086
842
9,037
1,141
3.181
13,480
25.249
2;670
8,060
31,205
631
2,075
5,271
23,118
3,074
4,925
2,.585
3,629
4,259

13
02
65
34
69
43
14
45
19
27
50
60
00
00
13
26
00
04
70
82
00
92
90
00
89
24
93

$799
2,283
5,728
7,402
107
524
3,222
351
1,104
737
24,117
1,110
6,171
22,095
62,470
3,052
571
103,615
524
2,923
17,063
23,708
6,045
13,977
2,684
5,579
5,830

17
34
38
12
65
35
51
03
58
58
88
29
10
82
17
35
10
97
69
71
42
75
39
71
62
90
30

$161 65
138 d a y s . . . .

$27,783 80
9,810 71
263,428 36
"*6,67'l*47'
6,703 81
4,481 26
10,139 42

43 days
26 days
97 days
113days. , . . .

51,849
14,502
64,860
5,073

10
15
12
46

041

7,672 33
23,334 96
142,424 62
752 47
100,348 69
1,283,141 17
3,552 44
2,530 24
248,897 59
16,952 77
6,020 10
12,766
24,134
7,665
18,130

$26,597
84,281
103,698
394 792
23,013
*; nnn
40,036
33 37n
48,418
23,952

46
63
19
00

f $75,292 20, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.

70
72
13
81
12
on
96
80
31
68

r)r>A OQ

66 000
40,348
110,000
291 1.30
74 571
75.001
761 327
^3.107
1.59,532
183,643
195,426
125 Q43
159,907
58,846
73,785
217,403

00
30
00
83
85
45
95
83
94
50
9t
Q2
05
45
34
75

o
QQ

TABLE 4^'^-Gontinued, •
00
Post offices.

Custom-houses.

Aggregate.

Court-houses.

.
•a

>
0

Location.

1

s
c
o.

o
ii

>

g

Cleveland Ohio .
Detroit 'Mich
Chicasro 111
Gah'na, 111
Dubuque, l o w a t
Milwaukie, Wis$
Rutland, Vt., C H . .
Windsor, Vt., C. 11 ..'..'.'.
Indianapolis, Ind., C. H

$53,262
101,781
22,125
510,578
133,810
478
3,601,2.59
50,081
365,703
15,514
79,812
146,716
145,662
763
20,254
. 284,792

47
21
97
16
31
73
36
99
78
51
42
37
49
32
50
88

5,907,212 95

$6,365 81
8,272 44
1,134 52
69,542 28
51,909 63
3,012 62
263,985 05
17-, 187 77
10,857 93
689 41
6,565 81
19,556 07
14,349 29
6v!5 .59
761 10
5,962 86

612,287 32

V s

•

55

$11,058
32,8.59
10,552
43,006
31,341
>-98
"$2,'533*89*
108,905
3 "337." 274 31
7,610
32,894 22
72,650
354.845 85
33,685
14;825 11
40,249
73,246 61
27,292
127,160 30
81,380
131,313 20
137 73
6, .304
18,872
19,493 40
26,436
27C^830 02
1,852
1,246
14,639
$46,896 66
93,503 77
20,P91 45
441,0.35 88
86,900-68

5,327,023 33

1

c
D.

1

32,097 69

* $18,594 60, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
J $18,492, amount of revenue fvom railroad iron in bond.




3

u m

6
B

3

V
<u

Ol

c

1
W h e e l i n " Va*
Charleston S O
Mobile Ala
....

t'i

S

76
60
98
89
95
96
35
83
87
95
74
77
09
31
95
46
87
64
05

698,665 50

$3,900
ll,9:i8
9.990
.10; 587
7,673
546
25, .520
4,8.56
19,798
11,68«
15,066
15,033
45,220
2,170
9,452
5,669
1,017
687
12,154

00
44
60
00
79
22
45
66
30
33
22
00
12
00
65
63
21
20
73

263,534 95

$7,168
20,921
.562
32,419
23,668
352
82,384
2.754
.52,852
22,0112
25,183
12,259
36,159
4,134
9,420
20,766
835
559
2,484

76
16
98
89
16
74
90
16
57
62
52
77
97
31
30
83
66
44
32

435,230 55

.. .'.'.''

0 6

Q3

S

0

.

«j >

c

"o^

1

ll
• II

1
$54,065
114,429
21,5.54
473.455
110;568

42
93
43
-7
84

<*,
0

1
V

W
O

w
H

393,009 43
49,177 43

O

359,987'08
262,640 75
168,236 30

^

..

!25

173 .351 36
65,775 22
80,427 36

21
38
42
73
13
07
17
72
70
85
66
44
32

5,744,439 83

.S
'5

$99,664 88
254.763 35
117,239 02
$2,181'is

3,419,659
35,648
407,698
36,827
98,430
139,42i»
167,-473
4,271
28,913
299, .596
835
4 daysC.& D
559
5 daysC &D.
2,484
58 days 0 &D.

-

^«

a

77,872 44

14,283 93 5,743,519 25

f $75,292 20, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
^$271,922 40; amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.

fe5

ft
CQ

TABLE 5.

^

Statement showing the places where customhouses, court-houses, and j^ost offices have been asked for but not authoi-ized, the revenue collected at each, and cost ofi coUection, fior thefiiscalyear ending June 30, 185T, iviih the estimated cost ofi huilaings.
Custom-houses.

Aggregates.

Couit-houses

Post offices.

<u <u

Location.

o s
h3

O

S .2 c - "
H

W

O
$608 71
Machias, Me
395 12
Plymouth, Maas
Boston, Mass., P. O . . . . . . . . .
Hanford, Conn., P. O
805 44
Bridgeport, Conn
128,722 48
Rochester, N. Y *
723 72
SagHarhor, N . Y
26,997 48
S a c k e t t ' s Harbor, N. Yf . . . .
42,510,753 Id
Nevv Y o r k j N . Y.
Albany, N. Y., C. H
Brooklyn, N. Y., C. H . . . . . . . .
409 40
Camden, N. J., C. H
...
Trenton, N. J., C. H
Jersey City, N. J., C. H
Annapolis, Md., C. H
180 75
Harridburg, Pa., C H
441.100 78
Chaileston, S. C , C H
Greenville, S. C , C. H
Macon, Ga., 0 . H
Montgomery, Ala , C- H
2,317 40
Vicksburg, Miss, C. H
,6,710 90
Paducah; K y . , C . Ht
Tyler, T e x a s , C. H
C'»lumbiis, Ohio, C. H
8,810 40
Burlington, Iowa§
I o w a City, Iowa, C. H
,

$1,997 01
2,820 92

$2,605 72
3,216 04
1,766
6,549
635
6,004
1,213,099

24
2.1 $122,175
'• 88
72
20,992
51
'll 141,297,654

290 16
929 20

748 45

58.263 41

382,837 37

709 96
559 74

1,607 44
6,151 16

1,177 54

* $122,033 40, a m o u n t of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
iJ; $6,516 13, a m o u n t of reveriue frora railroad Iron in l>ond.




25
00
97
02

$798
2,090
215,431
23,604
7,858
26,8.55
1,448
714
691,359
45,^14
22,2.55
1,864
8,583
7,717
2,360
23,724
43,006
1,916
8,9.38
8,833
5,904
1,999
518
14,671
6,854
6,930

11
36
92
46
36
00
27
67
96
85
49
53
53
01
65
26
18
14
91
85
71
22
38
18
95
33

$476
1,099
56,963
7,675
2,957
6,449
720
381
159,459
19,074
4\ 735
1,368
2,8U0
2,800
1,191
8,583
10,587
882
3,361
7,404
3,451
898
253
10,446
3,155
2.000

71
44
75
39
57
75
12
47
69
79
.00
.53
00
00
29
31
00
52
17
07
26
30
75
53
85
00

$321
990
158,468
15,929
4,910
20,406
728
333
531,930
26,340
17,520
496
5,783
4,917
1,169
15,140
32,4 i 9
1,033
5,577
1,479
2,453
1,100
264
^ 4,224
3,699
4,930

40
92
17
07
79
25
15
20
27
06
49
00
53
01
36
95
18
62
74
78
45
92
63
65
10
33

$1,675 61
1,830 00

2.55
52

$158, 468 17
15; 929 07
3, 919 99
142. 579 50
816 15
21, 326 17
459
41,829,' 584 29
17
26,,340 06
. 2 49
50
615 24
.783 53
110
4 917 01
420 91
15, 140 95
113, includ'ji|
415, 256 55
Columbus
1, 033 62
577 1^

n,

^ ?4, 060 89
: 479 78

10
10

,..
2=2
264
224
,331
,93'0

08
63
65
96
33

f $26,883 90, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
^.$8,472 90, amouni of revenue from railroad iron in bond.

$20,000
20,000
1.000,000
150.000
100^000
200^000
20,000
50,000
2,000,000
2011.000
1,000^000
100,000
100,000
100,000
50,000
50,000
500.000
50,000
* 50,000
50,000
50.000
50^000
50,000
1-50,000
50,000
50,000

w
HH

t>

o
w
Ul

CO

TABLB 5—Contmued.

to

o

Location.

1

Post offices.

>->
>
Cfc

a
o
o
a

.§
'•B

S

a?

i
•i

c

Court-houseg

•

t5

1 ••

1

li •

r^ 1

cu

x

o

Number of days' session for the year
ending December
31, 1856.

Custom-houses.

Aggregates.

*1
1
1

'•B

c
.2
§<u

3

11

O 73

X

Keokuk, Iowa*
N e w Albany, Ind., C. H . . . . . .
A l i n n Tli

Peoria, III .
mt Paiil'<! Minn
Total




$11,390 90

2,HI io
1,961 89
1,020 95
210 20

43,145,281 41

$862 46
382
435
525
363

53
73
00
60

$10,528 44
1,758 57
1,526 16
495 95

1,298,376 56 41,853,565 43

'*$i53 40

$7,287
1,098
4,837
7,369
4,275
8,512
10,078

63
83
94
83
66
69
90

6,680 58 1,226,107 76

$3,470 24
585 64
2,000 00
2.000 00
2,053 71
3,585 26
3,278 75
336,150 86

$3,817 39
513 19
2,837 94
. 5,369 83
2,221 95
4,927 43
7,700 15

$14,345 83
513 19
4,596 51
6,895 99
2,717 90
4,927 43
7,700 15

869,950 90

•

*

42,740,500 76 $3,505 61

$50,000
50,000
50 000
50,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
6,560,000

»|10,323 50, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
NoTE.^These estimates are such as would be asked for ^ judging by others for like places and purposes.

QQ

TABLE 6.
Statement showing the places where custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices have been authorized hut not commenced, the revenue
collected at each, and cost ofi collection, fior thefiscal year ending June 30, 1857, with amount ofi approjoriations.
Custom-houses.

Location.

5 .
o

•1
"o
o

1

c

c
a;
a.

>
<u

Post offices.

6

li

1
o

V
X

<u

1
<u

"o
o

5^'

«
a
>

$7,932 31
$2,078 14
$10,080 45
4,471 79
1,531 73
1,347 48
i6,743 66
18,091 14
990 63
17,031 37
18,022 00
32,01-7 83
2,241 61
34,2.59 44
21.2.54 51
4,173 64
7,240,308 72 414^660 63 6.82.5,643 09
Baltimore, Md., C. H . t . . 1,473,797 87 141,619 78 i;332,178 09.
Columbia, S. C , C. H . ..
Raleigh, N. C , C. H . . . .
792 45
9,688 09
10,480 54
Key W e s t , Pla., C. H . . .
Tallahassee, Fla., C. H . .
Memphis, T e n n . , C. H.§. '""112*883*90 **'5,'185*89" *"i67,'698'6i'.
Spiincrfield, III., C. H
Madison, W i s . , C. H . . . .
8,923,557 43

609,392 72

8,334,185 64

^ , 9 4 0 06

17,080 87

20,020 93

* $18,085 13, amouut of revenue on railroad iron in bond,
f $33,999 90, amount of revenue on railroad iron in boad.

$5,C9l
8G0
3,676
20, .336
2,416
291
215,431
•1I6,3:{0
7,477
4,340
1,363
2,031
16,581
8,718
13,347

o

a.

99
39
49
07
92
69
92
46
60
95
05
26
02
68
64

V

418,297 13

$2,4.52
476
1.734
8;457
2,000
160
55,963
28,064
2,721
3,462
572
974
6,614
3,917
3,919

%
Si
c

76
28
18
36
Q
U
17
75
47
91
TO
66
36
18
97
96

$2,639 23
384 11
1,942 31
11,878 71
416 92
131 52
158,468 17
88,265 99
4,7.52 69
878 25
790 49
1,0.58 Q
O
9.939 84
4,798 71
9,427 68

122,525 61

295,771 52

X

o ^

6

ee
o

o c

1

o £

rt

a

o S

i

c

11

1
.5 ^"

It
o

i

• Aggregate.

cij5S3

% <v
_

•

Ogdensburg, N . Y . . . . . .
Perth Amboy, N. J
Knoxville, T e n n * . . . . . . .
Nashville,<Tenn
Cairo, Ill.f
Astoria, Oregon




Court-houses.

3

Cfl <U CO

55

o
$4,715 37
$2,556 15
40 daj's.... = . .
50 days

18,685 97
28,910 08
32,434 75
16,949 37

256 days. . . . 6,984,116 26
1,562,063 86
195 days
4,7.52 69
8 days
878 25
55 days
1,582 94
16 days
1,058 90
117,637 85
48 days
4,798 71
9,427 68
17 days
8,771,061 31

19,505 52

X $11,619 69, aniount of revenue on railroad iron in bond.
^ §iJ0,065 90, amount of revenue on railroad iron in bond.

O

ri
•o
$118,000
24,000
96,800
124 500
50,000
40,000
100 000
200,000
50,000
.50.000
44,000
50.000
50;0()0
fil 000
50,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1 108,300 00

O

o
Ul

TABLE 7.

,

to
LND

'si

Name and location ofthe
work.

c.2

6
0

c
0

m

«2
2i ri

ill

1

•1 5

ii

•J

3

3 tfi a,

c 0

<

<

Contract time of completion.

0.
ri

Am't available September 30,18.59,vvith
additional appropriations.

Date of purchase of
site.

Tahular statement ofi custom-houses, marine hospitals, court-houses, jDOst offices, branch mints, and other j^uhlic huildings in charge of
the office ofi construction under the Treasury Department, exhihiting ihe total amount of appropriations for each ivork; the date
and cost of purchase of site; the amount availahle Septemher 30, 1859 ; the amount expended during the year ending Septemher
30, 1860 ; the amount availahle fior the current year; addiUonal appropriations required during ihe current year; date ofi contract; •
contract time ofi completion; actual time ofi completion; contractp)rice for construction; total cost ofi the work, &c.

i-2ri

H
0
0

g £=
c

•2 M 0
-« -C t

Q

c

S

0
0

«*-

"c _i

0
0

CO

c

s.2

O
6

=a

6

1

O

CUSTOM-HOUSES, E T C .

Bath, M e .
Belfast, Me
Bangor, Me
Castine, Me .
Ellsworth, Me
Eastport, Me
4^.
Kennebunk, M e . . . . . . . .
Portland, Me
Wiscasset, Me . ,
Waldoboro', Me
Portsmouth, N. fl

$105,391
36,450
112,800
4,7-0
24,809
36,780
U600
376,031
2,200
25,000
166,300

7,1852 $1.5,000 00
25 Feb.
5,600 0)
00 Feb. 24,1855
00 J u n e 5,1851
15,000 00
1,200 OJ
00 April 6,1833
3,000 OJ
6« April 11,18.55
3.1847
2,7f0 OJ
00 July
1,575 00
00 \'ov. 19,1832
71 Julv 5,1849 149,000 00
2,000 00
00 N'ov. 3,1848'
2.000 00
00 Nov. 9,18.52
00 J u n e 20,1857
19^500 00

Burlington, Vt
Boston, Mass

.56,-3.50 00
1,005,658 00

Dec. 4,1854
Aug. 29,1837

Barnstable, Mass
Glouco.ster, Mass
Nevv Bedford, M a s - ' . , . .
Newburyport, Mass . . . .
S llem, Mass
Bri^'tol, K. r
Newport, R. I
P r o v i d e n . e , R. I
Middletown, Conn
Nevv Haven, Conn . . . . .

33.370
53,000
31,745
23,:>00
19,271
31,41/0
. 10,500
274,000
15,800
190,800

April
June
April
Auir.
June
Mar.
Sept.
Dec.
Feb.
June




80
00
00
00
77
0»
00
00
00
00'

2.5,1855
6,18.55
13,1833
9,1833
93,-181813,18.56
29.1828
15,18.=i4
8,1833
1,1855!

7,750 00
190,000 CO
1,500
9,000
4,9ii0
3. OUO
5,000
4,400
1,400
40,000
:•{ r.on
2.5,500

00
00
00
00
00
00
01)
U>
no
00

$5,704 69 $2,.395 08
4;149 62 4,l'i9 62
5,300 00 5,300 00
2,043 03

"615*63"

14,402 06 11,983 17
2,811 86

2,758 63

$3,308 61

"i,*427"40'

2,415 89
53 23

July 9,18.53
May 30,18.=i5
Mar. 5,1855
Purcliased .
Oct 10,1855
Purchased . . .
do. . .
April 25,1855
Purchased.
April 13.1855
April 24,'18.57

J u n e .30,18.57 Oct. <9,18.58 $47,594 36
•
17,500 00
J u n e 30,1856 Oct. 1,18.58
54,042 44
Oct. 31,1855 Oct. 31,18.55
Dec'.* 1,1856
Jan.

Aug,

2,1858

15,1857

Nov. 1,1855 Jan. 27,1855
Dec. 15,1857
A:-sumed by July 28, ie60
govr;rnme!it.
1,1857 April 1,1857
Sept. 30,1855 Feb.
Aug. 1,1847
Built by government.
July 19,1855 J u n e 30,1856 Dec. 1,1855
Sept. .8,lb-55 Mar. 1,18.57 Sept. 2,1857

9,200 00
153.500 00
15,800 00
82,728 96
28,238 40
17.2-50 00
26; 596. 78

(jo

4,902 25 '3*533 55

'*i,"368'70

21,938 80 115,652*69"

**6;886 71

- . . do
Aug 27,18.55 dept." l*'l'S57* July'25'; 1857 •*i7,'522'00
Purchased . .
May 28.1855 M a r . " 4,"1857 July 25,1857 151,000 00
"Purchased . .
88,OCO 60
Sept. 29,1855 *M*ar*.*"jil8;57 Feb. 14,1860

tn
$99,851
33,084
104.338
1,9.50
23,107
36,044
1,.575
359,724
2.200
24,324
159,532

53
27
49
00
83
00
00
54
00
68
94

,52, .5,56 14
1.106,658 00
33.370
49,858
31,740
23,188
19,271
S6,.535
10.0(10
249,7.53
15,676
.183,643

80
32
00
50
77
75
00
22
64
50

O
Ul

N e w London, C o n n . . . .
Bufralo, N. Y
J^ewYork, N. Y
Oswego, N . Y .
•
Ogdensburg, N . Y
Plattsburg, N . Y
Ivfevyark, N . J
Perth Amboy, N. J
Wilmington, Del
E r i e , Pa
Pittsburg, Pa
Philadelphia, P a . . . . . . .
Baltimore, Md
Georgetown. D. C
Alexandria, Va
Norlolk, Va
...
Petersburg, Va
^iclin?ond, Vjj.
Wheeling, Va
Wilmington, .V. C
Charleston, S. C
S a v a n n a h , Ga
Mobile, Ala

V

.....

Jjley We>-t,Fla ..."
Pensacola, Fla
Wew Orleans, La
' Gal veston, T e s a s . . . . »,,
St. Louis, Mo
Louisvi(le,Kv.
Knoxville, T e n n

20,2.37 37
290,800 00
1,105,313 57

18,1833 j 3,400 00
40,000 00
26,18.55
9,1833 270,000 00

Dec.
Jan.
June
May
Sept.
Nov.
July

15,1854
20,1857
10,1856
30,1855
7,1857
26^1852
2,1849

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
82
59
00
00
53

Aug.
June
Oct.
May
Feb.

27,1844
10.1833
23,1856
13,18.56
28,1852

8,486
12,000 00
8,000 00 108,876
,5,000 00
14,221
3,480
50,000 00
2,000 00
20,912
3,500 00
29,000 00
41,000 00
22.5,000'00
30,000 00
5,000 00
1,181
16,000 00
2,023
13,000 00 . 12,297

103^200
252,016
118.711
,57,039
2,073,000

00
00
00
75
00

liily
Mar.
Nov.
Mar.
July

12,1855
16,18.53
29,1854
19.1819
10,l&49

15,000
618000
20^.500
16.; 000
130,000

174,407 97
402,600 00
6,125 00
51,000 00
2,975,258 00
116,000
361,610
262,645
96,800

00
00
00
00

124.,500 00
166,900 00
292,083 90

Sandusky, Ohio,
Toledo, Ohio
Detroit, Mich,
Chicago, III...
Cairo, 111

76,450
79,950
217,071
447,733
50,000

Galena, 111
Dubuque, I o w a
|^i|\yj^l}kie, \yiiS

85.200 0)
138.800.00
173,351 36

00
00
17
88
00

May

8,18D1

Dec. 16,1845
Oct. 13,1851

00
0000
00
00

20,725 00
12,.500 00

779 92

62 2,803 57
25
18 00
18 14,221 18
50 3,480 50
84
267 50

.5,683 05
108,858 25

11,000
12,000
24,000
5'J,433

00
C
O
00
88

16,500 00
20,000 00
12,200 00 1

20,645 34

May
.55
86 2,* 623* 86*
78 11,151 03

3,445 11
2,747 35
1,562 35

1,146

75

43,566 64

12,780 57

2,235 5

9,190
1,054
5,872
126,671
50,000

84
40
22
62
00

805 79

^6,* ios 27

14,3'18 08 13,080 .52
79,822 08 34,535 49

25 62

Feb.

90,568 i9

05
89 !
29
35
00

327 56
45,286 .59
*281 90 1

.

20,337 ,37
105,426 91
1,105,313 57

1,1858

77,255 00

125,043 62

48,7.55 43
75,948 71

71,425 17
159 907 05

Oct.

1,1855

April

J, 1856

29,234 00

Feb.

6,1854

39,865 00

4L096
29,000
109,666
370.083
450,514
58,846
73,785
217,403

02
00
87
33
38
45
34
75

99,664
254,763
117,239
57,039

88
35
02
75

18,1852

Sept.

27,1857 J u n e

Mar.
Oct.
April

41,.582
9.1858
37,149
1,18.59
6,1858 Prices in
tail.
5,18.59 . 68,657
9,.185S 110,000
80,159
4,1859

00
37
de10
00
97

1,1856 J u n e

2,1859 Prices in detaiL

1,1858 J u n e 12,1858

39,181 07

206,260 5$
393,009 43
6,125 00
49,177 43

90,503 07 j
1,1861
.3.59.987 0§
1,1856 1 *i\T*.nt'.'31!, 18*59 336,309 07
262,640 75
1,1657 Mar. !2,1859 148,158 00

War. 2.5,1857 Dec.
1,1838 Oct. 11,18.59
April 8 , 1 8 5 7 . . . . d o
Oct. 25,1855 1 Nov. sb; "1*858* 1
*J*Jn.*"*l*,V/59i

W

O

w

Ul

8*1500 00
"1.1*859 J a n . '1,18.59
1,1856 Apr. . 1,1857 Prices in detail.
Jan.
9,1856 J u n e 1,1857 J a n . 6,18.58- 4.5,708 10
45,708 10
do.,
Jan.
1,1858
....do
103,160 6b
Oot.
1,18.56 Undetermined
84,4.50 00
Oct. 25,1855 Jan.* 1,1860

* Bepaymejits hV; ajjd balances dug ffom disbursing agents, ^ . 4 transfers ffom other y/orli

O
O

do.. . . .
Aug. 30,18.55 i a n .
July 18,18.53 Dec.

104,215 69
*7,787 85

11*3,892 95

1,1858 May 19,1858
1,1857 May 12,1859

Sept 30,1857

Building by
uovernmen .
J u n e 19. 1650 J u n e
Dec. 24, 1853 Jnly
May
1853 to 18.55
Not avvardet .

63,114 46
*89,593 86

12,18*5*8
22,1842

Mari
Mar.

Building by
government.
Purchased . .
July 23,1853 July

10,545 06

'1,385
*.3,4I1
* 13,765
96, .568
50,000

1,1857 fjuIy
Feb.

Mar. 29,1856 Sept. 30,1857
J u l y 11,1855 J u l y i.1857
J u n e 19,1856 J u n e l,'l858

• 774 83

116,814 42 73,247 78

j
Mar.

do
;
Dec. 18,1856 Sept. 24,1858 Nov.
Dec. 1.3,1856 May 1,1858 July
1,1855 Oct.
May 17,1853 Dec.

*1,314 22

3,419 49
2,747 35
787 53

1,000 00
July 26.1333
2,195 73 2,495 73
Acquired by
cession from
Spain.
170,301 56 107,187 10
Girt frnm first
municipality.
81,1.96 38
6.000 00
July 23,18.55
2,250 27 2,250 2 Oct. 3 1 J 8 5 J i 37^000 00
16,000 00
Oct. 7,1851
Not yet se"95,'601* 19" •**33"00
lected.
Oct. 7,1656
20,GOO'00 104,248 69
33 00
April 9, 1856
.30,000 ' 0 j
6,331 46
Sept. 84, 1851
aO,000 00 1
Dec. QS, i8,54i .
Feb. 20,1^55
Nov. 5.18,55 '
J a n . 10,18.55
Not yet se
lected.
.Tan. 20,1857
J a n . 20,1857
Feb. 16,1855

j Purchased . . .
J u l y 25,18o5
Built by government
Sept. 1,18.55
Not a w a r d e d .
Mar. 18,1857
Aug. 10,lg55
Ncit a w a r d e d .
Aug. 4,1853

1 95,323 69

96,103 61

131,100
118,000
79,900
162,000
24,000
41,500
54,000
110,000
264,487
456,893
60,000
74,700
229,652

Nashville, T e n n . . . ; - . . ,
Cleveland, Oiiio
Cincinnati, O h i o . . . . . . .




Feb.
Jan.
Jan,

168,2.33 30
291,502 00
75,040 49
76,533 a

43,fl-29 00
77,872 44
87,334 50
79,870 00 1 * 173^351'.36
03

TABLE

t—Continued.

to

'k-B-^

m

N a m e and location of
the work.

Monterey, C a l . . . . .
S a n Franciseo, Oal.
Astoria, Oregon . . .

^^'s

I

^B - <^^::i
cc ri

Acquired hy
conquest.
i$779,672 39
40,000 00

ill

<

m

Sept. 5,1854 [$150,000 00 $18,30 4 44
39,938 43
May l,18c6 Exchange or
lands,

•f 191,432 .51'
39,93d 43

S.g

Mt

to.

Dec, 22,1851 J u n e 30,1854 Oct. 15,1855 .$400,000 00

$757,456 68

S

GOURT-nOUSES AND r o s T |
OFFICES.
Jutland, Vt.
Windsor, Vt
Baltimore, Md., c ( u r t . house.
Baltimore, Md., postoffice. .
Columbia; S. C .
tlaleighjN. C
Key VVest, F l a . . .
Tallahassee, F l a .
Memphis, T e n r i » . .
Springfield, 111....
Indianapolis, Ind .
Bladisou, Wis

75,800 00
76,000 00
200,000 00

J a n . 20,185t
do
May 30^1859

1,400 00
4,500 00
50,000 00

.300,000 00

May 30,1857

207,000 00

50,000 00

Not yet purchased.
Sept. 22,1860
April 28. 1858
Not yet purchased.
J u n e 6,1860
J a n . 20,18.57
Aug. 20,1856

50,000 00
44,000 00
50,000 00
50,000
61,000
163,700
50,000

00
G
O
00
00

Maf. .5,185? July 1,1858 J a n . 31,18,59
Mar. 19,18.5?
do
, Mar. 25,1859
July 30,1860 Aug. 1,1862

8,019 44 ^1,059 01
7,737 52 7,177 14
149,838 00 4,108 83

7^960 43
560 38
145,729 17

1,514 30

1,240 41.

273 89

49,955 00

21 88

49^933 12

Repairs completed.
Not a w a r d e d .

7,700 00
3,000 00

49., 927 02 7,847 50
40,908 26
49,933 90
18 00

42.079 52
40,908 26
49,915 90

.do.,
.do..
• do,.

15,000 00
6,000 00
1^,160 OOgl

49.936 10 15,061 00
53,886 60
77,475 21 48,'672'47"
49,968 75
71 00

34,875
53,888
28,802
49,895

10
60
74
75

July

52,827 00
49.300 00
112,808 04

1,1859

65, n s 22
80,427 36
298,107 51 -

o

do..
Aug. 17,1857 Dec. 17,1858
Not a w a r d e d .

Ul
98,983 79

MARINE HOSPITALS.

iPortland, Me
Burlington, V t . .
Chelsea, M a s s . .

99,000 00
43,650 00
284,700 00

Pittsburgj P a . . . . ,
Ocracoke, N. C»

70,570 23

Wilmington, N . C .
Mobile, A l a . , . . . . .
Key West, F l a . . ^ .

51,324 00
54,540 00
27,100 00




11>)000 00
May 30^1855
Nov. 5, 1855
1,750 00
From
Navy
Department
Sept. 7,1842
10,253 00
1845 and 1846 No record
of cost.
6, .500 00
Mar. 17,1857
4,000 00
J u n e 20,1848
1,500 00
SepM0,1833

3,241 27
6,662 78
4,217 69

5 78
3,443 43

M,951 05
6,656 98
774 26

April 16,1855 Aiig. 1,18.56 Oct. 28,1856
J u n e 17,18.56 Sept. 30,18.57 April 1,18.58
Aug. 9,1855 Mar. 3,1857 Dec. 25,1857

66,200 00
30,427 64

5,276 01

9,168 81

J u n e 26,1857 J a n .
Purchased . . .
......do

05,7.58 73
37,005 24
283,015 31
60,919 06
8,927 0?

Purchased . . .
do
14,444 82

§

1,1859 Nov. 23,1859

28,868 25

43,846 04
54,540 00
25,571 00

Pensacola, Fla
St. M a r k ' s , Pla
N e w Orleans, L a
'Vicksburg, Miss
St. L o u i s , Mo
Napoleon, Ark
Louisville, Ky
P a d u c a h , Ky
Cleveland, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Evansville, Ind
Detroit, Mich
Chicago, 111
Galena, III
Burlington, I o w a
San Francisco, Cal

,

1 20,947 04
22,000 00 I1 N o t yet purchased.
2,735 30
25,700 00 Government
property.
12,000 G
O
93,695 43
521,4.59 20 Aug. 7,1855
67,525 16 Oct. 1.5,18.53 1 4,500 00
24,985 00
118,574 00 I Ceded hy War
Department.
1,000 00
59,2.50 00 Sept. 15,1637
6,000 00
63,500 33 Nov. 2,1842
1,000 00
3,339 51
61,625 00 Dec. 26,1837
12,000 00
96,909 38 Oct. 11,1837
36,000 00
7,471 96
186,000 C
O Jan. 18,1856
6,000 00
6,981 15
62,500 00 April 29,18.53
23,000 01
12,111 21
113.000 00 Mar. 14,1855
57^712 CO Ceded by War
Department
-6,147 29
5,052 00
48,800 00 Mar. 14,1857
1,250 29
4;500 00
28,195 15 Jari. 16,1856
O
224,000 00 Sept. 5,1854 150,000 C

1 20,947 04

Not awarded
Mar. 24,1857 Sept.

1 2,735 30

Jan. 14,1857
April 18,18.55
Built by government.
do
do
do .
J a n . 15,1855
Sept. 27,18.56
June 1,1853
July 18,18.55
Built by government.
Mar. 2.5,18-37
Mar. 12,1857.
Nov. 13,1851

16,210 52

77,484 91

*35,176 04

3,304
119
5,628
4,459
10,336

35 38
1,843 34
2,521 89
1,774 42

23
25
62
26
79

2,009 12
699 56

4,147 17
650 73

1,1858 May 25,1858

18,444 00

July 1,18.59
July 31,1856 July 1,185*6
Sept. 3,1853

429,395 79
57,021 oa

Dec. 31,1355
April 1,1858
July 1,18.55
Dec, 31,1856

July
Sept.
April
June
April
Sept.
Nov.
Mar.

18,1854
11,1851
1,1852
1,1856
31,1859
2-S, 1856
13,1857
15,1852

*26*669 60"
106,4-24 07
40,000 O
Q
54,637 12

Doc. 1,1858 Oct. 4,1859
29,862 00
Jan.
1,1858 J a n . 14,1858
15,978 00
Undetermined Oct. 16,1854 Prices in de• tail.

24 196 20
*67,* 52.5*16
87 647 00
,58,080
61 6-^7
57 320
84,378
178,535
57,730
101,258
57.436

61
71
77
66
52
32
64
67

48,202 93
27, .590 59
224,000 00

MISCELLANEOUS.

United States raint at
Philadelphia.
Branch mint at Nevv Orleans.
Branch mint at Charlotte, N . C.
Branch niint at Dahlonega, Ga.
Branch mint at San
Francisco.
Vault for public funds at
New Mexico.
New York assay office...
N e w York Atlantic Dock
stores.
Boarding station at Pass
k I'Outre.
Boarding station atSouth. west Pass.
Appraisers' stores, San
Prancisco,
Utah penitentiary
Minnesota public buildings.
; N e w Mexico penitentiary.




913 12

913 12

216,800 00

Built by government.
Repairs finished.

576,926 40
2,352 23

110,850 00

90 00

212,227 85
557,950 90
99,359 97

2,262 23

62,588 50

66,500 00
345,000 00

2,1854

283,929 10

684,716 80

Feb. 19,1857
Ceded by city
o l N . Orieans.
Nov. 6,1856

175 13

3,500 00
100,000 C
O

Oot.

268,609 10

290,000 00

700,000 00

9,1854

100,000 00

Dec. 23,1856 Sept.

1,1857 Aug. 21,1857

10,900 00

13,000 00

J u n e 2T,1855 Mar,

1,1836 April 1,1856

53,500 G
O

92,556 93

3,500 00

3, "^00 00
7,746 05

.5,990 44

1,755,61

45,000 00
86,500 00
20,000 00

1,1854 Mar. 31,1854

Built by Territory.
Built by government.
Purchased . . .

100,000 00

12,000 00

April 15,1853 F e b .

45,000 G
O

Aug. 19,1853 573,716 80

100,000 00

45,000 00 j

175 13J

May

2,000 00

1

1

Built by Territory.
Built by government.
do

* llepayments by and balanccis due from disbursing ag^criits, and transfers from other w o r k s .

44,998 90
86,303 34

ri

o
o

si

Name and location of
the work.
ri o

ri

3
New
Mexico
public
$130,000 00
buildings.
Extension of the Treas- 2,117,500 00
ury building.
Ventilating b-nsement of
39,640 00
Treasury building.
Fire-proof vaults for
66,000 00
puhlic .stores.
50,OCO 00
W a r e h o u s e s at quarantine station,N.Orleans.
183,001 59
Annual repairs of custom-houses.
75,000 00
Annual repairs of marine hospitals.
15,000 00
Repairs of Baltimore
custom-house.
24,172,032 75




o

Am't available September.30, 18.59, vvith
additional appropriations.

TABLE T-^-Continucd.

m
. 5i != :-

iJri

JS, y
>

=

<

<

c
o

aj

tif

— CJ

o 2

it

Government
property.
do

li

"ri c

^ :£ S
c -*^

.$622,401 67 302,733 20 .:&-319,668 47

1
o

c 2iS

l-ii

^§

i•

c
O

<

s

c
o

Q

CO

c
c S
<-' CO

i
o

Built hy government,
. .. .do

59,315 35

.3, .594 01

55,751 34

By d a y s ' labor.
By purchase .

49,456 50 33,163 44

18,293 06

Sept. 10,1859 July

O

~

o
15,1860 May 31,1660 $31,984 00

$37,091 90

45,641 69

9,862 14

li

.§s

4,511 18

3,654 90

o; o

li
s.

2,081 32'

50,295 59

i.

c

6, .592 50

50,341 52

1

o

40,479 38

15,000 00

15,000 00

Sept. 21,1860

3.585,824 78 2,975,723 18 900,764 11 •2,270,631 32

' The new appropriation of ,'$603 000 still remains, available for this work.

7,800 00
13,588,637 32

m

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

127

Report upon experiments made in the analyses of iron and iron or^s,
firom the acting engineer in charge Treasury Department, September
30, 1860.
OFFICE OF CONSTRUCTION, Septemher 30, 1860.

SIR : In reference to the experiments instituted under this office for
testing the quality of various specimens of iron and iron ore, I have
the honor to report that the 34th Congress, at its 3d session, passed an
act, approved March 3,1857, ^' to enable the Secretary of the Treasury
to cause such experiments and analyses of different beds of ore, as to
test v/hether any such ores, in their native state, possess alloys that
will resist the tendency to oxidise to a greater extent than others, and
to ascertain under what circurastances they are found, and where, in
order to facilitate the proper selections of iron for public works," and
appropriated the sura of twenty-five hundred dollars to defray the
expense of such experiments.
In pursuance of this authority, thefollowing circular was addressed
to all parties in interest- whose names could be collected for the purpose, and public notice was given by advertisement of the department's desire to obtain specimens from as many and varied localities
as possible.
[Circular.]

August 1, 1857.
SIR: This department has been furnished with undoubted evidence
that there is a great difference between iron from different mines in
the United States, in the degree and rapidity with which they become
oxidized. Congress, during the last session, appropriated the sum of
$2,51)0 to test the different irons of this country in that particular. If
these experiments shall establish the important fact that we have irons
•entirely or nearly proof against the corrosion of oxygen, it will multiply
the uses of such iron to a very considerable extent for purposes to
which it is not now applied, and give it the preference over other irons
for many purposes for which .iron is now used.
The very large extent to which this material is superseding the use
of wood and stone in the public buildings, erecting at a cost of many
millions of dollars annually, under this department, renders it of the
greatest importance to know what irons resist, for the longest period,
t>
the action of .oxygen. It is hoped that the great interest the iron
masters have in the result of this experiment will be considered a
sufficient apology for requesting samples of their iron and the ores
from which they are made.
^
I have, therefore, to request that you will forward to this department, by mail or express, two or three sraall samples of iron and a
sample of ore from each ofthe mines worked by you ; the samples of
iron not to exceed a^quarter of a pound each^ and the ore not to exceed
a half pound in weight. I would also request infbrmation on the
ibllowing points, viz: The extent of the ore deposit, facilities of mining




TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

128

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ore, its distance from furnace, and distance of furnace from market,
a-nd mode of transportation thence, the fuel used, relative cost of charcoal, coke, crude bituminous and anthracite iron, kind of flux aud its
cost, &c. The capacity of the establishment and the amount of iron
it produced during the last year, and what it would be capable of
producing under a ready sale and remunerating prices; a'uy peculiarity
ofthe iron produced; whether there are rolling mills in the vicinity,
and what descriptions of iron they roll; to what purposes most ofthe
products of your furnaces are applied, and what description of iron the
establishment mostly produces; when did your works first go into*
operation; what has been the annual production, and what the ruling
prices each year since your works were first started. You will please
give the State and county in which your iron mine is situated, and the
distance your fuel is transported. As it is the intention of the department to furnish you with the result of the experiments, you will please
name the post office, through which to address you. If you know of
any one in your neighborhood interested in the iron business, who
does not receive a copy of this letter, if you will forward his address
one will be sent to him. You will realize the value of the information,
which it is sought to be obtained by this circular, when you reflect
upon the growing importance ofthe iron interestof the country. A
fact attributable in no small degree to the introduction of iron as a
substitute for other materials in our public buildings.
The policy of affording encouragement to this great interest, by
promoting its production and increasing its consumption, has been
commenced by the government, and I am desirous of obtaining all the
infbrmation v/hich can be had onthe subject, with a view to its further
development.
This circular will be addressed to persons not immediately connected
with iron establishments, as it is believed that there will be not only
a willingness, but an anxiety, on the partof every one to advance thc
object which the department has in view.
I am desirous of obtaining the information asked for at the earliest
practicable moment.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HOWELL COBB,
Secretary ofi the Treasury.
In response to this circular there were received samples from nearly
every State in the.Union, but many of them were so carelessly transmitted as to make it difficult to determine the precise locality from
whence they came. It was no unfrequent occurrence to receive upon
the same Aiij^per mail, letters from different parties, stating particulars as to samples sent by express, and to receive a number of samples
on the same day without any distinctive mark to indicate which letter
should be referred to, so that their locality became almost conjectural.
In other (and very many) cases the parties in interest seem to have
had but a vague idea of the department's wishes, or of the object
in view ; and their letters* only enforced the consideration of samples
furnished, without data, simply upon sectional or personal groun^ds ;




REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

129

while still others sent large masses of iron or of ore without writing
any particulars wliatever, not even the poirit from which, they wjere
transmitted.
The confused aggregateof specimens thus transmitted were tabulated
for examination, with as close an approximation to economy as the
circumstances permitted, for future reference. This table is herewith
submitted.




130

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Tahulated statement ofi the specimens ofi iron and irpn ores received under the
and other defails, with a synopsis ofi the
t
Name of mine or furnace.

I-i

Location of mine or
furnace.

Commenced
operations.

jEjctent of ore deI
posit.

Distance of mine
from furnace. -

VERMONT.

Orleans Iron Company,
Francis Fisher, Boaton.

Troy.

Inexhaustible .

1^ mile.

MASSACHUSETTS.

Brandon Iron and Carwheel Company, Q. W .
Palmer.

Boston .

OONNECTICDT.

Eli P r i e s t . .
Birmingham Iron and Steel
Works, H. Atwater.
Wilson H. Clark

Oakham, Dudley..
Birmingham

NEW YORK.

Leavenworth, Kendrick &
Co.
Crovvn Point Iron Company, Hammond Sc Co.

Wolcott P. O., Wayne
county.
Crovvn Point, Essex
county.

1822.

"Supposed to be
abundant."

1846.

5 miles,
I mile..

part of Beeninoper-j Covers an area of On the e s t a t e .
Stirling Iron Estate, Town- Southern
aiion nearly
Orange county.
20 square miles.
send & Co.,42 Pine street,
2 centuries.!
New York.
St. L a w r e n c e county.
12 or 15 m i l e s . .
Fullerville Iron-works, M.
Tithian.
From 1 to 4 feet l i mile north of
Cheevi^r Ore Bed Compa- Port Henry, Es.sex
thick; traced ^
furnace.
county.
ny, VVilliam H. Stone,
mile.
agent.
. . d o . . . . 1847, closed
Port Henry Furnace, W. . . . d o
in 1848, ancl
T . Foote,'cashier.
resumed in
1853,
j
Saranac river,24 miles 1845
J. Inexhaustible.
20 feet .
L. Myers & Son.
from Plattsburg.
Janes, Beebe & Co.
Hobert S. Hall
Dr. L-;aiah Deck .
E. Meriam

New York city
Elizabethtown, Essex
county.
New York city
Brooklyn

NEW JERSEY.

Solomon Andrews
.
'I'renton Locomotive &
Machine Manufacturing
Company.
' W n \ . Turner and M. A.
S liter.
N e w Jersey !^inc Company.
Trenton Iron Co., Cooper,
Hewitt & Co., Andover
Mines.
Roseville Mines
,

Perth Amboy .
Trenton
Morris county
Newark

1855.

Abundant..

50 miles.

Trenton Sussex C o . .

1750.

Abundant, about
20U acres.

39 miles..

3} miles from Ando' v e r niines.

1849

42 miles..

Ringwood Estate..

35 miles from New
York, and 25 miles
from Piermont.

1760

Abundant, about
800 acres of ore
land.
Abundant, about
11,000 acres of
ore land.

Scofield Mines
Muir, Hibernia, and Beach

On Morris canal .
do

Large
,
Very great.

Mitifs.

Dell Mine
Ironclale Mine
Dickerson Mine




do.
do.
do.

Large .
do . ,
.do. .

131

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

department's circular, shoioing the localities, nature, extent and cost ofi the product,
owner's remarks upon their ofierings.

Distance of
fuel from furnace.

Distance of furnace Modeof transporta- Fuel u s e d ; price Kind of flux, and Am't produced
per bu.shel or
lastyear.
tation to market.
its cost.
from market.
ton.

10 miles by t e a m s ;
balance by railroad.

200 miles

Charcoal,3ito4
cents.

Limestone, $2 per
ton.

Charcoal

Loam, 25 cents
per ton.
Limestone and
clay, at ^ 1 25
per ton.
Limestone,.f I p e r
ton.

468 tons

10,825 t o n s , .

,

1 to 5 m i l e s . . Sold mostly at the
furnace.
10 iniles from L a k e
Champlain.
On the estate. 40 miles to N e w
York city.

By teams to the Charcoal, 8 cts.
l a k e ; thence by
per bushel.
boat to Troy. &c.
Railroad and boats. Charcoal, 7 cts.
per bushel.

40 miles southeast
or Ogdensburg.
I mile

9 rniles to railroad
at Gouverneur.

275 miles

Boats

Anthracite

Limestone and
clay, S l 25 per
ton of iron.

24 miles by t e a m s ;
and thence by
boat or railroad.

Charcoal, 5 cts.
por bushel.

3,400 t o n s . . . .

White flint

7

•
V

Canal or railroad... Anthracite coal. Oy.ster shells
N e w York and
Philadelphia.




Canal or railroad...

Charcoal

'

40 tons f)er
week.

Limestone.

'.

132

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Tahulated statement of the specimens of
Name of mine or furnace.

II

Location of mine or
furnace.

Rolling mills in the Description of Purposes to which
vicinity.
iron they roll.
the products of
furnace are applied.

VERMONT.

1

Orleans Iron Company,
Francis Fisher, Boston.

2

Brandon Iron and Carwheel Company, G. VV.
Palmer.

Troy

MASSACHOSETTS.

Boston

CONNECTICDT.

3 j Eli Priest
4 Birmingham Iron and Steel
Works, H. Atwater.
5 Wilson H. Clark

Oakham, Dudley....
Birminchara
New Haven.

NEW YORK.

6 Leavenworth, Kendrick &
Co.

Wolcott P.O., Wayne Nine
county.

7

Crown Point, Essex
county.

Crown Point Iron Corapany, Hammond & Co.

Keeseville, fifty
railes.

Stoves, machinery, ploughs, &,c.

FouT\dery
poses.

pur-

8 Stirling Iron Estate, Town- Southern part of
send & Co.,42Pine street,
Orange county.
New York.

Malleable castings, wrought
and cast iron.

9 Fullerville Iron-works, M.
Tithian.

Bar and bloom...

10

Cheever Ore Bed Company, Wm. H. Stone,
agent.

St. Lawrence county.
Port Henry, Essex
county.

11 Port Henry Furnace, VV. ....do
T. Foote, cashier.
12 Tl Mvpr«? Sc Son

do...

Keeseville, Clin- Merchant iron Railroad bars . . . .
tonvillCj and and rails.
Ausable Forks,
about 40 miles.
Saranac river,24 miles 16 miles south . . . All kinds, ex- (See remarks in
from Plattsburg.
cept shafts.
last column.)

13 Janes, Beebe & Co

New York citv

14 • Roberts. Hall

Elizabethtown, Essex county.
New York city
Brooklyn

15 Dr. Isaiah Deck
16 E. Meriam
NEW J E R S E Y .

17 Solomon Andrews

Perth Amboy ..„

18 Trenton Locomotive and Trenton
1 Machine Manufacturing
1 Company.
Wm. Turner and M. A. Morris county.
Salter.
20 New Jersey Zinc Com- Newark
pany.

19




Lehigh region... •

Sample No. 4,
mostly.

133

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Continued.
Annual production and ruling prices, Am'nt that could
be produced uneach year since the works were
der ready sale
first started ; prices per ton.
and remunerative prices.

Remarks.—Facilities of mining o r e ; relative cost of
charcoal, coke, crude, bituminous, and anthracite
iron ; peculiarities of iron, &c.

Speciraens received.

No speciraens or inforraation received.

No specimens received.
Do.
Sends s p e c i m e n s ; supposed to be silver ore.
Year 1847,300 tons, average price $28;
1848, 366 tons, average $ 2 8 ; 1849,
409 ton.s, average ^ 2 6 ; 1850,456 tons,
average $25; 1851,358 tons, average
$24 ; 1852, 390 tons, average $24;
1853, 400 tons, average $30; 1854,
402 tons, average$32; 1855,442 tons,
average $30; 1856,232 tons, average
$30; 1857, 468 tons, average $28.
Annual production 3,000 tons of 2,240
pounds. Year 1846-'7, price $30;
1848, price $25; lH49-'50, price $23:
185l-'52, price $23 ; 1853, price $33;
1854, price $36 ; 1855'-56, price $ 3 1 .
T h e two furnaces on the estate make
about 5,000 tons annually.

1,200 t o n s .

57,500 t o n s ;
furnaces.

12,000 tons .




raine.

The

Cost of mining does not exceed $1 per ton.

Average product for several years has
been 40,000 tons per annum : capable of yielding about 30,000 tons of
manufactured iron h o m its own
percentage.

Axe iron, finished, $80 per t o n ;
scythe, $85; car axles, $110; wagon
tire, $110; and blooms, $60 per ton.

Costs .Sl 31 per ton.to convey ore from
cost ofthe iron is about $22 per ton.

1,000 tons bar and
bloom per annum.

The ore of these mines is known as black magnetic
oxide of iron, yielding about 60 per cent, of metal,
and can be mined for an average of 50 c e n t s p e r
ton. This iron is used by the government for ordn a n c e , strong machinery, &c.
T h e r e is abundant evidence of the existence of ores
in the immediate vicinity of these works whioh
have not been developed, the home demand not
warranting the outlay.
The ore is blasted and rai.sed by steam power. Samples
of iron made from this ore have been sent by W. T.
Foot, agent for the Port Henry Fnrnace. This ore
is also used bythe Poughkeepsie Blast Furnace ; at
the Rolling Mills of Trby.and Saugerties; of Boston
and its vicinity ; in Maine; thence southward and
westward to Maryland,and Pittsburg and its vicinity.
T w o furnaces.,

This iron is used for axes, scythes, car and locoraotive
shafts, wire, jacks, boiler plate, locomotive tires,
axles, &c. T h e mine is 40 feet deep. Ore is blasted
with fuse or powder, and raised by horse power.
Manufacturersof iron work; the specimens sent c a n ' t
be identified.
Sends list of irori manufactures, «nd requests circu
lars sent to them.
Gives his opinion and experience on iron.
Do.
do.
Has proved by experiment that nickel is the cause of
non-oxidization in iron.
Box received containing nearly 100 sahnples of iron
from different ores. T h e specimens are niarked,
showing the different circumstances under which
they were manufactured.
Description of process of manufacturing malleable
iron, with specimens.
Box containing 5 specimens; report accompa;nying
containing a chemical analysis of the same, modus
operandi^, &c.

134

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Tahulated statement ofi the specimens ofi

Name of mine or furnace.

Location of mine or
furnace.

Commenced
operations.

Extent of ore dedeposit.

Distance of mine
from furnace.

NEW JERSEY—-Continued.
King Mine
Joseph C. Kent, of Trenton
ton Iron Co.
n

Small..

On Morris canal .
Phillipsburg

PENNSYLVANIA.

Lehigh Co., 12 miles
from
Allentown
Iron-works.
Centre county

1800.

D.

Blair c o u n t y . . .

1815.

Columbia co., I mile
from Catawissa.
Clarion county

1845.

F.

Thorndale
Iron-works,
Horace A. Beals.

Chester county ,

1847.

Richland F u r n a c e , John
Keating.
W a t s o n , White & Co

Clarion county, Richland township.
Hollidaysburg, Blair
county.
Mahoning, Armstrong
county.
Carlisle, (^u.mberland
county.

1847.

Very limited.

From ^ to 3 miles,

1856.

Large

3 miles

Allentown Iron Co., W a l nut street, Philadelphia.
23

Bellefontaine Iron-works,
Valentines, Thomas &
Co.

24

Springfield Furnace,
Good & Co.
J. P. Fincher . , .
Clinton Furnace, S.
Plumen.

Mahoning Furnace, J. A.
Colwell & Co.
Pine Grove Iron-works,
W . M. Watts.

1846.
3 miles .

Sufficient for use
of furnace for
100 years.
Large

2 miles .
25 miles
From ^ to 3 miles,

F r o m i t o l mile.,

1845.
1757.

1,000 acres, 200
feet deep.

Fairmount
Iron-works,
Charles E. Smith.
Stockdale Forge, James
Gardner.
Lycoming Iron and Coal
Company.

Hollidaysburg, Blair
county.
Clinton county

Nov. 20,1856

Large

Nov. 26,1856

Large

Armstrong county . . ,

1846

Abundant.

,

Philadelphia Rolling 1853.
Mill.
Huntingdon county ..

Chimney Rock Furnace,
Gardner, Osterboh & Co
Mill Hall Iron Company, J.
Jslovve S h a w .
Pine
Creek
Furnace,
Brown &, Mosgrowe.
Laurel Iron and Coal
Company, W . Walker.
Sharon Iron
Company,
S a m u e l H . Kimball.
Kittaning
Iron-works,
Brown, Floyd & Co. •
Youiig, Slilank & Fort

T mile

Mount Laurel F u r n a c e ,
W. H. Clymer & Co.
Cornwell Ore Banks, R.
W. & W . Coleman &.W.
G. T r u m a n .
Samuel G. Morrison
T. K. Van Geld en
W e s t Brandywine Ironworks, Samuel Hatfield.
E. G. Pomeroy
Jacob Reese
Dillsburg Iron Mines, John
Huinper.
W . Wade
,
Raymilton F u r n a c e . . . . . .




Large. .

Ralston,
Lycoming
county.

Woodvale, Fayette
county. •
Mercer county
Kittaning, Armstrong
county.
Allentown, Lehigh
connty.
Berks county

Large
1853.

Unlimited .

Philadelphia.,
Pittsburg . . . . .
Dillsburg
Pittsburg
Venango county.

L mile.
Marquette county.
Michijian.

1848.
From 4 t o l 2 i n i l e s |
Very large.

Lebanon c o u n t y .
Jersey Shore
,
Damascus county.,
Chester county . . . ,

: mile.

Very large.

9 to 10 m i l e s . .

135

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Continued.

Distance of
Distance of furnace Mode of transporta- Fuel u s e d ; price Kind of flux, and ira'tproduce^d
fuel from furfrora raarket.
per bushel or
its cost.
lastyear.
tion to market.
nace.
ton.

»

50 miles

83 miles to Philadelphia.

Railroad 55 miles... Anthracite coal,
$2 80 per ton.

Liraestone, 65 cts.
per ton.

Charcoal, 10
miles; stone
coal, 16 mis,

280 miles
from
Philadelphia.

Canal

Limestone.......

4 miles

100 miles
Pittsburg.

from

Philadelphia
From 1 to 6
miles.

,. Charcoal, 6 cts.
per bush.; bituminous, 16
cts. per bush.
Oanal and railroad . Charcoal, 5 cts.
per bushel.
do

. . . . . . d o . . . . . . . . Limestone, $1 50
per ton.
Charcoal
. , Limestone,$l per
ton.

8 miles by teams,
thence by barges
to Pittsburg.

100 railes

2 miles

108 railes to Pittsburg.

Pittsburg by flat- Charcoal . . ; . . . .
boats.
Canal and railroad. Coke, from bit.
coal.
Flatboats down the Charcoal, $8 per
Alleghany.
ton.
14 miles by teams, Charcoal
balance by railroad.

120 miles, eost $4
per ton.
65 miles to Pittsburg.
Baltimore 85 miles.
Philadelphia 130
miles.

Limestone, 75 cts.
per ton.

1,600 t o n s . . . .

2,208 tons . . .
Freight to Pittsburg
$4.

4.t the furnace.
the vicinity.

1,600 t o n s . . . .

Limestone, 62 cts.
per ton.
Limestone, 35 cts. 3 4 5 0 t o n s . . . .
per ton of metal.
Limestone, 75 cts. 2 006 tons
per ton.
Limestone,25 cts.
per ton of metal.

93 miles

Pittston, Luzerne CO.
3 miles

20,000 t o n s . . .

288 t o n s o . . . .
Railroad

Bituminous coal. Limestone,
25
miles by railroad.
Pittsburg, 113 miles. Railroad and canal. Coke, 5 cts. per Limestone,80 cts. 3,000 t o n s . . . .
bushel.
per ton.
Canal and railroad . Anthracite coal, L i m e s t o n e , 6 0 c t s . 467 tons
230 miles
per ton.
$ 3 50 per ton.
Pittsburg 56 m i l e s . . T e a m s , flatboats, Charcoal, 5 cts. Limestone, 50 cts. 1,295 tons,ran
&c.
per bushel.
per ton.
27 weeks.
Pittsburg70 m i l e s . . Railroad

In

Bituminous coal

20 to 50 miles
5 miles . . . . . . 33^ miles




Limestone . . . . . .

Charcoal

Limestone,
per ton.

Railroad
2 i miles by team,
31 miles by railroad.

$1

954 tons

136

KEPOET ON TflE PlSlffCES.
TabvMed stdtement of the spedmens of

Narae of mine or furnace.

S.|

Location of mine or Rollingmillsin the Description of Purposes to which
the products of
iron they roll.
iiirnace.
vicinity.
furnaces are appHed.

NEW JERSEY—Continued.
Trenton ;Iron Co., Cooper,
Hewitt & Co., Andover
Mines.

Trenton Sussex Co..

Roseville MisMje.

35 miles from New
York, and 25 miles
from Piermont.

All purposes.

3A miles from Andover mines.

Ringwood Estate.

2 at Trenton belonging to this
company, 50
miles from furnaces.

Wife..

On Morris canal.
Scofield Mines
do
Muir Hibernia, and Beach
Mines.
.dOi
Dell Mine
.do.
Irondale Mine
.do.
Dickerson Mine
,
.do.
King Mine
,

Joseph 0. Kent, of Trenton Iron Co.

Phillipsburg.,

PENNSYLVANIA.

Allentown Iron Co., Walnut street, Philadelphia.




Lehigh Co., 12 miles
from. . Allentown
Iron-works.

Cooper, Hewitt & R. R. comCo., Easton, Pa.
mon bar,
&c.

i foundery and
^ forge iron.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES

137

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Continued.
Annual production and ruling prices
each year since the works were
first started ; prices per ton.

Am't that could
be produced under ready sale
and remunerative prices.

Remarks.—Facilities of mining o r e ; relative cost of
charcoal, coke, crude, bituriiinous, and anthracite
iron; peculiarities of iron. Sec.

3 furnaces, 2,000
tons per ann.

T h e value of this ore consists in its superior quality,
being the only iron ore in this country that, smelted
with anthracite coal, will produce iron capable of
being reduced to wire ; in the economy with which
it is mixed, and the truly admirable manner in
which it acts in the lilast furnace, not only smelting with great facility, bpt acting as a rectifier of
other ores. No ore of similar character has eyer
been found on the company's land. The experience of this establishment " g o e s to show that ihe
presence either of zinc or manganese, or both, in
the ores has great influence iri overcoming the
liabihty of iron to rust, and we therefore recom- .
mend that especial attention be given to this
point." The ring of iron in the New York box is
made from the Andover ore, which contains both
zinc and manganese. Cost at blast furnace $2 60 ;
2 i tons make 1 ton of iron. This company was
organized in 1847, have three blast furnaces one
mile from Easton, on the Delaware river, Lehigh
river and canal.
T h e iron made of this ore is of very superior quality
for remelting, a fact so well known in the market
that it commands a higher price in consequence.
Only limited ih their mining operations by the
quanlity they can get carted to the canal, (5
miles.) Costs $2 per ton at blast furnace; 3 tons
of this ore make 1 ton of iron.
There are two. forges on this estate driven by water
power. " M i n e s about without n u m b e r . " The
ore is the black magnetic oxide, more uniformly
pure and rich than any other ores in the State,
and produces iron o f t h e best quality for the forge.
Cost at furnace $2 30 per ton ; 1^ tons of this ore
make 1 ton of iron.

10,000 tons p. arm
Yielding rich ore of analogous character, and making
a superior quality of iron.
30,000 tons p. ann
20,000 tons p. ann
10,000 tons p. ann
Yielding a rich ore, but ofsraall capacity.
T h e Scofield, Muir, Hibernia, Beach, Dell, Irondale,Dickerson, and King mines yield magnetic ores,
and from the nature of the veins are, in all probability, inexhaustible. T h e y are simply limited in
their annual capacity by the number of men that
can be economically employed.
In addition to
those named, the company possesses mines of hematite or secondary ores in Pennsylvania, but do not
work them extensively, as it is more expensive,
and yield not so good as magnetic ores.
Gives as the result of his experience, that " the
iron best adapted to resist oxidization is a carbonate of iron, free as possible from all impurities,
(and especially from sulphur, phosphorus, and
silicium,) close grained, smooth, and of liigh
specific gravity; and that the ores for the production ot this iron are the manganese ores, free
from sulphur, and worked with the necessary
skill in the blast furnace.
'
Year*1847, 9,900 tons, price $25 9 8 ;
1848,8,240 tons, price $23 90 ; 1849,
7,272 tons, price $20 73; 1850,6,3:^0
tons, price $18 8 5 ; 1851, rione;
185-2,6,071 tons, price $20 34; 1853,
10,314 tons, price $28 0 3 ; 1854,
13,972 tons, price $31 70; 1855,
16,212 tons, price $25 44'. 1856,
19,964 tons, price $24 58.




22,500 tons of
foundery,
or
27,500 tons of
forge iron.

T h e ores froni these mines are classed as " b r o w n
h e m a t i t e , " yielding, where well selected, from
40 to 45 per cent, of iron, and are very extensively
distributed in beds or deposits near tlic surface of
the ground and in the alluvi.^l clay. They are .
dug out in open workings and hoisted and prepared by small stationary engines. Delivered at
the works, costs from $2 75 to $3 per ton of 2,240
pounds. The forge iron is used for rails, common
bar, nails, and spikes; the foundery iron, for machinery, stoves, pipes, &c., requiring soft metal.

1847 includes t w o months of 1846.

138

REPORT ON THE FINANCES
Tahulated statement ofi the specimens ofi

^

IIc.
o

Name of mine or furnace.

Commenced
operations.

E x t e n t of ore deposit.

Distance of mine
from furnace.

1855

Location of mine or
furnace.

Large

From 3 to 35 miles
by canal and
railroad.
Four miles

c
OHIO.
ly)

Volcano Iron Company,
H . B . Well man.

53

Howard Furnace, H. A.
Webb.
Jackson F u r n a c e Company, Tracy & Uavis.
Lawrence C o u n t y - F u r nace, Culbertson, Man
& Co.
Madison Furnace, Peters,
Terry &. Co.
Ealaski Company, 11. B.
Robson.

\

54
55
56
57

Wheelersburg, Scioto
county.
Jackson county

1853
Inexhaustible....

From i t o 2 m i l e s .

Abundant

1840

Lawrence c o u n t y . . . . 1832

All around
furnace.

Portsmouth, Jackson
county.
Vinton county

1853

Abundant

N o t i n operation.

6,000 acres

18.32

,

Large

58

Andrew Ellicott

Baltimore

60

Report of Piedmont Committee.
Elba Furnace, J a m e s W .
Tyson.
Lady Stafford Iron-works,
W i n . Walsh, agent.

Washington county,
oft C. and 0 . canal.

Costs 35 cents per
ton to haul.
Furnace building
at the mine.

Chas. Whittlesey

5Q

the

MARYLAND.

61
6^

Several
mines,
from 1 to 75
miles.

1850
Very large

VIRGINIA.

6*^
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71

Shenandoah Iron-works . .
Tredigar Iron-works, MorriSj'Tanner & Co.
Cloverdale Furnace, An- Botetourt county
derson &^Patton.
Buena Vista Furnace, S.
F. & W . H. Jordan.
.John W Jordan
Au.?tralia F u r n a c e , E. & J.
P. J o r d a n .
Cripple Creek, W m . Wilk erson.
Catherine Iron-works, J n .
Mc Kiernan.
David Fowler

72

Raccoon Furnace, Barr,
.McGrew & Co.
Laura F u r n a c e , J. J. Tomiinsori.
Kenton F u r n a c e , John
Waring & Co.
Greenup Furnace, Wilson
Baird & Co.
Mount Savage F u r n a c e , R .
M. Biggs.
Buena Vi.-<ta F u r n a c e and
Star Furnace, L a m p t o n ,
Nicholls & Co.

Inexhaustible....

T w o miles

Rockbridge c o u n t y . . . 1847

Numerous

3 miles

1850

Abundant

2 miles

Large

700 y a r d s . . . . . . . .

Inexhaustible....

3 miles

Large

^ mile

do

Alleghany c o u n t y . . . 1854
Wythe county

Lately

Pa^e countv

1847.

Independence, Pres. ton county.

1857

Larce

Near

Green county

1834 . . . .

Inexhaustible....

2 miles

Trigg county

1855.

Small

5- m i l e . . . . . . . . . . .

Inexhaustible....

1 mile

Large

3 miles.

* .. •

Armory Rolling Mills, R.
Archer & Co.

73

1842

KENTUCKY.

74
75
76
77
78

Greenup county . . . . .
Ashland,
Greenup
county.
Carter county

1849

Greenup county ahd
Carter county.

TENNESSEE.

79
80

Reuben Rose . . . . . .
Sailors' Rest Furnace, J.
D. West.




Tazewell, Claiborne 1838
county.
Montgomery c o u n t y . . 1858

Extensive. . . . . . . 3^ miles
Inexhaustible....

5 miles

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

139

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Continued.
i

Distance of
fuel from furanco.

Kind of flux, and Am't produced
last year.
its cost.

Distance of furnace Mode of transporta- Fuel u s e d ; price
per bushel or
from market.
tion to market.
ton.

Raw bituminous
coal.
Four miles

Nine miles

Teams

Tvventy m i l e s , ' , . . . . Railroad
Seven to 9
miles.

Various

Steamboat or railroad.

Limestone, ^ 1 30
per ton.

5,000 t o n s . . . .

Charcoal

Limestone

2,200 t o n s . . . .

Charcoal,4i cts. Limestone, 40 cts.
per bushel.
per ton.
Charcoal, 5 cts. Limestone,10 cts.
per bushel.
per ton.

2,700tons . . .
2,434 t o n s . . . .

Charcoal, 5 cts. Limestone
per bushel.
Bituminous coal, Limestone, $2 per
ton,
cost 95 cents
'a
per ton ; charcoal, 4 cts. per
bushel.

From I ' t o 5
miles.

Charcoal, 6 cts.
•perbushel.

Thirty-two miles . . Railroad

Oyster
shells;
cost nominal.

2.500 t o n s . . . .

Charcoal,60 cts.
per bushel."

Limestone, $ 1 25
per perch.

1,000 t o n s . . . .

Charcoal, very
expensive.

Limestone, small
expense.

1,400 tons

Charcoal

Marl

1,000 tons . . .

Caual and railroad.

/
2 miles

...

by
T w o hundred miles. Seven miles
teams, balance by
canal.
Richmond, 190 miles Canal

Limestone
8 miles by teams, . . . . d o
172 by railroad.
1,100 tons . . .
do
8 miles by teams & Charcoal, 3 cts.
per bushel.
75 by canal.
do
Charcoal, 4 cts. . .
Railroad
per bushel.
Limestone, 20 cts
Flatboats and rail- Charcoal
per ton of metal.
road.
30 tons per
Limestone
....do
week.
...do..
..

180 miles
2 m i l e s . . . . . . 83 miles

1.50 m i l e s . . . . .
Wheeling

Near

•

Steamboats

Limestone, $2 per 1,500 tons . . .
ton.
Limestone . . . . . . . 1,400 tons . . .

Charcoal, 4 cts.
per bushel.
Charcoal, 3 cts.
per bushel.
....do
'

1

raile

.

T e a m s . . . . . . . . . . . . Charcoal, 4^ cts.
per bushel.

25 miles

Lime^tone,$150
per ton.

1,500 tons . . .

Limestone, $1 50
per ton.

2,010 tons , . .

Limestone

l,350tonri...

*
Flatboats & steam- Charcoal, cost
triflirig.
boats.
6 m i l e s . . . . . . . . . . . . Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . Charcoal, 3 cts.
per bushel.
5

200 miles
2 miles




140

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Tahulated statement ofi the specimens ofi

Name of mine or furnace.

Location of mine or
furnace.

Rolling mills in the Description of Purposes to which
the products of
vicinity.
iron they roll.
furnaces are applied.

^d

PENNSYLVANIA—Oontinued
Bellefontaine Iron-works,
Valentiiies, T h o m a s &
Co.

Centre county .

Finewire,scythes
&c.

Springfield Furnace,
Good & Co.

Blair county.

Cannon,
car
wheels, forge,
boiler plate, &e.
Boiler iron

D.

J. P. Fincher..

Clinton Furnace, S.
Plumen.

Columbia co., ^ mile
from Catawissa.

F.

Clarion c o u n t y . .

Thorndale
Iron-works,
Horace A. Beals.

Chester county .

10 mills in a circle
of 10 iniles.

Richland F u r n a c e , John
Keating.

Bar iron, nails,
&c.

Pittsburg..

Clarion county, Richland township.

Boiler iron.

Mahoning F u r n a c e , J. A.
Colwell St Co.

Kittaning& Great Railroad iron.
Western, fifty
miles distarit.
Hollidaysburg, Blair Duncansville . . . . Bar iron
Poundeiy,forge,«S:
mill purposes.
county.
Nails and bar iron,
Mahoning, Armstrong Kittaning.
county.

Pine Grove Iron-works,
W. M. W a t t s .

Carlisle, Cumberland
county.

Fairmount
Iron-works,
Charles E . Smith.

Philadelphia Rolling
Mill.

Watson, White & C o .

Boiler iron and
foundery metal.

Stockdale Forge, J a m e s Huntingdon county ..
Gardner.
Lycoming Iron and Coal Ralston,
Lycoming
Company.
county.
Chimney Rock F u r n a c e , Hollida3'^sburg, Blair 2 miles.
Gardner, Osterboh & Co.
county.
Mill Hall Iron Company,
J. Stowe S h a w .
Pine
Creek
Furnace,
Brown & Mosgrowe.

Woodvale,
county.

Foundery & mill
purposes.

Clinton county . . . .

Laurel Iron and Coal
Company, W . Walker.

Chain cable .




Armstrong county .

Fayette

One 6 miles, Kittaning.

Rolling mill and
foundery metal',
for machinery.

141

EEPOET ON THE -FINANCES.

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Continued.
Annual production and ruling prices
each year since the works were
first started; prices per ton.

Am't that could
be produced under ready sale
and remunerative piices.

Remarks.—Facilities of mining, ore ; relati"^. cost of
charcoal, coke, crude, bituminous, and anthracite
iron ; peculiarities of iron, &c.

F o r the last 10 years, 1,000 tons per
annum of finished bar iron, averaging from $65 to $80 per ton.

4,000 tons
annum.

per

Capacity, 2,000 tons per a n n u m .

2,400 tons
annum.

per

T h e ore is found in small nests in a limestone
valley, and not in regular veins. Cost of mining
about $1 per ton, capacity of establishment about
2,000 tons of metal, finished into charcoal bar
-would make about J,350 t o n s ; if puddled, would
make 1,800 t o n s ; could be doubled if prices
would justify.
Cost of mining $1 25 per ton. Peculiarity of iron
being the strongest made in Pennsylvania.

Capacity of furnace from 1,300 to
1,500 tons. In 1846, from $22 50
to $30 per t o n ; 1853, $35 per ton.
Average annual production 800
tons ; at present the price realized
is $32 per ton.
Average production 1,400 tons. Receive in Pittsburg from $26 to $44
• per ton.
Annual production 1,000 tons. Average price $110 per ton of 2,000 lbs.

About 1,500 tons
per annum.

Facilities of mining good.

2,400 tons..

Cost of mining ore about $1 25 per ton.
three tons of ore to make one of iron.

2,000 tons.,

T h e ores of this locality are of the *,' hematite " class
of the limestone region, but as yet undeveloped.
W e have no furnaces for the manuiacture of pig,
metal.
Cost of ore in furnace bank from $ 3 to $ 3 50 per ton.

Annual production 700 tons. Ruling 800lons per anprices average from $30 to $33 per
num.
ton.
Prices range from $25 to $30 per t o n . . | 6,000 tons per annum.
Annual production from 1,900 to 2,500 tons; with
hot blast, could
2,300 tons. Sold from $25. to $45
reach 3,000.
per ton.
Average production 650 tons. Pig 1,600 tons
metal frbm $18 to $49, boiler
' blooms from $45 to $86.
Year 1853, 488 tons, price $ 8 5 ;
1854, 1.402 tons, price $ 9 0 ; 18.55,
1,172 tons, price $82 5 0 ; 1856,
1,950 tons, price $ 8 0 ; 1857,1,598
tons, price $77 50. Cost to import similar iron is $72 50.
Average price from .|80 to $82 50
per ton.

Requires

Work two furnaces.
Cost of mining $1 75 per ton.
per cent, of iron.

Ore yields about 40

Very cheaply rained. The metal is worked into
blooms, which is rolled in Dauphin and Chester
counties, Pennsylvania; and in Baltimore into N o .
1 quality boiler plate.
Capacity of this rolling mill, if employed on hoop
iron alone, 2,500 tons; on bars, 4,000 tons; on rails,
6,000 tons per annum.

300 tons
9,000tons

From $20 to $30 for foundery, and
$25 to $27 for mill iron.

4,000 tons

.,

60 tons per week
Year 1846, 427 tons, 15 weeks, price
$ 2 6 ; 1847, 1,047 ton?, 33 weeks,
price $ 3 2 ; 1848, 9.55 tons, .32
weeks, price $28 50; 1849,1,473
tons, 47 weeks, price $ 2 5 ; 1850,
1,218 tons, 37 wrecks, price $2«;
1851, 1,285 tons, 42 weeks, price
$24 .50; 1852,1,629 tons, 40 weeks,
price $ 3 3 ; 1853, 1,877 tons, 34
w e e k s , price $ 4 5 ; 1854, 2,068
tons, 41 weeks, price $42 50; 1855,
2,236 tons, 44 weeks, price $ 3 4 ;
1856, 1,295 t o n s , 27 w e e k s , price
$ 3 1 ; 1857, 816 tons, 16 w e e k s ,
price $30.
Prices not remunerating, but on the
contrary are ruinous.




This iron has been rolled and extensively used by a
locomotive manufacturing company in Philadelphia. An unlimited force can be employed in
this mine.
Furnace stopped July 5, 1857. T h e cost of mining
and hauling averages about $ 3 per ton. T h e different ores are mixed in the proportion of. I each.
Semi-bituminoiia coal has been tried and found
unsuitable.

Facilities for mining ore and coal are very g r e a t ;
4,000 acres of land, 2,000 of which are underlaid
with ore and coal. Furnace stack erected, which
can be supplied for an age with dre from immediately under the furnace bank and within one mile.
Abundance of coal, wood for charcoal, and limestone for flux on the premises. Twenty-one specimens of ore received.

142

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Tabidated statement ofi the sp)ecimens ofi

•a
cd

.

Name of mine or furnace.

zl

Location of mine or
furnace.

Extent of ore deposit.

Distance of mine
from furnace.

Abundant ,

Commenced
operations.

200 yards

o o.
c
S5
.TENNESSEE-Continued.
81
82
83
84

Forty-eight Furnace, Painter Biother.
Union F u r n a c e , W . B. &
J. P. t . Carter.
Louisa Furnace, Jackson,
McKiernan & Co.
Antonio Furnace, Dixon,
Vanlew & Co.

85
86
87

Holston Furnace, Welcker
&. Pattons.
R . L . Blair & Brother

Waynesborough
Carter county..

1818.

Montgomery c o u n t y . . 1837

Inexhaustible....

1 rnile

100 acres

400 yards

1854

300 yards

Palmyra, Montgomery county.
Cuniberl'd Gap, Claiborne county.
Sullivan county

1852

Large

500 yards

1855

Large

6 miles

Jonesborough........

1816

Large

2 miles

MICHIGAN.

88
89
90

Lake Superior Iron Mountain, 5S. P. Elv, Rochester, N. Y.
Jack.son Iron Company,
Samuel H. Kimball.
Collins.Iron Company, C.
A. Trowbridge, Detroit,
Michigan.

Marquette c o u n t y . . . . No furnace .. Iinmense deposit.
L a k e Superior, Marquette county.
Marquette c o u n t y . . . .

1856

Unlimited

1855

Immense...,*..^.

Ohio and P e n n sylvania.
9 miles by railroad.

INDIANA.

91

Winslow S. Pierce

92

Black River Falls Ironworks, Henry Richter.

93

Napoleon Aubuchen

94

American Iron Mountain
Company, Jas. Harrison.

95

W m Hill

96

Stokes Iron Mining Company, Reuben D. Golding

WISCONSIN.

200 yards

Large

Jackson county.

MISSOURI.

Predericktown, Madison county.

No furnace .. Very l a r g e . . . . . . .

NORTH CAROLINA.

.

.

.

Tom's Creek, Surry
county.
Stokes county . . . . . . .
2 | to 4 miles

97

Republic, Yadkin c o . 1834

; . . . Large

98 . Cranberry Forge, Jordan C.
Hardin.
99 Mount Welcome Forge,
James F. Ji)hnston.

Watauga county

1827 . . . .

Large

Lincoln county

1808

Inexhaustible....

.......... limile....
l i mile

....

.,,....,.

SOOTH CAROLINA.

100
101
102

New York Hou^e,Reuben
Swan.
Hurricane Furnace, Sirnp.son Bobo.
VJ ri Shenherd

New York .district... 1850

4 to Smiles
s

Spartanburgh district. 1834
Charleston

GEORGIA.

103
104

O P Fannin
Etowah Manufacturing &
Mining Company, Mark
A. Cooper.

105

TJnnnfl

Cave Snrin'' . . .

.....
1845

Larn'e . . . . . . . . . .
Very l a r g e . . . . . . . From l i t o 5 miles

1852

Inexhaustible....

ALABAMA.
Mnnntnin

Trnti-

works.




Cherokee county . . . .

350 yards

143

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Contiriued.

Distance of Distance of furnace Mode of transporta- Fuel used; price
fuel from furfrom market.
tion to market.
per bushel or
nace.
ton.

Boats
2 miles.......

126 miles

2 i railes

St. Louis and Cincinnati.
Nashville, Memphis, & St. Louis.
2 miles

1 mile
^ mile

On the s p o t . . .

...

14 miles by teams;
balance by railr'd.
8 rniles by t e a m s ;
thence by boats.
Steamboat

Kind of flux and
its cost.

Am't produced
last year.

Charcoal . . . . . . . Limestone

1.500 tons

Charcoal, 3 cts.
per bushel.
Charcoal

Limestone, nominal.
Limestone

^000 lons and
600 blooms.
8 tons pr. day.

Limestone,25cts.
per load.
Limestone

120 tons

....

250 tons

....

Charcoal, 4 cts.
per bushel.
do
Teams & flatboats;
costs $6 per ton.
Biver and railroad.. Charcoal, 4A cts.
per bushel.
Cliarcoal, 2A cts..
per bushel.

Limestone, 50 cts.
per ton.
Limestone

.

1,500 t o n s . . . .

400 tons

Railroad and l a k e .
Ohio and Pennsylvania,
550 miles

Canal and railroad..

Near

2 railes

50 miles

110 miles.

do

Charcoal, 5 cts.
per bushel.

No flux u s e d . . . . . 800 tons

Steaniboat

Charcoal, 6 cts.
per bushel.

Limestone,
per ton.

Railroad

Charcoal, 3^ cts.
' per bu.-^hel.

Imile
2 m i l e s . . . . . . 30 miles

Teams

3 railes

Teams

25 miles.
The country about
for 50 miles.

Charcoal a t . l i t o 10 railes
the furnace,'
stone coal
100 iniles.
i mile

75

Charcoal, 3i cts.
per bushel.
Charcoal, 3 cts.
per bushel.

Lime, $ 1 20 per
ton.'

No flux used . . . . 100 tons . . . .

T e a m s and railroad. Charcoal,'^^ cts. Lime.=tone,50cts.
per bush.; bit.
per ton.
coal, 20 cents;
coke, 25 cents
per bushel.

railes........... S t e a m b o a t . . . . . . . . .




Charcoal, 3 cts.
per bushel.
Charcoal, 3 cts.
per bu.-hel.
Charcoal,-iA.cts.
per bushel.

$6

Charcoal, 4 cts. Limestone, 55 cts.
per bushel.
per ton.

800 tons, two
furnaces.

4,000 t o n s . . .

144

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Tahulated siatement ofi the specimens ofi

Name of mine or furnace.

Ronin.fr mills in the Description of Purposes to which
the products ot
vicinity.
iron they .roll
furnace are applied.

Location of mine or
furnace.

PENNSYLVANIA—CoUt'd.

Sharon Iron Company,
Samuel H. Kimball.

Mercer county.

Kittaning
Iron-works,
Brown, Floyd & Oo.

Kittaning, Armstrong
county.

Young, Shlank & F o r t . . . ,

39

Allentown, Lehigh
county.
Berks county

Mount Laurel Furnace,
W. H . Clymer & Co.
Cornwell Ore Banks, R.
W . & W.Coleman & W .
G. T r u m a n .
Samuel G. Morrison
,
T. R. Van Gelden
,
West Brandywine Ironworks, Samuel Hatfield
E. G. Pomeroy
,
Jacob R e e s e . . . .
Dillsburg Iron Mines, John
Humper.
W . Wade
Raymilton Furnace

One at furnace
worked till 1855,
capital lost and
business
suspended.
On the premises .

Four in vicinity.. Most kinds.

Car wheels and
pig iron.

Lebanon c o u n t y .
Jersey Shore

,

Damascus county
Chester county . . . ,
Philadelphia .
Pittsburg
Dillsburg .
Pittsburg
Venango county .

OHIO.

;,Volcano Iron Company,
. H. B. Wellman.

At Pittsburg, 108
miles.

Jackson county

Ealaski Corapany, H. B.
Robson.

Vinton county

Chas. W h i t t l e s e y . .

T w o in the vicinity.

Boiler, sheet
iron, &c.

Boiler iron and
car wheels.

All kinds.

B;)iler plate, car
wheels, nails,
&c.

Wheelersburg, Scioto
county.

Jackson F u r n a c e Corapany, Tracy & Davis.
L a w r e n c e County Furn a c e , Culbertson, Man
& Co.
Madison F u r n a c e , Peters,
Terry & Co.

Most k i n d s .

Several.

Howard Furnace, H. A.
Webi).

All kinds . . . . Castings.

Six within 25
railes.
Three within 10
miles.

Massillon

Cleveland .

Lawrence c o u n t y . . .
Portsmouth, Jackson
county.

Various castings.
Pig iron

,

MARYLAND.

Andrew E l l i c o t t . . .
Report of Piedmont Committee.
Elba Furnace, J a m e s W .
Tyson.

62

Sykesvitle .

Lady Stafford Iron-works,
W. Walsh, agent.

Washington county,
C. and O. canal.




Car v/heels and
malleable castings.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

145

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Continued.

1 Annual production and ruling prices Am'nt that could Remarks.—Facilities of mining ore; relative cost of
charcoal, coke, crude, bituminous, and anthracite
be produced uneach year since the works were
der ready sale
iron ; peculiarities of iron, &c.
i first started; prices per ton.
and remunerative prices.

Mill operated five years. Annual 9 ton sof found ery
or 14 tons of
1 product 3,000 to 4,000 tons. Ruling
forge per day.
I prices frora 2J to 3^ cents.
•3,000 tons. Average price frora 2^
: to 6 cents.

Product of superior quality. Steel produced for
tools, saws, springs, &c., fully equal, if not superior, to any imported article. Operations of the
mill wholly suspended.
;
Rolling mill, roll merchant bar, nail plate, sheet and
boiler iron. Use iron from Pine creek and Mahoning furnaces. Four speciraens received. •
No specimens received.

6,000 tons .

Average cost bf mining the three different specimens of ore $1 per ton, gross weight..
j

Average annual production for 9
' years 900 tons. Price frora $29
; to $46 per ton.

Specimens received, none of the required information given.
.">
Speciraens of several kinds of ore, and full description of thera.
No inforraation given.
No inforraation given ; asks for a circular.
Gives results of experiraents, and his experience.
Will not give the required, orany other, information
without compensation.
Required information not given, but discusses the
iron business in Pennsylvania.
Makes some suggestions as to mode of testing iron.
Speciraens received; no correspondence.

Frora $28 to $33 per ton; produces
5,000 tons annually.

10,000 tons.,

Year 1853, 1,825 tons, price
1854, 2,150 tons, price $35;
1,232 tons, price $30 50;
2,200 tons, price $29 50;
1,600 tons, price $27.

5,000 tons..

$42;
1855,
1856,
1857,

Annual production for twelve years, 2,500 tons.
average 1,600 tons; price, frora $25
to $35 per ton.
Average production, 2,000 tons per 3,500 tons.,
annura ; price, hot blast pig, $31;
cold blast pig, $33.
100 tons
week.

2,500 tons annually..

Year 1850,912 tons, price at furnace,
$23; 1851, 1,085 tons, price at
furnace, $23; 1852,694 tons, price
at furnace, $23; 1853, 811 tons,
price at furnace, .$35; l854, 1,.304
tons, price at furnace, $40 ; 1855,
830 tons, price at furnace, $ —,
hot blast; 1856, 511 tons, price at
furnace, $30; 1857, 1,000 tons,
price at furnace, $35, cold blast.

Iron used raostly for castings is sirailar to the
Scotch pig; not well calculated for bar iron ; received three specimens of iron; the two of ore
have not come to hand, or have been mislaid.
Speciraens received.

Abundance of timber for coaling.

per Estiraates iron frora biturainous coal to cost $13 10
per ton, and iron from charcoal $17 50; have not
made any iron yet; expect to have furnace in
operation early in 1858; charcoal iron commands
$2 to $3 per ton more than raw coal iron.
Gives his 0|)inion ou iron.

5,000 tons per
annura.

Three furnaces can make either white or gray iron
at pleasure, but are now making white iron, which
puddles into wrought iron with greater facility.

1,700 tons.

This iron is remarkable for its chilling properties and
strength, making it very valuable for car wheels,
for which purpose it is almost exclusively used.

Samples of ere received; information not given.

10




146

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Tahulated statement ofi the specimens of

03

|i

' Name of mine or furnace.

S.1

r
.

Location of mine or
furnace.

Comraenced
operations.

.
ALABAMA—Continued.

Montevallo, Shelby
county.
107 Horace Ware. . . . . . . . . . . . Columbiana . . . . . . . . .
Benton county,...!... 1843.,
108 Goode, Morris & Co
106

Extent of ore de- . Distance of mine
posit.
from furnace.

John S. Storrs

Large

On the spot

Large

2. miles

CALIFORNIA.

109

Samuel S. S w e e t . . . . . . . . . Rattlesnake Bar, Placer county.

Large...........

NOVA SCOTIA.
•

Acadian Charcoal Iron
Corapany. ^*
111 Union Iron Mining Company, N . W . Busteed.
lid




A few yards

.

Large

1

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

1.47

iron and iron ores, Sc —Continued.

Distance of Distance of furnace Mode of transporta- Fuel used; price Kind of fluxj and Ara't produced
per bushel or
tion to market.
its cost.
last year.
fuel from furfrora raarket.
ton.
nace.

Near

70 miles

Steamboat and rail- Charcoal
road.

Limestone

10,000 Ibs.p
day.

Flatboats & steam- Charcoal, 4 cts. Limestone,75 cts. 1,600 lbs. bar
iron and 1^
boats.
perbushel.
per ton.
ton pig and
cas'gs daily.

2 miles

35 miles

Teams and railroad. Charcoal

Liraestone.......

...^ Charcoal

Liraestone . . . . . . .

..............
On the spot..




Vessels..

148

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Tahulated statement ofi the specim

Narae of raine or furnace.

Location of mine or
furnace.

Rolling mills i n t h e Description of Purposes to which
the products of
iron they roll
vicinity.
furnaces are a p plied.

Shenandoah I r o n - w o r k s . . Page county.
Tredegar iron-works, Mor- Richmond....
ris, Tanner &. Co.
Cloyerdale F u r n a c e , An- Botetourt county.
derson & Patten.
Buena Vista Furnace, S.
F . & VV. H. Jordan.
John W . Jordan .

Rockbridge county.
.do.

All k i n d s . . .

Guns, bar

iron,

&G.

Richmond,
miles.

190

Richmond,
miles.

Various kindsl Rolling mills

180

Australia Furnace, E. & J.
F. Jordan.
Cripple Creek, W m . W i l kerson.
Catherine Iron-works, J n .
McKiernan.

Alleghany county.

One 150 railes.

Wythe county....

Lynchburg . . .

David F o w l e r .

Iron rolling mills,

Independence, Preston county.
Richmond

Armory Rolling Mills, R.
Archer &, Co.

Bar iron and castings.
Several kinds

Page county

Car wheels,guns,
&c.

STATE OF KENTUCKY.

Racoon F u r n a c e , Barr,
McGrew & Co.
Laura Furnace, J ; J. Tomlinson.

Green county.

Kenton F u r n a c e , John
Waring & Co.
Greenup Furnace, Wilson
Baird & Co.
Mount Savage Furnace, R.
M. Bi?gs.
Buena Vista F u r n a c e and
Star F u r n a c e , Lampton,
Nicholls & Co.

Greenup county

Trigg county .

One 15 railes distant.
One at .30 railes,
one at 16 miles.

Most all kinds
All k i n d s .

Ashland,
Greenup
county.
Carter county

Foundery & rolling mills.

Greenup county and
Carter county.

STATE OF TENNESSEE.

79

Reuben Rose

Tazewell, Clairborne
county.

Sailors' Rest F u r n a c e , J.
D. West.

Montgomery c o u n t y . . 2 miles.,

Forty-eight Furnace, Painter Brothers.

Waynesborough .

Paducah .

Rolling mill purposes.

Union F u r n a c e , W . B. &,
J. P. S. Carter.

Carter county.

One 28 miles from
furnace.

Car wheels, foundery purposes,
&c.

Louisa Furnace, Jackson,
McKiernan & Co.
Antonio F u r n a c e , Dixon,
Vanlew & Co.




Pig, hollow ware,
and olher castings. .

All k i n d s . . .

Foundery purposes.

Montgomery county.
Palmyra, Montgomery county.

One 25 miles; one
60 miles; one
160 miles.

All kinds.

Machinery and
boiler plate.

149

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

iron and iron ores, Sc.—Continued.
Annual production and ruling prices
each year since the works were
flrst started ; prices per ton.

Average production, 1,000 t o n s ;
price, guu iron, $40 to $ 5 0 ; oiher
iron, $28 to $40 per ton.
Average annual produciion for last
ten years, 1,000 t o n s ; average
price, .$36 per'ton.
1855, made 1,079 t o n s ; 1856, 1,075
t o n s ; average price since 1853,
about $35 at Richmond.
Average price, $32 per ton

Ara't that could
be produced under ready sale
and remunerative prices.

1,500 tons..

Remarks.—Facilities of mining ore ; relative cost of
charcoal, coke, crude, bituminous and anthracite
iron ; peculiarities of iron, &c.

;p egimens received; no correspondence.
Promises to forward specimens and information j
not received.
Cold blast furnace ; cost of transportation from furnace to market, $4 85 per ton.
In 1853 made about 1,500 tons in six

raonths.

2,500 tons . .
Mining costs 75 cents per ton.

1,000 tons . .
In 1854, for metal, $41 to $ 4 2 | ; for
blooms, $85 per ton. I n l 8 5 5 , ftr
raetal, $29 to $ 3 5 ; for blooms, $70
per ton. In 1856, for metal, $33
to $ 3 5 ; for blooms, $70 per ton.
In 1857, $35 to $ 3 8 ; for blooms,
$75 to $80 prr ton.
Iron worth in Wheeling from .$35 to
40 per ton.

1,500 tons . .

This iron is good for hollow w a r e , stove plate, machinery of any kind, &c.
The cost of mining is about $1 25 per ton of metal,
and cost of transportation of iron to Baltimore,
$8 per ton.

1,200 tons .

3,000 tons .
1855 and 1856, $25 ; 1857, $26 to $28
per ton at landing, two railes frora
furnace.
2,500 tons .

Specimens received, and also Report of Geological
Survey of the State.
Mining costs 30 cents per ton ; iron costs (to raake)
about $20 per ton of 2,268 pounds at the establishment.
Cold blast; ore easily obtained.
Hot blast; for peculiarities of the ore refers to 1st
and 2d volumes Geological Survey of Kentucky.

Average
tons.

annual

production,

1,700

13 tons per day..
T h e coarse grain pig iron is used for foundery purposes ; the close grain is for railroad and bar iron.
Star Furnace is situated 14 miles from the Ohio
river, on the Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad;
Buena Vista Furnace 12 miles from the Ohio river,
.and on the line of the above railroad. W e m a k e
the iron from a mixture of the o r e s ; the blue
limestone or blue rock ore is about53 per cent. iron.

Produced during the last 4 raonths
4 tons pig metal daily, independent of castings; from 40 to 50 tons
annually raanufactured into farming utensils, which are sold at the
works at 5 and 6 cents p e r p o u n d .
Average, 1,350 tons. In 1855 pig
sold at $20 per t o n ; in 1856 at
$25 per ton.

$50,000 worth of
iron.
2,000tons p e r a u num.
1,000 tons forge
and 600 tons
blooms.
2,000 tons

In 1854 made 1,150 tons, $28 to $40
per t o n ; in 1855 made 1,275 tons,
at $24 per ton; in 1856 made 1,200
tons, at $26 per ton ; in 1857 made
1,500 tons, at$28 per ton. No year
running more than nine raonths.




2,400 tons..

T h e iron is ofthe cold short c h a r a c t e r ; of fine quality for rolling-mill purposes, and not suitable for
foundery purposes, being too hard.'
T h e mining and hauling to furnace costs 90 cents
per ton.
Speciraens of pig iron and ore received.
This correspondence contains an abstract of'* T h c
Reportof t h e l r o n Men's Boardof Trade, in Clarksville, T e n n e s s e e , " illustrating the operations of 51
furnaces, located on the Cumberland and T e n n e s see rivers, embracing all of Tennessee and most of
Kentucky.

150

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Tahulated statement ofi the specimens qf

Name of mine or furnace.
%B

Location of raine or Rolling mills in the Description of Purposes to which
the products of
iron they roll.
vicinity.
furnace.
furnace are applied.

TENNESSEE—Continued.
John G. Newlee

...

Holston Furnace, Welcker
& Pattons.

87

R . L . Blair & Brother..

Car w h e e l s . .

Oumberl'd G&p, Claiborne county.
Sullivan c o u n t y . . . . .

Jonesborough.

All purposes.

One on the prem- All kinds; flat,
sq're, round
ises belongs to
and plate.
these parties.

MICHIGAN.

L a k e Superior Iron Mountain, S. P. Elv, Rochester, N. Y.

Marquette county.

Jackson Iron Corapany,
Samuel H. Kimball.
Collins Iron Company, C.
A. Trowbridge, Detroit,
Michigan.

L a k e Superior, Marquette county.
Marquette c o u n t y . . .

Cast steel.
At Detroit, 550
railes.

All kinds . . . . Boil'r plate, sheet,
nail rods, and
wire for suspen. sion bridges.

St. Louis,
miles.

All kinds . . . . Not in operatibn.

INDIANA.

Winslow S. Pierce

Indianapolis....,

WISCONSIN.

Black River Falls Iron.
Works, Henry Richter.

Jackson county.

MISSOURI.

Napoleon Aubuchen
Araerican Iron Mountain
Company, J a m e s Harrison.

Predericktown, Madison county.
St. Francis c o u n t y . .

110

NORTH CAROLINA.

T o m ' s creek, Surry
county.
Stokes Iron Mining Com- Stokes county
pany, Reuben D. Golding.
Republic, Yadkin co,
Stephen Hobson
Wra. Hill

Cranberry Forge, Jordan C.
Hardin. .
Mount Welcome Forge,
Jaraes F. Johntton.

W a t a n g a county . . . .
Lincoln county

One, 30 m i l e s . .

All kinds .

Hollow ware,niachinery, and pig
iron.

SOUTH CAROLINA.

101

N e w York House, Reuben
Swan.
Hurricane Furnace, Simpson Bobo.

New York district .. Three, from 10 to Ail kinds
15. miles.
Spartanburgh district, One at furnace . . Various kinds Bar iron,
&c.

102

C. U. Shepherd .

Charleston ,

103
104

0. P.Fannin
, Cave Spring
Etowah Manufacturing & Etowah , . . .
Mining Company, Mark
A. Cooper.

100




nails,

made Merchant bar .
One.at Etowah . . Have
railSjbutnovv
make
merchant bar.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

151

iron and iron ores, c&c—Continued.
Annual production and ruling prices Am'nt that could Rera,arks.—Facilities of mining ore; relative cost of
each year since the works were
be produced uncharcoal, coke, crude, bituminous, and anthracite
der ready sale
first started; prices per ton.
iron ; peculiarities of iron, &c.
and remunerative prices.
}

Average 120 tons per annura; price, 3 tons per day....
frora $30 to $40 for pig.
In 1855, 250 tons pig, at $27 per ton ; 1,000 tons
Ore can be mined for 85 cents per ton; can be delivered at furnace for about $3 50 per ton; will
in 1856, 250 tons pig, at $24 per
yield about 65 per cent.; think pig iron can be
ton; in 1857, 250 tons pig, at $20
per ton.
raade at a cost of about $18 per ton. This iron is
celebrated for its toughness when manufactured
into bars.
Since 1849 averaeed 400 tons of iron
: nails and castings ; price of iron 3i
to 5 cents; hollow ware castings,
' 2i to 3 cents; nails, 6 to 7 cents.
Iron can be advantageously manufactured with
charcoal, which can be abundantly and cheaply
obtained, and be profitably shipped for manufacture in New York or Pennsylvania. The ore
averages from 65 to 70 per cent.' medallic iron.

;

Average price bloom, $65 per ton . . . . 2,000 tons blooms. This corapany can furnish the United States navy
with hararaered charcoal bar iron, superior to any
Russia iron ever iraported. A stearaer shaft made
of this iron, 30 feet long and 16 inches diaraeter,
withstood a breaking force of three-fold greater
than any other iron. .
Received copy of proceedings of Board of Trade.

10 tons per day... Red and magnetic ore in equal portions near the
surface.

No specimens received. Gives his experience in the
iron business, and also his opinion as to oxidization.

1,500 pounds per
week.

Specimens received, but none of the required information.
Specimens of iron and ore received, and also charter
of company.
The specimens belonging to this establishment carinot be identified.
Do.
do.

$30 per ton delivered at Charlotte . . . 12 tons per week.

Ruling prices, 1837, have been frora
4 to 4i cents per pound.
The price of iron has ruled from 4 to
6 cents per lb.; nails from 5 to 8
cents ; castings from 3^ to 5 cents,
except for machinery, which; has
brought from 5 to 10 cents per lb.

130 tons per annum.

Average price 4 cents per pound by
the ton for common bar, other
sizes in proportion.

Six furnaces together, 25 tons
per week.




Speciraens of pig iron received.

Letter and catalogue of meteoric collection.

Three speciraens of ore and no other inforraation.
Paraphlet accompanying this, which is referred to.

152

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Tahulated statement ofi the specimens of

•a
p
o

m m

Name of mine or furnace.

l|
O.B

Location of mine or Rolling mills in the Description of Purposes to which
vicinity.
furnace.
iron they roll. the products of
furnaces are applied.

^
.

ALABAMA.

105 Round Mountain
Works.

Irori

106 John S. Storrs

Castings and raachinery.

., .. Montevallo, Shelby
county.

107
108

Cherokee county....

Horace Ware
Columbiana
Goode, Morris & C o . . . . . . . Benton county .. ..

CALIFORNIA.

. . . . . . . . Rattlesnake Bar, Placer county.

109

Sarnuel S. Sweet

110

Acadian Charcoal Iron
Corapany.
Union Iron Mining Corapany, N. W. Busteed.

NOVA SCOTIA.

111




Bar, machinery,
pig, and hollow
ware.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

153

iron and iron oreSj Sc.—Continued.
Annual production and ruling prices
each year since the ,v/orks were
. first started ; prices per ton.

Am'nt that could
be produced under ready sale
and remunerative prices.

Remarks.—^Facilities of mining ore ; relative cost of
charcoal, coke, crude, bituminous, and anthracite
iron ; peculiarities of iron, &c.

p r i c e s $20 to $35 per ton for pig
iron, and $70 to $90 for raachinery
, and hollow w a r e .

1,200 tons cold
blast, 1,800 tons
hot blast pig
iron.

The cost of raaking pig iron $15 per ton with char
coal.

Bar iron, 5 cents per lb. at furnace;
hollow w a r e , 4 cents perlb. at furnace ; pig iron, frora $20 to $25 per
ton at furnace.

Price of pig iron, $60 per t o n ; price
of bar iron, $100 per ton.




Facilities for mining and transporting to market
good. Capital invested remunerative. Bituminous
coal works well and an abundance within 20 miles
by. railroad.
T w o specimens of iron received, but no information.
Ore costs $ 1 75 per ton delivered at furnace.

Saraples of ore received.

100 tons per week. Speciraens of ore received.
Speciraens cannot be identified.

154

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Specimens of uniform size were carefully prepared from all theise
various offerings, and permanently marked with numbers corresponding with those upon the table, and their examination intrusted to an
officer of this department, (now deceased.) His experiments were
without result, and the specimens were subsequently confided to
Professor Thomas Antisell, ofthe Patent Office. This gentleman has
since had them under examination, keeping them variously exposed
under different circumstances for the past two years, and recording
his observations and results, which are now embodied in the following report:
SECTION I.

Chemical and physical properties of bar and cast iron,
CONTENTS.

Of compounds of carbon and iron.
Tables of centesimal proportion of carbon.
Karsten's views of iron and steel.
Constitution of steel doubtful.
Mushet on the presence of titanium in iron and steel ores ; relationof free and combined carbon in iron.
Constituents present in commercial iron ; conversion of cast into
bar iron ; the chemical formula representing white and gray material.
Combination of iron with sulphur, phosphorus, and silician.
Physical properties of cast and bar iron.
As this report may be read by others than technological chemists
and iron manufacturers, the following summary of the chemical and
physical properties of iron, according to present information, is prefixed.
The several varieties of iron in commercial use are combinations of
carbon with the pure metal, which latter, from its infusible property
when pure, is of itself wholly inadequate to subserve the various
purposes which are performed by the carbides.
These are, at least, seven in number, but only four of the compounds present a metallic lustre, and are commonly known as iron
and steel. In these the amount of carbon varies from 0.104. to 5.75
per cent. The quantity of carbon is least in bar iron, (in burnt bar
iron it is absent;) it is in somewhat greater amount in steel, and in
cast iron the maximum of carbon is attained of these combinations
having metallic lustre.
The total quantity of carbon in bar iron varies (according to'
analyses by Gmelin) from. 0.144. to 0.293. The following proportions of carbon found in steel and cast iron show the various qualities
which the compounds acquire, and in the case of steel how little of its
real difference is learned from its chemical composition. The table
is extracted from the ' ' Mushet Papers,'' p. 256.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

^155

Iron semi-steelified contains 1.150 of carbon.
Soft cast steel capable of welding, 1.120.
Cast steel for common purposes, .100.
Oast steel requiring more hardness, .90.
Steel capable of standing a few blows, but quite unfit for drawing, .50.
First approach to a steely granulated fracture, .30 to .40.
White cast iron, .25.
•
Mottled cast iron, .20.
Carbonated cast iron, .15.
Super-carbonated crude iron, .12.
A somewhat different per centage is given in the following series,
comprising the degrees of wrought iron, steel, and cast iron, arranged
according to the amount of carbon in each, taken from the proceedings ofthe Institute of Mechanical Engineers.*
Soft wrought iron contains Hard wrought iron contains
Soft steel contains
Hard steel contains - - Cast iron contains
- - Hard cast iron contains - - ,

- - - - - -

0.0
0.4
0.5
2.4
2.5
5.

per
per
per
per
per
per

cent,
cent,
cent,
cent,
cent,
cent,

of
of
of
of
of
of

carbon.
carbon.
carbon.
carbon.
carbon.
carbon.

I n many samples of cast iron the microscopic and chemical analysis
show that someof the carbon is mechanically difi'used through the
mass, Avhile the residual metallic portion contains a portion of carbon
in chemical union with the iron. While the cast iron was in a molten
condition the whole of the carbon was united with the metal; but
some portion separates from it as it cools, leaving ia smaller amount
still combined.
Karsten, who was the first to observe this, has pointed out the
various ways in which carbon is found in combination with iron.
1. Combined with the whole of the iron, (iron saturated with carbon, F . £. ^c.)
2. Combined with part of the iron, as F . e. c. 3, which, compounded,
is diffused through the rest of the iron.
3. In the free state—^^as lamino of graphite diffused through the
mass of iron—the carbon having dissolved at the melting point of
iron, and then separated as it cooled slowly.
The compound of F . e. c. 3 is a graphitic and magnetic mass, and,
like true graphite^ is not dissolved by acids ; in gray pig iron it may
be separated, as may also the graphite or carbon, separated by slow
cooling, by treating the iron with acids, (especially nitric acid.) Both
free carbon and combined carbon, as F . e. c. 3, exist in cast and bar
iron, as the analysis of Kaster and Bromies show ; the latter of whom
determined the amount of combined carbon, in seven specimens of bar
iron, to vary between .104 and .660 per cent., while the free carbon
in the same specimens varied from .02 to .26. Eough steel contains
from 1.25 to 2.3 of carbon, (Kaster ;) soft steel, .0.9. The ordinary
'^ Civil Engineers' Journal, January, 1859. London.



156

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

English steel contains one per cent. When it contains little carbon it
approaches bar iron in properties; when the carbon is in excess it
approaches cast iron ; when the carbon is at 1.4 or 1.5 per cent., the
limit of hardness is attained at which steel, after hardening, passes
the greatest degree of hardness and tenacity. In this state it does
not yield any uncombined carbon upon slow cooling.
The proportion of combined carbon in steel is always much greater
than that of the graphitic variety. In white bar-steel from Eberfield
Bromies obtained .416 combined; and .080 as graphite; in Khenish
cast steel, 1.157 combined to .110 free.
The true composition of steel is still an unsettled problem. That
the difference of carbon between it and bar iron should communicate
so different properties is scarcely probable. In the opinion of some,
nitrogen is a necessary element present in the process of steeling, and
others believe that manganase, fungstine, or titanium must be present,
separately or together. General Auacoff,* in his experiments and
observations made to ascertain the mode of making damasked steel of
quality equal to the Asiatic, has shown that some of these metals are
absolutely necessary.
Mr. Christopher Bricks, in adducing the various modes of making
steel, and the processes of case-hardening, has endeavored to show
that nitrogen is an absolute necessity in the manufacture of steel;
that substances capable of yielding nitrogen must be presented to the
iron, and if not nitrogenized organic substances, as, horn, hoof, hair, &c.,
or saline matters, containing nitrogen, be not used for steeling, then
atmospheric air becomes necessary to be admitted ; that when bar iron
is steeled, by being imbedded with charcoal at a high heat in a box,
the latter is never hermetically sealed, and hence air is admitted, and
nitrogen thus afforded to the iron; and that if the operation be so
conducted that air is not admitted the bar iron is not steeled ; and,
finally, that if analysis does not point out the presence of nitrogen in
steel it is because it has not been looked for.f
In this view he is supported by Mr. Sanderson, who affirms that the
substratum of four-fifths of the carbon present in cast iron will not
convert the latter into steel.
Schaffhault was the first to point out that the carbon existed in cast
iron as cyanopine ; and showed that the latter element always existsin castings, while its amount is small and almost nil. Chemists have
not verified this statement, and it is yet an unsettled point what is
the combination in which the carbon exists.
The more recent observations of Mr. Mushet and Mr. Stenson have
led these gentlemen to believe that oxide of titanium is not only a constituent of all good steels and iron but that it is also a necessary constituent. To this conclusion they have been led by an examination
of the ferruginous sand of New Zealand, which is a finely divided
iserine, and which, admixed with iron ores, has produced a steel of
great density and value. Mr. Mushet, in a letter to the Engineer,
(London,) thus writes:
.
.
^ Baneal Chemie technique, tom. 4.
'^
f Transactions of Royal Society of Arts, (London.)




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

157

** Moreover, as titanium is the most difficult of all the metals to fuse,
its alloy with bar iron requires a higher temperature for its fusion
than that required for the fusion of bar iron destitute of such an alloy,
and it is well known that the best Dannemodro iron in the state
of iron is more difficult to melt than any other charcoal iron. If
any chemist will be at the pains of annalysing the steel irons used in
Sheffield, and seek especially for their percentage of titanium, he will
find that their market value is in exact proportion to the per centage
of titanium they respectively contain.''*
^ He proceeds to enumerate the Damascus steel^ the wortz of India,
Elba iron ore, and the brush iron of the forest of Dean, and asserts
that first rate steel can only be made from iron containing titanium^
and that the great difference between titanium, steel, and manganese
steel is, that the latter has no ' ' body," by which is implied strength
and tenacity.
Mr. Mushet also asserts that the excellence of Lowmon iron is due
to the presence of titanic acid in the minerals, and that these English
irons can at any time be rivalled by adding a mixture of titanium ore
to the burden of the blast furnace. ^^The question is simply this:
whoever wishes to make the best iron must add the largest proportion
of titanic ore to the burden of his blast furnace, being careful, however, to introduce nothing which tends to counteract the effect of the
titanium alloy, such as materials containing phosphorus, sulphur, and
excess of lime.f
Magnetic oxide, accompanied by titanium, is not unfrequent upon
this continent. Mr. T. S. Hunt has examined several titanium ores
and minerals found in Canada, and described their constitution in the
geological reports of that province for 1857 and 1858, and has pointed
outj their abundance in it in case it should be proved that the presence
of titanium is so necessary to a valuable iron as has been lately set
forth.
As the consideration of the constitution of steel is not a subject
properly belonging to this report, it might seem out of place to enter
upon it here were it not that it has an importance bearing upon the
composition of bar and cast iron. Should it be hereafter found by experiment that Mr. Mushet's statement is correct concerning the presence of titanium in Dannemodro and other iron ores^ it becomes thenceforward the interest of the iron manufacturer, when he designs to make
a superior bar iron, to select only these ores which are titaniferous.
Berthier asserts that titanium exists in ores in the condition of
titanate of the protoxide of iron, and that it is present in greater or
less proportion in almost all magnetic ores..
I t certainly is a common impediment in the slags produced in the
reduction of magnetic oxide, and it was in this connexion observed
many years ago by Mr. David Mushet. Berthier found in the scorio,
from Villefranche Avignon, a reddish copper-looking effloresence which
yields a small proportion of titanium.
A question here presents itself, ^^is an iron chemically pure that




* Chemical Views, No. 20.
I Chemical Views, No. 23.
X Idem No. 3L

158

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

material best adapted to form bar iron, or is not the latter an alloy of
iron with titanium, fungsten, or manganese; and if the latter, how
far is each of them replaceable by the others." Experiments to answer these are needed. •
In cast iron the quality of carbon varies from 2,5 to 5.6 per centum,
and the form in which it occurs is thus given, (taken from Gmelin's
Hand Book :)
.
Combined carbon

0.75

0.58

0.95

3.62

3.15

2.57

2.70

4.60
Combined carbon
Bromies.—Free carbon

1.03

3.71

Kasten.—Free carbon..

89

4.65

3.90

3.15

3.65

0.93
2.34
3.27

1.514
1.040
2.554

2.518
0.500
3.018

2.908
0.550
3.458

3.10
0.72
3.82

Beside the above compounds of carbon in either of the forms with
pure iron, other substances are met with, some ofwhich are dissolved
in an uncombined form, but others are chemically united with some
of the iron; these combinations being finely diffused through the mass
of carbide of iron variously afi'ecting the quality of the cast iron.
These substances are: Sulphur, phosphorus, arsenic, vilicium, manganese, molybdenum, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, potasium, (2,)
sodium, fungsten.
The proportion of these substances vary with the nature of the ore,
the fuel, the flux, and the mutual reactions which they undergo at
the high temperature of the furnace. A sample of cold blast gray
iron (suitable for making wire) yielded to Messrs. Calvert & Johnson
the following proportions of these foreign substances :
Carbon
Silicium
Phosphorus
Sulphur
Manerancie )
Aluminum S Iron

,....,.

c.

2.275
2.720
.645
301
,
^'^'^''
94.059
100.000

The conversion of cast iron into bar is not merely a diminution of
the relative amount of carbon, but there is accomplished at the same
time the elimination of some of the above matters, and the proportion of these remaining is consequently varied, as shown by the abovenamed observers.*
The results obtained by these gentlemen show the rate of loss of
carbon bythe process of puddling, which loss takes place very unequally;
with regard to the time of exposure in the furnace, the greatest
^ London, Edin. and Dub. Phil. Mag., vol.J4, page 175,1857.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES. ^

159

amount of carbon being lost in the latter half of the operation. The
silicum separated during the same time, but by far the greater portion of this substance was removed in the first hour in the furnace.
It is worthy of remark that the granules formed by the melting mass
in the furnace were prevented from coalescing by being coated over
with a black powder, which had a remarkable preserving influence
on the metal, for, say the experimenters^ '^none of the samples
became oxidized during the nine months they were in the laboratory
exposed to the atmosphere and to the various acid fumes floating
about.'' The chemical nature of this covering was not examined into,
the experiments suggesting it were ^'probably composed of a saline
oxide of iron."
The ^' blueing " of iron, which takes place when it is heated in a
drum or slant over a fire, protects the surface of the metal from rust,
which is done to prevent nails, &c., oxidating in the air, is to all
appearance a low degree of oxidation of the surface.
Of combination qf iron and carbon in cast iron.
Iron cannot chemically combine with more than from 5.50 to 5.75
per cent, of carbon, when it becomes specular pig iron; it has then a
foliated structure which it preserves until the proportion of carbon is
reduced to 4,50^ when it loses that structure and becomes granular,
losing at the same, time its white color and becoming more and more
grey in tint, which becomes lighter as it becomes more and more seely.
The percentage of graphite in gray iron runs from 2.57 to 2.75, and
the whole amount of carbon from 3.15 to 4.65.
The propprtion in which the graphite and combined carbon separate
depends on the temperature to which the metal is exposed, and the
mode of cooling, i.e., whether it be rapidly or slowly produced. To
separate the carbon, as graphite needs the previous application of the
highest heat, when the iron is cooled rapidly the carbon does not
separate and white metal is the result; but when the iron is slowly
cooled gray metal is produced, the graphite separating out in foliated
lamina. Some of the carbon remaining still united with the iron as
a carbide, so that gray iron may be looked upon as a mechanical mixture of white iron and graphite, white iron being a true chemical
compound of carbon and iron a tetracarbide, and containing in every
100 parts—94.88 of iron. \ _ ^
5.12 of carbon. J — ^ ^ ^•
This compound has a specific gravity of 7.65 to 7.66., is white, hard,
and crystaline; its form is an oblique prism with oblique terminal
planes, belonging to the oblique system; it melts at 1,600° centigrade,
and is the most fusible of the compound of iron and carbon.
The ocia carbide.-—'Ee g cis a less abundantly formed carbide, occuring sometimes crystalized in gray pig iron, but never in white.
It has a specific gravity of 7.15, color iron gray; in hardness, brittleness, and fusibility, less than specular iron ; its crystals are pyramidical and indescent, which, wheii perfectly pure, yield in 100 parts,




160

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

iron 97.37, carbon 2.63. Though not abundant it occurs frequently,
its formation being connected with that of gray iron.
The observations and analysis of Geult,* have thrown much light
upon the chemical constitution of the carbon. Compound of iron,
according to him, in samples of cast iron, manganese, zinc, and copper, may replace the iron^ and sulphur, silicum, and phosphorus,
may replace the carbon ; when the iron contains manganese, it takes
up its fullest dose of carbon (six per cent.)
Cast iron, as ordinarily produced, may be looked upon as a mechanical mixture of carbides of iron, two in number, a sulphade phosphide, and silicide of iron, with, sometimes, corresponding salts of
manganese ; they may be thus formulized :
Fe^c
FeS
( F e Min) 4 P .
TsgC
Fe Si
( F £ Min) 8 S.
F.£ P
( F e Min) 8 S i .
The sulphur, silicium, and phosphorus, are combined chemically
with the iron, as shown in the second column, and replace or displace some carbon.
The graphite found in cast iron is a mere mechanical mixture, and
no part of the chemical compound, which, as stated, is chiefiy a tetracarbide.
It is commonly believed that malleable iron exists in many cast
irons, but the affinity of iron at high temperatures for carbon is so
great that no malleable iron can exist in it.—(Geult.)
When cast iron contains about six per cent, of carbon, or closely
approaches it, it is fully saturated—it is wholly a tetra-carbide, and is
white or specular iron.
The gray iron is a mixture of the octo-carbide and graphite.
The mottled cast iron is a mixture of octo and tetra-carbides.
From many analyses Geult has calculated the following formulae of
these irons:
A. Specular iron,
1. F e ^0
F e «S.

2. F e ^C
F e ^S

F e Min
Min
Min
Min

' 0.
4. S i .
4. P .
8. S.

B. White cast iron.
1. F e ^C X F e SO
Fe«Si
99.141,
Te S
T e P.
Graphite......'... .500




2. F e ^ 0 X 6 F e ^ 0

, Te^Si
Mint 4 P .
Graphite
Copper.

*Chemical Gazette, No. 327.

I 93.90
'
.6.10

IGl

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

C. Gray iron.
1. F e ^C
F e ^Si
F e ^S.
Graphite 5.38.

2. ( F e min^) C
Fe^
Si
Fe
P
. Graphite 2.37.

3. F e 8 C
F e S Si
Fe^P.
Graphite 2.710.

D. Mottled cast iron,
1. F e ^ 0 X F e ^ O
F e ^ Si
Fe^ P.
Graphite 1.99.

2. F e ^ C X F e ^ C
Fe^Si
Te^P.
Min )
c a V.740
va )
Graphite .260.

2.Fe^Cx FeSC
Fe8Si
Fe^S
Fe^P.
Graphite .18.

OF COMBINATION OF IRON AND SILICUM IN CAST IRON.

Coride iron contains silicum in amount varying between 0.4 and 3 •
per cent.; its addition to iron renders the latter harder, though in this
property it cannot compare with^ carbon. Silicum is found in all pig
metal, the highest quantity found by Karsten being 3.46 per cent.
When it is present in quantity it renders the metal brittle and worthless; as much as 0.37 is capable of destroying the tenacity of iron,
and this substance is, in the opinion of Karsten, more injurious than
phosphorus to iron. When it is separated from iron cooling it is always as silica in the form of a stelliform filmis mass, or in minute
drusic crystals. Pig iron made with the hot blast from silicious ores
always contains silicum. When iron contains manganese, much of
the silicum is removed, owing to the superior affinity for that substance
possessed by manganese.
OF COMBINATION OF IRON AND PHOSPHORUS IN CAST IRON.

The phosphorus found united with iron in pig metal is generally
introduced by the ores; phosphoric acid being common in the yellow
iron stone ores of all formations. Combined with lime as apatite,
indeed few ores of iron do not contain some of this acid. The coke
used also supplies phosphorus, and charcoal supplies phosphorus
from the phosphates which it contains; it hardens iron when combined
with it, making the metal cold-short; in small quantity, i. e., under
0.3 per cent., it does npt sensibly diminish its tenacity; with 0.5 Karsten found it bore the hammer best, but not with 0.6; at 0.66 the coldshort property was shown, and at 1. per cent, it would not bear bending at all. An evidence of phosphorus added to iron arrest the specific
influence of carbon. Less than 0.5 only makes the iron more fusible,
makes bar iron and' steel weld sooner, and while it facilitates fusion
of cast iron delays the cooling and makes good hollow-ware castings,
11



182

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

OF COMBINATION OF SULPHUR AND IRON IN CAST IRON.

The sulphur present in iron is derivable from two sources, either
from the ore or from the fuel; chiefly, hbwever, from the former
source. I t i s usually separated very readily from the ore by the fluxes
passing off'in the slag; for although sulphur unites readily with iron
and lowers its melting point, making it readily fusible, yet the sulphide of iron is easily decomposed by lime to form the earthy sulphide,
it can be separated by fluxing until the bar-iron contains no more
than 0.008 of sulphur, (Karsten.) This amount does not apparently
deteriorate the metal. It is not yet ascertained exactly what proportion of sulphur conveys to iron the .brittle and easibly fusible
properties which render its presence so objectionable and known as
red-shortness.
Stengil found 0.03 of sulphur in iron not sensibly red-short, and
t h a t i t required 0.1 to make it red-short. But Karsten fbund that
0.01, or one part in ten thousand, communicated the property'^to it.
Sulphur modifies the influence of carbon* in iron very considerably,
we must suppose the sulphur to be united with onl}^ a small proportion
of iron as sulphide which fuse in with the remaining iron, forming
thus minute particles disseminated through the mass, destroying its
tenacity; as it makes the whole mass more readily fusible so does it
also render its congelation, or chill, more rapid, and thus prevents
the separation of graphite carbon, others tend to keep the F e ^3
united intimately in the whole mass; in other words, it prevents the
formation of grey iron; so that, according to Karsten and others,
sulphur does not displace carbon in cast iron; nor does it appear that
carbon can expel sulphur from sulphur iron; but a statement of Geult's,
directly to the contrary, has been already brought forward; so that
this iraportant point may be looked on as yet undecided.
Fournet {annates des mines) has, however, shown that carbon reduces
the bisulphide of iron when heated strongly; the latter losing weight
by calcination with carbon, and the mass becoming magnetic subsequent to the operation, when it was not so before.
^'Schaff'hautt states (T. jur. pr. chem. 40, 304) that cast iron, bar
iron, and steel almost always contain more or less arsenic and phosphorus, which often greatly improve their quality. The Dannemodro
iron and the Lanmor iron owe their good to the presence of arsenic,
and the Eussian iron, (c c N. D.,) from Demidoff works at Nischnetgilsk, is indebted for its peculiar properties to the phosphorus- which
it contains.—-(Gmelin, vol. 5, p. 214.)
This statement is contrary to general experience, which goes to
prove that the presence of arsenious acid in iron causes it to oxidize
rapidly.
Berthier examined some Algerine bombs supposed to havebeen of
Spanish make, and which had suffered much from corrosion, and found
them to contain 9.8 per cent, of arsenious acid, and 1.5 per cent, of
carbon.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

163

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES.

Cast iron,
Sp. grav., 7.'207. W t . of cub. ft., 450 lbs.
One bar 1 foot long and 1 inch sq;uare weighs 3.2 lbs nearly; i t
expands TWOTO" ofits length by 1 degree of heat.—(Ray.)
Greatest change of length in lens rays, yyyo^; melts at 3479°,
(Daniel;) shrinks in cooling ^V ^o - - of length, (Mushet;) is crushed
gV
by a force of 93,000 lbs. to square inch.—(Bennie.)
Malleable iron.
Spec, grav , 7.6, (Muschenhock;) at its maximum^ 7.788, (Berthier;)
weight of cub. ft., 475 lbs.; weight of bar 1 foot long, 1 inch square,
3.3 lbs; do. when hammered, 3.4 lbs.
Expands with 1° of heatY^g^o-o-o, (Smeaton;) indilability it ranks
seventh among metals.
Good English iron will bear on square inch, without perraanent
alteration, 17,800 lbs. = 8 tons; and an extension of y-^^^.
From 32^^ F . to 212° F . its linear dilability is 0.00122 = tV- Halstrom values it at fi^^, and, according to him, from 72° F . to 0 F . it is
•2T07.—(Berthier.)
In malleability it stands eighth on the list of metals, in ductibility
it stands fourth.
Compared with cast iron as unity its strength is 1.12_, its extensibility, 0.86, and its stiffness, 1.3; when pure itis flexible andis devoid
of elasticity, when forged its structure is fllmis, when unforged, granular.

SECTION II.

Action ofi air and firesh water on bar and cast iron,
CONTENTS,

Nature and extent of the inquiry.
Action of air and water on pure iron.
Effects of confined air.
Action of air on cast iron.
Stages of oxidation made, and extent of corrosion.
Corrosion depends on carbon element.
Oxidation of bar iron and steel.
Effects of running water on iron ; tuberculization of water-pipes ;
effects of cblorideof sodium in solution ; a-ction of alkalies and earths
proper in retaining oxidation ; action of ammoniacal vapor on iron ;
possible explanation of; action of clays and gravels on iron ; composition of results of action of Potomac water ; mild action of river
waters ; conditions of experiments ; comparison of specimens ; analysis of specular metal and bar of Crown poirit iron; remarks on the
influence of ores of magnetic oxide.



164

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Pure iron does not decompose pure water at ordinary temperature,
but if the water contains carbonic acid, or if the iron is placed in contact with substances with which it may form a pile, (or voltaic circuit,) decomposition takes place slowly. It is evident at 50° 60° C,
very evident at the temperature of boiling water, and at a red heat
is very rapid, hydrogen gas being given off, and a magnetic oxide
formed. In the presence of many acids water is decoraposed by iron
at common temperatures, and when air iron is placed in contact with
acid water and air at the same time, oxidation is very rapid, especially
if the iron be firraly divided. In all these cases the lowest oxide of
iron is formed.—(Berthier.)
An inquiry into the causes of the oxidation of iron is met at the
outset with a difficulty of no mean magnitude. Were it a question
under what circumstances does pure' metallic iron oxidate most
rapidly, perhaps the information at present afforded by modern research might answer satisfactorily the query. But the real subject
of inquiry is, under what conditions do the impure iron known as
har iron and the carbide of iron ^ known as cast iron corrode most
rapidly; but as the composition of these two bodies are yet scarcely
known with the usual chemical exactitude, the difficulty of answering
becoraes at once evident.
* Iron," says Vicat, ^^does not rust in dry air, nor in water de^
prived bf air, nor even in dry oxygen at ordinary i^emperature. It
requires the conjoined effect of both air and water."*
Iron, when left exposed to air and uncleansed, frequently, after receiving a complete coat of rust, suffers no further oxidation. Vicat.
mentions an iron fence in the city of Grenoble, which is built two
hundred and fifty years, and, according to tradition, has never had a
coat of paint or varnish, and yet now is only lightly covered with a
thin layer of light brown-colored oxide.
This apparently self-protective and limited destructibility of iron
applies only to large castings or bars, for every one knows that iron
wire is rapidly corroded and destroyed, whether isolated or in contact.
Vicat has shown that in confined localities where air has.no circulation^ or iraperfectly performed, iron suffers great loss by oxidation.
The presence of free carbonic acid favors the forraation ofa protocarbonate of iron, which rapidly passes into the state of peroxide, and
a fresh araount of protoxide requires to be forraed^ in order that the
carbonic acid raay be again corabined. In exaraining the suspension
bridge over the Drac, those portions of iron which had been irabedded
in the piers were enclosed for twenty-three years in part of the space
in a tight air chamber in the masonry. The oxidation was so great
that the workmen were engaged seventy-five days in cleaning rust
from it, and the stability ot the structuie much endangered. When
the iron was repaired it was surrounded by a bed of hydraulic lime
in paste.
The corrosion of cast iron in air, whether of normal temperature
and tension of watery vapor, or whether these conditions vary, is
much more simple than when immersed in water or saline solutions,




• Annales des Ponts et Chaussees.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

165

and approaches closely in its action to the influence of the sarae reagents upon pure raetals. There is formed in regular sequence, flrst,
magnetic oxide; second, sesquioxide; third, carbonate of protoxide.
Where air has only limited access to iron, as when castings are wholly
covered by fresh water, the magnetic oxide is first produced ; if, on
the contrary, the casting be wholly exposed to the air and wetted
occasionally, the coating of rust is at once a bright red sesquioxide
3r H 0 X F e o and the rate of corrosion proceeds with rapidity, no
2

3

doubt owing to the fixation of an atom of water and the displacement
ofthe protoxide out of the magnetic oxide, thus:
2 eq. of magnetic oxide i=:2 | F e o X F e o ^ would produce by
\

2 35

fixation of 4 equivalents of oxygen and 3 eq. of water, (2) equivalents
of hydrated sesquioxide, =z 2 /40 X F e o \ and two equivalents of
hydrated sesquioxide 2 / 4 0 -|- F e o \
^
'i'he corrosion of cast iron takes place over the whole surface, and
pretty evenly, so that an uniform coating of red oxide forms after even
one night's exposure, which layer is easily removed by the finger;
this, rapid corrosion is no doubt owing to the deposition of dew over
.the whole exposed surface of the metal, and as the water of the atmosphere always holds oxygen dissolved, the rapidity of oxidation is
effected when corrosion has taken place, so as to forra a pulverulent
coating on the surface of the plate; protection does not seem to be
afforded, for the loss of metal appears rather to increase, which may
be due to local circuits, established by the presence of the powder,
which, being a mixture of plumbago and oxide, isjgnegation as regards
the metal test sample. This mode of decomposition, however, chiefiy
occurs when the raetal is placed in a saline solution or any coraparatively good conductor of electricity.
The corrodibility of cast iron, as regards its chemical composition,
depends not so much on the presence of S. P . As. or Si. as upon the
carbon element and the condition of the carbon, for the tetracarburet
alone does not readily oxidize, but when graphitic carbon is liberated,
then the voltaic circuit alluded to is formed, by which oxidation is
. set up.
In fact, whatever develops the electric action favors rapid corrosion
of the iron, as in water or in saline solutions the presence of a small
quantity of peroxide, already formed on the surface of iron, favors the
more rapid rusting of the clean surface; a graphitic iron, by forming
a circuit of two solids and one liquid ; irons of different quality united
together, as in wrought iron when different '''makes" are welded.
Corrosion once set up proceeds rapidly, and an iron containing a slag,
silica, or magnetic oxide always corrodes more rapidly than iron of a
uniform constitution.
Bar iron and steel are more difficult to be oxidized ih the open air
than cast iron ; that is, the act of oxidation is raore difficult of commencement, and the first actions of oxidation are the formation of
grey or magnetic oxide.
When oxidation does commence it is never uniformly spread over




166

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the whole surface, but is shown in spots with larger intervals of a
clear metallic lustre, which is retained long after the corroded spots
have formed inequalities one-half of an inch below the level of the
surface; ultimately, however, the bright surface becomes tarnished
and oxidized.
One mode of oxidation of iron by fresh water has not been much
alluded to by writers ; it is that which arises from the flow of water
through large pipes, in which after a number of years transit, a series
of tuberculous eminences are formed on the outside of the pipe, which
grow partly by external deposition and partly by corrosion of the
surface of the pipe, which forms the base of the tubercle ; the tubercles are frequently an inch or more in height, and have their base
depressed two or three lines below the level of the inner surface
of the main ; when cut across the tubercles present a scaly section
like the coats of an onion, have a dark or black brown color internally
and a yellow tint outside; by exposure the whole passes into a yellow
brown. These tubercles were first observed in the water pipes at
Grenoble, (France,) where the supply was feruginous and calcerous
after a fiow of seven and one-half years. They have been also found
to exist in the waters of the Oureque and the Seine, as the mains in
Paris have been found tuberculated (the tubercles more wide than
elevated) after a continual fiow of water during twenty-four years—
between 1810 and 1834.* The size and constitution of these tubercles
are, to some extent^ deterrained by the character of the waters, raineral waters augraenting them; but they appear to be formed byi all
waters, and are partly formed by chemical and partly by mechanical
forces.
^
^
Mr. Gaudief, in a paper on the concretions formed in the waterpipes of Cherburg, (Prance,) which.were laid down from 1836 to
1838, mentions that the calibre of the pipe was diminished to onethird; they were of a° black and greenish color, and were composed of—
Proxide of iron
=
96 to 98
Silica and alumina (clay)
4 to 2 f
Chloride of sodium
traces
Sulphate of iron
traces
The structure of the tubercles were testaceous, and when exposed to
the air becarae ochrey red"; by drying above the temperature of boiling
water they lost nineteen per cent, of water. The small quantity of
clay present is remarkable, and shows, says Mr. G., how little influence upon this tuberculation of iron the mechanical collections of
foreign maitters have.in these circurastances. He also alludes to the
presence of sulphate of iron indicating a secondary alteration of the
iron. When the water entered the pipes it had no sulphates existing
in it, so that salt had been formed at the expense of the cast iron
(white metal.)
The tubercles in this case were very large, standing out from the
inner surface of the tube as much as five centimetres; but this is an
unusual occurrence, for the above writer mentions that the main pipe
^'See Annales des Ponts et Chaussees, 1st series, p. 8.
t Annales des Ponts et Chaussees, 3d series, v. 2, page 341.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

167

(called Eose fountain) in the same city, destined for military use,
laid down in 1786 and removed in 1837-'38, had tubercles also, but
not higher than .01 millimetre high.
According to Pague,* grey cast iron is more attackable by these
incrustations than bar iron or white metal. A small portion of
chloride sodium hastens tuberculization so that it shows itself in one
minute's time in a solution saturated with salt and carbonate of soda
and ifterwards diluted with seventy-five times its volume of, aerated
water.
. The first change produced was the formation of some whitish
hydrated protoxide of iron, which reraained in that state a Jong time
when in contact with the metal or with the oxide, which goes on
constantly forming. This oxide is occasionally removed to some distance from the point of formation ; passes by degrees to,a greenishbrown color, and then an orange tint upon the superficial Jayer. Analysis always shows the presence of 3 oxides: F e o — F e o F e o — F e o
2 3

2 3

in various proportions. The proportiou of sesquioxide continues to
increase a little carbonate of iron and sorae silica appear ; the latter
arising frora oxidation of the silicide of iron. When these tubercles
are forraed in water holding coraraon salt in solution, a little chloride
of iron is formed ; when the oxidation is well developed the casting
shows a considerable amount of graphite.
The contact of metals or metallic salts which are electrically positive
with regard to iron serve to protect the latter.
The presence of the fixed alkaline earths has a similar effect.* Iron
immersed in lime water corrodes very slowly. .As carbonic acid in a
free state cannot exist in this latter solution, the delay of the rusting
be partly due to the fact that no acid is present to unite with the
oxide when formed ; this delay occurring even though the lime water
have absorbed enough of atmospheric acid to start corrosion under
other circumstances.
The influence of lime in preventing oxidation is well exemplified in
the case of nails and iron rod worked into the plaster of walls. The
iron in cases will be found to be almost perfectly bright, and in no
case which has fallen under the writer's observation has a scale of
oxid formed on iron imbeded or surrounded by lime-mortar. The
carbonates of the alkaline earths—at least the abundant one, chalk—
does not appear to have the protective property enjoyed by the alkaline carbonates.
Where iron is iu contact with vegetable acids or substances by
whose decomposition this class of principles may be originated, it suffers corrosion to a considerable extent, although much less than when
exposed to moist air or to saline solutions. Wherever tannic acid it
oxidizes iron, and those woods which contain the most of it corrode
nails to the greatest degree. All of the fine woods contain it, as also
oak wood, while the African teak is comparatively free from it.
When iron is in contact with an alkaline solution, the metal becomes electro-negative and the water positive, as if chemical action had
* Ann. de Chemie et de physique, 1836.




168

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

commenced between them, and this condition continues until coraraunication is established—so to speak—between the iron and the solution
by means of a platina wire connected to the free end of the iron.*
Iron rendered constantly negative is in the most favorable condition
not to combine with free oxygen in the solution. Where coramon salt;
is added to this solution all protection ceases, since the salt is decomposed and a new affinity for iron is developed.
While the contact of the fixed alkalies or of the alkaline earths,
either in uncombined form or as carbonates, favors the preservation
ofthe surface of iron from oxidation, the presence of araraonia in the
atmosphere favors the rapid oxidation of iron and the formation of
the hydrated sesquioxide. This is well exemplified in privies and
urinals where the iron work is not protected by paint. The erosion
takes place very rapidly and irregularly in these places where the
vapor of the araraonia reaches So extensive is this rusting that
sorae other action besides mere absorption of oxygen must be at play.
As ammoniacal gas does not in itself contain the element producing
oxidation, it is obvious that this action raust occur in an indirect way.
Kuhlman has proved that the presence of lime and araraonia in
contact with a given quantity of air produces nitric acid. He has
also, shown that araraonia formed from decomposing organic matter
is ultimately in the presence of bases converted into the sarae acid.
The sesquioxide of iron, once formed^ becomes the means of further
oxidation to organic substances in contact with it by means of the
property it possesses of absorbing araraonia and retaining it in its
pores,*until by contact with the atmosphere and in the neighborhood
of iron undergoing oxidation the araraonia takes on a similar action,
and becoraes converted into nitric acid, which unites with some oxi,de
of iron. Whether this be the true explanation or not of the fact of
the rapid oxidation of iron under the circurastances raentioned, there
can be no doubt.
The protection afforded by alkalies and earths proper, as lirae and
such substances as have a strong affinity for carbonic acid, is not
given by the comraon earths or clays. If the latter be of fine texture
and kept dry, it raay be kept in contact with saraples of iron and
dirainish the brilliancy to a very slight degree ; but when the clay is
moistened with water, oxidation imraediately occurs, and if the nail
be near the surface, proceeds rapidly. The clay evidently acts in a
negative manner, the rusting of the iron depending on the porosity
of the.earth.
A few nails, two and a half inches long, which had laid for a year
in a fine sandy clay, becarae coated with a layer of clay two lines
thick^ ceraented by sesquioxide of iron. The surface^ after reraoval of
the crust of oxide, was irregularly corroded in the direction of the
fibres of the raetal, the oxide not scaling off as in oriforus rusting, but
adhering most tenaciously^ and having a grannlar character. A parcel
of nails of the sarae size and form as the foregoing, placed in a coarse
gravel, did not cement a coating round them as that in fine clay, but
the iron oxide had escaped and tinged the bed for several inches




* Pay en Ann. de Chem., 1836.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

169

round, and the nails had attached themselves to a large pebble by a
plastic layer of oxide, and had formed a partial coating of scale
separable by knife blade. The corrosion had extended much deeper.
The amount of material which may be cemented together by a
sraall amount of oxide of iron is, indeed, very great. Where nails or
pieces of bar iron rust under ground in the presence of moisture, but
at the sarae tirae undisturbed by a current of water filtering through
the mass, a tenacious paste of oxide of iron, diffused through the clay,
is forraed, which involves pebbles of various sizes, until a considerable
space becoraes tinged with the red ceraent which, in tirae, hardens
and produces an artificial breccia or congloraerate, resembling in
every respect the pudding stone conglomerates of pre-historic periods.
The metal itself becomes impacted in the mass considerably enlarged.
The difference in effect between clay and gravel is more apparent
than real. The increased silicius element in gravel could exert but a
small influence in increasing oxidation. The gravel being more
porous, acts like a sponge, allowing more air and aerated water to
corae in contact with the metal, and in this way it exerts a more
oxiditing influence than fine clay.
In the experiments carried oui for the departraent, the exposure of
the test samples in cold, fresh water (of Potomac river) for two
raonths developed but a slight araount of oxidation, so slight as to
show but little difference between any of the speciraens, and could
afford no reliable results as to the variation of corrosion between cast
and bar irons. The results are, therefore, not given here. The corrosion was mostly in the forra of pulverulent hydrated oxide, very
little scale being produced, (a)
When the sarae water is warraed, oxidation proceeds very rapidly,
as shown by Tables-1 and 2. The oxidation of iron is so slow in the
presence of fresh water, especially if the latter contain only a sraall
portion of saline raatter, that it would require.the exposure of masses
of iron of considerable size to the action of water for'^'several years.
More information on this oxidation is allowable by the examina-.
tion of castings or bars which are being in course of removal from
bridges, light-houses, piers, wharves, or other, positions where the
metal may have been for several years in contact with water^ than by
the narrow experiments which even a lifetime could supervise.
An instance of the oxidating infiuence of river water is adduced by
Vicat (Annales des Ponts et Chaussees, 1853) in the case of the demolition, in 1837, of a bridge at Grenoble, which had been built in
1626, that the cramping irons, cross-ties, and other iron-work which
had been imbedded in mortar were as clean on the surface as when put
down. These portions of metal, which were in contact with gravel,
were attacked at the point of contact. These irons were two'hundred
and twelve years immersed. The water of the river (Isere) is chiefly
supplied from the glaciers of Savoy, waters which contain little air,
and do not favor oxidation. Deep waters are never aerated like shallow streams, and oxidation occurs less rapidly in such cases.
The time which the specimens were exposed in cold fresh water not
being sufficiently extended to allow of oxidation being carried out to
be appreciable to the balance, it was believed that by using the water



170

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

warm the ordinary action of corrosion would be hastened, without,'
perhaps, developing any new source of error, and thus the delay
otherwise necessary might be avoided. The temperature of the
waters (both fresh and salt) in these experiments was obtained by
placing dishes of the fluid in a close water bath heated by a spirit
lamp placed underneath it during the entire period of exposure. The
exact temperature was secured by iraraersing the bulb of a thermometer in the liquid, and regulating the lamp as required. The fresh
water used in the experiraents was obtaiped from the Potomac river^
a short distance below Little Falls, near Georgetown^ D. C. An
analysis of this water taken from the same locality (although made
upon a sample drawn some time previous) afforded the following coraf
position:
Specific gravity 100066.
Solid raatters in one gallon
Eesidue fixed after ignition
Insoluble in water...

:
5.9126 grains;.
5.590 '' i
4.860
^'

•,

The fixed residue had the following composition:

i

Potassa

200

Soda...
Lirae with carbonic acid
Magnesia with carbonic acid
Silicia oocooooeo.
Chlorine
Sulphuric'acid
Organic matter
Nitric acid"
Carbonic acid and loss

..
.'

m
,,.,,

—

3.48:4
840
066
270
210
040
traces.
380
5.590

The water was collected for experiments one week after a iieayy
fall of rain in the month of October, 1858; when freshly collected lit
contained no free carbonic acid, leaving litmus, paper, and Brazilwood unaffected. The samples experimented on were all small size;
a necessity arising out of an endeavor to establish a uniforra rate of
comparison of the irons forwarded to the department; they were
mostly squares of one square inch surface, and one-fourth of an inbh
thick; cut with a cold chisel; and the siirfaces cleaned and having; a
dense brilliant surface. This was deemed preferable' to using the
surface as it comes from the mould, as different modes of casting so
alter the surface as to produce even in iron of the same make very
varied results, as the nature of the surface differs. The numbers of
the samples correspond to the numbers upon the- tabulated sheets
made up from the information given by the iron masters who fbr\varded samples to the department.
;
According tb these tables it appears that in fresh water of aii
elevated temperature (110^ F.) in the majority of. instances, the



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

171

greater amount of corrosion was on the side of bar iron, with which
the loss varied from .f j-f to .-f-^|- per square inch, while in the case of
cast iron . ^ { ^ to .^fif per square inch, a difference in amount which
though not very apparent at first view, is yet well marked from its
constancy.
Greater variety in the range of oxidation appears to have occurred
with bar than cast iron, for while samples 7, 19, 21, and 12, underwent no more corrosion than the least corrodible samples of cast iron,
we find Nos. 90, 104, 31, 32, 26, and 37, suffer corrosion to nearly
double the extent of many samples of cast iron.
The returns furnished do not in every case state whether cold or
hot blast has been used, and no general conclusion could be drawn as
to the influence of either upon the specimens under experiment; but
from the information supplied it does not appear that as regards
oxidization any difference is produced by the employraent of either.
All of the saraples indicated above as least corrodible were made
from magnetic ore, while the six that suffered from corrosion so markedly were made from hematites and carbonates, especially from the
former ore.
From these' results it would appear that under certain conditions
magnetic oxide furnishes a non-corrodible iron; which view is still
further supported by a comparison of castings and bar from same
metal. Thus No. 7, made from magnetic iron, is the least corroded
speciraen of bar iron. No. 7 cast iron among (though not the least)
the less corroded of the castings. Again, No. 1 bar corroded nearly
twice as ranch as 7 bar, yet it still is a lightly corroded specimen.
No. 1 casting suffered actually very little more corrosion, and compared with castings stood midway in the scale of corrosion. No. 19
bar suffered less than 19 casting, as also No. 21, these furnishing
exceptions to the statement put forth previously^ that in fresh water
bar irons suffered more than castings.
The comportment of samples 7 led to the analysis of the casting
and bar. The former was a beautiful specimen of the specular iron
of large foliated surfaces.* In one hundred parts they contained—
Casting.

Iron
Carbon combined
Carbon graphite
Manganese
Sulphur
Phosphorus
,
Lime
Arsenic
Silicum
Loss....: ......0

!

'..

88.41
5.50
17
4.36
10
.16
24
03....
19
84
100.00

Bar.

95.20
.20
00
3.18
.06
.07
15
00
24
.80
100.00

Specific gravity of casting, 7.48.
Specific gravity of bar, 7.69.
« For another analysis of this iron see letter of C. E. Detmold, in Appendix.



172

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

This would indicate this cast iron to be almost wholly a tetra-car-*
buret of iron, := F e. ^c, intermixed with small proportions of silicide
of iron, considerable manganese, and some sulphide and phosphide of
manganese. The difference in chemical constitution of the bar from
the casting is so little that the different tendency to corrosion displayed
cannot be attributed to that source, but must be referred to the condition of the surface—the closer and more compressed superfices of the
bar.
:The manganese exists as a compound of carbon and metallic manganese, similar to the iron compounds which it replaces. Manganesian irons are well known to have a greater resisting power, as regards
rusting, although it is not probable that the power is due to the actual
presence of manganese, but the well-known influence which the metal
possesses to purify iron by forming a slag.
;
One cause why mariganesian irons are less likely to oxidite may be
due to the property which such possess of retaining the combined carbon and preventing its separation in the mass of metal in the graphite
forra as it cools ; for the presence of free carbon, as frequently stated,
produces voltaic circuits, and proraotes decoraposition. Cast irons
containing much free carbon are prone to pxidite in proportion to the
amount of free carbon: hence gray iron rusts sooner than mottled,
and mottled sooner than white metal.
This may explain the protecting influence of manganese on cast
iron, but would not explain its influence on bar. The manganese in
cast iron, when being worked into bar, forms, with any foreign earthy
matters present, more soluble slags than iron does, which impurities
are thus removed from the bar.
'
'
Admitting that raagnetic ores have sorae effect in producing a noncorrodible iron, yet the form of the iron seems to be' all-essential.
Thus the same irons (1 and 7) had vastly different rates of corrosion
when in bar or casting. Should this occur if the .cause of non-corrosion was due to the ore? Should not the prevention of corrosionibe,
more properly, attributed to the condensation and less -porous condition
of the surface, as well as to the smoothness and protected conditioh of
the superficial layer ofthe bar? Among irons of the same make this
is constantly so. .
.Nos. 68, 73, 77, 78, 95, 20, and 26 of the cast iron specimens furnished—the least corroded samples ofthese^ from 68 to 78 and No'. 26,
are made from the carbonates ofthe coal measures and the fossil hematites of the same geological age ; 20 is from a zinc ore, and 95 is a
hematite from North Carolina ; 68 and 72 are from Virginia furnaces ;
73, 77, and 78, of Kentucky make ; 20 from New Jersey, and 26 from
Pennsylvania.
*
;




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

173

SECTION IIL
Action ofi sea water on iron,
'

CONTENTS.

Nature of sea water.
.^
Nature and amount of gaseous element.
Analysis of saline matter of the sulphates and chlorideSc
General action of sea water.
Action of raetallic iron. Forraation of Te.
Oxidation of iron by sea water.
Non-'formation of scale in sea water.
Extent of oxidation.
Circurastances under which hydrated oxide is formed.
Forraation of carbonate, constitution of the scale.
Forraation of the sulphides, analysis of scale.
•Corrodibility of different irons.
Effect of spec gravity on corrosion.
Action of S. P . & C. in iron as oxidating agents.
Corrosion of bar iron the result of local circumstances.
Not always so in wrought, iron.
Effects of position on rusting of bar iron.
Horaogenity of the raetal.
Cause of rapid destruction of cast iron.
*
Of the mixing of various irons.
Of chemical polarity and voltaic circuits.
Action of sea water on samples.
Different results in bar and casting, analysis irons tested.
Prof. Koger's analysis of brown hamatite.
General results of warm sea water.
Andover iron and ore, analysis of.
Analysis of a special tried sample of Andover iron.
The specific gravity and chemical constitution of sea water varies
with the latitude and distance from the shore ; the difference in the
former case being mostly due to diminished teraperature, and in the
latter to the diluting effect of rivers emptying themselves into the
ocean.
Laurent, Bouillon, and Lagrange (according to Mallet) assert that
sea water contains 62 voluraes of carbonic acid in every thousand,
and Mallet found 100 c. i. of sea water of Dublin bay to yield -—- cub.
inches of gas, monthly atmospheric air, with a trace of carbonic acid
or about one volume in 70. This proportion of carbonic acid, so much
less than the quantity given by the three named chemists, is raore in
accordance with results given by Erich off, (Cheraical Geology, vol. 1,
p. 99, 114) in which at 1,994 feet deep frora the surface, in the raonth
of August, the amount of gas contained in 100 volumes was 2 04 per
cent, which was raade up of oxygen, carbonic acid, and nitrogen gases.
as follows:
Oxygen
.08)
Carbonic acid
.59 > Sum of oxygen and carbonic acid .67.
Nitrogen
1.37)



174

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Brichoff asserts that the amount of air increases with the depthy
and especially the amount of oxygen and carbonic acid, of whichj
however, he gives no examples.
The total saline matter is in the proportion of 3 | per cent.; in 100
parts of salts, the chlorides are to the sulphates as 90 to 10 : chloride
of sodium constituting 74 to 80 per cent of the saline matter, so that
the element chlorine is equal^to one-half of all the solids.
The following analysis of sea water of the north Atlantic oceaxi
by Van Bibra,* shows the proportion of each saline ingredient.
Solids in 100 parts of water
3.47
3.84
Chloride of sodium in 100 parts of solids
76.05
76.89
Chloride magnesium
,. 9.
8.05
*'
potassium
4.
3.33
Bromide sodium
,. 1.15
1.3:0
Sulphate lime
4.60
4.9:4
''
magnesia
, 5.20
5.49
^^
potash
L.
100.00

100.00

The sulphuric acid varies in amount in sea water mbre than the
chlorine element, which Bischoff attributes to the proximity of rivers,
bringing in a large quantity of sulphates, and also to the fact that
these salts are easily decomposed and the sulphuric acid removed by
the action of organic matter, sulphurites being formed thereby.
The magnesian chloride is converted into carbonate of magnesia under
the influence of organic vegetation and the chlorine set free. Ordinarily
this latter unites with some calcium tq form chloride calcium, which jis
then decomposed by the sulphate of magnesia to form chloride of magnesium and sulphate of lime ; but in the presence of iron this change
does not occur. The free chlorine unites with the iron to form chloride
of iron; this, being a very deliquescent salt, is rapidly dissolved and
removed from the corroded metallic surface, and the play of affinities
commences over again.
,
,
'
The observations of Dr. A. A. Hays on the action of sea water on
copper sheathing of vessels and on copper coinsf show that the oxidation of that metal is due to the decomposition of the chlorides, in the
presence of free oxygen and raetal. These chlorides are removed |by
solution, and only the insoluble sulphurites remain attached as a criist
to the surface of the metal. The same reaction occurs when iron is
the metal, with modified circumstances, inasmuch as cast-iron is not
a pure metal, but a carburet alloyed with other electro-negative substances.
'
It would thus appear that the predominating chemical action of
sea water on iron is that of a chloride, and its ultimate effect is; to
remove rust of the iron, as a chloride; but this is not its immediate
effect, which is that of oxidizement, almost at a minimum; a portion
of magnetic oxide being first formed, which itself is partially converlfeed
'•' American Journal of Science, vol. ii, 2d sec, p. 242 and seq*
* Annal der cheim u Phar. T* 77, p. 90.



^

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

175

into a hydrated sesquioxide; but the sulphates, which constitute ten
per centum of the saline matters, now exert their influence, and some
sulphate of iron is forraed, thus reacting on the chloride of sodium of
sea water, forms a chloride of iron. Some of the iron is reraoved in
this forra by the raass of sea water. The carbon is gradually separated,
and attaches itself to the surface, as does also the silicium, which has
been oxidized and deposited as silica. A portion of the iron rjemains
as a sesquioxide attached to and coating the graphite sponge; and
lastly, there raay exist a trace of silicate iron.
Mr. Hatchett exarained a cannon at Plyraouth, England, which
had been long* iraraersed in sea water. He found it incrusted to the
depth of an inch with a substance having all the appearance of plurabago and consisting of oxide of iron 81^
plurabago
16,
in 100 parts. M. H. also observed that anchors and other articles of
wrought iron were only superficially oxidized, while those.of cast iron
suffered frora galvanic action.
When iron is exposed to the action of coraraon salt in solution,
after a few days a portion ofthe raetal is reraoved and deposited after
a while as red oxide and a coating of this oxide with a dark brown
powder underneath. Nuraerous little seraicircular pits are present on
the surface ofthe coating, which is a mixture of the different oxides
and of the carbon separated by the oxidation. The oxides chiefly
formed are the raagnetic and the sesquioxide; the forraer is always
present under the above circumstances.
The action of a solution of salt is therefore similar to that of sea
water in so far as regards simple oxidation of the iron, but the changes
produced and combinations formed are much more complex in the case
of sea water.
The action of sea water on metallic iron is due, in the first instance,
to the amount of saline raatter which it contains dissolved ; and next,
to the araount of gases held in solution by it. The latter cause acts
more imraediately by oxidizeraent of the raetal, but is limited in its
extent. The saline matter of the sea coming into, play and exerting
the action of dec .)mposition arising from electrical disturbances to a
much greater extent, which may be due to the circumstance that °the
chloride of iron forraed by the reaction of coramon salt water uponoxide of iron is readily removed as soon as: formed, and thus a fresh
surface of metal is left for oxidation.
This rapid formation of chloride of iron, leads to the destruction of
the iron in a much shorter time than when merely subjected to the
action of gases in- a very weak saline solution, such as occurs in river
water.
The first action of sea water on iron appears to be simply oxidation : a coating of gray colored magnetic oxide, in a pulverulent form,
is deposited on the surface of the sample ; no bubbles of hydrogen,
however, are perceptible ; the layer of oxide is non-adherent and preserves this want of tenacity throughout^ being at all times easily reinoved by the fingers ; neither does it perceptibly increase by daily ex^' Sic in Quarterly Journal of Science, vol. 12, p. 407.
^



176

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

I

posure, while at the same time the weight of the sample is gradually
diminishing, and the presence of iron in the sea water is easily recog^
nizable by tannic acid. It may be that the rapid forraation of chloridb
of iron, gradually removing.sraall particles of oxide, soon after they
are deposited, tend to prevent the consolidation of the layer of oxide
into a scale, as occurs in the case of iron under river waters ; and this
non-adhering oxide being liable to be removed by slight friction, a^
by currents, &c., leaves no protection on the newly exposed surface
of iron ; whatever may be the true reason of this fact, there is no
doubt that scales of oxide do not form under sea water.
;
The oxidation of the metal rarely proceeds to the formation of a
hydrated oxide, stopping at the point of constitution of bligist iron.'
1 have not observed the formation of a hydrated oxide, unless when
a portion of the raetal was exposed to the action of the atmosphere.
So long as the sample was wholly immersed in the water only the
gray oxide was produced, but when, as by removal or evaporation of
the fluid, so as to expose a surface of the sample to the air, then did
the oxide become lemon red.
;
The same observation has been made as regards the union of carbonic acid with the rust: so long as the sample was fully immersed,
and some inches below the level of the fluid, I did not observe that
the rust yielded carbonic acid, but when the sample was removed frojn
the solution and exposed some hours, in few instances, and days in
others, then the addition of acetic acid always evolved a few bubbles
of carbonic acid. When the scale is examined in quantity after being
well washed with water, it yields faint traces of chlorine ; probably
owing to a portion of chloride of iron remaining attached to, or united
with the oxide, (which may be conveniently termed a chlor-oxide,) bo
that the scale or rust of iron would appear tb be made up of,
o* A f 1
^cc^{
1st formed, constituted internal layer ahd
2. Anhydrous
>
, .
' . r
i
^
i
Q x\ A f
(i \ greatest amount ot scale.
;
4. Proto-carbonate of iron,') Last formed, extended layer least in
5. Chlor-oxide ef iron,
5 aniount.
'
i
The chloride of iron chiefly passes in solution into the raass of sea
water; the proto-carbonate does not long remain as such, but is decoraposed, either by the sulphates or by organic matter in sea water^
and a sulphurate of iron is produced ; this change does not, however,
occur in pure sea water.
Chevreuil (Comptes Eendus, 1853) pointed
out this ready formation of sulphide ot iron, whenever iron, organic
matters, and sulphates were bronght into contact, as in the dust and
mud of paved streets, and showed that in this case, as in most otlier
instances of corrosion of iron,'magnetic oxide is first formed, the sulphate of lime is reduced to a sulphide of calcium, and this latter converted into the iron sulphide,, by the reaction of either the protoi or
sesquioxide.
•
'
Mallet, in his 2d report to the British Association, on the oxidation
of iron, (s. 171,) having reraarked that in foul sea water this forniation of carbonate of iron occurs, led me to allude particularly as to
its formation in pure sea water, with the negative result as abbve
stated.
i



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

177

That the forraation of carbonate of iron may nevertheless occur in
pure sea water is evident from the above observations^ for should the
iron exposed be of such quality, (as a bar or rod,) and so situated as
to be exposed to the air at ebb tide, it is obvious that then a carbonate
would be formed as well as a hydrated oxide.
When a portion of this scale or coating is rembved from the surface
ofa test sample and heated with acetic acid no effervescence is produced, showing that no appreciable amount of carburet of iron has
been forraed ; when further treated with aqua regia,a rainute quantity
of a dark powder remains undissolved, which, when washed with
water from the pipitt and transformed to a plate of platinum and
heated in the spirit-larap fiame, is readily consuraed, leaving a slight
gray trace of ash behind. This combustible substance represents the
carbon (combined and graphitic) ofthe iron. Whatever silicum may
have been present was acidified by the aqua regia, (if not previously
by the act of oxidation,) and remained as ash on the surface of the
platinum plate.
The results ofthese experiments show that bar iron suffers corrosion in sea water raore rapidly and to a greater extent than cast iron.
The tendency of steel to be corroded is interraediate between bar and
cast iron. Viewed raerely as a corapound of carbon and metal the
increased presence of the more positive element gives a protecting
infiuence.
The rate of corrosion being inversely to the amount of carbon, as
shown by the following table of the amount of carbon present in the
three conditions of iron :
In bar iron carbon varies from... .104 (Bromies) to .354, (Karsten.)
I n steel carbon varies from
496
*^
2.3,
(Bromies.)
In cast iron carbon varies from.. 2.3
''
5.3,
( Gmelin.)
Generally speaking, those irons which had the highest specific,
gravity resisted oxidation most, though this must be restricted by the
nature of iron.
Thus it is truc'^ of cast irons that those whose
specific gravity was high generally resisted corrosion better than
those of lower gravity ; which is, perhaps, but another mode of expressing the fact that the purer the carburet of iron the less likely is.
it to corrode ; the sulphide and phosphide it contains the less corrodible. The presence ofa silicum compound in the iron does not
appear to act so decidedly in rusting the iron. If it be interspersed in
the raass of iron a voltaic circuit is produced and corrosion occurs ;
but if, as is often the case, a gloss of silicate exists on the surface,- the
iron is preserved bright, rather than corroded by its presence.
The presence of sulphur and phosphorus compounds in cast iron
proraote oxidation by the forraation of voltaic circuits, in which these
compounds play the negative part to the more positive tetra-carburet
of iron. Graphitic carbon also acts negatively and produces local
circuits, and appears to act even more energetically, and in this respect,
than sulphur and phosphorus compounds. The cast iron which is
'freest from this form of carbon is the least oxidizable, and its power
of resistance increases as it approaches the type of the tetra-carbide—
F . e^. c.
12



178

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

I t is by the cheraical action arising from local voltaic circuits, that ;
cast iron suff'ers corrosion in sea water, the extent of corrosion being i
in relation to the impurity of the iron, and the rusting being spread ;
more equally oyer the whole superfices than occurs with bar irons. ;
In these experiments it has been frequently observed of bar iron that |
over several inches of the length of the bar no rusting has taken place, i
while in patches the whole surface is rusted deeply ; this occurring i
when the strength of the saline solution was the same, and the posi- i
tion of the bar horizontal, so that, it-can hardly be set down as pro-;
duced by difference of chemical constitution, but, perhaps, fromj
difference of structure or density^ where the fibres were not brought]
' so closely together as in the brighter parts. That chemical constitu-!
tion is not the sole cause of corrosion of iron, especially of wrought!
iron, is shown by the fact that difference of position of the bar will
produce different degrees of oxidation.|
, The corrosion of wrought iron proceeds irregularly if a portion oi^
the bar or stancheon be placed under different conditions, as wheni
one extremity is iraraersed in a clay or raud bottom and the remain-j
der in fresh or salt water. When such clay or mud is charged with
vegetable matter, the sulphates are decomposed into sulphide by the
organic substa^nces present, and a coating of sulphide of iron formed!
Sometimes only crystals of pyrites are deposited here and there along
its surface, and as it corrodes passes into the cavities thus formed';
local voltaic action is then set up and corrosion proceeds more rapidly
when the bar is of the sarae thickness throughout. Of course its weak
point is immediately transferred to this extremity, .and hence, ih
practice, the lower end of iron beams intended for subaqueous supports should be made of greater weight than the upper portions.* |
The homogeneity of a.raetal is one of its raost essential conditions
for its prevention from rusting; and as this homogeneity is less preserved in ba-r iron than in castings, the former are raore easily coifroded. When bars of different '^ raake'' are welded together there
is not only, as in cast iron, a mixture of sulphide and phosphidie
mixed with the metal, but fibres of one make of iron are disseminate|d
through the mass of another make of iron, and hence different polar
•arrangement of the fibres, the whole bar becomes a galvanic circuit,
not merely on its surface, as in the case of cast irons, but also to its
more intimate structure, leading to a raore rapid corrosion.
;
It is doubtful if the practice of raixing ores, which is adopted by
the iron manufacturers for the sake of improving the quality of tlie
metal, is one which results in the obtaining suitable metal castings
for submarine structures, inasmuch as a greater variety, though, perhaps, not a greater amount, of foreign ingredients are introduced into
such irons. And the same objection may be advanced with more
force against the practice of uniting irons of different ^^make'' to
form an improved bar, since all of these irons so made preserve their
electrical polarities in the united bar, and conduce to develop voltaic
circuits resulting in oxidation.
I
The forraation of voltaic circles is at present explained upon the




* Mallet, 3d report.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

179

hypothesis of cheraical polarity, whereby elementary atoms are supposed to array themselves into two classes, the basyles and the M o gens. To the former belong hydrogen and the metals, to the latter
chlorine and the other non-metallic bodies; these terms corresponding,
also, to positive and negatively electrified bodies. A compound like
water or chlorhyodic acid, formed of two elements, represents a small,
magnetic bar possessing opposite, properties at each^end,, and by which
proximity they are held together and preserved in force. Thus, in
water the oxygen is called the halogenous or negative element and
the hydrogen the basylus or negative, and these two atoras are held
together by the mutual affinity ofthese opposite polarities just as, for
the integrity of a magnet, it is necessary that two distinct polarities
should be in close relation. In chlorhyodic acid the chlorine is the
halogen and the hydrogen the bavsyl. If a bar of iron be plunged in
this chlorhyodic acid, the iron dissolves and hydrogen is given off as
a gas—case of simple decomposition, where one basyl (iron) replaces
another basyl, (hydrogen.) But the manner in which this decomposition is effected is not rendered evident in simple circuits, where one
metal and one executing fluid only is used. When two metals are
partially immersed in the acid solution and their free ends brought
into contact, the decomposition ofthe acid proceeds and the hydrogen
is given off' on the surface of the least pbsitive of the basyles. Thus,
if iron and copper were the two metals engaged, the chlorine of the
acid would unite with the iron and the hydrogen would escape as a
gas from the surface of the copper plate, even though the two metals
be several inches apart; as many atoms of acid intervene between the
electrodes or ends of the two inetal plates, it cannot be the sarae atom
of acid which has been broken up, unless it be supposed that the electric fluid circulated through the liquid and carried the atom of hydrogen across to the copper electrode. But such a view is not now sustained by the facts, and the belief that the decomposition is transferred
through a chain of particles is raore in accordance with the actual
phenomena. This transfer extends from the zinc to the copper, and
may be conceived by this diagram, in which each particle of chlorhydric acid is represented by the letters cl and h, initials of the component atoms, chlorine and hydrogen. The chlorine (fit.) of particle!
1 in contact with the iron,,
combining with that metal;
its hydrogen h combines, the
moraent'it is set free, with
the chlorine of particles 2,
as indicated by connecting
bracket below, and liberates
the hydrogen of that particle,
which hydrogen forthwith combines with the chlorine of particle 3,
and so on to 4, when the last liberated atom, not having any more
chlorhyodic acid to act on, rises as^gas^ and is given off at the copper
plate.
Now if, in the above diagram, common salt, chloride of sodium, be
substituted for the chlorhyodic acid, the chlorine ofthe first particle of
salt would attach itself to the iron, while the sodium would be set



180

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

free and appear at the copper plate; but as its affinity for oxygen is
very great^' it decomposes a particle of water at the edge of the copper plate, forms soda, and reraains in solution while the hydrogen of
the water atom escapes. Qhloride of iron is produced in either case,
which, being soluble, is reraoved frora the surface of the metal, leaving a clean place to be again attacked by another decomposition.
This illustrates the action of salt water on iron, and serves to explain why saline solutions act more energetically than fresh water,
and why bar iron suffers more than cast. For, in the case of fresh
water, the oxygen, either of the air dissolved in the water or of ari
atom of water itself, unites with the iron and forms an oxide which is
insoluble, and remains as a coating upon the surface of the metal,
and prevents or greatly retards further union of oxygen with iron ;
hence the minor oxidation occurring in fresh water.
When cast iron is acted on by a saline solution, as comraon salt, a
chloride of iron is also forraed, as in the case of bar iron, but to a
lesser extent; for at the same time the carbon of the casting separates out frbm corabiuation with the fron, and, for a time, delays the
action ofthe comraon salt upon the iron. It is only for a time, however, for the carbon on the surface, having a different chemical polarity
from the raetal^ produces electrical actions of induction, whereby decoraposition of the iron is produced. Sirailarly is it with the coating
of oxide on bar iron; the iron and thin layer of oxide becorae polar,
the iron acting' as a basyl and the oxide as a halogen, the two elements of a pile are produced and galvanic phenomena accelerate the
decoraposition, the iron acquiring sufficient power to decompose water
freely.
All of the elementary substances possess, in a greater cr less degree, property of polarity, already explained, and they may be classified as ranged in the following list, abstracted from Sir E. Kane's
Elements of Chemistry:
Halogens.
Negative.
/ ^ Oxygen.
Fluorine.
Chlorine.
Bromine.
iodine.
Sulphur.
Selenium.
Tellurium.
Nitrogen.
Phosphorus.
A Arsenic.
Antimony.
Silicon.
Boron.

Mercury.
Chronium.
Vanadium.
Iridium.
Rhodium.
VUranium.
Osmium.
/ ^ Platinum.
Titanium.
Gold.
Molybdenum.
Fungsten.
Columbium.

Palladium.
A Silver.
Copper.
Lead.
Tin.
Bismuth.
Cobalt.
Nickel.
Iron.
/ \ Manganese.
' Cadmium.
Zinc.
Hydrogen.
Carbon.

Potassium.
Sodium.
Lithium.
Nj/Barium.
Stronlium.
Calcium.
Magnesium.
Glucinium.
Yttrium.
Thorium.
Aluminum.
Zinconium.
\1/Lanthanium.
Corium.
Positive.
Basyls.

The most powerful halogenous bodies are placed first on the list
in the first column, and those most basylous in the fourth. Any substance in the list is basylous with regard to any others toward which



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

181

the arrow points, and halogenous in relation to any from which the
arrow is directed.
Thus iron is negative or halogenous to all in the fourth column,
and all below it in thethird, carbon is positive or basylous to iron,
while negative or halogenous to all in the fourth column. When
both iron and carbon are so circumstanced that both may unite with
oxygen^ carbon exerts a protecting influence over uniting itself with
the oxygen and thus preventing the union of iron with oxygen until
the last portions of carbon have obtained oxygen; this is what occurs
in the manufacture of metallic iron, the carbon thus at high temperatures acting as pota«ium or sodium would at low temperatures. But
as carbon has no affinity for oxygen at low temperatures, it possesses
no protecting influence beyond what is effected by its aggregation on
the surface in a pulverulent form.
In operating on the samples in no case was the natural face of the
iron as it carae from the mould left on the raetal; a clean bright
metallic surface was obtained by the cold chisel; it was deemed that a
greater uniformity in the samples as compared with each other was
thus obtained; for as the nature of the surface influences very much
the rate of corrosion, causes saraples of the same chemical constitution to
differ considerably, such a condition, if left its full force, would neutralize the results by introducing a new element of corrosion and prevent any composition being approxiraately true.
The samples for examination were treated in exposing them to salt
water in a great degree similar tp that adopted in the testing in warm
fresh water. Having the w^eight indicated and presenting a comparatively large surface, they readily showed incipient oxidation. The
sea water was warmed (for the high temperature experiments) in pans
placed in a drying chamber and regulated by a thermoraeter. The
loss of water was supplied by the addition at intervals of an equivalent "of distilled water.
For the sake of uniforraity_, the saraples were as nearly as possible
of the sarae size, (one inch square and one-sixth of an inch thick;)
' squares of this size were cut at the department for experiments at high
temperatures in the air; thjs- line of experiment was not carried out.
The exposure of the samples to the action of sea water occupied the
same period as in the case of fresh water. At the close of the experiment the filtered salt water showed the presence of iron largely to
reagents, and a thin layer of rust, (red oxide,) coated the bottom of
the vessel.
In this, as in all other forms of experiment where imraersion wais
concerned, samples of bar were exposed in one vessel, and of castings
in another; and thus a source of error was avoided arising from possible production of galvanic circuits by proximity of irons of different
constitutions.
The result of the immersion in sea water at 60° Fahrenheit goes to
show a greatly augmented rate of corrosion above what takes place in
fresh water.
While compared with fresh water at 110° Fahrenheit the corrosion,
althbugh increased, was not so well marked; a result interesting in
itself so far as the actual and relative rate of corrosion in these cases is



182

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

concerned, but still of not much practical value, since, in point of fact,
the conditions given in tables 1 and 2 are rarely ever, in practice followed out; for iron is rarely ever kept ex:posed to a temperature of
110° Fahrenheit; and although some experiments in sea water were
conducted at ordinary temperatures, yet they were performed in small
basins or troughs were the water was constantly still. This does not
hold good in the open sea, where currents, waves, and tides are continually changing the layers of liquid in contact with the iron, and
thus producing a more rapid means of oxidation than can take place
in experiraents on a small scale.
Of the two conditions of iron bar iron was corroded much more
than .castings. In the case of bar, the rusting varied between .165
and .010 per square inch of surface, and that of cast iron .155 and ,010
per square inch.
The averages in the latter case leaning to the miniraum, while in
the forraer it verged in the
raaxiraura.
^
.
The test samples of bar least corroded were Nos. 1, 7, 19, 20, 90, 39,
11. All of these excepting 39 had their ore of magnetic oxide mostly
ill whole, but in two instances mixed with other ore.
Among the cast irons Nos. 7, 1, 11, 21, 68, 20, 22, 95, 69, 92, 24, 25,
28, 29, suffered least in the order given. In this case there are 4 specimens of a like number standing at the top of each list, viz : 1, 7, 11,
and 21; these are irons having magnetic oxide as their ores. The analysis of No. 7 has been already given when describing the action of
fresh water. That of No. 1 was as follows, in 100 parts:
Bar.

Iron
Combined carbon
Graphite
Silicum
Sulphur.....
Phosphorus
Manganese
Copper
Arsenic...

Cast, white.

98
1.37

95
4.66
traces.
.02

traces.
.
traces.

.......

99.37

99.68

o

The proportion of carbon in this casting is not sufficient to form the
whole mass into tetra-carburet, the least corrodible of the carbides ;
but the extrerae purity of both casting and bar raay be sufficient reason why it stands so high on the list.
Castings Nos. 69, 92, 24, 25, 28, 29, have either brown hematite or
a mixed hematite and carbonate from the (lower) coal measures; as in
all of these ores sulphur and phosphorus exist in considerable amount,
their little tendency to corrosion could not be attributed to their purity. They also contain, besides water, silica, lime, sesquioxide of
manganese, and oxide of copper. Yet many irons raade frora the ore
possess fair power of resisting corrosion. Of this No. 63 forms an




REPORT ON THB FINANCES.

183

example. This bar specimen lost .120 per square inch, and had the
following constitution:
Iron
96.77
.11
Combined carbon
Graphite
2.11
Manganese
.57
Silicum
• ..^
.04Phosphorus...;
Zinc
.,
„
Arsenic
29
Loss
'

100.00

The composition of the ore from which the carbon is made is given
as followfs by Professor Eogers, in the first Eeport of Geblogy of the
State of Virginia, for 1836 :
Porous brown hematite,—Shenandoah.
Carbonate of iron
Carbonate of lime
Carbonate of magnesia
Silica
Alumina
Iron pyrites
Phosphoric acid
Loss
,

,
,.

71
4.80
1.90
13.50
6.25
1.58

....,
97
100.00

As neither phosphorus nor manganese found in the sample is re, corded here, they may have been overlooked, and perhaps the former
was introduced by the fuel.
The result of exposure to sea water at an elevated teraperature has
been in a general way to confirm the result previously arrived at by
imraersion in cool salt water, namely, the greater oxidizement of bar
iron ; the samples losing by two months' exposure at 110° F . from
fi^-Q to IfVo" gi^ains per square inch, while the samples of cast iron,
similarly circurastanced, lost from y^^o to iVo, or little more than onehalf that of bar.
The samples which suffered least by oxidation were Nos. 21, 7, 11,
90, 19, and 107. Among bar irons and among castings were 21, 20,
19, 24, 11, 7, 18, and 52. Now, ofthe bars, all except the last number were made from magnetic oxide, although some are from brown
hematite and ore (20) from Franklinite ore. Pirst among both characters of irons stands No. 21. On looking back to tables 3 and 4 it
will be found that this iron, under other circumstances, has proved its
capability of resisting oxidation ; it was deemed desirable to make a
chemical analysis of this iron, but as the sample examined was but



184

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

one variety of raany forwarded by the raanufacturers, (the Trenton
Iron Company,) the remarks made will be understood as referring only
to iron of this constitution.
The assorted samples of iron forwarded to the department by this
company was the most complete of any received, and would in themselves furnish raaterial for assays which would no doubt yield valuable
results, selected as they have been from samples purchased by the company in the ordinary course of their business, reraelted and cooled at
various intervals of time.
.
The test specimen examined was labelled ^^Andover lamellated,''*
both in pig and bar, and was constituted in 100 parts as follows :
' Andover lamellated iron.
Pig, white.

Iron
Graphite......
Corabined carbon
Phosnhorus
Sulphur.....'
Alurainum
Calcium
Silicum..
,
Manganese
Magnesia
Fixed alkalies ; loss

... • 91.004
traces.
5.390
.051
.005
,..

Bar.

96.028
.214;
.044
.0020
.460
3.140

240

.112

100.000
Specific gravity

traces.
.700
2.610

100.000

7.248

7.476

This iron presents the characters of high gravity, great chemical
purity as regards freedom from carbon, sulphur, and phosphorus, and
the presence of an unusual proportion of manganese. This metal is
present in the ores of this locality to a large extent.
It is a constant associate of magnetic iron, and becoming reduced in
the furnace intermixes with the iron; from its affinity for silica, and
forming therewith a very fusible slag, it aids in removing the silica
of the ore and places raore iron at the disposition of the carbon to unite'
with it.
The coraposition of the Andover ore varies in the amount of foreign
matter. An examination of it made by Professor Beck, and published
in the Geological Survey of the State of New York, discloses but a
minute proportion of manganese, the ore was of a light red color with
crystals of magnetite imbedded^ and was coraposed in 100 parts of—

* This make, according to the statement of iVTessrs. Cooper & Hewit, is formed from Irondale ore 3 and Andover J. Roth ores are magnetic oxide chiefly. For analysis ofthese ores
see letter of Mr. Joseph C. Kent to Major Anderson, U. S. A.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

185
Andover iron ores.
No. 1.
No. 2.

Peroxide of iron 70.72
76.97
Insoluble silicons matters ,28.51
8.04
Alumina 1.14
1.78
Carbonateoflime - .
.0.57
8.14
Manganese •
Traces. Traces.
Carbonate of magnesia ,
3.74
Mr. Kent, in the letter already referred to, gives the analyses of
several ores from the same locality, in five of which the proportion of
manganese.present was much greater than shown above.
The letter of Mr. Mushet to the ^^ Engineer,'' referred to in a previous portion of this report, did not come to hand in tirae to ascertain
whether titanium was present in the Andover iron, or whether the acid
existed in the ore. A new set of experiments are needed to determine
this.
In connexion with Andover iron it was deemed necessary to examine
a saraple of bar iron forwarded by the Trenton Iron Corapany, N. J . ,
having this label attached, ^* Crude billet puddle from a broken screwfile after one year's immersion in salt water without appearance of
oxidation. Made from Andover ore with one reheating, by the Trenton
Iron Company, N. J . , and referred to in Major Anderson's letter of
February 6, 1857.''
By chemical analyses it yielded the following in 100 parts :
Iron
97.870
Graphite
Corabined carbon
.042
Phosphorus
Sulphur
.007
Alurainura
.
...,
Calcium
.004
Silicum
.007
Slag
- , .012
Manganese
1.876 Spec, gravity, 7.54
Magnesia
Traces. '
Potas.h and soda
Loss
• .
.082
100.000
Comparing this sample with the analysis of the Andover lamellated
•iron previously given, it differs in the much smaller quantity of manganese and the corresponding increased amount of iron. The specific
gravity is higher, however, than this alteration would justify, and this
alteration must be due tothe treatment which the bar received,partly
by reheating, which always increases the density of irons, and partly by
the additional rolling, condensing the superficial layers. Where this
sample had been broken and bent over on itself the fibres were of a
silvery whiteness and of a silky fineness.
The high specific gravity and the fine fibre are the prominent
physical characters of this iron.



186

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
SECTION IV.

On the surfiace protection ofi iron.
'

CONTENTS.

Classification of causes of corrosion.
Porosity of iron.
Chemical coniposition.
Metallic coatings.
Varnishes.
Cements.
Hydrocarbon coating.
The amount of corrosion which the various irons undergo under
diversified conditions has been already pointed out, and it has been
indicated that the purity, density, horaogenity, and smooth surface of
the metal exert great influence in resisting rusting. . But even the
presence of iron under, these conditions would ultimately oxidize, and
although it may 'not be pertinent in this report of experiments (whose
object was to determine what are the conditions and characters of
iron which have the greatest resisting power) to enter at large on the
subject of the prevention of oxidation generally, yet, as regards this
metal in particular^ a slight notice of the means at present recominended may not be deemed out of place.
I t is obvious that in many cases the quality of iron most suitable
for durability may not be conveniently had, and that inferior qualities
must be adopted. To render this poorer iron more durable and
unchangeable is to render the use of iron more universal, and the
eraployraent of castings raore general.
The oxidation of raetallic iron, (whether bar or cast) as regards the
substance itself, depends on two causes.
1. The porosity of the mass.
2. The impurity present in the sample.
It is unnecessary here to enter into all the proof of the porosity of
iron ; that even thick castings are porous is shown by the trial-tests
to which the large street mains for water supply, by the depth to
which the carbon penetrates into the inner surface of cast iron gas
retorts, when the manufacture of gas has been carried on for some time,
are subjected. M. Mauj, engineer, describes in the Annales des Ponts et
Chaussees, (1st ser., vol. 8,) the method of testing the mains in Paris
iu 1834, which consists in filling them with water and subjecting them
to a pressure of ten atmospheres by a hydraulic press. Detailing the
effect of this pressure, he states that frequently on applying the pressure a light oozing or sweating takes place through sorne of the pores
of the metal. Whenever a jet occurs, no matter how weak it raay be,
the main is put. aside ; when it merely sweats the pipe is again submitted to a similar pressure after a few days interval, where it often
happens that no further sweating occurs. This cessation the writer
attributes to a light oxidation filling up the pores.



REPOiRT ON THE FINANCES.

187

In preparing a smooth surface of either sheet metal or castings
before being varnished, it is found admissible to cover the surface well
"With linseed oil and rub it in, and subsequently heat by baking or charring the oil, so that its superficial pores at least raay be filled up.
• The experiraent on the Parisian raains teach us that oxidation may
pass through several inches of'iron, especially of castings, and that
should such be placed in conditions where moist air or moisture can
attack them they will inevitably oxidate, not merely" superficially, but
throughout the mass ; it is obviously good practice to prevent this by
coating the surface, not so much to prevent the metal from the approach
of air and raoisture to the raere surface, as to fill up the pores and
prevent penetration to any considerable depth below the surface.
Mr. Mallet, in his 3d report to the British Association, divides the
raethod of protecting the surface of iron into two classes: the first
being the use of paints, varnishes, and thin sheets of raetal, adherent
to the surface ; the second being the application of such raeans as
develop electrical action and place the iron as the negative eleraent.
That talented physicist leaned toward the second class as affording the
best protection, and indicated the nature ofthe alloy and the modeof
application which he deemed most advisable. It was chiefly in the
coating of ships' bottoms which he then recommended, a triple alloy
of zinc, mercury, and potasium or sodium. I am not aware that practical success has attended its adoption, or if it has ever been extensively applied, but a priori reasoning would lead us to believe that
the oxidation of an alkaline metal like sodium or potassium must take
place rapidly in sea water, and must place the iron subsequently in a
worse condition than before its applicatioh.
Where large samples of iron are not exposed—where it is merely
bar, wire, or castings as pipes and rod^ I am inclined to think that
the first class of protectives would prove most efficient.
Of this class the metallic coating, when it is perfectly and thickly
laid on, would appear to be most efficient. . Tlhe^objection to its use
is, that the thin film of coating scales off, and the iron underneath
then rusts faster than without any coating. This occurs even with
zinc, which is electro-positive as regards iron, and should therefore
protect the iron from oxidation; but in practice the electrical protection of zinc has been found worthless when the iron is under water,
and its mechanical protection is very slight from the usual thinness of
the zinc coat and its brittleness, which prevents its durability.
The difference between conditions of oxidizement in air and in saline
solutions is shown by the use of zinc as a coating for iron. When ,
exposed to atmospheric infiuences merely, galvanized iron suffers but
little oxidation ; but when expbsed to a saline sblution, as by immersion in sea water, zinced iron corrodes somewhat less rapidly than
uncoated iron does ; but w^hen organic matter is present, as in muddy
waters, the corrosion is much greater than of unprotected iron.'''
Copper possesses much more elasticity than zinc, and is capable,
t=herefore, of adapting itself to the uneven and unequally expanding
surfaces of iron. When under water or beneath the soil it is open to




* Mallet, 3d Report.

188

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the objection that if the coating be detached at any point, there the
corrosion of the iron goes on with rapidity, increased by the presence
of the electro-negative copper; but when the coating is thick and not
capable of detachment, this objection has no force. : Several modes of
laying on copper on iron have been described and patented, (in the
United States.) The method of E. G. Pomeroy, which consists in
cleansing the surface of the iron in the usual way, and then iraraersing it in a solution of alum previous to dipping it into a bath of
melted copper, appears to furnish a close and pure coating of copper
which may be of any thickness desired.
The coating of clean iron with paints appears to afford very little
protection to the metal when exposed to sea water ; the coating is
soon removed by friction and oxidation, and the lead: used in the
paint acts injuriously by hastening oxidation. The list of varnishes
comprise those of caoutchouc, copal, asphalt, mastic, turpentine,
Stockholm gas tar, drying oil, wax and suet melted together, &c.;
but not one of these remain any length of time (not even one year,
says Mallet,) attached to the metal. The least ^efficacious are those
which have oxide of lead as a base, which passed into a sulphuret.
The-bituminous varnishes, as asphaltum, coal tar, Sse, so much
praised by Mr. Mallet, when laid oh hot, have everything to recommend them. When required, paints are the means adapted for preservation.
In place of coal tar, which is a heterogeneous mixture of acids,
bases, and neutral substances, either the native petroleum now so
abundantly collected in Pennsylvania, or the artificial coal oils
obtained by the distillation bf coal, might be used. These substances
have this advantage over vegetable oils, that they do not contain oxygen, nor have any tendency to oxidize, and on that account form one
of the most eligible menstrua for a paint substance being applied.
As they do not readily thicken or dry, it would be necessary to dissolve in the oil, by heat, a portion of asphaltum, sufficient being used
so that when cool the whole will indurate. It should be applied quite
hot, withTa brush, and the surface of the metal should not be so reduced as to suddenly cool the varnish.
M. Minard supports the stateraent of Vicat about thevalue of mortar of quick'lime, by the fact evinced on exaraining, in 1809, the
foundations of the rope-yard of the port of Eochfort, built about the
year 1680. The mortar in the interior of the masonry was as soft as
if freshly prepared. I t scarcely effervesced with acids, and had the
caustic taste of quicklirae. The iron work which it surrounded was
perfectly free from oxidation, and had the grayish-blue tint of good
sheet iron.
The practice of soaking the surface of cast iron and steel with linseed oil has, as stated, been found to be a good preventive against
oxidation. In place of linseed oil, any of the coal oils, or even the
residues after the distillation of coal oils, might be used as a substitute. These residues, which now command little price, are loaded
with paraffine, and have so high a boiling point that when applied
to metallic surfaces they adhere tenaciously to it when cold.
There is little doubt that the anti-oxidating influence of coal tar is
due to the paraffine it contains. Paraffine itself is now a compara


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

189

tively cheap article, and might be applied in various ways to the
practice of iron surfaces. Small articles might be soaked in a bath of
rrielted paraffine, which undergoes no change by exposure to air, no
matter how prolonged. Larger articles might be coated with Inelted
paraffine, and baked below 212° for a few days^ to allow of the paraffine soaking into the pores of the raetal. As paraffine has a low^ raelting point, (about 110° Fahrenheit,) does not contain oxygen, and has
no active affinity for oxygen or any other eleraent, it deserves an extended use in this direction.

SECTION V.

Remarks and suggestions upon the experiments.
Considering the circurastances producing and accorapanying oxidation, one raight, without refiection, be led to believe that iron comported itself like other metals ; and judging from the electrical rela,tions of matter influencing chemical combination, by which less corrosion results where only one metal is concerned, that a pure metal
would suffer less than an alloy—would thereby be "led to overlook the
true conditions of the case of iron.
For cast iron, incorrectly called iron, is a carbon corapound, so also
is steel, and bar iron alone approaches that character of a pure metal
which might be contrasted with other metals, as copper, zinc, &c.,
which can be more readily obtained pure.
The result of this difference of composition between bar and cast
iron is that they undergo oxidation in very different degrees under
similar conditions, the difference being as great as occurs between any
two metals of. very different chemical characters.
Exposed to an imperfect conductor, as air and fresh water, the two
varieties do not differ much ;'but when surrounded by a good conductor as a saline situation, the bar iron suffers most, because being
really a raetal, it becoraes ranch raore electrically positive than the
salt in solution, the cheraical action is carried on at its expense.
Cast irbn not being a raetal, but a true salt, (a carbide) has different
electrical relations, and when placed in saline solutions does not
become to the same extent electrically positive with,regard to the
saline matter, and although it does finally undergo corrosion until it
loses nearly all its iron, yet the rate of destruction is generally much
slower than that of bar iron.
It should, therefore, be recollected that it is not always the strongest
iron which will resist oxidation best; the iron well adapted for
many structural purposes, on account of possessing the necessary
strength or other quality, will often make a poor figure beside an iron
inferior to it in that respect, because the latter could better resist the
action of chemical forces tending to oxidate it. Iron intended for guns
requires to possess one class of properties, for architectural purposes
another, and for capability of .endurance unaltered by chemical agents,
yet a third class. It is fortunate that many of these qualities
are found in the same metal, and hence, the great and increasing value
of iron.



190

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

'' The properties of raetals," says Major Wade,* ^^ which are raost
material in the raanufacture of cannon, are tensile strength, hardness,
and specific gravity ;" now the latter is the only property of the three
which is material in regard to the capability of the metal to resist
oxidation ; the experiraents detailed lead to the belief that the qualities which an iron should possess to resist its tendency to form new
combinations are high specific gravity, homogeneity of surface, and
chemical purity ; by the latter term is understood an uniform constitution ; thus a cast iron of chemical purity is that w^here composition
is wholly a tetracarburet of iron, without admixture of sulphides,
phosphides, &c,, while that of bar iron refers to the greatest amount
of uncombined metal with a miniraum of carbide and slag.
Exposed to air alone, bar iron appears to undergo oxidation less
rapidly than castings, the same holds good of exposure to fresh water
at ordinary temperatures. It is difficult at present to decide how
much of this superiority of bar iron is due to chemical constitution, .
and how much to closeness of surface since the preservative infiuence
of the latter is well known. This is the case with a few of the irons
operated on, thus No. 104, (Elowah, Geo.,) bar and casting acted very
, differently with sea water and warm fresh water ; the cast iron suffering considerable corrosion an^ ranking low, while the specimen of
bar resisted oxidation better than many irons made from similar ores^
the difference being doubtless due to the greater closeness of the surface of the bar ; an indifferent iron may be well rolled an(J made to
assume a fine fibre, and thus raechanical treatraent may be made to
supply the place of cheraical purity.
The frequent formation of tubercles in the water mains of cities led
French chemists to recommend that the inside of the pipes should be
coated ; and the report by Messrs. Gueymard and Vicat, of experiments
raade at Grenoble in 18H4-'35, and '36, in.order to prevent the deposit
of tubercles on the inside of the water mains of that city, show that,
of all coatings examined which belonged to the class of earthy substances, hydraulic cement was the most effectual, a,s it had been the
most economical, The coating, to be uniform, must be two and a half
milliraetres thick. The mode of application consisted in closing one
end of the pipe with the prepared mortar, and then pushing it along
with a piston or rod, armed with a brush, until it reached the other end;
the rod was then drawn back, when the brush swept the mortar back
over the inside and placed it again as at the coraraencement. It was
passed to and fro several times. A layer of finer mortar may be afterwards passed over the whole. It requires three or four days to harden.
Vicat asserts that so long as a mortar is in the pasty state, and until
it becomes dry and hard,- it possesses the property of preventing oxidation of iron. A mortar may reraain naturally in this condition for
raore than one hundred years. Lirae water has been found soft' and
in a quick state alter five hundred yearsf by Alberti, and after eighty
years by JohnsJ.
* Report of Experiments on Metals for Cannon. Published by authority ofthe Secretary
of War, 1856,
t Annales des Ponts et Chaussees, Ist series, vol. 12.
t Vicat in Annales des Ponts et Chaussees, 3d series, vol. 5.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

191

There is no experimental result to support the opinion that the
excellence of bar iron in its power of resisting oxidation depends on its
fibrous structure, or, in other words, in its purity. Bar iron has been
shown by these experiments (as, indeed, had been shown previously
by Mallet,) to suffer more by corrosion in saline solutions than cast
iron ; but as bar iron is a much nearer approach to pure metallic iron
than castings, it is evident that the purity of a metal is no safeguard
against oxidation. It is the nature of the surface which appears to
determine the greater or less amount of corrosion. Where it is close,
dense, and uniform in structural character, and this is accompanied
by a high specific gravity, then the corrosion will be at a miniraum
in bar iron.
Where conditions of surface are the same, or where they are bf the
kind most favorable to resist, then oxidation occurs most rapidly in
those irons which possess metallic combinations capable of acting as
halogens to the iron present; and reviewing the action of the various
irons examined, the iollowing conclusions were arrived a t :
1. Ores containing manganese produce least oxidizable iron.
2. Ores containing magneticoxide produce iron not easily oxidizable.
3. An iron containing S. and P . is liable to oxidize.
4. An iron containing free carbon very liable to oxidize.
5. The difference between hot and cold blast iron not apparent.
6. The presence of siliceum. not objectionable, the silicide of iron
appearing to resist oxidation as well as the carbide; but when this
eleraent exists as silicic acid in the forra of slag, the latter acts very
injuriously, by loosening out and leaving cavities in which corrosion
is set up.
Frora the coraportment of iron referred to throughout this report,
the fbllowing indications for the practical employraent of this raetal
have been deduced:
1. For subraarine purposes castings are preferable, where a raanganesion iron of density is not attainable.
Where immersion is under fresh water, there appears no superiority
arising from chemical composition ; a homogeneous surface is the chief
necessity.
. 2. In all irons immersed it appears desirable that the surfaces should
be protected by coatings. Two varieties of iron, (as cast and bar,) or
even separate makes of iron, ought not to be placed, in contact in
subaqueous structures.
5. Where rods or pillows of bar or castings are required tb be sunk
under ground or deep in wood-work, it will be advantageous to have
a packing of mortar or. lirae paste immediately in contact with and
surrounding the metal, and in no case should ironwork be enclosed
in hollow chambers of.masonry.
In many cases, while samples of cast and bar iron were forwarded
l)j the* manufacturer, yet the two samples were not produced frbm the
same ore, and hence, although useful so far a s a n experiment on either
bar or casting was concerned, yet it prevented any comparison being
made as to the comparative rates of oxidation of different characters
of iron made out of the same.ores. Indeed, to enable this question
(as also many others) to be truthfully decided there would require to




192

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

be samples of cast or wrought irons made with special reference to the
object in view.
It is not thought that these experiments conclusively prove any one
circumstance connected with the comportment of iron ; safe conclusions cannot be drawn from one single series of experiraents, especially in an inquiry where so many conditions have to be observed, one
and not the least important of which is time. It is only upon repeated
experiment, protracted over a nuraber of years, that results truly
' reliable can be obtained.
It is to be regreted that Congress did not make a raore liberal
appropriation, whereby continuous attention could be devoted to the
experiraents, and by which raeans a raore suitable collection of saraples
might be obtained for experiment. Indeed, this report, short and
necessarily imperfect, demands that this subject be again examined,
both upon the results obtained as herein shown, as well to verify as to
determine how far electrical action aids or controls corrosion—whether
that action arise from chemical impurity or from external sources.
The application of the microscope to ascertain the mechanical state
of aggregation ofthe raetal and the various forras in which free carbon
presents itself in castings, has not been pursued to any great extent
or with any decided success, as hitherto, yet it is believed that much
inforraation is to be derived from such an investigation, and facilities
should be afforded as by a renewed appropriation for that purpose.
The electrical relations of bar and cast iron towards other metals in
weak saline solutions, as fresh and salt water, has not been studied
extensively ; at the same time these are the conditions in which
structural requirements place iron very frequently. This subject, also,
would require a large series of experiments for elucidation.
SECTION VI.
CONTENTS.

Table 1.—Tabular result of action of fresh water on cast iron at
110° Fahrenheit.
Table 2.-—Tabular result of action of fresh water on bar iron at
110° Fahrenheit.
Table 3.—Tabular result of action of sea water, at 60° Fahrenheit,
on cast iron.
•
Table 4.—Tabular result of action of sea water, at 60° Fahrenheit,
on bar iron.
Table 5.—Tabular result of action of sea water, at 110° Fahrenheit,
on cast iron.
•
Table 6.—Tabular result of action of sea water, at 110° Fahrenheit^
on bar iron.
Tables 7 to 12.—Synoptical view of the nature and locality of the
various samples of iron forwarded., and of the several circumstances
connected with the manufacture.
APPENDIX.'

Extract of letters of Messrs. Detmold, Kent, Wade, and Cooper,
Hewit & Co,



193

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
TABLE 1.

Action of river water, at 110° Fahrenheit, on har iron.
Loss by corrosion.
W e i g h t of
specimen, in
grains.

N u m b e r of specimen.

1
7

n

W e i g h t after
experiment, in
grains.

.119.
117.8
118.8
120.
121.
121.
118.6
115.6
116.7
114.8
114.
117.8
119.
121.
115.6
118.
124.5

118.974
117.786
« 118.778
119.977
120.985
120. 986
118.463
115.521
116.630
114.728
113.960
117.721
118.941
120. 960
115.550
117.950
124.460

_

_

12
19
21
23-_--26
31
32
35
37
39
63
90
104
107

_
.

-

-

Total loss.

Loss per
sqaare inch.

.026
.014
.022
.023
.015
.014
.037
.079
.070
.072
.040 •
.079
.059
.040
.050
.050
.040

. 013
. 007
.011
.011
.007
.007
.018
.039
.035
.036
. 020
. 039
.029
.020
.025
.025
.020

TABLE 2.

Action of river watery at 110^ Fahrenheit, on cast iron.
Loss by (corrosion.
W e i g h t of
specinaen, in
grains.

No. of specimen.

1
6
7
11
18
19
20
21
22
24
25
26
28
29
31
35
37...
39
42
52
53

.

-

.„

^
,

-

13



120.
118.
118.
119. .
118.
119.6
.215.
120.5
119. •
118.6
117.5
117.4
118.
118.
119.4
120.2
118.6
118.5
119.8
118.4
119.

W e i g h t after
exposure, in
grains.

119.972
117.974
117.960
118.980
117.958
119.571
213.580
120.460
118.969
118.574
117.478
117.381
117.983
117.980
119. 384
120.170
118.560
118.466
119.764
118.366
118.958.

Total loss.

.028
.026
.040
.020
.032
.029
1.420
.040
.031
.026
.022
.019
.017
.020
.016
.030
.040
.034
.036
.034
.042

Loss per sq.
inch in grains.

014
013
. 020
. 010
. 016
.014
.010
. 020
.015
.013
OU
. 009
. 008
. 010
. 008
. 015
. 020
.017
.018
.017
.021

194

REPORT ON TIIE FINANCES.

TABLE 2—Continued.
Loss by corrosion.
Number of specimen.

64...
55
56
69
68
69
73
74
75
76
77
7.892
95
96....
104

Weight of
specimen, in
grains.

120.
118.
117.4
118.
118.2
118.
117.
117.3
118.
116.8 ,
115.
116.
117.
121.
110.4
121.5

:

Weight after
exposure, m
grains.

119.965
117.975
117.365.
117.970
118.180
117.977
116.980
117.265
117.972
116.776
114 980
115,979
116.971
120. 981
119.364
121.469

total loss.

Loss per sq.
inch in grains.

.035
.025
.0.35
.030
.020
. 023
.020
. 035
.028
.024
.020
.021
. 029
.019
.036
.031

.017
.012
.017
.015
.010
.011
.010
.017
.014
.012
.010
.010
.014
.009
.018
.015

TABLE 3.

Action of sea water, at 60° Fahrenheit, on bar iron.
Weight of
specimen, in
giains.

Number of sample.

1
7
11
12
19
21
23
26 - . 31
32
35...
37
39
63
90-.
104.
107...

...

-

1




---

118. 7
118.
118.4
119.
121.
J 2 0 . 02
1)8.
115.9
116.
114.6
114.
117.6
118.18
125.5
115.
117.
128. 6

Weigbt after
exposure.

118.670
117.980
118.280
118.840
120.980
119.990
117.870
115.720
.115.850
114.440
113.790
117.370
. 118.100
125.260
114.830
116.770
128. 370

Loss per ^
Total loss by
corrosion. square inch.

;

.030
. 020
.120
.160
. 020
.030
.130
.180
. 150
. 160
. 210
.230
.080
.240
ol70
' .230
. 230

.015
.010
.060
.080
.010
.015
.065
.090
.075
.080
. 105
.115
.040
.120
.085
.115
.165

195

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
TABLE 4.

Action of sea water, at 60° Fahrenheit, on cast iron.
Weight of
specimen, in
grains

Number of sample.

1
6
7
11
18
19
20
21
22
24
25
26
28.
2931
35
3739
42
52
53
64---

^

5968
73
74
75

. .-.-

77
78.
92.
95
96
104

-—..

.-.

119.
117.
118.6
119.4
117.4
120.
280.
121.
119.2
118.5
117.6
117.8
118.
118.2
118.9
120.
119.
118.5
121.
120.4
119.
119.3
119.2
118.9
119.
117.7
118.
116.
116.6
117.2
115.
113.
114.
118.
121.
118.6
^ 120.

Weight after
experiment.

Total loss by
corrosion.

Loss per
square inch.

118.970
116.930
118,580
119.360
117.340
119.930
279.955
120.970
119.160
118.430
117.530
117 700

.030
.070
.020
.(40
.060
. 070
.045
. 0:.iO
.040
.070
.070
.100

.015
.035
.010
•020
.030
.035
.022
.015
.020
.035
. 035
.050

118.130
118.830
119.800
US. 780
118.320
120. 720
120. UO
118.740
119.050
118.970
11 .680
118.840
117.670
117.950
115.860
116.470
117:080
114.890
112.900
113.910
117.940
120.960
118. 3<0
119.743

.070
. 070
.2<I0
.220
.180
.280
.290
.260
.250
.230
.220
.160
.030
.050
.140
.130
.120
.110
.100
.090
.060
.040
. 230
.257

.035
.035
. 100
. UO
.090
. 140
. 145
.130
.125
.165
. 110
.080
.015
.025
.070
.065
.060
.55
.50
.045
.030
.020
.115
.128

,

TABLE 6.

Action ofi sea water, at 110° Fahrenheit, on har iron.
Loss by corrosion, in grains.
Number of specimen.

1..---....--.7 .

11.
12
19....i

.

...

.

^^.i.^.

...-^..
.......-;.




Weight after
Weightof
specimen, in experiment, in
grains.
grains.

118.7
118.
118.4
119.
121.

118.04
117.51
117.89
118.24
120. 45

Total.

.66
.49
.51
.76
.66"

Per square
inch.
.330
.245
.255
.380
.275

196

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TABLE 5—Continued.
Loss by corrosion, in grains.
Weight after
Weightof
specimen, in experiment, in
grains.
grains.

Number of speciraen.

;

2123 — 26
31
32
35
^7
39
63
90..
104
10,7

120. 02
118.
115. 9
116.
114.6
114.
117.6
118.18
125.5
11.5.
117.
128. 6

Per square
inch.

Total.

119.61
117.21
115.16
115.23
113.81
113.11
116.28
116.81
124. 77
114.31
116.49
128.0

.205
.'395
. 370
.385
.395
.395
. 690
.685
.365
.345
. 225
.300

.41
.79
.74
.77
.79
.79
L38
1.37
.73
.69
.51
.60

TABLE 6.

Action of sea water, a^ 110° Fahrenheit, on cast iron.
1..
6.7
il..
:i8,
19.
20
21
22
24
25.
'26''28
29
.31

....--...-.
-

..

.

Is: ::::::::::::;;::::
37
;39.
42
52
63
54
65
66
'59.--68
----..
69
73
74
75
76
77
78.--.-..
..-.^
•92:
951--:...-.-.-.
961
-.--..
104



.....
...
...

119.
117.
118.6 .
119.4
117.4
120.
220.
121.
119.2
118.6
117.6
117.8
118.
118.2
118.9
120.
U9.
118.5
121.3
120.4
119.
119.3
119.2 :.
118.9
119.
117.7 i
118.
116.
116.6
117.2
115.
113.
114.
118.
121.
118. 6
119.

118.60
116.51
118.21
119.03
117.
119.74
219.77
120. 77
118.58
118.18
117.10
117.19
117.27
117.54
118.25
119.16
. 118.21
117.91
120 84
120.
118.21
118.64
118.66
119.20
118.25
117.
117.21
115.19
115.87
116.50
114.15
112.22
113.18
117.54
120.31
117.81
118.19

.

.40
.49
.39
.37
.40
.26
.23
.23
.62
.32
.50
.61
.73
.66
.76
.84
.79
.59
.46
.40
.79
.66
.60
. 70
.75
.70
.79
.81
.73
.70
.85
.78
.86
.•46
.69
.79
.81

1

1

/

'

.'200
. 2'45
. 195
.135
.200
. 130
.115
.115
.310
. 160
.250
.305
.365
.330
.375
.420
. 395
.295
.230
.200
.395
.330
.300
.350
.375
. 350
.395
.405
.365
.350
.420
.390
.430
v230
; 345
.395
.405

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

197

APPENDIX.

No.
No.
No.
No.

1.
2.
3.
4.

Extract
Extract
HiXtract
Extract

of
of
of
of

letter
letter
letter
letter

from
from
from
from,

C. E. Detmold, esq.
Major W . Wade.
Joseph C. Kent^ esq.
Messrs. Cooper, Hewitt & Co.

No. 1.
Extract from letter of C. E. Detmold, esq., to Henry Atlcins, esq.,
president of New Jersey Zinc Company,
The peculiar characteristics of the iron of the New Jersey Zinc
Company are not only its remarkable structure and color, but its
chemical constitution, which shows that it has absorbed the maximum
amount of carbon, chemically combined, with which iron will combine ;
for, according to Karsten and other eminent metallurgists, ' ' t h e
combination of carbon with iron attains its maximum, or the point of
saturation of iron with carbon, beyond which there is no further absorption, is reached when the iron has been combined with from 5.25
to 5.75 per centum of carbon. This is found only in the most perfect
specular iron.'"—{Karsten Blet. ofi Iron, 3c^ ed., vol. 1, p . 383, 158.)
Scheuer gives the contents of cai bon in specular iron as varying from
5,10 to 5.80 per centum, and says that it is '' that iron which has saturated itself entirely in the blast furnace process with carbon, without
having at the same time taken up any notable quantities of other substances."—{Scheuer, Chemical Principles of Metallurgy, 1853^ vol, 2,
p. 51.)
^
^
The analysis of the iron of the New Jersey Zinc Company shows it to
contain 5.48 per centum of carbon, a mean, therefore, of the maximum
determined by Karsten and Scheuer. Now, it is a perfectly ascertained fact that the tendency of iron to oxidize is precisely in inverse
ratio to its contents ofi chemically combined carbon; in other words, the
more carbon the iron contains, chemically combined, the less easily
is it attacked by rust, " while iron with lamellar fraction (specular
iron) is scarcely at all subject to riLsting, and all other white iron is
less subject to this alteration of its surface than either steel or gray
r£Ow.''—{Karsten, vol. 1, ^.'367, 149.)
' ' White iron rusts much less easily than gray, and this again much
less than bar iron, provided the gray iron does not contain any notable
quantity of sulphur. Specular iron resists oxidation extraordinarily
long.'' Again: '' The white pig iron is, or, in other words, the more
chemically combined carbon it contains the less easily is it attacked
by dilute acids. At the ordinary temperature specalar iron is not
acted upon by sufficiently dilute muriatic or sulphuric acids until after
several weeks' immersion."—(/Sc^ei^er, vol. 1, p , 565.)
Valerius, in his Theoretical and Practical Treatise on the Manufacture
of Pig Iron, says, (p. 33,) '' while iron resists oxidation by moisture



198

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

remarkably well, the same with mottjed iron, as is demonstrated by
the perfect preservation of cast iron cannon constantly exposed to
atmospheric changes ; but gray irons rust the more readily in proportion to their porosity. The English j^uns, made of mottled iron, and
left at St. Sebastian, in Spain, after the siej>:e of 1813, remained there
in battery on the sea-shore, without the least covering of paint In
lb24 they exhibited not the least sign of damage by rust. One
piece, the trunnions ofwhich had been knocked off, had been abandoned
on the beach, where it was submerged at every tide ; notwithstanding
this circumstance, so powerfully calculated to favor oxidation, this
gun had not been much more affected by it than the others. But it
was very different with the Spanish guns, which were cast of gray
iron. The rust had eaten deep into them, and was flaking off in thick
scales."
All the above demonstrates that the two qualities in iron essential
to enable it to resist oxidation, namely, maximum proportion of carbon
chemically combined and density, are possessed in a most eminent
degree by the iron manufactured by the New Jersey Zinc Company.
But here it is proper to state that this iron, by itself, is not suitable
for castings, Jt is chiefly employed for conversion into bar iron, and
is largely employed by the Troy Iron ^and Nail Works, Troy, New
York ; the Pembroke Iron-works, Maine, and the Greenwich Ironworks, Connecticut, for mixing with other inferior irons; the quality
of which is greatly improved by the admixture of \ to \ of the New
Jersey Zinc Company's iron. It is used to a large extent for the manufacture of boiler rivets, wire, and the finest qualities of bar iron.
Experiments, however, have been made at the foundery of Mr.
Alger, in Boston, for mixing the NewJersey Zinc Company's pig iron
with other irons of infierior quality, for the purpose of castings ; and
the results have shown most conclusively that such a mixture produced
castings of much greater strength and density ; and, applied in the
way as an admixture to other pig irons in castings, there cannot be a
doubt that the specular iron of the New Jersey Zinc Company will communicate its valuable qualities of resisting oxidation and density to
other irons of inferior grade^ just in proportion to the quantity of
admixture.
Kespectfully submitted.
C. E. DETMOLD.
NEW YORK, December 22, 1857.

No. 2.
Extract firom letter ofi Major W, Wade to Charles Knap, esq,
PITTSBURG, Septemher 9, 1857.

DEAR S m : I see in the Intelligencer of the 4th instant a letter of
the Secretary of the Treasury, requesting iron masters to send to him
samples of iron, with a view to their being tested, in order to ascer


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

199

tain the susceptibility of differentkinds of iron to corrosion, or their
capacity to resist the corrosion of oxygen.
This is a very important matter, and I am glad to see that the
government is undertaking the investigation of it.
*
*
*
With regard to thecorrosibility of cast iron, I suppose it may be influenced, not only by the character of the ores from which it is made,
but in a higher degree by the processes of treating the ores in the
smelting furnaces, and in a much higher degree by the trfatment
which the crude pig iron may afterwards receive in the foundery.
I have never made any experiments with a special view to, this matter, but casual observations have led me to believe that all the varieties of corrosibility in cast iron, from an extreme susceptibility to a
maximum resisting power, may be obtained from the same uniform
parcel of pig iron by different methods of melting, castiu)^, and cooling it in the foundery. The manner of cooling it will, of itself, materially afi'ect its capacity to resist corrosion.
Again : much will depend upon the kind of surface which is exoosed
to corrosion, whether it be the original natural surface which is
formed in the mould, or whether that be removed, and another interior surface be exposed.
There is a wide difference in the susceptibility ofthese kinds of surfaces. Wrought iron may be similarly affected by a different treatment in the processes of manufacture, but' with this material I am less
acquainted.
Now, in order to accomplish the objects proposed by th.e Secretary,
by obtaining results which shall be reliable and complete, all these
particulars, with others, should be known and specified in the report
of the experiments. All the plans for conducting the operations, including the collection of samples, should be arranged accordingly;
and they should, I think, be made to include both cast and wrought
iron.
It appears from the letter that the Secretary contemplates the collection of statistics concerning the history, position, and capacity of
all the ore deposits and iron-works of the country, and of the quantity, description, and prices of their products.
It would greatly facilitate the collection of the information desired,
and also the arrangement of the results of the 'experiments in the
final report of them, if all the particulars needed were named, classified, and explained, in printed blank fbrms, to be filled up by the
contributors.
As the purposes contemplated by these exper"m-nts are of such
high importance, all who are engaged in the production or manufacture of iron in the United States should contribute all in their power
to promote the successful prosecution of them.
* > { < > : ' *
Time is a very important element in investigations of this kind,
and it appears to me that the experiments should be continued for
several years, with the same samples, in order to be completed.
Yours very truly,
W . WADE.




2G0

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 3.
Extract of a letter from Joseph C, Kent, esq,, to Major Anderson,
U. S. A,
PHILLIPSBURG, N . J . , January 17,'1858.
MY DEAR S I R : I find, on referring to our books, that we sent in
1854 to Van Cleve, McKean & Co. two kinds of iron—one made from
pure Andover ore, andone from equal proportions of Andover and
Koseville ores ; it is supposed that the iron you allude to was cast
from those lots of irori.
On receiving the small specimens from Mr. Hewitt, I decided at
once, and unhesitatingly, that it was made from Andover ore ; the
peculiar characteristics of Andover iron were plainly visible, these are
a striated appearance in the grain of the iron, the striae sometimes
radiating from a centre, and overlapping each other in a lamellated
form, exposing brilliant faces. In eight years' close observation of
the grain, fracture, color, and general physical properties of cast iron,
I have remarked the above properties in Andover iron only, and so
familiar have they become that, on one occasion when our iron was
mixed with that of another establishment, I was enabled to separate
it by those tests alone. I will, however, observe tha^t an examination
under a magnifyer of the specimens strengthened the decision, and the
chemical examination which I also made confirmed it by the detection
ofa notable quantity of manganese combined with the iron.
You will naturally inquire why the Andover ore should make iron
difiering in its properties from that made from other ores. Passing
by the historical reputation of this ore for making steel in the period of
our revolution, I shall dwell only on what our own experience has been.
We commenced using it in the year 1849, and found that the iron °
produced from it possessed unusual properties; the pig iron was highly
lamellated, the crystals sometimes measuring several inches across
their faces ; the bar iron made from it possessed great strength. The
pig iron has been puddled with anthracite coal, and then drawn down
to No. 36 wire.
These facts early awakened liiy interest, and, desirous of discovering
all the constituents of the ore, I made careful and extensive analyses
of all the'different varieties from the Andover mines. Among these I
subjoin the fbllowing:
No. 1. No. 2. No. 3. No. 4. No. 5. No 6. No. 7.

Peroxide of iron
Protoxide of iron
Oxide manganese
Carb. lime
Silica
Alumina Oxide zinc
Magnesia Carbonic acid
Lime -




-

90
3

6
99
zn

70
...
10
12
6
...
1
...
...
...

30
...
...
35
30
3
...
...
...
...

99
zzz

98
mz

...
1.5
34

70
.. .
2
16
8
2
...
2
...
...

, 40

18
11

61
...
4
16
10
2
6
1
...
...

98.5

100

100

100

. . 0

33
1
• ..
• • 0

15
12
30
3
...
i> .

^

..
•••

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

201

In addition to the above principal ores, a great number of minerals
occur in the mines ; and the mineral variously denominated ^' silicate
of manganese," ^'car bo-silicate of manganese," ''manganese spar,"
''photozite," and ''rhodenite," and containing variable proportions
of spaltic iron ore, abounds in Andover ores.
These minerals occur also in the celebrated Swedish, Siberian, and
Eussian ore beds, which furnish the finest iron in Europe.
I bave demonstrated, by a great number of experiraents, that the
large proportion of manganese in these ores determines the peculiar
character of the iron.
That the Andover iron possesses the property of resisting oxidation
to a remarkable degree, when placed in contact with salt water, I
proved by the following experiment:
In a strong solution of chloride of sodium I immersed two pieces of
pig iron—one made from Andover, the other from an ordinary iron
ore—and kept them immersed for thirty days. On withdrawing them,
the Andover iron was free from rust and unattacked by the saline
solution, but the ordinary iron was covered with a thick coating of
oxide.
The iron made from Andover ores possesses great strength, not only
in.the pig, but also when worked into wrought iron, and in the latter
state its other good qualities—extreme ductility, malleability,, and
tenacity—have long been a subject of comment.
The analyses above given show the large proportion of manganese
in the Andover ores. I now proposa to examine the influence of this
mineial on the iron.
Ordinary cast iron is contaminated by the presence of sulphur,
phosphorus, and silicium.
The affinity of sulphur for iron is so great that it cannot be prevented from combining when it is present in the furnace.
Silicic acid and the phosphates are reduced only at a high temperature. It is evident, then, that, to produce good iron in the blast furnace^ the ores and coal must be free from sulphur, and the ores reduced
at a low temperature, to avoid the reduction of silicic acid and the
phosphates, and thus prevent them from uniting w;ith the iron.
The silicate of manganese is the most fusible material we have
among our furnace fluxes. The great affinity of manganese for cart o n , and the favorable conditions which it produces in the blast furnace for the reduction and carburition of the iron at a low temperature, render it of inestimable value in the metallurgy of iron.
The product of manganesian iron ores worked in blast furnaces is
usually a peculiar iron known as lamellated iron, (fonte blanche lamelleuse,) which I have before described.
This iron always contains a large percentage of carbon, and in a
great number ef examinations I have never yet failed to find manganese combined with it.v It may be regarded as pure carburet of iron,
in which the carbon is combined with the iron in the highest proportion in which the foriner combines with the latter in metallurgic
operations.
From the above observations we shall expect to find this iron free
from the evil influence of phosphorus and silicium; and the fbllowing



202

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

analyses, made hy eminent European chemists, prove that the purest
iron is that made from manganesian ores :
Iron.

Carbon.

Sulphur.

Phosphorus.

Silicium. Manganese.

No. 1
89.718
5.14
0.002
0 08
0 56...J.. 4 50
No. 2.... 89.80
5.41
Trace
.Trace
0.37
4.24
No 3
89.63
3.82
0.05
0.05
0 17
6 95
The above analyses are of iron made from manganesian ores. ,In
the analyses by the same chemists of iron made from othe- ores the
contents^—sulphur, phosphorus, and silicium—are almost invariably
higher.
With the foregoing facts for a basis, I am convinced that the iron
which has so well resisted oxidation on exposure to salt vater is a
product of manganesian ores..
We are aware that specimens of iron exposed for a great number of
years in the sea have been found completely decomposed, with the
exception of a small portion of carburet of iron, which hajs resisted
decomposition.
The iron I would make, therefore, to resist oxidation would be a
true carburet of iron, comp.iratively free from all impurities, of great
density, and of such fluidity as to enable it to run smoothly into any
form without exhibiting points, depressions, air-bubbles, or roughness
of any kind.
I do not think that the actual presence of manganese in the iron
itself is indispensable to this end. I regard its office as that of an
efficient aid in the furnace to afi'ord the requisite conditions for the
product'on of this peculiar quality of iron; nor^will it invariably
produce these conditions without great care on the part of the ironmaster, for, though it will enable him to smelt the ores at a low temperature, and consequently produce the iron free from some of the
worst impurities, it will not prevent him from raising the temperature
to a point incompatible with this end. The agent is efiective only if
properly managed.
It is inconceivable that iron contaminated with sulphur, phonphorus, and silicium, should withstand the action of salt water. The
great affinity of these substances for oxygen must cause a rapid decomposition of the iron which contains them.
Berthier gives the following analysis of an iron made in France: •
Iron.

Carbon.

Sulphur.

Phosphorus.

Silicium.

91.90
1.40
0.30
2.30
4.10
Here we have an iron which, in accordance with my theory, should
prove extremely oxidizable on exposure; and Berthier, without adducing.any cause, remarks ofit that it sufifered oxidation with extreme
rapidity when exposed to a moist air.
1 have recently made a great number of assays with different ores,
and find that the iron made from manganesian ores contains variable
proportions of manganese in conibination with the iron. The specimens have a high specific gravity, which increases with the proportion
of manganese combined; the lowest specific gravity was 7.40, and
the highest 7.60.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

203

You will draw the inference from the remarks I have made that the
iron best adapted to resist oxidati(m is a carburet of iron, free as possible from all impurities, (and especially from sulphur, phosphorus,
and silicium,) close-grained, smooth, andof high specitic gravity;
and that the ores for the production of this iron are the manganesian
ores, free from sulphur, and worked with the necessary skill in the
blast furnace. With these conditions all fulfilled, I have no doubt we
shall arrive at the desired result; and I shall feel proud to have thrown
any light upon the subject you are so worthily investigating.
Very respectfully, yours.
JOSEPH C. K E N T .
Major EOBERT ANDERSON, U. S . Army,

No. 4.
NEW YORK, Decemher 9, 1857.

S I R : In answer to your circular of August last, we have forwarded,
on behalf of the Trenton Iron Company, for whom we act as agents,
samples of ore, pig iron and wrought iron, representing the materials
used in our works in the raanufacture of the varied articles which we
produce. Our apology for the delay is to be found in the desire to
furnish the departraent with reliable specimens, so that the results arrived at may be achieved wnth certainty and success. One box is forwarded from Trenton direct, and the otber we send from New York.
We have to state that our experience goes to show thatthe presence
either of zinc or manganese, or both, in the ores, has great influence
in overcoming the liability of iron to rust, and we therefore recommend
that especial attention be given to this point. The '^ring" of iron in
the New York box is made from the ^'Andover" ore, which contains
both zinc and manganese, and it is recommended that a careful
test be made with this specimen.
We now proceed to furnish other information demanded in the circular in some detail, premising that all the works and property of
the company are in the State of New Jersey, and at points in direct
communication by canal and railroad with New York and Philadelphia.
The Trenton Iron Company was organized in 1847 by virtue of a
charter granted by the State of New Jersey. The desigri of the projectors was to erect a complete establishment for the manufacture of
iron from the ore into pig, and the various forms of bar iron. To do
this are necessary, 1st, ore; 2d, blast furnaces; 3d, puddling and
rolling mills ; atid no establishment can be considered complete unless
these three departments of the business are suitably adapted eiich to
the other, and on a scale sufficiently large to insure economy of management and manufacture. The Trenton Iron Company are now the
proprietors of such an establishment, adequate in all its parts for the
manufacture of 20,000 tons of lorought iron per annum. Professor
Wilson, the industrial commissioner of Great Britain to this country
in connexion with the World's Fair, remarks, in his report to the
British Parliament: .''In New Jersey the largest works are at Trenton,



204

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

belonging to the Trenton Iron Company. This may be looked upon
as the leading establishment of the United States, not only in regard
t o i t s production, but also in regard to its working arrangements.
About 20,000 tons of iron are consucned annually in the production of
rails, chairs, and wire. The latter forms an important portion of, their
trade."
It being unnecessary to add any general remarks as to the efficiency
of the works to such testimony borne by the most competent authority
after a thorough examination of the various establishments for the
production of iron in this country, we proceed at once to describe the
property in the natural order above indicated.
1 . ORE LANDS.

The main reliance heretofore of the company for ore has been the
Andover mines, in the county of Sussex, seven miles from the Morris
canal, with which they are connected by the Sussex railroad, now in
full operation, transporting several hundreds of tons of ore per day.
Thence by canal to the furnaces is 32 miles. The company own about
one hundred acres of land in fee, and the mine rights are nearly one
hundred acres more, covering.the line of the vein for more than a mile.
No ore of similar character has ever been found off the company's land.
The mine was wrought long before the revolution, its products being
chiefly exported to England ; and during the war of independence
the continental army was entirely supplied with iron and steel from
the old Andover works. After the revolution they remained unwrought until reopened' by this company, who have removed and
smelted 150,000 tons of the ore with extraordinary success. The deposit was so extensive as to excite doubts as to the regularity of the
vein, but the mining operations of the present year have shown the
certainty of the vein as well as its abundant richness. The value of
this ore consists in its superior quality, being the only iron ore in the
country that, smelted with anthracite coal, will produce iron capable
of being reduced to wire; in the economy with which i t i s mined, and
the truly admirable manner in which it acts in the blast furnace, not
only smelting with great facility, but acting as a rectifier of other ores.
In this connexion, Professor Wilson remarks: ' ' A t the establishment
of the Trenton Iron Company, at Easton, I found three large furnaces
in operation, two of them having a diameter of 20 feet, and one recently erected with a diameter of 22 feet, giving an average production
of from 500 to 600 tons per week. In looking over the worI»'ing returns
of the furnaces, all of which were most liberally exposed to me by the
managing partner, I found some extraordinary runs, amounting to upwards of 240 tons per week from the 20 feet furnace, and continuing
at that rate for several weeks together."
^'The Andover (New Jersey) ores (raagnetic oxide) which are largely
used by this company, have been long celebrated for the superior
quality of the iron they produce."
From the presence of zinc and manganese in these ores, it is believed
that the iron made from them will be found less oxidizable than any
other samples submitted by this company, '



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

205

The cost to the company ofthe Andover mines—real estate, houses,
shops, adits, shafts, and mine drafts—is $9,629 93. The cost of the
ore delivered at the furnaces is as follows:
Mining and transportation to canal
Tolls on canal
Freight on canal, average.
,\,
Cost of blast furnace

$2 00 per ton.
32
''
28
*'
>

2 60

*•

About two and a quarter tons make one ton of iron.
ROSEVILLE MINES.

• These mines are situated about three and a half miles from the
Andover mines, and about five miles from the canal. A branch on
a descending; grade of four miles in length will connect them with the
Sussex railroad. The company own the mines and about five hundred
acres of land in fee. The mine rights extend over about three hundred acres more. The company have worked these mines for eight
years to a moderate extent. The iron made from this ore is of very
superior quality for remelting, a fact so well known in the market
that it commands a higher price in consequence. These mines and
the lands^and houses cost $23,375. The quantity of ore is exceedingly
great, and the company are only limited in their mining operations
by the quantity they can get carted to the canal. The average cost
isasfollows:
Mining and carting
Tolls and freight to furnaces
Cost at furnaces

$1 40 per ton.
u
60
2 00

''

Threetons are required to make a ton of iron.
RINGWOOD ESTATE.

Long before the revolution a company was formed in England
whose leading object was the manufacture of iron in the American
colonies. This company, known as " T h e London Company," with
unlimited resources, and after a careful preliminary examination in
New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey, resolved to place its works
at Ringwood, in the State of New Jersey. Here land was bought,
roads made,-mines opened, blast furnaces erected, stores, grist and
saw mills started, and, in fact, a colony established. The products
were forwarded to the owners in London, and the works throve until
the revolution stopped their operations. After the close of that struggle the;property passed into the hands of the late Martin J . Eyerson,
esq.jofl^ompton, who realized from it the largest fortune that was
ever made ia-'the iron business in New Jersey. This company purchased it ofhis descendants, under the pressure of sherifi''s sale, foi*
the sum of one hundred thousand dollars. The estate consists of



206

^ REPORT ON TIIE FINANCES.

about eleven thousand acres ofland, thirty-five miles from the city of
New York, and twenty-five miles from Piermont, on the Hudson river.
The Erie railroad passes within three miles ofthe tract, and the navigable Pompton feeder of tlie Morris canal is distant about eight miles
from the lower line of the estate, which covers in all about seventeen
square miles of surface. It has mifies almost without number, and
the quantity of ore may be regarded as literally inexhaustible. The
ore is the black magnetic oxide, more uniformly pure and rich than
any other ores in the State. There are two forges on the estate driven
by water power, and sites for many more, or for other works. There
is a saw mill, and houses scattered over the property sufficient to provide for the workmen. I t is traversed by roads made by the old
London Company, who have also exposed many of the mines, from
which it is estimated 500,000 tons of ore have been removed, scarcely
doiug more than fairly to expose the deposits to view. There are
2,000 acres of farm land of various grades of quality, and the balance
of the tract is covered with a heavy growth of timber, by converting
which into charcoal the company are enabled to turn out a very superior iron for wire, and to furnish to their wire mill a full supply of
raw material. A large saraple of this iron in the bloom is sent, so
that the relative oxidizing properties of charcoal iron may be ascertained.
The "Ringwood" ore has been thoroughly tested at the company's
furnaces. It works admirably, and produces iron of the best quality
for the forge. With the railroad constructed, the cost pf the ore at
the furnaces will bie as follows:
Mining
Railroad to canal
Tolls on Morris canal
Freight
-

,.
-

-

.
-

$1 00
25
45
60

Cost of furnaces

-

-

-

2 30

One ton and a half of this ore has been found to make a' ton of
iron. A comparison with the Andover and Roseville ores required to
make a ton of pig iron at our furnaces shows the following results :
2 i tons Andover, at $2 60
3 tons Roseville, at $2
1^ tons Ringwood, at $2 30

-

-

- | 5 85
6 00
•
3 45
3) 15 30

5 10
Thus showing that Ringwood will be the cheapest source of supply
for ore fbr the furnaces, and, we are confident, cheaper than that possessed by any other iron company on the seaboard. It will be observed that the average of the three ores combined would cost $5 10
for sufflcient to make one ton of iron, and if the branch road to Roseville is constructed, this, average will be reduced to $3 85 per ton;



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

207

making the Ringwood ores still the cheapest. It is safe to say that,
with the railroad constructed, we can procure all the ore required by
the company for many years to come, if not forever, frora the present
property ofthe company, at a cost not exceeding $4 25 per ton of pig
iron made at the works.
OTHER MINES.

The company own or control, in addition, the following mines,
from most of which samples are turnished for experiment:
1. Scofield mine—a large vein capable of producing about 10,000
tons per annum.
2. A.group of mines known as the "Muir,'"' " H i b e r n i a , " and
" B e a c h " mines—all yielding rich ores of analogous character, and
making a superior quality of iron. The capacity of these mines is
very great..
3. The " Dell" mine, frora which 25,000 to 30,000 lons of ore can
easily be extracted per annum.
4. The " I r o n d a l e " mines, which yield about 20,000 tons per
annum.
5. The "Dickerson" mine, yielding about 10,000 tons per annum.
6. The " K i n g " mine, yielding a rich ore, but of sraall capacity.
All the above mines yield magnetic ores, and, from the nature of
the veins, are in all probability inexhaustible. They are simply
limited in their annual capacity by the number of men who can be
economically employed. They are all on the line of the Morris canal,
by which cheap and easy access is had to the furnaces.
In addition to the above, the company possess mines of hematite
or secondary ores in Pennsylvania, on the line of the Lehigh canal,
but do not work them extensively, as the ores are found to be more
expensive and not to yield so good an iron as the magnetic ores.
2.

BLAST FURNACES.

The blast furnaces of the company are in the county of Warren,
on the banks ofthe Delaware river, about one mile below the borough
of Easton and the mouth of the< Lehigh river and canal. The real
estate comprises about forty acres of land, through the centre of which
runs the Morris canal, connecting with the coal region of the Lehigh
on the one side, and the ore regions of New Jersey on the other ;
making this site the cheapest point at which coal and ore c m be delivered, with a view to making iron for the New York and Philadelphia markets. To the former the outlets are two in number—by the '
Morris canal aiid the Central railroad of New Jersey—which pass
through the company's* land, directly in front of the furnaces. Philadelphia is also reached by two channels—the Delaware division of the
Pennsylvania canal, and the Belvidere Delaware railroad, which
passes in the rear ofthe furnaces, and was located with express reference to the transportation of the pig iron thence to Trenton and Philadelphia. Besides the Lehigh canal, reaching to the coal regions, the
Lehigh Valley railroad is completed, and the extension of the Central



208

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

railroad, by way of the Water Gap, to the Lackawana coal fields, is
in actual operation. The company is thus enabled to receive daily
supplies of fuel.
The cost of transporting by railroad the pig iron from the furnaces
to the rolling mill at Trenton is $1 per ton ; to Philadelphia, $1 5 0 ;
and to Elizabethport, $1 74 per ton.
The lurnaces are three in nuraber: One, 19 feet in the boshes and
42 feet high ; one, 20 feet in the boshes, and 55 feet high ; ones, 22
feet in the boshes and 55 feet high.
No expense has been spared in their construction. The engines
were built at the Allaire Works, at a cost of $40,000. The total cost
of the whole property, including the real estate, is $250,000. The
capacity to make iron, with due allowiance for contingencies, may be
safely set down at over 20,000 tons per annum. The cost of the furnaces is therefore about $12 per ton on the annual product.
The cost of making pig iron, when the Ringwood road is done, may
be safely estimated as fbllows :
Ore
- $5 00
Two toiis coal, at $3 50
7 00
Limestone
25
Labor and incidentals 4 00
16 25
3.

ROLLING, PUDDLING, AND WIRE MILLS.

Property at Trenton.
Following the Delaware river from the blast furnaces, by way of
the Belvidere railroad—^^a distance of fifty miles—^the mills of the
company are reached, situated in the city of Trenton, the capital of
the State. The investments of the company at this point are as
follows:
Rolling mill, cost
Real estate
.
Basins Capital stock of Trenton Water
Wire mill
RailroadChair patent
.

- ,
Pow.er
-

.
.
_
..
Company
.
.
.
.

Total cost of permanent investments at Trenton

.-$324,299 30
.
32,348 05
16,046 90
71,000 00
95,97.3 10
„
25,441 17
10,72138
-

575,830 08

These will be described in their order.
1.

ROLLING AND PUDDLING .MILL.

This mill is among the largest, if not the largest, in the United
States. It contains twenty-two double puddling furnaces and. six
double heating furnaces.



REPQRT ON THEj FINANCES.

209

The machfnery is complete for the manufacture of railroad iron of
the various patterns in general use ; of railroad axles and chairs ; of
bars and rods ; of forging bars, and wrought iron beams. Its capacity
to turn out irou;may.be moderately estirnated at 15,000 tons per annum. It is now actually turning out iron at more than that rate.
The mill is driven in part by water power, having three wheels, and
in part by steam, having two large, engines ope'rated by the waste
heat from .the furnaces. No pains or •expense has been spared to
m a k e t h e mill perfect in.its arrangements. It has connected with it
commodious blacksmith, .pattern, and machine ,shops j, for doing the
repairs ofthe works, and is perfectly found in tools and patterns. Its
largest produce during.the,last two years has been railroad.iron ; but
the directors have aimed to. confine its work to articles whichj command the highest price, inasrauch as the admitted superiority of the
iron made by the corapany opens a better market than is furnisned by
rails, in which public sentiment improperly justifies the use of inferior
iron. Hence a very large araount has. been expended in perfecting
the machinery for the manufacture of wrought iron beams. This machinery is now in daily successful, operation, and we have reason to
believe that the demand for beams will ultimately absorb the e ntire
product of.the mill. They have been used with, great economy and
success in nearly all the buildings erected during the last three years
by the United States, and in a large number of private buildings.
2 . REAL ESTATE AND BASINS.

This comprises, including the basins, about twenty acres ofland in
various parts ofthe city, with a considerable number of dwellings for
the workmen and superintendents.
3 . THE WIRE MILL.

This mill is capable of turning out about ten tons of brazier and
wire rods, and five tons of wire per day. I t stands at the junction of
the canal and railroad, on six and a quarter acres of valuable land,
and occupies the most eligible manufacturing site in the city. It is
in complete running order, making the various kinds of wire, from
the smallest to the largest sizes. The gross sales from this mill, for
the six months from January 1 to July 1, were about $140,000.
4 . THE. RAILROAD.

This road has been constructed for the purpose of connecting the
blast furnaces with the rolling mill, so that no transhipments of iron
may be necessary. I t also connects the wire mill with the rolling
mill, and over it all the coal and other raw materials required, by the
corapany pass. I t is a mile in length, and is constructed with a
large number of branches at the basin and mill, so as to save all
rehandling of stock.
14




210

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

5.

WATER POWER.

The water power in the city of Trenton is supplied by a canal
debouching from the Delaware river, and extending a distance of seven
miles into the heart of the city. It is a first class work, with solid
stone river walls, and of sufficient capacity to earn, at the present
rates of rental, about $30,000 per annum.' Its present annual revenue
over and above the expenses of maintenance is about $11,000 per
annum, chiefiy on perpetual leases, which are a lien on the mills, of
which thirteen are suppled with power.
The entire cost of the permanent investments of the company is
$989,851 70. The amount of active capital used in operating the
works is about $700,000.
The company have a paid-up capital and surplus ofabout $1,100,000.
The balance is suplied by a funded debt of $350,000, and the ordinary
credits procured in carryirig on the business.
The company has never suspended operations or payment. The
existing derangement in business, however, has pressed upon their
resources with great severity, and unless there is a decided revival in
business at an early day, it will be irapossible to continue the works
in operation.
We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants,
COOPER, H E W E T T & CO.
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury.

LIST OF SAMPLES FORWARDED.

1. Ores.
Red Andover, Dell, Blue Andover, Scofield, Corapact Ringwood,
Hibernia, Specular Ringwood, Irondale, Roseville, Hematite.
2. P i g iron, made firom ores as specified,
Scofield, pure; Dell, pure; Andover, pure; Andover, lamellated;
Hibernia, pure; Irondale, pure; Irondale, | ; Roseville, f; Irondale, |-;
Roseville, f; Hematite, |-; Scofield, f; Hematite, ^; Irondale, f;
Andover, \', Irondale, \', Roseville, |-; Dell, | ; Hematite, \', Dell, J;
Andover,^; Ringwood, J; Ringwood, f; Andover,-|^; Dell, f; Andover,
J; Irondale, | ; Dell, \ .
Specimens of wrought iron made from each kind of pig iron are
also sent. The ring sent from New York, is made from laraellated
"Andover " pig.
COOPER, H E W E T T & CO.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

211

It is obvious from the foregoing report and its accompanying table
and appendix that the full result sought to be obtained by the department has not been reached; yet sufficient information has been elicited
to show the iraportance of the inquiry to the vast interest represented
by the specimens, as well as its significant utility to government in
the many and varied purposes for which the difi'erent departments now
make use of iron.
A course of experiments is therefore earnestly recommended to be
regularly and systematically continued from year to year, and the
results promulgated as often as any facts of value are ascertained.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
S. M. CLARK,
Acting Engineer in Charge of Ireasury Department,
Hon. HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury,




212

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 11.—Statement of the expenditures and receipts of the marine hospital
fior thefiscal year
r3

Agents.

Districts.

&
cs

E
rt
p
B

Mode of accommodation.

c

Rate per week.

(U

B

2

s

CO

Oi

MAINE.

Frenchman's Bay
Wcildoborouirh

94
22
13
2
24

94
26.
17
2
32

Private board.
do
do
do
do

32
110
2
2
4
31
89

27

Private board
HcSsnital
.
Private board
do
do
.do
do

425

Passamaquoddy

410

Augustus J e n k i n s

33

32

Private board

2 25

Isaac B. Bowdish

14

14

Private board

2 50

1

1
Private board

3 00

Robert Burns*
A. F . Parlin
Thornas D. Jones
John R. Uedman*
. . . . . . . . John H. Kennedy
Thomas Cunningham .

Bath
Poitland and Falmouth.
York
Bflfa^t

Moses Macdonald . . . .
Alpheus A. Hanscom*.
John Cousens*
Luther Junkins
Jonathan G. Dickerson
D. F . Leavitt

es
2
2
3
31
89

^3
2
2
2
3

00
50 to $ 3 00
0 0 , 2 50, to $ 3 . . .
50
00 to $ 3 50

3 50
...

3
2
3
3
3

00
75
00
50
00

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Portsmouth
VERMONT.

Vermont...............
MASSACHUSETTS.

Newburvport
Gioucester
...
Salem and Beverly
Marblehead
Boston and Charlestown.
Plymouth
Fall River
Barnstable
New B e d f o r d . . . . . . . . . •
Edirartovvn
Nantucket...

J a m e s Blood
Gorliam Babson . . . .
W i l l i a m B . Pike
William Bartoll
James S. W h i t n e y . . . .
Wait Wadsworth . . . . ' .
Phineas W . L e i a n d . . .
S. B. Phinney . . . ; . . . .
C. B. H. Fessenden . . .
Constant Norton

3

1

926

873

253
31
68

247
29
61

1,282

1,212

6
71
18

5
80
14

95

99

18
23
45

19
24
54

Hosnital
Private board
City of New Bedford
Privaie board

3 50
3 00
3 50

Private board
......do
do

3 50
3 75
3 50

RHODE ISLAND.

Bristol and W a r r e n
ProvidtMice

,

George H. R e y n o l d s . . .
J a m e s A. Aborn
Gilbert Chase

CONNECTICUT.

Middletown
Nevv London

Patrick Fagan
John P. C. M a t h e r . . . .
Minott A. Osborn
B'^nia'rin F. States
William S. P o m e r o y . . .

Stonington
Fairfield

Private board
do
Hospital society ..

2 50, 2 80 to $ 3 . . .
3 50

Private board

3 00

2

2

88

99

89

1
7
93

Private board
St. Mary's Hospital.
Private board

3 00
3 50
3 50 to $5

277

267

Hospital of Sisters
of Cha riiy.
Private board

2 50

NEW YORK.

Sackett's Harbor
Genesee
Oswetjo
Niagara
Buffalo Creek

..

Oswegatchie
Sag Harbor




William R o w l a n d * . . . .
Pliny M. Bromley
Orville Robinson*
George P. F.ddy
Warren Bryant
Horace Moody*
Jason M. Terbeli . . . .

1

2 50

213

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

fiund fior the relief qf sick and disabled seamen in the ports ofi the United States
ending June 30, 1860.
JL
0
0

.
5

a

cu

to

X

<w
to
a

OJ

rt
•a

c

"rt

•
-

a
n

>

i!

$1,026 00
414 84
362 50
47 , 0
5
818 32

^589 75
161 00
117 50
13 50
244 00

tJD
c

c
0

0

1

JS

— CJ
'0.
0
X

rt
0

i

$664 33
472 75
668 86
556 21
871 53
118 85
227 99
1,580 52
122 55
88 03
32 70
365 20•
486 41

$1,956 67
726 91
574 79
61 61
1,204 44

$18 00

3

12 00

2
1

6 00
18 00
18 00

1
3
3

1,369 50
5,486 15
89 94
86 39
206 54
1,384,59
1,717 01

157 39

72 00

13

14,864 54

6,255 93

179 20

12 32

12 00

3

1,244 29

176 38

19 30

2 42

248 02

213 64

30 79

159 31
435 37
879 00
29 19
14,480 43
87 3.^
632 85
1,293 83
802 48
323 43
94 86

"ii2 20

462
999
14
8
27
377
679

9,767 66

3,695 21

1,172 28

832 02

208 75

168 05

58 25

13 55
64 89
89 I
56
2 04
13 71
16 99

339 78
13 05
25 15
127 55

6 00

22 00

38 50

19 25

13 05

19,228 70

2,442 82

973 95

2 79
12 00

2

83 62

241 61

49 00

45

22,937 08

$34 74

75 04
7 37
25 79

24 00
12 00
18 00

5
2
4

34 74

353 42

115 00

58

33,983 53

19,209 10

82.
$1 00

4,667 50 1,414 00 1,4U0 95
474 00
1]0 60
140 50
1,676 00
502 80
348 75
26,090 70

a>

$19 37
7 17
5 69
61
11 92

$321 55
143 90
89'10

F81 50
4,081 51
61 50
77 83
145 85
847 89
1,002 42

45
97 1
50
00
50
44
60

2

7, .581 49
744 47
2,606 08

4,387 32

3,001 35

I 00

146 50
1,989 68
404 00

33 50
500 50
84 50

20 10
557 10
121 20

1 00

2 05
. 30 61
11 78

6 00
,12 00
12 00

1
2
2

208 15
3,090 89
633 48

103 96
820 64
291 93

2,540 18

618 50

698 40

1 00

44 44

30 00'

5

3,932 52

1,216 53

381 61
296 50
952 50

100 95
163 75

26 70
119 85

5 15
5 89
9 51

6 00
6 00

520 41
591 99
962 01
67 24

795 97
774 46
893 80
157 40
601 34

2,141 65

3,222 97

19 19
199 48
3,631 40

28 78
90 96
1,013 S9
40 20
2,561 50

50 57

12 00

4 00

67

1,681 18 [

276 70

150 55

21 22

12 00

19
1 98
35 95

12 00

2

39 62

48 00

10

12 00
197 50
3,583 45

7 00

3,913 80
30 00

4 00

2 40




36

4,ooi 42.
36 76
1

S97 83
329 79

214

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 11.—STATE

a
Agents.

Districts.

a

Mode of accommodation.

g

cu

B
rt

Rate per week.

B

a

NEW YORK—Continued.
801
10
2
2

762
11
2
1

"l7l90

1,145

William S. B o w e n * . . . .

24

23

Private board

3 00

Amos Robins
T h o m a s D. Winner* . .

3

4

Private board

3 00

27

27

427
12
119

442
12
113

City Hospital
Private b o a r d . . . . . .
Hospital

3 50
3 00

558

567

1

1

Private board

3 50.

317

322

Infirmary

3 00

317

322

Henry 0 . M a t t h e w s . . .

15

16

Wash. I n f i r m a r y . . .

3 00

W i l l i a m M . Harrison..
Norfolk and Portsmouth. Jesse J. Simkins
George T . Wright
John S. P a r k e r . . . . .
William F . PressonTimothy Wives
Edward S. Hough . . . .
.Alexandria
Andrew J . P a n n e l l . . . .
'Wheelinp
.
...
Gordon Forbes . . . .

42
137
14

42
134
16

Private infirmary ..
Hospital
Private board

5 12

64
20
13

63
16
14

Medical Infirmary.
Wash. Infirmary . . .
Private h o s p i t a l . . . .

3 50
3 00
3 50

290

285

Lucien D. S t a r k e . . ..
Edmund Wright
Joseph Ramsey

72
6.
38

74
6
38

Hospital...
Private b o a r d . i . . . .
do

3 50
3 .50
3 50

William G. Singleton.
Oliver S. Dewey
J a m e s E. Gibble
J a m e s T. Miller.,

56
3
122

60
3
127

Hospital
Private board
Seamen's H o m e . . .

4 00
3 50

297

308

Augustus Schell*
Henry Smith
Theop. Peugnet*
Oscar F . Dickinson* . .

N e w York
Dunkirk

Hrideetown

.

.....

Perth Ambov
G r e a t E g g Harbor
Little E*g Harbor

Philadelphia
Pittfiburi?

.....

City H o s p i t a l . . . . . . $4 00
Private b o a r d . . . . . . 3 00
do
3 50
do
2 00 to $3

Edward T . Hill v e r . .
Tliomas B. Atkinson

Joseph B. Baker
Charles M. T i b b a l s , . . .
Jaraes A. Gibson

DELAWARE.

Jesse Sharpe*
MARYLAND.

John Thomson Mason.
John T . Hammond .

Baltimore

Williarn S. J a c k s o n . . .

D I S T R I C T O F COLUMBIA.

Georcetown

. . .

VIRGINIA.

~

3 50

NORTH CAROLINA.

Camden




•
;

215

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

MENT—Continued.
XO)

c

c

0)

3

a

E
n

C

1

•
3

0)

1 ;

to

>
CJ

03

IS

$16,674 86
161 15
. 31 71
12 86

0)

Q.
Qi
Ul

o

o
O

c
Cu
M

ee
JZ

G
J

B
O

a,

o

1

».a

3

O

JZ

ftj

s

o

il
—«
'S,
o

$18 20
10 80
4 50

$169 48
2 25
49
31

$273 00

$45 75
. 7 00
.
7 50

6 00

1

71 25

35 90

250 63

339 00

52

25,314 11

300 42

90 05

18 16

4 08.

6 00

1

418 71

36 85

19 25

7 70

64

337 27

1C9 30

25 86

4 72

6 00

1

483 15

4 845 65

8,697 41
12H 26
6,088 74

14 00
63 20
833 33

28 20
12 10
215 56

95 56
2 03
86 15

135 00

22

57 00

6

9,651 42
205 59
7,289 78

5,911 40
170 42
1,663 35

910 53

255 86

183 7 4 .

192 00

28

17,146 79-

7,745 17

24,617 33

14,914 41

59 50

17 85

.$681 25

"* $9'66
9 00

681 25

39

.
.

$17,117 34
$43,648 .58
227 35
410 70
50 00 .
256 00
31 1 7 .
235 21

64 44 -

77.

78 12

49.013 54

1 187
'l44
1 263
'770
554
307
617

86
60
48
00
43
76
52

1 046 72

5,146 56

57 1 0
.

65 00

13

5,268 66 ;

4,776 67
389 03
467 30
963 17
99 68
153 71

5,146 56

57 10

65 00

13

5,268 66

6,849 56

252 91

2 .58

6 00

1

261 49

9 18
40 00
3 21

25 00

3

927 35
4,042 77
325 41

918 17
2,693 65
235 00

292 00
252 00
031 00

1,065 00
GO 00

219 12
27 20

110 15

66 45

105 50

169 .30

3 97
2 52
9 37

12 00

2

4,951 82 1,340 05

502 07

68 25

37 00

4

6,899 79

1,238 00
04 50
381 00

385 00
28 00
149 50

371 40
22 75
114 00

20 18
1 15
6 44

•24 00

4

2,038 58116 40
650 94

i,656 68

840 00
12 50
618 5U

109 21
7 .50
485 55

26 05
48
30 52

6 00

9

18 CO

3

2,631 94
49 05
3,092 97

2,033 50

1,110 41

84 82

48 00

16

8,579 8 8 '

28 57
1,940 40
5,303 15




402 57
254 52
947 17

432 60

510
3,130
169
496
337
226
530
793
71

01
28
72
46
24
53
94
55
80

6,266 51

496 98
151 56
342 37
133 70
303 71
65 60
,47 80
409 2 2
1,950 94

216

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 11.—STATE

Mode of accommodation

Agents';

Districts.

Rate per w e e k .

SOUTH CAROLINA.

Charleston...
Georgetown .
Beaufort

VVilliam F . C o l c o c k i . .
John N. Merriman ;..
Benj. R. Bythewood . .

294
35

• 278
31

City C o u n c i L .
Private board,

$4 20.
3 50.

329

Savannah ,
St. Mary's,
Brunswick

John Boston
,
John J. Defour...,
Woodford Mabry.

275
"47'

47

322

1.54
106
9
26
48-

149
93
6
2.5
46

343

Private hospital.

400

318'

FLORIDA.

Pensacola
Key West
....
Saiiit Mark's
Saint J o h n ' s . . . . .
Apalachicola'....
Fernandina
Baypor

Joseph Sierra
John P. B a l d w i n . . . .
Alonzo B. Noyes . . .
Thomas Led vvith...
Robert J. Floyd
Felix L i v i n g s t o n . . . .
Andrew J. Decatur .

Hospital.
,
dodo
Private board.
do

667

Thaddeus Sanford.

HospitaL

73
228

3 50.
3 50.

Hospital.
do .

MISSISSIPPI.

Pearl River
Natchez
Vicksburg . . . . . . . .

Robert Eager.
John H u n t e r . .
John Robb . . . .

81
242'
323

Prancis H. Hatch . . . .
:Robert N . McMillan*.

2,349:
3

2,269^
3

2,352

New Orleans .
Teche

2,272

416
60

400
57

Hospital
Private hospital.

TEXXS.

Texas
Saluria
Brazos de Santiago

Hamilton Stuart
Darwin M. S t a p p . . , .
Francis W . L a t h a m .

Private hospital.
Private b o a r d . . .

7 00.
4 00.

City Hospital ,
d o . . . . ..

2 50.,
3 00.,

457
TENNESSEE.

Louisville .
Paducah . .

Jesse T h o m a s . . . .
Henry T . Hulbert.

Walter N . H a l d e m a n .
William ISTblen




31
362

89
342

393

Nashville.
Memphis.

381

360

Hospital.

217

REPORT ON THE FINANCiES.

i

a

,=

c
o
s
-a

S

a
o

OJ

OJ
Ou
M
OJ
Sfl ,

5

1

bD

S

"
o
O

si

i

i<

a.

•

OJ

O

cy

rt
ft

5

li
EH

Hospital money coU
lected.

MENT—Continued.

$4,269 00
300 00

$151 50

$90 90

$43 78
5 64

$108 00
24 00

4,569 00

151 50

90 90

49 42

132 00

22

4,992 82

2,222 72

97 06

121 00

20.

9,804 66
341 7?

1,440 56
• 62 00
30 75
1,533 31

6,649 50
188 00

1,457 00 1,330 10
94 00

$150 00

56 40

18 . $4,420 78
4
'572 04

3 37

$2,167 76
50 16
4 80

V

6,837 50

1,551 00 .1,386 50

5,520 74 1^000 00
2, .574 08 1.000 00
1,803 66
'767 15
296 00
111 00
891 50
282 00:

121 00

20

10,146 43

61
01
70
02
51

72 00
78 00

12
13

6 00
12 00

1
2

7,536 22
3,838 93 1
2, . 9 51
56
506 22
• 1,467 46

157 85

168 00

28

15,945 34

2,858 84

162 65

198 00

22

16,427 40

3,986 23

100 43

150 00

868 87
148 84

74
38
25
5
14

88 20
267 45

•••••

11,085 98

3,160 15 1,373 36

12,806 20

2,025 00

1,235 55

371
1,189
106
398
635
138
20

40
21
4>
9
09
04
3i
30

..
.
^
335 50
4,428 92
4,566 93

1,000 00
1,000 00

42 18
375 13

55 05
62 02

36 00
60 00

5
10

5,562 15
6,064 08

131 60

8,995 85

2,000 00

417 31

.117 07

96 00

15

11,626 23

467 10

37,269 51 3,6-9 80 3,356 82
37 50
3 90
8 75

400 00
50

522 00

78

45,228 13
50 65

16,965 64
3:U 98

37,307 01

3,688 55

3,360 72

400 50

522 00

78

45,278 78

17,297 62f

9,395 CO
661 61

i73 85

96 05
10 83

210 00
18 00

35

228 75

9,701 05
1,093 04

1,543 45
274 45
18 37

228 75

173 85

. 106 88

228 00

35

10,794 09

1,636 28

500 49
2,768 90

241 OO
1,050 50

3,329 39

1,291 50

554 95
2,653 50

5 54
27 40 "**88"()b "**26'"

3,208 45

32 94

88 00

20

113 34
94 05

144 00
98 00

18
15

• 11,448 87
9,501 07

1,940 75
281 75

207 39

242 00

33

20,949 94

2,222 50

8 5 ' 4 78 1,740 00
,,.
6.998 30 1,862 50

896- 75
448 22

**
15,553 08

3,602 50

1,344 97




2U

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 11.—STATE

JZ

rt

Agents.

Districts.

& :
a

"i

-o
c

a
tt)
B
0

1

•

Mode of accommo-'.
dation.

Rate per week.

1
QJ
CQ

OHIO-

O
$ 3 00 to $ 5 G
City Hospital
Sisters of C h a n t y . . 4 50
Private b o a r d . . . . . . 3 G O . . . . .
Hospital..........

414
45
13
236
708

176
18

209
18

194

227 .

303
303

303 .
3G3

382

368

41

41

423

409

Daniel TL Donavan . . .

572

455

Hospital

A . A. Edinton

232

204

Hospital.,

Philip Harjrey

^

2

Hosnlta"!.

3

Sandu.sky

S82
44
13
235
674

(Gincinnati .

2

104

107

T.Jefferson Sherlock..
Emery 1). Potter
George S. P a t t e r s o n . . .
Robert Parks
.

,

MICHIGAN.

©Rtroit,

RotmrtW. Davis
Jacob A . T . WendeK..

INDIANA.

Evansville
Charles Denby
SJew A l b a n y . . . . . . . . . . . . John B. N o x m ^ n . . . . . .

Flospital.
Private

3 O
Q

HospitaL

ILLINOI8.

O h i c a g o . * , . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' Bolton P . S t r o t h e r . . . .
Alton . . . . . .
Daniel Wann*

Hosnital...

.......

Private board

2m

JWSSOUEL

&C. Louis
ARKANiSAS.

Bfajpoleon
IOWA.

SiUrlington
Keokuk
Dubuque

WISCONSIK.

George'VV-Cle son

...

Private board

OREGON.

Gnegon,
Port I'Orford

,

'
CALIFORNIA.

Sonoma...

Benj. F . Wasliington.. S,365
T. 6 . Storer
...

Sacramento

1,314

L e w i s Saunders, j r . . . .
1,365

WASHINGTON TERRITORY

Puget's S o u n d . . . . . . . . . . Morris IT. Frost

"



......

1,314

Hospital.*

3 O
G

219

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

MENT—Continued.

t
i

cn

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$8,783 54
1,125 84
368 46
7,436 02

$2,687 47
131 79
531 70
1,678 45

24

17,713 86

5,029 41

. $86 97
11 15
3 65
76 86

$108 00

$75 75
724 85

36 00

1,069 32

800 60

178 63

144 00

5,031 16 1,600 00
197 55
349 79

489 62
24 28

70 71
5 72

54 00

5

7,245 49
577 34

1,684 67
220 40

5,380 95

1,797 55

513 90

76 43

54 00

5

7,822 83

1,905 07

4,509 91

800 00

294 40

56 02

5,660 33

38 00
72 00

5,660 33

110 00

8,982 00
559 56

2,493 79
73 97
1,058 69

9,541 56

3,626 45

15,023 17

6,243 25

$8,588 57
1 114 69
223 0 > • $66 00
5,594 99 1,U03 3>
15,521 31

••

,

'

4 509 91

800 00

294 40

56 02

7 409 71

999 98

453 38

88 93

340 52

177 50

36 00

5 54

7 750 23 1,177 48

.489 38

94 47

30 00

12 950 91

1,000 00

831 54

148 72

92 GO

M

5,538 94

1,000 00

297 77

60 00

11

1 167 78 1,025 00

10 80

1 167 78 1,025 to

10 80

22 02

945 75

129 60

26 06

1 517 81

*'
"

30 00

5

5

6,896 71

2,225 60

22 02

69 80
10 6Q
2,225 60

12 00

2

80 40

2,631 22

931 11

"
*

217 77
71 30
10 64
299 71

33 170 43 6,199 95 3,420 29

425 34

742 00

50

42,958 01

11,907 66
88 00
4 80
113 20

6,199 95 3,420 29

425 34

742 00

50

42,958 01

12,113 75

9
32,170 43




570 20.

'Becapitulation hy States ofi the expenditures and receipts on account of the marine hospital fiund fior the fiscal year ending June
30,1860.
Seamen
admitted.

Maine
New Hampshire
. Massachusetts . . . .
Rhode T-iland
Connecticut
N e w York
Pennsylvania
Delaware

^

District of Columbia.

....

North Carolina
South Carolina

......

Florida

.....

Mississippi.
Louisiana
Texas
1'ennessee
Kentucky
Ohio
Miohifan
Indiana
^
Illinois...................
...
Missouri... ,,
....
Iowa
. . . . . , . . , . , , . . . , , i ...
Wisconsin
Oregon . . . .
California
Washington Territory

Seamen
discharged.

425
33
"
14
1,282
95
88
1,190
27
558
1
317
15
290
297
3-.29
322
343
690
323
2,352
476
393
374
674
194
303
423
572
232
3
104

410
32
14
1,212
99
99
1,145
27
567
1
322
16
285
303
309
400
318
667
301
2,272
457
381
360
708
227
303
409
455
204
2
107

$9,767
832
168
26,090
2,a40
1,681
24,617
337
14,914
59
5,146
252
4,951
5,303
4,569
6,837
11,085
12,806
8,995
37,307
10.056
3,208
15,553
15,521
5,380
4,509
7,7.50
12,950
5,538
1,167
1,517

1,365

1,314

32,170.43

6,199 95

3,420 29

14,104 .

. -States.

1.3,731

293,590 69

45,132 46

23,340 47

Board and
nursing.

Medical ser- Medicines.
vices.

$3,695 21 $1,172 28
66
179 20
208 75
C2
19 30
05
58 25
3,001 35
4,387 32
70
698 40
618 50
18
150 55
276 70
18
35 90
71 25
33
25 86
109 30
27
255 86
910 53
41
17 85
50
56
91
502 07
1,340 65
82
1,110 41
2,033 50
15
90 90
00
151 .50
1,386 50
50
1,551 00
1,373 36
3,160 15
98
1,235 55
2,025 00
20
417 31
2,000 00
85
3,360 72
3,688 55
01
173 85
228 75
61
45
08 *"3,'602'56" ' " i , * .344'97
800 60
1,069 .32
31
513 90
1,797 55
95
294 40
800 00
91
489 38
23
1,177 48
831 54
1,000 00
91
297 77
1,000 00
94
10 80
11025 00
78
129 60
81
945 75

Travelling
expenses.

Clothing.

Other
charges.

Funeral ex- Deaths. Total amount. Hospital mopenditures.
ney collected.
$14,864
1,244
248
33,983
3,932
2,141
25,314
483
•17,146
.78
5,268
261
6,899
8, .579
4,992
10,146
15,945
16,427
11,626
45,278
10,79.4
3,329
20,949
17,713
7,822
5,660
9,541
15,023
6,896.
2,225
2,631

54
29
02
53
.52
65
11
15
79
12
66
49
79
88
82
43
34
40
23
78
09
39
94
86
83
33
56
17
71
60
22

$72 00
'; 12 00

13
3

115
30
12
339
: 6
192

00
00
00
00
00
00

58
5
52
1
28

65
6
37
48
132
121
163
198
96
522
228
88
242
144
54

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

13
I
4
16
22
20
28
22
15
78
35
20
33
24
5

30 00
92 00
60 00

5
51
11

22 02
26 06

12 00

2

425 34

742 00

50

42,958 01

3,605 64

3,863 00

615

370,410 25

•
$1 00
1 00

$34 74

9 00

681 25

150 00

V

161 00

715 99

$157
12
2
353
• 44
21
250
• 4
183
57
2
68
84
49
100
157
162
117
400
108
32
207
178
76
56
94
148

39
32
42
42
44
22
63
72
74
77
10
58
25
82
42
43
85
65
07
50
88
94
39
63
43.
02
47
72

$6,255
176
213
19,209
1,216
3,222
49,013
4,845
7,745
1.046
6,849
432
6.266
1,950
2,222
1,533
2,858

93
38
04
10
53
97
54
65
17
72
56
60
51
94
72
31
84

3,9J:6

23

467
17,297
1,836
1,291
2,222
5,029
1,905

10
62
28
50
50
41
07

n o 00

3,626 45
6,243 25
80
934
299
12,113
570

40
11
71
75
20

173,073 09

F . BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T , Register's Ofice, November 24, i860.




to
to

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QQ

221

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

First Auditor's Ofiice, November 21, 1860.
^ SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860 :
Accounts adjusted.

Collectors of customs
Collectors under steamboat act
Collectors for wages of seamen forfeited under 25th section of
the act to regulate the diplomatic and consular system of
the United States

No. of Amount of reaccounts.
ceipts.
1,667
314

589 42

Aggregate of receiptsCollectors and disbursing agents of the treasury^ ..._.
Oficial emoluments of collectors, naval officers, and surveyorsAdditional compensation of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Accounts for refunding duties and claims for net proceeds of
unclaimed merchandise
-«
-..
The j udiciary
Interest on the public debt
Treasury notes presented for funding and received in payment
of duties
Redemption of war bounty scrip
Claims for property lost in the military service of the United
States
^
Inspectors of steam vessels for travelling expenses, &c
Accounts for redemption of United States stocks
Salaries of officers ofthe civil list paid directly from the treasury
Superintendents of life-saving stations on the coast of the
United States
_.-.
Superintendents of lights
Agents of marine hospitals
Support, &c., of the penitentiary of the District ofColumbia.
Commissioner of Public Buildings
:
Support of Insane Asylum of Washington
Contingent expenses of the Senate and House of Eepresentatives and the departments of the government
Coast suryey
Treasurer of the United States, for pay and mileage of the
members of the Senate and the House of Representatives..
Treasurer of the United States, for general receipts and expenditures
,
Designated depositaries for additional compensation
Construction and repairs of public buildings, light-houses,
beacons, &c
Territorial account s
Disbursing clerks for paying salaries
->-Mint accounts
Payments for patents withdrawn
Disbursing agent California land claims
Accounts for payments of the creditors of the late republic cf
Texas
-.
Accounts of public printers and of contractors for furnishing
paper for public printing, and for binding and engraving, &cMiscellaneous accounts
Aggregate payments.



$54,156,212 16
30,993 52

54,187,795 10
.890
1,004

4,630,410 20
790,572 03

20

5,931 06

232
837
20

73,341 26
952,606 42
1,390,585 69

445
3

15,391,198 01
318 65

72
146
2
1,036

40,267
26,106
2,146
356,652

61
81
42
56

28
730
810
4
153
3

27,074
750,189
409,662
13,274
276,489
31,274

84
74
26
63
06
63

309
26

712,635 90
326,916 53
935,865 42

3
15
750
32
248
49
6
4

66,199,755 01
1,047 79
1,819,780
90,070
1,819,780
21,850,695
24,213
7,461

43
82
43
15
32
18

16

. 6,511 01

109
331

304,588 08
6,363,225 83
125,630,648 78

222

REPORT ON THE FINANOES.
Number of reports and ce rtificates recorded
..Number of letters recorded
Acknowledgments of accounts recorded .-_„ -

- - — --

7,533
718
4,319
12,570

T. L. SMITH, Audiior.
Hon. HOWELL COBB, Secretary of ihe Treasury.

B.
Statement of the operations of the Second Auditor's ofiUce during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, showing the numher ofi money accounts settled., the expenditure embraced therein, the numher ofi property accounts examined and adjusted, together tvith other duties
pertaining to the husiness of the office; prepared in obedience to instructions of the Secretary of the Treasury.
The number of accounts settled is 2,174, embracing an expenditure
of $9,972,757 3 1 , under the following heads, viz :
Fay department
...;
$5,300,255 66
Indian affairs...
2,874,417 86
Ordnance department
... 1,457,791 53
Medical department.........
65,287 12
Quartermaster's department
26,614 10
Expenses of recruiting
55,537 34
S t a t e a n d private claims
92,269 47
Eelief of S. J . Hensley
96,375 00
Printing books of tactics
3,750 00
Contingent expenses of Adjutant Generars department
459 23
9,972,757 31
Property accounts examined and adjusted...
Private claims suspended or rejected
.,.,.,
Requisitions registered, recorded, and posted
»
Army recruits registered
Dead and discharged soldiers registered.......
Letters, accounts, &c.,received, briefed, and registered
Letters written, recorded!^ indexed, and mailed.........
Certificates of military service issued to Pension office

..:

10,484
442
1,819
2,914
3,122
5,042
8,003
1,331

In addition, the following statements and reports were prepared and
transmitted from this office, viz:
Annual statement of Indian disbursements, prepared for Congress
in duplicate, for the year ending June 30, 1859, comprised in 950
sheets foolscap.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

223

•J

Annual statement of the ^^ recruiting fund,'' prepared for the adjutant general of the army.
Annual statement of the contingencies of the army, prepared, in
duplicate, for the Secretary of War.
Annual statement of the contingent expenses of this office, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
Annual reports of balances, for one year and three years, to the
First Comptroller.
Quarterly reports of balances to the Secretary of the Treasury and
to the Second Comptroller.
Annual report of the clerks and others employed in this office for
the year 1859, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
A report to the Secretary of the Treasury showing the amount expended in removing the New York Indians to Kansas.
A statement of expenditures and payments from 1831 to 1856 under
treaty with the Choctaws of 1830 ; and
^
A statement of payments made to Chippewa Indians, from 1838 to
1853, inclusive, under treaties of July 29, 1837, October 4, 1842, and
September 30,1854.
The bookkeeper's register shows the settlement of 1,382 ledger accounts which have been regularly journalized and posted in the
ledgers, which, as well as those for the appropriatiohs, have been duly
kept up.
T. J . D. FULLER, Auditor,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Second Auditor's Office, Octoher 20,1860,

C.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Third Auditor's Office, Novemher 16, 1860.
SIR : T have the honor to report to you the operations of this branch
of the Treasury Department for the fiscal year ending June 30,1860,
as follows, viz:
BOOKKEEPER'S DIVISION.

I t appears from the bookkeeper's statement that the amount of drafts
on the treasury, by requisitions, during the fiscal year ending June
30, 1860, was
$11,687,492 54
Viz : Amount of drafts by requisitions
charged to personal accounts
$11,485,271 32
Amount of drafts by requisition on
account of military contributions
charged to personal accounts
.
1,093 76
Amount of claims paid and charged
to the appropriations to which they
pertain, including acts for the relief ,
of individuals
201,127 46
•
11,687,492 54




224

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

REPAYMENTS.

Amount of counter-requisitions by transfers
Amount of deposits in the treasury
J
Amount of drafts cancelled
^,

;
,

$1,040,714 09
74,037 48
967 00
1,115,718 57

The total amount of settlements during the fiscal year,
comprised in 2,300 reports, was
14,591j,815 42
Viz: Accounts settled out of advances
made and charged to disbursing officers and agents..
$14,578,738 07
Accounts settled appertaining to military contributions, per act of March
3,1849.
13,076 80 .
Civil fund, California
,
55
~
14,591,815 42
The operations of the various subdivisions of the office may be
stated in detail as follows:
Q U A R T E E M A S T B R ' S DIVISION.

From the 1st of July, 1859, to the 30th of June, 1860, there were
received" and registered 769 quartermaster's accounts, involving an
expenditure of $7,872,681 25. During the same period 726 accounts
were settled, involving an expenditure of $6,893,875 07, leaving at
the end of the fiscal year, June 30, 1860, 204 unsettled accounts, as
follows, vi2j:
Eemaining unsettled June 30, 1859.......
Eeceived during the fiscal year
Total
Deduct the number settled as above stated

,

.............o.
,,.,.,....,....

161
769
930
726

Total number unsettled
.,..,,, 204
of which a large number are the accounts of officers who have rendered accounts exhibitiog balances due them, but have failed satisfactorily to explain how the balances originated, and are consequently
suspended lor such explanation. Nearly all the above accounts are
accompanied by property accounts, showing the purchase, application,
and expenditure of the public property in the service, which are set-^
tied conjointly with the money accounts.
Five hundred and sixty-four property accounts, unaccompanied by
money accounts, have been settled out of the number received within
the year, viz: 599.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

225

SUBSISTENCE DIVISION.

In this division there were audited and reported to the 2d Comptroller of the Treasury, during the year, 672 accounts of officers
disbursing in the commissariat, involving an expenditure, on account
of subsistence of the army, of $1,829,017 82. The number of letters
written, connected with their settlement and other businessof the
division, was 539.
ENGINEER AND TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEER DIVISION.

The accounts' transmitted under the regulations of officers of t h e '
army and agents ofthe Engineer and Topographical Engineer bureaus,
the office of exploration and surveys of the War Deparment, and the
accounts received from the War Department of officers and agents
disbursing under direction of the Secretary of War, are assigned to
this division for adjustment.
The number of accounts received from the several sources, on file,
and unadjusted at the commencement of thefiscalyear was.. 62
The number received during the year was
198
Making the whole number to be adjusted
-— 260
There were of this number adjusted
221
Leaving unadjusted at the close of the year

39

The 221 accounts adjusted within the year, including sundry additional special statements, involved the sum of $3,437,405 72. The
business of a miscellaneous character, transacted during the year,
consisted of 152 letters written and 23 requisitions drawn.
PENSION DIVISION.

To this division are assigned the keeping and settlement of accounts
of agents for paying pensions, the settlement of claims on account of
arrearages of pensions and unclaimed pensions for a period exceeding
fourteen months, made payable b / law at the treasury, with other
miscellaneous reports and extensive correspondence.
During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, there were received
and registered, letters
.,
1,570
Letters written during the same period
1,754
Calls for information received and answered
325
Pension agents' accounts OR hand, June 30,1859
Pension agents' accounts received during the fiscal year, ending June 30,1860...

189

Ofthese there were settled during the year

226
206

Leavingon hand unsettled
15



37

20
~

226

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Pension claims received during the year....

457

Ofwhich there were settled

355

Leaving suspended and disallowed

102

Amount of expenditures involved in the pension
» agents'accounts settled was
Amount of claims settled was

$1,039,309 78
19,892 97

DIVISION ON CLAIMS.

In this division during the fiscal year 390 claims requiring investigation, statements, and reports under special laws, were received and
legistered, involving an aggregate amount of $286,884 09, and of
these and others previously filed 769 were reported on, involving the
sum of $285,327 96, of which $244,840 15 was allowed. I t i s proper
to remark that the large proportion of these claims were paid under
special acts of Congress, or by direction of the proper head of department, in which cases the duties of this office are merely administrative
and are comprised in the stating of the account and observance of other
formalities, preparatory to obtaining a requisition on the Treasury for
the amount allowed. In some of the cases, however, written reports
were made and other investigations^ involving much time and labor.
Seven hundred and fifty letters were received, and five hundred and
eighty-four letters were written. Onethousand eight hundred and
seventy-six other papers, connected with claims and other business of
the division, were received, registered, arid filed. Five hundred and
nineteen pages copying on foolscap, and eight hundred and seventyfive pages of letter correspondence were filled, as well as one thousand
three hundred and forty-three statements, reports, and giwards made,
the reports having been to the Secretaries of the Treasury and War
Departments, and Second Comptroller, as well as on calls by Congress.
A number of claims, under the act of March 3, 1849, providing for
lost horses, &c., htill remain ;unsettled, notwithstanding the active
arid constant employment pf one clerk on their investigation, who has
disposed ofa considerable number during the year.
.

.

•

•

•

J

•

.

•

COLLECTION DIVISION.

The operations of this diyision from the 30th September, 1859, to
the 30th September, 1860, were as follows:
Total balance outstanding September^ 30, 1859, as
stated in last report, exclusive pf amount in suit
and balances which accrued prior to the year 1820 $1,012,238 51
From which deduct amount closed by settlements and
payments into the treasury during the year, including amount paid on judgments
128,665 31
Balance due September 30, 1860




-

. . .

883,573 20

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

227

During theyear there were 239 letters received and registered^
with a brief of contents, and 127 letters written and recorded.
BOUNTY LAND AND SOLDIERS' CLAIMS DIVISION.

In this division 488 communications, relative to pay, pension, and
bounty land claims, were investigated and disposed of, which included
claims of widows and orphans under the acts of the 3d of March,
1802, 16th April, 1816, first section of the act of 3d February, 1853.
Of the number of claims presented 21 were allowed—in all $1,240 83.
Six thousand seven hundred and nineteen bounty land claims, and
222 invalid and half-pay pensions cases were examined and certified
to the Commissioner of Pensions, and 547 l e t t c s were written.
I would add that the clerical forco of this office has been reduced
from ninety to sixty-one clerks under the first section of the act
making appropriations for the legislative, executive, and judicial expenses of the government, approved 23d June, 1860, chap. 205,
which permanently transfers the twenty-nine clerks, theretofore legally
attached to this office, but detailed on duty, by order of the Secretary,
in other offices of the Treasury Department to the several offices in
which they have been doing duty, and thus reducing the future estimates of appropriation for the clerical force of this office in the sum
of $39,200. Considering that the sixty-one clerks actually employed
in the office were sufficient for the discharge of the duties devolving
upon it^ the reduction has been made under my suggestion.
Notwithstanding the diminution of the clerical force and the increase of business, keeping pace with the growth and expansion of
the country, I am gratified to say that the current demands upon the
office have been' discharged with promptitude. The only arrearages
that now exist are the remnants of the accumulations of former
years, some of them running back to a period cotemporary with the
Mexican war. The claims for horses and other property lost or
destroyed in the military service of the United States, which, in the
years 1849-'50-'51, had accumulated to the number of several thousands, and were constantly increasing for several years, have been
largely diminished by adjudications, either favorable or adverse, and
thus removed from the docket entirely. And the same may be said of
the great mass of accounts and arrearages of other descriptions with
which the office was clogged immediately following the Mexican war.
During the last year an unusual and very laborious duty was imposed by the House of Eepresentatives in relation to the claims growing
out of Indian hostilities in 1855-'65, in Oregon and Washington Territories. These claims, amounting in the aggregate to upwards of six
millions of dollars, had been reported by a commission or board,
which was in session about a year, with a corps of clerks, and the
expenses incurred by it in examining and reporting upon the claims
alone amounted to over twelve thousand dollars. The papers connected therewith coming to this office, and application being made to
Congress for payment, as reported by the commission, at the instance
of the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs of the House of
Eepresentatives, an examination was made of said claims, and the



228

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

result thereof cGmmunicated in a letter or report darted January 10,
1859. On the 8th February follovdng a resolution was adopted by
the House of Eepresentatives directing me to re-examine and report
to the House at the next session of Congress the amounts due and
properly allowable, agreeably to certain rules and regulatibns as to
rates of pay, &c., prescribed in said resolution. No additional clerks
were authorized to be employed, nor was any appropriation made to
coyer any expense that might necessarily be incurred in discharging
the duty imposed. The business was promptly taken in hand, and
from four to ten clerks were most of the time engaged in examining,
transcribing, and analyzing the various accounts, vouchers, muster
and pay rolls connected with the claims, making abstracts and states
ments, and also investigating the records of this office, involving an
examination of the accounts ^of all the disbursing officers ofthe regular army stationed in these Territories during the period in question.
Considerable correspondence was also had with officers ofthe military
as well as the civil service, and information sought from every available source. Eleven large volumes of imperial paper, comprising from
three to six hundred pages each, were filled with a complete Tecord of
said claims, classified and arranged so as to show the nature and
description of each claim, the amount thereof as reported by the commissioners, and the amount allowed by me. My report was transmitted to the House on the 7th February last, just one year from the
date of the passage of the resolution, and the conclusions arrived at
were set forth therein at some length, from which it appeared that
said claims would be reduced to two millions seven hundred and fourteen thousand eight hundred and eight dollars and fifty-five cents,
being a reduction from theamount originally reported of three millions two hundred and ninety-six thousand six hundred and fortyeight dollars and eighty-one cents. D u r i n g t h e session the Senate
/passed a bill appropriating the sum of three millions four hundred
thousand dpllars in payment of said claims, but no decisive action was
had in the House of Eepresentatives, the Committee on Military Affairs reporting a bill reducing the appropria,tion to the amount reported by me as above stated, but which did not come to a final vpte
in the House, Thus it would appear that the labors of the investigation have not been in vain, and that so far as action has been had by
Congress the conclusions and recommendations contained in my
report, resulting in a large reduction on the claims, have been substantially approved.
Whatever final disposition may be made of these claims, it is manifest that some specific legislation should be had with reference to such
cases in the future. It is admitted to be the duty of the general
government to protect the citizens of the States and Territories in their
persons and property, alike from foreign invasion and the hostile
incursions of marauding savages within their borders. For these
^purposes a regular force is maintained at vast expense, not indeed on
a scale sufficiently large to meet emergencies that may arise on extraordinary occasions, biit affording a nucleus around which the volunteer
militia may be brought into the field. When such emergencies have
occurred in the former history of the country, and it became necessary



REFORT ON THE FINANCES.

229

to call out the volunteer militia, provision has been made for the payment of all the expenses necessarily incurred thereby. Congress,
however, reserving the right to determine the principles upon which
the claims should be adjusted and payment thereof made. But of late
years a new method has been devised, by which all control over the
matter will be practically taken from Congress or the Executive.
Indian hostilities are prosecuted on the frontiers and in newly settled
portions of the country by the local authorities calling out volunteers,
without the authority or assent of the general government, and even
in opposition to the wishes of its officers. These local authorities thus
not only assume to be the judge of the necessity of such a proceeding,
the mode and manner of prosecuting the hostilities, but the extent to
which they shall be carried and the amount of expenditure to be
incurred, and then look to Congress to provide out of the national
treasury for the liquidation of all the claims they have contracted and
may see proper to present. By recognizing such a right the general
government will be placed in the position of an involuntary debtor
to claimants with the origination of whose claims it had nothing to
do, and who exercise the perogative of creating the indebtedness as
well as fixing the amount thereof, and thus it will be left entirely
defenceless and at =their mercy. I t is easy to see the opportunities
that will thus be presented for spoliation of the national treasury.
Trifling expeditions and forays on the border may be magnified into
hostilities on a large scale, involving the expenditure of vast araounts
of money, causes that are perhaps beyond control are constantly
operating to make such collisions and hostilities inevitable, and they
will doubtless continue, to a greater or less extent, until the Indian
race within our borders shall become entirely extinct or reclaim.ed to
civilization'' But in the absence of salutary checks, the opportunities
for personal aggrandisement and speculation will of themselves operate
as incentives to produce such a state of affairs"on every occasion and
pretext. Especially will this be the case, if it be once understood
that persons who render services or furnish property on such occasions
will be permitted to set up claims against the general government, for
such property and services, at prices above what they are actually
worth in cash^ and obtain payment thereof without full and thorough
investigation into all the circumstances connected therewith. I therefore beg leave to repeat the suggestion submitted in a former report,
of the '* necessity of some general legislation by Congress, prescribing
some rules and regulations for calling out volunteers on special
exigencies and mustering them into service, requiring some sort of
regularity and conformity to army regulations with respect to pay,
allowances, &c.; and also providing for an early adjustment and payment of expenses necessarily incurred, according to fixed principles,
enforcing strict accountability, and the usual scrutiny and investiga-"
tion of the proper officers of the United States." If "such provisions
were made as suggested, and enforced in all such cases in the future,
just and honest claims would be paid without material delay to the
persons who rendered the service or furnished, the supplies, and at a
great saving, as I believe, to the treasury.
I deem it proper to add in this connexion that at the last session a



230

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

bill was introduced into the House of Eepresentatives providing for
the payment of expenses incurred in the suppression of Indian hostilities in the State of California prior to the first day of January,
eighteen hundred and sixty^ in which an appropriation of five hundred thousand dollars was made, and it was provided that '^upon
presentation of the certificate of the treasurer of the State of California,'countersigned by the governor and comptroller, showing the
amount appropriated and actually paid out by the said State in
accordance with an act of the California legislature approved April
16, 1859, * * * it shall be the duty of the Secretary of War to
draw his warrant in favor of the authorized agent of said State, (taking
his receipt therefor,) upon the. Secretary ofthe Treasury, who is hereby directed to pay the same out of the appropriation hereinbefore
made." And another section made provision for the. redemption by
the United States of certain bonds issued b y t h e said State, a n d i n
like manner provided that ^>it shall be the duty of the Secretary of
W a r (upon the presentation of any of said bonds) to draw his warrant
in favor of the holder or holders thereof for the amount due upon the
same upori the Secretary of the Treasury, who is hereby directed to
pay the-same,'' &c. Thus it will be perceived that no opportunity is
given ibr an investigation into the character of the claims allowed,
either as to rates paid for services, supplies, &c., or ofthe necessity of
incurring the expenditure; the action of the local authorities, either
in making payment or issuing bonds, being held to be conclusive and
binding as against the United States. A precedent for this is found
in the act approved August 18, 1856, which directed the assumption
by the United States of bonds bearing seven and twelve per 6ent.
intere.st, and amounting in the aggregate to over nine hundred thousand dollars, issued by the State of California in payment Pf expenses
incur] ed by said State in the suppression of Indian iiostilities prior to
January 1," 1854. A siibsequent examination ofthe papers connected
with the claims, in this office, showed that the prices for services of
volunteers and everything connected with the hostilities were of the
most extraordinary character, the compensation of the private soldiers
being at the rate of five to six dollars per day, besides subsistence and
other allowances in proportion. It does not appear what rates of pay
have been allowed by the State in the more recent hostilities, for payment of which claim is now made, but the Committee on Military
Affairs of the House of Eepresentatives, after considering the matter,
have reported the bill back, directing an audit of the accounts of the
State for payments for the services of volunteers and for supplies,
transportation, &c., by the Third Auditor ofthe Treasury, fixing the
rates of pay for the volunteers ^'the same as were paid for services in
the same grade and fbr the same time in the United States, army serving in Oalifornia," and further providing that ^Hhe Third Auditor,
as to all principles not expressly settled by this act, shall be governed
in auditing and settling said claims by the principles adopted in his
report upon the claims of the Territories of Washington and Oregon
of the 7th of February, 1860-," &c. At the present time a large vol-'
unteer force is understood to be in the field in New Mexico, called out
by the local authorities, in prosecuting hostilities against certain tribes



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

231

of Indians, and, in the course of time, the claims for expenditures
made and liabilities incurred will be presented to Congress for payment. But until such provision is made by law the persons who thus
render their services or furnish supplies must go unrecompensed, depending on the recognition of their claims at some future time by
Congress, and i n t h e meantime speculators and agents intervene by
the purchase of the claims at heavy discounts, the rate depending on
the prospects for speedy payment as well as the necessities of the
holder. Were provision made by law for all such cases as they arise in
future, it can hardly be doubted that great advantage would, result to
the persons engaged in such services, where the services were approved
by t h a proper authority, and Congress would be in a great degree
relieved from the pressure of such claims, for the thorough investigation of which in their details it is incapable by its organization and
mode of action, as well as the multiplicity of business constantly
pressing upon it during the period of its sessions. It would supersede, also, the necessity for such investigations as have been recently
required, which consume much time and are necessarily conducted
under great disadvantages, prolonging the time of settlement and
producing dissatisfaction and embarrassments growing out of the
delay of payment as well as transfer of claims that would not otherwise exist.
'
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
E. J . ATKINSON,
Auditor,
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Fourth Auditor's' Office, December 3, 1860.
SIR : In compliance with the requirements of your letter of the
30th ultimo, I have the honor to report to you the operations of this
office during the fiscal year ending on the 30th of June last.
This report would have been presented at an earlier day but for
the fact that during the time occupied in the removal of the office to
its present location and the re-arrangement of its files, there was, necessarily, a partial suspension of its business.
The total number of accounts audited is 666, consisting of 320 reported and 346 certified accounts.
The amount of disbursements involved in those settlements is
$17,517,439 58.
.
This sum may be arranged under the following divisions : viz :
Expenditures on account of the navy
$16,618,068 70
Expenditures on account of the marine corps
713,83;^ 02
Expenditures on accountof pensioners
113,037 86
Expenditures on account of steamship—foreign mail
service
•
72,500 00




232

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Among these accounts are those of paymasters of the navy, the paymaster and quartermaster of the marine corps, and navy agents, endbracing minor accounts to the number of 58,098.
The number of advance and pay requisitions registered is 780,
amounting to $11,856,201 98.
The number of transfer and refunding requisitions issiied and rcrgistered is 155, amounting to $326,608.
The number of letters received and registered is 5,25.2.
The number of letters written and recorded, embracing reports to
the heads of the Treasury and Navy Departments and Second Comptroller, is 5,673.
The number of allotment tickets granted by officers and ottfers iin
the naval service is 1,867. An abstract of each of which, exhibiting
the name of the grantor, his rank, the monthly sum allotted, number
of months, date of first payment, and the place where payable, was
entered in the appropriate books.
At the close of each quarter of the year a report was made to the
Second Comptroller, exhibiting the names of those disbursing agents
of the Navy Department, who had failed to render their accounts
within the period prescribed by the act of 31st of January, 1823-showing, also, the nature and extent of the default in each case.
Quarter-annual reports were made to the Secretary of the Navy,
showing the amounts which, had been passed to the credit ofthe navy
hospital fund on the books of this office.
A report was made to the Secretary of the Navy showing in detail
the items of expenditure charged to the appropriation for the contingent expenses of the navy.
A statement was prepared and transmitted to the Secretary of the
Navy of the amount received during the year by each officer of the
navy and marine corps, on account of pay, rations, travelling expenses,
servants, forage, quarters, &c.
All the cases of application for bounty land, which were referred
to this office by the Oommissioner of Pensions for evidence of service
in the navy on the part of the applicants, received prompt attention.
Applications by seamen for admission into the naval asylum at
Philadelphia were numerous. As a service of twenty years is required
as a qualification to entitle an applicant to such privilege, and as
the service is, in many instances, performed at intervals of time extending through a period of thirty-five or forty years, much time has
been occupied in the examination of such cases.
The removal of the office into *'Winder's building" havingbeen
completed, it affbrds me pleasure to be able to say, that the rooms
assigned for its use are sufficient for the accommodation of the clerks
and the methodical arrangement of its files.'
Its location in the fourth story of the building renders it rather
difficult of access, and its separation from those offices with which it
has such constant intercourse is attended with much inconvenience.
But the^e drawbacks are fully compensated by the relief from the




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

233

serious embarrassments under which it labored for want of suitable
accommodations while located in the navy building,
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
T. HUNTEE,
Fourth Auditor,
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury,

E.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Fifth Auditor's Offiice, November 21, 1860.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
There have been adjusted ih this office and transmitted to the
Comptroller of the Treasury for his revision, one thousand three
hundred and forty-seven (1,347) accounts of the various -classes of
public expenditure by law referred to this office for statement, and
during the period embraced in this report the number of letters
written in relation to the examination and adjustment of accounts
has amounted to two thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven
(2,777).
The current work in all the divisions of this bureau has been
performed punctually and well, but few accounts lie over, and in all
such cases the reason of delay is to be found in the fact that they
were either wholly unsupported by vouchers or the vouchers were so
incomplete and unsatisfactory as to preclude an accurate statement.
I have appended to this report four statements, marked respectively
A, B, C, and D, to which I would respectfully call your attention.
Statement A exhibits in detail the amount of salaries paid to and
fees received from the consular officers of the United States, mentioned
in schedules B and C ofthe act of August 18, 1856, ^Ho regulate the
diplomatic and consular systems of the United States" for the year
ending December 31, 1859. From this statement it appears that the
total of salaries paid to one hundred and thirty-three consular officers
for the period last mentioned is two hundred and sixty-three thousand
two hundred and six dollars and ninety-eight cents, ($263,206 98,)
and that they have returned fees for the same time amounting to the
aggregate sum of one hundred and ten thousand eight hundred and
and ninety-six dollars and seventy-eight cents, ($110,896 78,) which
has been applied towards the payment of salaries. The balance of
its destitute seamen abroad for the iiscal year ending June 30,
1860, amounts to a total of two hundred and twenty thousand nine
hundred and eighty-two dollars and sixty-nine centsi, ($220,982 69,)
towards the payment of which the sum of forty-five thousand nine
hundred and twenty dollars and thirty-five cents, ($45,920 35,)
received by the consals for extra wages upon the discharge of
American seamen in foreign ports, has been applied, leaving the net



234

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

cost to the government, upon this account one hundred and seventyfive thousand sixty-two dollars and thirty-four cents, ($175,062 34.)
By comparing this statement with the corresponding one for the
year ending June 30, 1859, it will be observed that the cost of '^ relief
and protection" of our destitute seamen fbr the period embraced in
this report is less by the sum of forty-seven thousand four-hundred
and six dollars and ninety-eight cents, ($47,406 98,) than during the
previous year. This result is caused in part by an increase in the
amount of extra wages, and in part by the more economical administion of the fund appropriated by law.
The practical utility ofa statement.of this kind of salaries, amounting
to one hundred and fifty-two thousand three hundred and ten dollars
and twenty cents, ($152,310 20,) was paid by the treasurer of the
United States.
A comparison of this statemerit with the corresponding one, appended
to the last annual report from this office, will show that the amountof
fees now shown to have been collected is greater by thesum of twelve
thousand five hundred and thirteen dollars and thirty-seven cents,
($12,513 37,) than was reported for the year ending December 31,
1858, thus justifying the remark in my last report that there is '^ a
steady though gradual approximation of the revenues of the government from this source, towards the disbursements on account of the
consular system."
Statement B exhibits in detail the amount of disbursements on
account of destitute American seamen in foreign ports, and the amount
of extra wages and moneys received by the United States consuls at the
ports specified.
By this statement it is shown that the cost to the government of the
care and protection, which was first prepared to accompany my last
report, has been so frequently manifested that I have prepared two
additional statements with the view of showing, completely, the affairs
and operations of this office.
Statement C exhibits the number and cost of transportation of
destitute seamen from foreign ports to the United States during the
year ending June 30, 1860, from which it is shown that the number
of seamen brought home was one thousand and forty-nine, (1,049,) at
the aggregate cost to the government of twelve thousand and eight
dollars and fifty cents, ($12,008 ^50.)
Statement D shows the amount expended in arresting American
seamen in foreign countries, charged with the commission of crime on
American vessels, together with the expenses attending the examination of the same by the consul, and sending them home for trial, with
the witnesses for prosecution, during the year ending June 30, 1860.
It thus appears that the number of criminal seamen sent home for
trial was forty-eight, (48,) at the aggregate expense to the government of two thousand three hundred and thirty-two dollars and ninetysix cents, ($2,332 96.)
I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient,
B. F U L L E E , Auditor,
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

SecretaryoftheTreasury.



235

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement ofthe amount ofi salaries p a i d to and fees received from the
consular officers of the United States mentioned in schedules B and C
ofi the act of August 18, 1856, \* to regulate the diplomatic and consular systems ofi the United States," fior the year ending Decemher 31,
1859.
CONSULi^ T E S , W H E R E LOCATED.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

.
Amoor river
Amsterdam (a) •
Acapulco
Amoy
Athens Antwerp (i)
Aux Cayes
Alexandria
Aspinwall
Apia (c)
Aix-la-Chapelle

Salaries.

-,
-

-•

- . -

-

$1,000
942
2,000
3,000
1,000
3,052
500
' 3,500
2,500
" 902
• 2,500

Fees.

00
94
00
00
00
73
00
00
00
17
00

$34,50
360 21
854 95:
271 40
• 6 25
1,236 12i
351 75
66 14
2,749 37
70 42
1,803 00

B.
12 Bordeaux

-

T^
xo

R P 1 ffl sf (h\
JDCildoli \UJ

-

14
15
16
17
18
19
20

Basle
Beirut
Bremen Batavia Bahia
Buenos Ayres
Bay of Islands

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32

Cork (6) Cape Town
Cadiz
Callao
Candia
Canton
Cape Haytien - .
Corbija
Cyprus (e)
Carthagena
Constantinople (&)
Calcutta -

-

.

• -

-

-

-

-

-

-

{d)

-

9. ^^iS 4 9

—
. , -• . -

.

„

"

$757
380
582
1,541

49
75
43
17

$2,718
1,000
1,500
3,500
1,000
4,000
- 1,000
500
- "
767
500
4,267
5,000

86
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
34
00
37
00

'"410'46
174 23
48 09
1 00
224 05
181 92
2,741 90

$2,000 00
2,000 00

$1,998 00
289 29

-

-

-

14
67
00
13
00
23
99
76
38

00
00
00
00
00
00
86

—

-

$2,777
2,663
1,039
64
518
298
486
1,828
211

2,000
2,000
• 2,000
1,000
1,000
2,000
931

-

. •

-

c.
-

$2,000 00

•

D.
33 Dundee 34 Demarara



-

-

-

236

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

E.
Salaries.

35 Elsinore -

-

-

-

-

-

Fees.

$1,500 00

$122 49

$3,000
750
3,500
1,000
1,500

$539
455
194
59
68

P.
36
37
38
39
40

Frankfort-on-the-Main - • Fayal
- ' Foo Choo
Falkland islands
Funchal -. -

-

00
00
00
00
00

00
73
17
52
41

G.
41
42
43
44
45

Geneva (6):
Gaboon ( / )
Guayaquil
Glasgow
Genoa-(6)'

1,569 29
-

-

-

-

-

750 00
3,000 00
1,860 00

77 87
2,865 12
587 08

6,494 50
4,000 00
2,000 .00
6,000 00
2,000 00
3,500 00

-

190 00

3,647 86
3,979 72
1,198 71
7,641 33
1,452 09
4,184 38

H.
46
47
48
49
50
51

Havre {b)
Honolulu
Hamburg
Havana
Halifax
Hong Kong

52 Jerusalem

-

.

-

-

-

1,500 00

12 00

53 Kingston (6)

2,233 98

690 63

54 La Guayra
55 Leipsic 56 La Eochelle
57 Leeds
58 ,Lahaina 59 Lyons
60^ Lanthala
61 Leghorn 62 London 63 Liverpool (gr)

1,500 00
1,500 00
1,500 00
2,000 00
3,000 00
1,500 00
1,000 00
1,500 00
7,500 00

237 14
1,196'65
705 06
1,644 00
789 05
785 00
32 46
522 01
5,626 17

K.




-REPORT ON THE . FINANCES f

.237

M.
Salaries.

64
65
66
:.67
68
69
70
71
72
'73
74
75
76
77
78

Marseilles
Munich
Montreal
Messina Moscow Malaga Maranham
Mauritius
Manchester (6)
Matanzas (6) Monrovia (A) Melbourne
Matamoras
Mexico {i)
Montevideo

$2,500 00
1,000 00
4,000 00
1,500 00
2,000 00
1,500 00
1,000 00
2,500 00
2,267 38
2,815 93
• 986 11
4,000 00
1,000 00.
500 00
1,000 00

Fees.

-$1,420
102
406
292

;02
00
16
17

'563 39
110 98
.442 74
840 50
1,357 22
138 00
1,429 75
1,859 75
391 59
980 12

N.
79 Nassau
80 Naples
81 Ningpo

-

2,000 00
1,500 00
4,000 00

992 34
588 70
50 25

82 Oporto 83 Omoa
84 Odessa {j)

1,500 00
1,000 00

264 50
53 00

85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94

1,000 00
1,000 00
3,500 00
5,000 00
1,500 00
2,000 00
500 00
1,500 00
2,000 00
500 00

496 91
352 79
885 02
6,292 00
.402 34
404 85
8 00
640 51
1,750.58
313 99

1,916 65
2,000 00
6,000 00
1,000 00

21
1,079
3,364
548

7,050 00
500 00
4,000 00

34 64
373 83
1,565 96

0.

Prince Edward's Island
Para
Panama Paris
Ponce
Port au Prince
Paso delNorte
Palermo Pernambuco Paita
E.

95
96
97
98

EevelXi;)
Eotterdam
Eio Janeiro
Eio Grrande

99 St. Jago, Cape:de Verde
100 Sabanilla
101 Shanojhai



93
24
14
32

238

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Salaries.

102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117

Simoda {I)
^ L i Juan del Norte (6)
SX
St. Thomas (&)
Spezzia San Juan del Sur (6)
Stutgard Stettin
San Juan, P . E . (m)
St. Petersburg
St. Croix (TZ) Smyrna Southampton St. Domingo Singapore ' Santiago de Cuba
St. Paul de Loando -

$263 88
2,249 99
4,622 21
1,000 00
2,201 44
1,000 00
1,000 00
1,783 32
2,000 00
662 50
2,000 00
2,000 00
1,500 00
2,500 00
2,500 00
1,000 00

Fees.

$27 37
235 37
1,588 61
13 52
12 96
264 00
9 00
172.64
177 00
91 47
741 55
179 26
99 42
1,068 63
418 41
74 11

T.
118
119
120.
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128

Trieste (b)
Tunis {b)
Trinidad de Cuba
Tampico Turk's Island Tabasco -. ^ Tripoli Talcahuano (6)
Tumbez Tahiti
Tangiers

2,163 04
3,950 17
2,500 00
• 1,000 00
2,000 00
. 500 00
1,500 00
1,474 64
500 00
1,000 00
3,000 00

435 89
""419"44
677 07
801 47
160 40

""m'si
399 04
170 81

V.
129
130
131
132

Vera Cruz '
Venice Vienna Valparaiso (o)

3,500 00
750 00
1,500 00
2,250 00

770 91
27 38
1,120 00
2,299 61

1,000 00

203 62

Z.
133 Zanzibar
Total amount of salary paid to 133 consular officers for the year ending December 31, 1859
Total amount of fees returned by them
during the same period
Amount paid by the Treasurer of the
United States
- ^ -

263,206 98
110,896 78
152,310 20
263,206 98 •263,206 98

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Fifth Auditor's Office, Novemher 19, 1860.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

239

NOTES.
(a) Consul absent twenty-one .days without leave, for which period no salary was paid
him.
(6) The excess of salary paid over and above the salary per annum provided for this consulate is for time occupied in receiving instructions and making the transit in accordance
with the eiffhth section of the act of August 18, 1856.
(c) To 25th November, since which time no returns have been received.
\d) An interval of eight days—from 29th May, the day following George R. West's death
to Sth June, the day on which James Busby entered upon his duties—also, eighteen days
absence of the consul without leave, for which periods no salary has been paid.
(e) From 25th April, when J. Judson Barclay entered upon his duties, to December 31,
and for thirty days to W . L. Ellsworth for receiving instruciions.
(/) Vacant.;
Ig) No returns for the year 1859. (h) An interval of five days between the day of John Z* Forney's death and the day on
which John Seys entered upon his duties, for which period no salary was paid.
(i) No returns for the third and fourth quarters.
\
(j) Incumbent not a citizen of the United States, and by section twenty-one of the act of
August 18, 1856, not entitled to salary.
(k) An interval of twelve days, from 1st to 12th January, inclusive, for which no salary
was paid, Charles A. Leas, the present cohsul, having been paid from January 13.
(l) From 1st to 19th January, subsequent to which Townsend Harris has been paid as
minister resident, &c.
"
{m)'C. De Ronceday was paid for twenty-three days receiving his instructions, forty-seven
days for making the transit, and from April 20 to December 31 at his post.
(n) From February 12 to December 31, the returns from January 1 to February 11 having
been necessarily included in the annual report for 1858.
(o) Return of fees for the year complete, salary paid.to September 30, 1859.

•

^




240

R E P O R T ON .THE FINANCES.

Statement showing the amount of money reported to have heen disbursed
for the relief of searnen^ and extra wages arid money received by
American consuls during thefiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
Name of consulate.
Alicante .-^
^---Anioy. - - . - - , . . . „,
_.
Antigua. - , ^ . . . - - . - . . _ . , . . .
Antwerp, (three quarters)
1
As|>iawall
.
.
...
Aux Cayes. -Bahia, (two q^uarters) . - - . . . - - Bangkok........ ^
. . _. ^ _..
. Barbadoes . . . . . ^
..
..
Batavia, (three quarters)
Bathurst
.-...'
Bay of Islands.
---.
Bermuda- - . . - ;-.--.- —
Bombay, (two quarters)... —
Bordeaux...
.
. . - - -. Bremen.
_
Bristol. - - - - . .— — . . _ . . , - - ,
Cadiz
. - - . . - . . . . . . . . . . . 1. .
Calcutta, (three quarters).. . .
Callao
.-.----.--.Campeachy- - -. --.
Cape Town
.Cienfuegos........
. -Constantinople.,
Cork, (three quarters)
,
Curapoa
-.
Dundee
Elsinore-.^
Falmouth
»-...-.
Fayal, (two quarters)
---.
Foo-Choo
..».i--Genoa
...
Gibraltar
...
„
...
Glasgow...
.--....
Gottenburg
...
Grand Cayman
Guayaquil- - .
.Halifax
-._
Havan a
Havre
.
...
Hamburg
.
.
...
Hilo
Hobart Town
.-..,.....,
Hong Kong, (three quarters).
Honolulu._-.
Kingston, J a m a i c a . . . .
.
Laguayra..
...
Laguna de Terminis
Lahaina, (three quarters)
.,
La Rochelle
----Leeds
.>
London, (two quarters)
Lyons
i...
Malaga.-ii.-.,.---Manchester,...--- —
Maranham. - - - - . - i - - - - - - - -




Disbursements. Money received.

$91 00
,202 50

$224 00
90 00
30 o6

1,044 25

15 00

168 13

-.

..0
26
6
326
295
54
936

. 6 50
8
891 40
332 52
24 00
1,959 58
2^70 42
779 21

43
60
65
90
00
00

237-71
48 00
45 00
516 72
866 00
425 71
.4,342.87

351 96
65 06
1,046 90
1,232 55
94 83
24,626 15
255 66
238.49.

•
200 25

21 50
:811 57

920 58/

958 07
^ 171 60

74 00

115 07
160 61
239 09

.
280 17
84 75
1,509 27

4,494 39
21 00
114 30

460 50
109 50
164 00

196 25
142' 98
90 50
31 09
135 35
450 47
1,518 63
1,562 49

188 98
4,460 00
141 72
2,856 24
49,460 12

146 37
99 00
428 14
25,678 78

126
85
689
96
193
32
25

00
71
83
00
15
83
00

'

•

v

'
"

. 35 00
66 92
2,084 83
1,207 50
108 00
878 00
1,006 26
5,986 00
87 00

720 00
189 00

142 00

241

E E P O R T ON T H E FINANGES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Name of consulate.
Marseilles. .—
Matanzas-' !
-._
-.„
Mauritius
L -.
Mazatlan, (one quarter)
Melbourne
--.
Messina
--...„
Minatitlan
Montevideo
-.;.". ^
Montreal
Nagasaki
.
.,..'-Naples
Nassau, N. P.
-.
.
Newcastle-on-Tyne.
•--Ning-po
.-L ..
Oporto
,
:
L. Paita
,
Palermo
.
--.
Panama
;
Paramaribo
Paris
Pernambuco
Plymouth,
...
Point de Galle
Port Stanley
..-.--.
Prince Edward's Island..
Puerto Cabello
—
Rio de J a n e i r o . - . .
Rio Grande del Sur, (two quarters).
Rotterdam
..
Sabanilla
San Juan del Norte
-San Juan del Sur
.
SanJuan, P . R
Santiago
^
Shanghai . . - (jidney, (three quarters)
- -,
Singapore
..Srnyrna
Southampton L
-..'
St. Domingo, (two quarters)
.
St. Helena
St. Jago de Cuba
-...
St. Petersburg
St. Thomas - . . . - .
-^
Tabasco
Tahiti
Talcahuano
^
.-.
.-Tampico
Teneriffe
Trieste
Trinidad.Tumbez
Turk's Island
Valparaiso
Vera Cruz
Zante
Zanzibar
.-

Disbursements. Money received.

$818 60




637 73

1,508 39
253 30
24 00
154 88
2,147 69

.

3 00
48 00

1,052 22
14,205 00

66
1,666
227
131
36

619 72
2,301 20

24 00
6 72
2, 250 85
88 68590 74
637 30
203 38
23 66
591 90
1,001 76

856
22
69
10

738 76
48 00
496 00
780 00
197 GO

20
60
00
2,2U 00

16 00
602
90
684
946
2,670

93 26
1,801 23
3,321 72
3,475 20
125 76
25 41
607 39
81 00
37 60
1,009 21
30 00
5,995 20
13,309 87

10
999
420
17

76

83
95
30
10,186 50

00
00
33
48
00

1, 660 44

31

1,311 45

496.82
36 00

56 00
90 25

•
'

90
00
00
30
08

227
1,235
64
46
695

00
66
00
00
00

396 00
1,686 08
64 00
81 00
1,050 00

212 98
10,080

214 37'
183 70
10 00
220,670 30

16

$184 80
446 05
927 00

628 02
2,895 36
166 86
494 86
40 00
121 80,

1,088 75
763 00

45,920 35

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continuea.
.

.

.

.

.

.

•

^

•

•

•

•

The following sums were paid for the relief of seamen,
otherwise than by the.consuls, viz:
,.
To Isaac M. Brown, owner and master of the schooner
<'Mechanic," for blankets furnished destitute seamen
by order of the consul at Lanthala
.
To John Gibson, purser of the United States frigate
i' Merrimack," for provisions and clothing to destitute
seamen.-...:
.
.To M. Giddings, owner of the American brig ' 'Executive,''
for medical aid and funeral expenses of destitute
seamen.
.
-.-^
.--.
To Royal Greenland Mercantile Company, for subsistence
of destitute seamen/.----..»
------- ^

$122 00
67 43
62 40
'

70 56

'Total d i s b u r s e m e n t s . - - - — ^ - . - - . . . - - - - - ^ - . - - - ^ '
/ Less extra wasres • _--- . . . - - . . - . . - . - - - . 1 . r

220,982 69
45,920 35

Paid outof the t r e a s u r y . . . . - - — . . . - - - - — . . - - - . f

175,062 34

Statement shoiving the amount expended in arresting American seamen
in-foreign countries charged with the commission of crime on Americaii
vessels, together with the expenses attending the examination ofthe
same hy the consul, and the expenses of sending them home for trial
with the witnesses, during thefiscal year ending June.30, 1860.
Consulate, where expense originated.

AnoLsterdam
Bathurst.Bordeaux
^
-.
Cape Town, Cape of Good Hope.
Fayal-.1.
— .....
Gibraltar
-.-.--..^Havana - . . . . . . . - - - - - - . _ . . . _ .
Liverpool
— - - - - — - -. Marseilles
...
-Monrovia...
-.--..--.
Nantes - - ^ . . . . . . . . 1
—. Nuevitas - - . ' . . . .
.--..
Palermo. ^
Puerto Cabello
----St: John's, N. B ^..:1-St. H e l e n a . . . .
-^-..'.....
. St. Thomas
-- — . . . . .^ . . . .
Jrieste.---...-^-.---.^
Total.-.




-

No. of seamen Amouut expended.
arrested.

4
1

$263.68
78 96
160 m
118 26
125 G
O
106 00
75 00
118 00
60 G
O
238 7^5
192 64
20 00
60 G
O
92 76
146 60
116 00
344 92
17 60

48

2,332 96

1
1
2
13
2
I
1
2
1
2
2
I
4
1
3

243

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

0.
Statement showing the numher of ^ destitute American seamen'* sent to
^
the United States from their several consulates during thefiscal year
ending June 30, 1860.
Consulates and names of the consuls.

No. of seamen.

Amount.

A.
Alicante, "W. L. Giro
-.
Amoor river, P. McD. Collins
Antigua, R. S. Higginbotham
Antwerp, A. D. Gall
.Aspinwall, C. J. Fox
,Aux Cayes, R. L o r i n g - . . . — .

1
2
4
64
7

$10
20
270
40
640
70

00
00
00
GO
00
00

6
6
10
15
3
2
1
522
1
1
4

60
60
100
150
30
20
10
299
10
10
40

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
OO
00

1
2
1
1
31
10
7
2
4
2

10
20
10
10
310
100
70
20
40
20

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
GO
00

a 16

B.
Bahia, J. S. Gillmer
Balize, taken from a wreck
Barbadoes, N. Towner
Barrington, N. S., J. Robertson.
Bathurst, D. R. B. Upton
Bay of Islands, G. R. West
Batavia, H. Anthon, jr
Bermuda, H. B. Brown
Bremen, J. R. Diller
—
Bristol, England, S. Ward
Buenos Ayres, Wm. PI. Hudson
C.
Cadiz, T. T. Tunstall
---Callao, Wm, Miles
Calcutta, C. Hufifnagle...
Canton, 0. H. Perry
Cardenas, G. Harris
—
Cape of Good Hope, G. S. Holmes.
Cienfuegos, C. D. Fowler
Constantinople, James McDowell _
Cura9oa, M. Jesurun
Cuidad Bolivar, John Wulfif......
D.
30 00

Demarara, A. V. Colvin.
E.

10 00

Elsinore, J. P. M. Epping.
F.
Falkland Islands, W. H. Smiley.
Falmouth, Jamaica, M. Salmon..
Fayal, C. W. Dabney.
-.



6
1
c74

50 GO
10 00
1,510 00

244

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
No.

Consulates and names of the consuls.

No. of seamen.

Amount.

G.
33
34

Gibraltar, H. J. Sprague .
Glasgow, G. Vail

$40 00
10 GO
H.

35
36
37
38
39

Halifax, A. PiUsbury
Havana, C. J. Helm . . .
Havre, W. H. Vesey
Hong Kong, J. Keenan.
Honolulu, Abner Pratt -

. 4
20
13
86

30 00
200 00
290 GO
130 GO
860 00

I & J.
40 Inagua, D. S a r g e n t . , . . . .
41 Jacmel, Charles Moraria.

18

i

180 00
10 00

K.

42 Kingston, Jamaica, R. A. Harrison43
44
45
46
AT
48
49

Laguayra, Andrew J. Smith
..Laguna, G. T. Ingraham, jr., consul and agent.
Lahaina, Anson G. Chandler - .
Liverpool, England, Beverley Tucker
Liverpool, Nova Scotia, J. D. Davis
Loando, J. G. Willis
Londbn, R. B. Campbell
-

90 00

1
14
7
35
3
6
9

10 m
140 00
70 GO
350 00
18 00
60 00
90 00

M.
60
61
62
63
64
66
66
57
58
69
60

Macao, G. NyeMalta, W. Winthrop.
Marseilles, Alexander Derbes
Malaga, J. S. Smith..
Martinique, W. I., A. Campbell .
Matanzas, Hugh Martin, jr
...
Mauritius, G. H. Fairfield
Mazatlan, Edward Cornier
Messina, F. W. Behm
Minatitlan, A. C. Allen
Montevideo, Richard H. Gayle.-.

1
6
1
1
14
/ 5
4
3
7
13

10 00
15 GO
60 00
10 00
10 GO
140 GO
45 00
40 00
30 GO
70 OO
130 00

^201
1

2,211 75
10 00

10
15
3
1
1
31
1
1

100 00
150 GO
30 00
10 00
10 GO
310 00
10 GO
10 00

e 1

N.
61 Nassau, Bahamas, I. J. Merritt
62 Newfoundland, W. Si H. Newman .
P.
63
64
66
66
67
68
69
70

Palermo, H. H. Barstow.
Panama, A. B. Corwine
Para, Eben P. Bailey.
Paramaribo, Henry Sawyer
Plaister Cove, N. S., J. G. McKean...
Pernambuco, W. W. Stapp
Philippine Islands, C. Griswold
Prince of Wales Island, C. C. Currier .




245

BEPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Consulates and names of the consuls.

No. of seamen.

Amount.

R.
Rio de Janeiro, Robert G. ScottRio Grande, George F. Upton

Sabanilla, W. B. Storm-..------....
Sagua la Grande, J. W. Vanderkeift
San Juan, P. R., C. DeRonceray
Saint Christopher, J. R. Thurston
St. John's, N. B., C. Whitaker
St. Helena, G. W. Kimball
St. Thomas, R. P. Waring
St. Domingo, Jonathan Elliott - . --.
St. Jago de Cuba, S. Cochran
,
St. Jago, Cape Verd Islands, W. H. Morse.
Shanghai, W. L. G. Smith.- — . . . Singapore, J. P. O ' S u l l i v a n . . . . Smyrna, E. S. Offley
Southampton, William Thompson
Sierra Leone
»
.----

2
1

1
12
2
^11
6
16
J22
k 7

1
2
8
1
4
1

$20 00
10 00

10, 00
120 00
20 00
209 00
60 00
160 00
240 00
140 00
10 00
20 00
80 00
10 o8
40 00
10 00

T.
Tabasco, E. P. Johnson
..
Tahiti, Vicessimus Turner
Talcahuano, Albert G. Blakely. Trieste, S. S. Remak -Trinidad de Cuba, J.R. Hooken.
Trinidad Island, E. B. Marache.
Turk's Island, J. B. Hayne.

19

2
.
8
1
6
6
17

160 00
20 00
80 00
10 00
60 00
60 00
170 00

2
11

20 00
110 00

V.
Valparaiso, William Trevitt
., —
Vera Cruz, R. B. J. Twyman
Victoria, brought home by J. R. Lock, master of the
bark Forward
-..

60 00

Z.
30 00

Zanzibar, D. H. Mansfield
MISCELLANEOUS.

Picked up at sea
..
Fortune Island, Bahamas ,




m 14
3

120 75
30 00

1,049

12,008 60

J. T. FARRINGTON,
W. H. JOHNSON,
Justices of the Peace.

246

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

REMARKS. •
a 7 at $10 each, 6 at $20 each, and 4 at $25 each; brought in British vessels.
6 3 at $10 each, 8 at $13 each, and 11 at $15 each; brought in British vessels. c 41 at $10 each, 6 at $24 each, and 28 at $36 each; they being over and above tbe
number required by law to be taken.
d 14 at $10 each, and 1 insane man at $150.
e An extra $5 allowed, on account of i)utting the master to inconvenience.
/ 4 at $10 each, and 1 at $6, he having been left at the Cape of Good Hope oa account
of sickness.
,
'
g 116 at $10 each, 2 at $13 each, 6 at $10 50 each, 5 at $11 20 each, 61 at $12 each,
and 11 at $16 each, brought in British vessels; and $9 75 paid for funeral expenses of ono
man.
A 2 at $10 each, and 9 at $21 each; being over and above the number .required by law
to be taken.
% 12 at $10 each, and 10 at $12 each; being over and above the number required by law
to be taken.
A 7 at $20 each; brought home i n a British vessel.
;
l 2 at $10 each, and 7 at $20 each; being over and above the nuniber required by law
to be taken.
m Being 9 men for 9 days, at 75 cents per day, and 5 men for 16 days, at 76 cents per
_ FIFTH AUDITOK'S OFFICE, Treasury D^artment^ N'ovemher 12, 1860.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

247

F.
OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY
FOR THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,

November 26,1860.
SIR: In view of the fact that I have furnished the Postmaster
General with an official report of the operations of this office during
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860^ presenting in elaborate detail
everything connected with the financial status of the Post Office
Department of general interest to the public, to whom it will be
submitted by the Postmaster General in connexion with his annual
report, I beg leave to present the following, brief synopsis of the
chief labors, so diligently and faithfully performed by the efficient
corps of clerks employed in this office during the past fiscal year, and
have the honor to direct your attention to the report referred to for
details.
The general operations of the office have embraced within their
ample field the examination, comparison, and restatement of the
postage stamp and stamped envelope accounts of 28,539 postmasters
by the clerk's in chargeof the receipt from the PostOffice Department of the quarterly returns of postmasters, and' preparation of
these returns for the exarainers, who have completed their examination, and made such corrections as were found to be necessary, and
delivered the accounts to tbe registrars within the period fixed by the
department regulations. The examiners discovered and corrected
errors in 18,429 accounts, whereby the balance in each case in favor
ofthe United States was increased more than fifty cents, and carefully
prepared copies of these accounts as rendered by the postmasters, and
as audited and corrected, were sent out by the clerks in charge of the
' ' e r r o r accounts.*'
The registrars entered analytically, in their proper order, the postal
results exhibited by the:accounts previously examined, and delivered
their books to the bookkeepers for entry of the balances found due
from or to postmasters upon the ledgers of the office, without regard
to any payments made by them to the United States during the quarter, as such payments are required by department regulation (section
No. 271) to be carefully excluded therefrom; and the entries of pay-r
ments made on account of said balances are therefore made primarily
in books kept by the clerks in charge of the '^ miscellaneous business,'*
by the '' collecting division," and by the ^'pay clerks " a n charge of
contractors' accounts, and transferred from thence, in their proper
order, to the ledgers.
The number of miscellaneous entries made in the ledgers during
the year was:
Of balances
Of balances
Of balances
Of balances
laneous

due to or by postmasters
109,925
due to mail contractors
,
34,892
due to special contractors and mail messengers... 19,888
due to special agents, route agents, and miscel2,712




248

REPORT ON THE FINANOES.

Of payments made by postmasters on '^collection o r d e r s "
issued to mail contractors
Of payments made on '^ special collection drafts".,
Of payments made by 'Mraft offices"
Of payments made upon warrants drawn upon the treasury

64,986
3,854
10,777
9,606

The '^ pay division" has audited and reported to-the Postmaster General the balances arising upon 34,892 accounts of mail contractors, em-,
bracing the amounts due for their services, together with the interest
allowed by an act of Congress, approved 15th February, 1860, upon
the deferred payments for mail service during the quarters ending
March 31, June 30, and September 30, 1859, the computation of
which, and special reports to the Postmaster .General of the amounts
due to contractors, largely increased the labors of the clerks in this
*'division."
The labors of the clerks ofthe '* collecting division," and the success
met with in their eff'orts to collect the revenues of the department in
the hands of late and delinquent postmasters, by correspondence upon
disputed items of accounts, and by the institution of suits in all cases
of failure to obtain an amicable adjustment witliin the period fixing
the liability of the sureties upon their official bonds, are so fully set
forth in my report, before referred to, as to render it unnecessary to
report them in this.
The number of letters received during the year was 102,004, and
the number prepared, recorded, and mailed was 65,276.
Only three appeals have been taken to the First Comptroller of the
Treasury frqm the decisions of the office during the year, in two of
which the decisions of the office have been sustained, and the third is
still pending.
The entire business of the office is in as satisfactory a condition as
could be desired, the duties of each particular desk being fully up to
the requirements of the department regulations.
I, have the honor to be, very respectfully,
THOS. M. T A T E , Auditor.
Hon.

HOWELL COBB, '

Secretary ofi the Treasury,

G.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

; Comptroller's Office, November 28, i860.
SIR : Enclosed herewith please find a statement exhibiting an outline of the current business of this office during the fiscal year ending
the 30th of June, 1860.
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
W . M E m i A j , Gomptroller,
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary ofi the Treasury,



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

249

Statement exhibiting outline of current husiness, office of ihe First
Comptroller of the Treasury, during the fiscal year ending June 30,
1860.
The following-named warrants of the Secretary of the Treasury
have been countersigned, entered in blotters, and posted, to wit:
472 stock warrants.
,
1,869 quarterly salary warrants.
1,895 treasury (proper) warrants.
3,023 treasury (interior) warrants,
2,509 customs warrants.
2,380 war pay warrants.
507 war repay warrants.
875 navy pay warrants.
261 navy repay warrants.
959 interior pay warrants.
86 interior repay warrants.
32 treasury appropriation, warrants.
33 interior and customs appropriation warrants.
25 war and navy appropriation warrants.
17 Texas debt warrants.,
2 treasury funding warrants.
117 land covering warrants.
891 customs covering warrants.
1,069 miscellaneous covering warrants.
17,022 aggregate number of warrants.
The accounts described as follows, reported to this office by the
First and Fifth Auditors and Commissioner of the GeneraL Land
Office, have been revised and certified to the Eegister of the Treasury,
to wit :
Judiciary: Embracing accounts of marshals, for expenses of United
States courts ; of district attorneys,' clerks of United States circuit
and district courts and United States commissioners, for per diem
and fees, rent of court-rooms, &c.
802
Diplomatic and consular: Embracing accounts of foreign
ministers, for salary and contingent expenses ; of United
States secretaries of legation, for salary ; of consuls general, consuls, and commercial agents, for salary, and disbursements for relief of destitute American seamen ; for
passage from foreign ports to the United States of destitute and criminal American seamen a,nd witnesses ; of .
United States commissioners under reciprocity treaty, &c.
1,273
Puhlic lands.: Embracing accounts of receivers of public
o
money ; of receivers acting as disbursing agents ; of
surveyor general and deputy surveyors; of lands erroneously sold ; of the several States for percentage on
lands sold within their limits, &c....
,
2,513



250

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Salaries : Embracing accounts for salaries of United States
supreme, district, and territorial judges; attorneys, mar-r
shals, local inspectors, the clerks and other employes in
the several executive departments, &c.
Public deht: Embracing accounts for redemption of United
States stock and treasury notes ; interest on public
debt, &c
Puhlic printing: Embracing accounts for public printing,
binding, and paper
;...
Mint and branches: Embracing accountsof gold, silver,
and cent bullion ; of ordinary expenses, repairs &c
Territorial: Embracing accounts of governors of Territories, for contingent expenses, erectiDU of public buildings, and purchase of libraries ; of secretaries of Territories ; for legislative and contingent expenses, &c
Miscellaneous: Embracing accounts of the Coast Survey;
of the Commissioner of Public Buildings, the Insane
Asylum, Penitentiary, United States Boundary Commissions, of the United States Treasurer, for horses lost ih
the military service of the United States,, Texas debt,
suppression of the slave trade, Cayuse Indian war. Clerk
of the House, and Secretary of the Senate, &c., &c
Aggregate number of accounts

1,268
491
112
63

33

1,035
7,580

There have been, also, regularly entered and filed the half-yearly
emolument returns made by United States marshals, attorneys, and
clerks of courts, in pursuance of the 3d section of the act of February
26, 1853. Also, all requisitions made from time to time for advances
to United States marshals, territorial officers, treasurers of the
mint and branches, to disbursing agents for erection of court-houses
and post offices, mint repairs, &c., &c., have been examined and reported upon.
Number of letters written on all subjects, 3,732. Besides, other
duties have been performed which it is deemed unnecessary to particularize.

H.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Comptroller's Office, Novemher 27, 1860.
SIR: In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this office during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
During that year the number of accounts revised, passed, and re^
corded, were:




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
From the Second Auditor
From the Third Auditor
From the Fourth Auditor....
Total

251
«

0 ..........

1,390
2,299
324
3,013

Many of these accounts embraced heavy expenditures, and required
much time and careful examination.
The total amount erabraced in these settlements was |42,121,011 71.
Other than those above enumerated, the class of small accounts,
showing balances due soldiers, seamen, their heirs, administrators, &c.,
revised by this office, and paid by disbursing officers of the army and
navy, on certificates originating in the Second and Fourth Auditors'
offices, has, as heretofore, been subject to due investigation and examination. They were as follows:
,
.
Of those reported by the Second Auditor
584
Of those reported by the Fourth Auditor
,.
,
368
Total......

916

The number of requisitions upon the Secretary of the Treasury
received, examined, countersigned, and recorded upon the books of
this office, were:
Drawn by the Secretary of the Interior, viz : *
P a y o r advance requisitions.,
955
Repay requisitions
,
,....
99
Drawn by the Secretary, of War, viz:
Pay or advance requisitions
2,488
Eepay requisitions
506
Drawn by the Secretary of the Navy, viz :
Pay or advance requisitions...........
874
Eepay requisitions.....
251
Total

5,173

During the past year 578 letters have been received, filed, answered,
and indexed ; the answers thereto covering 270 folio post of the letterbook
The number of cases prepared for suit and transmitted to the Solicitor of the Treasury was three.
All the annual statements required by the law of May 1, 1820, have
been promptly transraitted in duplicate to the Secretaries of the Interior, of War, and of the Navy. These statements exhibited the
balances of the several appropriations remaining upon the books on
the Ist of July, 1858 ; the appropriations made for the service of the
fiscal year 1858-'59 ; the repayments and transfers in that year ; the
amount applicable under each appropriation, and the amount drawn
by requisitions during the same period ; and, finally, the balances



252

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

remaining unexpended on the 30th of June, 1859, with such appror
priations as were carried to the surplus fund.
The revision of accounts required of this office under the regulations
of the Executive, for carrying into effect the provisions of the treatiesof October 26, 1852, and of May 24, 1854, with the Chickasaw tribe
of Indians, has been duly made and the records kept up.
The usual prescribed duties of this office, embracing decisions of
cases reported from the Second, Third, and Fourth Auditors, and
from the different bureaus and offices of the War and Navy Departments, have promptly secured the attention of this office.
In conclusion, .permit me, most respectfully, to repeat the conviction,
expressed in previous reports from this office, that its greater efficiency
would be promoted, in case of vacancies here, by the appointment of
clerks from the offices of the Second, Thirds and Fourth Auditors,
where they may have evinced the requisite qualifications.
Most respectfully, your obedient servant,
J . MADISON CUTTS,
Comptroller,
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury,

^

L

•

>
:
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,.

Office of Commissioner of Customs, Novemher 20, 1860.
" S I R : In consequence of the indisposition and unavoidable absence
of the Commissioner, the duty is devolved dn me of furnishing a brief
report of the operations of this office for the past year. In the per^
formance of this duty, itis very gratifying to me to be enabled to state,
as a result of the integrity, ability, and fidelity with which the gentlemen employed in the office have performed their respective duties,,
that the affairs of the office, in all that affects the public interest, were
never, in myjudgment, in a better condition than at present.
All accounts reported to this office by the First Auditor have been
adjusted and transmitted to the Eegister in time to be included by him
in the annual statement of * ^public accounts."
There have been adjusted within the past year accounts of collectors
of customs and surveyors, acting as designated collectors, including
accounts of disbursing agents of the treasury, and the eraoluraent and
additional compensation accounts of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors, to the number of two thousand four hundred and fifteen.
Accounts relating to the superintendence and construction of lights
houses, buoys, and beacons, marine hospital, and miscellaneous purposes, amount to thirteen hundred and, twenty-eight. :
The number of requisitions issued upon estimates furnished by the
proper officers for the expense of collecting the revenue from customs;
for debentures and deposits; for unascertained duties; for the support
pf light-houses, and the maintenance and support of sick and disabled



REPORT ON THE FINANGES,

253

seamen; for the construction and repairs of public buildings, and
other miscellaneous purposes, amount to two thousand and fifty-one.
Fifty-six commissions to officers of the customs were transmitted
-during the year, and forty-nine official bonds executed by collectors,
&c., in conformity to the forms and instructions furnished by this
office, were received, approved, and acknowledged.
Three thousand six hundred and eighty-three letters were received
and registered in the course of the year, and five thousand four hundred and twenty-six were written and recorded.
With a view to facilitate the business transactions of the office^
I beg leave to invite attention to the recoraraendations subraitted
for your consideration in the reports- frora this office of the 20th
November, 1858, and the 23d of November last; and particularly those
relating to-the approval of the bonds of collectors^ &c., and the
increase of compensation to two of the clerks.
I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,
T. F E E A N ,
Acting Commissioner ofi Customs,
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury,

J.
TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES,

November 30, 1860.
SIR : In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to submit the following sumraary of the business of this office during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
The araount covered into the treasury during the year, by 3,335
warrants, was^—
From customs, lands> and miscellaneous sources
$77,050,867 94
From Interior Department
251,950 98
From War Department
1,539,073 82
From Navy Department
1,701,412 97
80,543,305 71
Which includes repayments of previous advances and amounts transferred from one appropriation to another in adjusting the balances of
settled accounts.
The payments during the same period on 12,924 warrants, and by
' 13,275 drafts, w^ere—
For civil, diplomatic, public debt, and miscellaneous
$45,796,058 95
For InteriorDepartment
4,304,068 47
For War Department
17,948,810 92
For Navy Department......0
.....o....... ,.
13,216,377 93




81,265,316 27

254

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Which also includes payments for transfer of balances in adjusting
settled accounts.
The amount received at the several offices of the
treasury for the use of the Post Office Deparment
was
......^
$11,340,805 0 4 And the araount of 6,600 post office warrants
....
10,360,824 0 5 '
Balance at the credit of said departraent, subject to draft at the
closeof the year, $1,022,293 06.
i
The sura of $15,895,400 has been reraoved from one depository to
another during the year, for the purpose of being coined or for making
disbursements for the public service.
Nine hundred and eighty-four transfer drafts were issued to authorize the moveraent of this araount, part of which was effected by actual
transportation, and the reraainder by the common practice of exchange, whereby much expense was avoided and a premium obtained
on a considerable portion.
The practice of holding moneys drawn from the treasury at the
credit and subject to the orders of disbursing officers continues to work
satisfactorily, and has been extended considerably even since the report
of lasfc year.
The receipts in the money branch of this office on treasury account
proper, from all sources during the year, amounted to $7,884^737 98,
of which $5,026,000 was transferred to it without expense by means
of 2,606 checka given in exchange for coin paid in advance.
Treasury drafts amounting to $7,377,200 42 have been satisfied,
either with coin or by being entered to the credit of disbursing officers.
Sixty-five accounts have been kept with disbursing officers, and at
least 16,000 of their checks, paid, amounting to $7,191,000.
In addition to the ordinary business of the office, we issued during
the year 22,787 treasury nofces, amounting to $19,345,200.
My recent connexion with this office, and consequent want of personal knowledge of the operations set forth above, disqualify me for
speaking of them decidedly ; but I am satisfied, by what I have seen
since ray accession, that all the duties were perforraed before, as they
have been since, with highly coramendable despatch and accuracy.
Eespectfully subraitted.
W . C . PEICE, ^
Treasurer United States.
Hon,

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury,




REPORT ON THE FINANCES. '

255

K.
OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR OF THE TREASURY,

November 30, 1860.
SIR : I have the honor to transrait herewith a report of the operations of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, erabraced
in five tabular statements, numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.
In these statements the suits brought are classified, as far as it could
be conveniently done, so as to present as distinctly as possible all
that has been done in each particular class of business in each of the
judicial districts^ and a general sumraary of the whole, as follows, viz :
No. 1. Statement of suits on treasury transcripts of the official settlements of the accounts of defaulting public officers, contractors, &c.,
adjusted by the accounting officers of the Treasury Department.
No. 2. Statement of suits brought during the year for the recovery
of fines, penalties, and forfeitures for violations of the revenue laws.
No. 3. Statement of suits on warehouse transportation bonds for
duties on goods imported.
No. 4. Staternent of miscellaneous suits, which includes all suits
brought during the year which are not embraced in the three preceding
tables.
No. 5 is a general summary showing the aggregates^of^ the above
tables.
. "
From this general summary it appears that the whole number of
suits of every description brought during the year was 760, of which
19 were of Class 1, for the recovery of $146,337 68 ; 210 for the recovery of fines, penalties, and forfeitures for violations of the revenue
laws, (Class No. 2,) the mass of which are in rem, but which includes
specific fines and penalties amounting to $272,016 56; 120 were on
warehouse transportation^bonds, amounting to $296,712 4 2 ; and 411
miscellaneous suits for $36,638 20.
Of these suits, 288 havebeen tried and disposed-of during the year,
as follows, to w i t : 151 decided in favor of the United States, 59 decided against the United States, and 78 settled and discontinued without
trial, leaving 472 still pending undecided.
.
Of the old suits on the dockets of the office, which originated and
were instituted previous to the coraraencement of the fiscal year, 189
have been tried and disposed of during the year, as follows, viz: 62
decided for the United States, 42 decided against the United States,
and 85 s^tled and dismissed without trial.
The aggregate number pf suits of all descriptions decided and otherwise disposed of during the year is 477. The gross amount of
judgment obtained, exclusive of cases in rem^ is $232,033 01, and the
amount collected from all sources is $434,201 32,
All of which is repectfully submitted.
Very respectfully your most obedient servant,'
J U N I U S HILLYEE^, Solicitor.
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury.




NO. 1.
Statement ofi suits on treasury transcripts fior thefiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
NEW

HAMPSHIRE.

Against whom.

JZ

B
3

Capacity.

s
Principal.

B

a-

o
O

Sureties.

2
a

|-

i •
o

•rs
,3

iS
-a
3

«^
O

c
z
Zi
o
S

<

- i

Q

$1,035 00

DecJBionH aTirl p n l l p p t i n i r a i n snitR hrniiorht n r i n r t n thft p . o m m f t n c H m f t n t n f thp. nrp.RP.nt fisp.al v p a r .
•

.

OS

2
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bi

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1
§

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ft

<
$1,055 65

53
•a

1

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'•5

•T3

.1

General reraarks.
a.

3 3
72 72

O
to
O

•

W

VERMONT.

Decisions in suits brought prior lo the commencement of the present fiscal year.,

5Z5
Q

MASSACHUSETTS.

QQ

Decisions in suits brought prior to the commencement of the present^fiscal year .

NEW Y O R K . - N O R T H E R N

Collections in suits brought prior to the commencement of the preaent fiscal year.




DISTRICT.

$17,800 00

NEW YORK.—SOUTHERN DISTRICT.
1859.
July
7

A. T . Hillyer .

Jos. L . W h i t e and
Richard Schell.

$24,855 57

Default as late United
Slates marshal.

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to the c o m m e n c e m e n t o f t h e present fiscal y e a r .

$23,491 90

$17,141 90

PENNSYLVANIA.—EASTERN DISTRICT.

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to the commencement ofthe present fiscal y e a r .

1,515 06

$224 06

Pi
H
O

PENNSYLVANIA.—WESTERN DISTRICT.
1859.
Nov. lerm John C. O ' N e i l l . . . . Wm. J. MadeirajWm.
Gerrish, jr.,and.S.
C. Stanbaugh.

Q

H
W
•I $279 77

>
o

MARYLAND.

QQ

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior lo the commencement ofthe present fiscal y e a r .

$5,135 66

$52,592 98

$24 00

$5,775 53

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to the c o m m e n c e m e n t ofthe present




fiscalyear.

to

No. 1.—Statement ofi suits on treasury transcripts, &c.—Continued.

bO
00

VIRGINIA.—EASTERN

DISTRICT.
CO

Against whom.

g

i

Capacity.

00

g

1

Principal.

1

Sureties.

1

.

C
3

i
I<

1

a

. '6

s
1

4)
rt

V

B
ca
ra
3
O
o
rt
Q

I

Deci^i^Tn.q nnfl pnllpptinno in ciiitq hrnnorht nrinr tn i\\n pnmmpnppmpnt nf ihf^ nrpspnt fi^pnl XPT^r..

o
c

<
$5,945 15

o
"o
c

3
O

6

<
$146 82

^

FLORIDA.—NORTHERN

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to the commencement ofthe present fiscal year.

Sa
c

.2
'S

jO

1
1c
c
CD

s

•3
0)
• 3 T3

General remarks.

M

w
w
o
w

2
"3 5
Q. '3 02
"5

1

•3Q

o

4

DISTRICT.

a

$25,000 00

o

ALABAMA.—MIDDLE DISTRICT.

QQ

Money in the hands of the marshal.

Collections in suits brought prior to the commencement of the present fiscal year.

ALABAMA.—SOUTHERN

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to the commencement ofthe present fiscal year.




DISTRICT.

$5,978 94

Money in the hands of the marshal.

TEXAS.—WESTERN DISTRICT.
$10,318 22

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to the commencement of the present fiscal y e a r .

ARKANSAS.—WESTERN DISTRICT.

1

1860.
J a n . 31

1

Mar. 31

Samuel M. Rutherford, surety of G.
W . Scott.
T h o m a s S. Drew . . W m . R. Hunter,
J o h n P. Black,
J a m e s Houston,
Dan'l Hannaner,
Jno. H.lmboden,
Alex. Robinson.

2

$1,179 67

Debt on marshal's official bond.

1

5,678 90

Debt on bond as superintendent Indiau affairs.

1

W
fel
O

w
H
O

2

6,858 57

w
m

KENTUCKY.

H-i

1859.
July 14

Alex. J, Mitchell.

Leslie Combs, R.
H. Crittenden.

$3,154 76

1860.
Debt on bond as late May term.
purser.

$3,380 80

O

fel

QQ

OHIO.—SOUTHERN DISTRICT.
1859.
Aug. 15

Sept. 24

Rich'd M. Corwine,
J n o . A. Corwine,
Wm. Wisnel.
t h o s . K. S m i t h . . . Johii A. Corwine,
W m . N. Corry, &
J o h n L . Vatiier.




$1,700 27

Breach of contract to
open passes at the
mouths of the Mississippi river.
Debt on bond as late
marshal.

1860.
Mar. 3

Appeal ordered.

1,700 27
CD

No. 1.—Statement qf suits on ireasury transcripts, (^c—Contihued,

to

INDIANA.

o

Against w h o m .
fl

a

1
B
3

1

o

c
O)

s
s
o

Principal.

Sureties.

1859.
Oct.
5

3

<
Alex. F . Morrison.. J o h n ? . Dunn. Wm.
H. Talbott.'

S

^3

?

O
03

B

O

i

$6,418 30

Debt on bond as late
pension agent.

1859.
Nov. T .

J a s . W . Davidson.

A . P a t t e r s o n , Rob't
Holloway, Henry
M. Boggess, John
C. Bond, C. W .
Lucas, F. H.Davidson, Jn. Riffgs,
P. PhelpSjH. Norcross, E. Davidson, A . S . Gilbert.

$6,797 81

Daniel Clapp .




Josh. Grundy, L e vin T . Palmer.

"o
o
3
3
O

S

s
<

$4,917 97

$4,900 00

sS
CO

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ti)
c

1

•6

rt 'rt

'•5

a.

General remarks.'

rt

1
.O

'5

1 'a

5
1

n

3

'3

fej
O

^^
O
W

Debt on bond as late
marshal.

O
fel
CQ

ILLINOIS.—SOUTHERN DISTRICT.
1860.
Feb. 9

•

C
3
O

ILLINOIS.—NORTHERN DISTRICT.
1859.
Dec. 6

t

fcO

-3

Capacity.

"3
3

-3
Oi
•

c
B

o

$4,040 24

Debt on bond as late
register.

WISCONSIN.
I860.
Aug. 26

Moritz Schoeffler .

J a s . B. Cross, W m .
Finkler,
Jacob
Best, jr., W m . H .
Lindnum, Philip
Best.

$11,855 60

Debt on bond as .late
collector.

Collections in suitsfbrought prior to the commencement^of the present fiscal y e a r .

$,581 06

IOWA.
O
Pi
1860.
May term Ariel K . E a t o n .

J o h n Acers, Daniel
B. Noble, John
W . Clark, T h o s .
C. Helm, John
Penn, Chas. Harding, Preder'k B.
• Doolittle, T h o s .
Helm.

$34,690 25

Debt on bond as late
receiver of public
moneys.

O

m

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior lo the c o m m e n c e m e n t of the present fiscal y e a r .

$979 70

$719 43

a
MINNESOTA.
1859.
June 3

W m . H . Nobles.

$20,868 00

Default as superintendent of Fort Ridgely
and South Pass wagon
road.

1860.
June T.

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to the c o m m e n c e m e n t of the present fiscal year ,




QQ

$3,446 00

$5,422 92

CD

No. 1.—-Statement of suits on ireasury transcripts^ (^c.-Tr-Contimied.

OS

to

CALIFORNIA.—NORTHERN DISTRICT.

2
2
c

Against w h o m .

a
•3

o
fl

s
1

«
s

3
55

Principal.

Sureties.

c
1859.
July
2
Sept. 2

1

CJS
'O
• 3

T3
3

6

1
1

Capacity.

i

c •
3
O
B

$4,367 73
4,920 00

•3

u

1

i
•3
Q

S

$4,920 00

fJnllpptJnns in Hiiit^ hrniipht nrinr tn thp commenoemftnt nf thp nrpspnt fispnl vpar

.

t

B

1

General remarks.

rt
• 3 '•B

11"3 '5
CO

1

1 Steamer sold and money exhausted
in p a y m e n t o f claims having priority
over that of United Slates.

I

4,920 00

Q-0IR7 7 n

b£
C
•3

Q

<

Debt on bottomry bond .

rt

•3

1
o

1

<
J a s Y McDnffip
George E. W e l c h ,
commander
of
m e r c h a n t steamer Washington.

'5

s

$51,133 33

- -

W
fel
hj.
O
H
O

w

fej
1
tz5

a

KANSAS TERRITORY.

fej
QQ

Elias T. D e n n i s . . . J. W. Whitfield,
Wm. H. Russell,
J. J. Clarkson.




$15,500 00

Debt on bond as late
marshal. ^

$2,162 58

Credited by amount allowed in treasury settlement since suit was ordered.

No. 2.
Statement ofi suits fior fines, penalties, and fiorfieitures-for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
DISTRICT OP MAINE.
Judgments.
Against whom or what.

-3

'B

1
B
3

«

-3
3
ao

B

In rem.

o
fl

•3
V

Under what act.
c

C

In personam.

1

%
S

0>

<
1

1859.
Mnv-

Collections.

A

1859.
Dec. T.

10 hhls. <)1lir»r ; 19 hh!a_ mnlasspa

Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fi seal v e a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

s

Sept. 29 The schooner Amulet
Dec. 24, The schooner Wanderer and cargo..
1860.
5 June 4 Certain merchandise, consisting of
silk dresses, embroidery, shawls,
&c.
3

Wnri. Davis, master of schooner
Amulets

4

Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fiscal year .




fit

s •3
a>

K

African slave trade
Sec. 30, act March 2, 1799.
Secs. 6, 8,21, and 22, act of
Feb. 18, 1793.
African slave trade
Sec. 2, act March 2,1799.

a: 3
3

3
-3 C

2 S'l

3

i5

"3

si
c
•3
C

1

i

a.

•3

$216 03

$143 44

...

DISTRICT OP MASSACHUSETTS.

The ship Atlantic .

D

1:

<

216 03

1859.
1 July 15
Sept. 28
2

5
2 n

143 44 z1

1

—~ —__ ....

1

No. 2.—Statement of suits fior fines, penalties, and fiorfieitures, d)C.—Contimied.

to

DISTRICT OF VERMONT.

•3
O
O

'3

Against.whom or what.

I n rem.

I n personam.

sz

1859.
July 29

9.

July

.?

Oct.
6
1860.
May 30

29

T h e sloop Joseph Clark, her tackle,
&c ; 1 single wagon; 1 horse and
harness; and 75 51-56 tons coal.
T h e sloop Vermont, her cargo, and
furniture, and 39f cords wood.

CUi_
M O

OJ

. '

'3 o b*

is

2

<

1

4

-3

Under w h a t act.

fl

5

%
B

<

-

•

oil

^

O

O

52:

to

-3
a;
be 3
cc 3 •3
•3 -3
C
_c
a>
"
•3 . § 0 '3 -3
'0
5 c
'S
Q •5 cc

"rt

1

•a-

$243 98

$182 04
1

1850.
Oct. T .

1 horse and 1 mare

*1

1
1

1 four j'ear old horse
243 98

Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fi seal year

-

182 04

$100 00

$4,650 00

-

^ Pending as to coal.

DISTRICT OP RHODE ISLAND.
1860.
No suit commenced during the present fiscal year
Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fiscal year .




b

b

"1= •

c

a>

. s
s
o
o

B
3

i

Collections.

Judgments.

OCIVTV

* Money in court.

$100 00*

1

1

4

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.
1

1859.
July 8

2

Aug. 11

T h e propeller tug Rapid, her engines, &c.
15 cases brandy

Act of Dec. 31, 1792, and
F e b . 18,1793.
Sec. 66, act of Mar. 2,1799,
and sec. 4, act of 1850.

1
1

D6Ci'=''^"s fiTifi r n l l p p t i n n s i n s n i t s p.nmmp.npp.d n r p v i n n s t n t h p n r P S P n t fiscal v p a r

$635 53

^'581 56

2

- -

1

"i

•

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.
1

1859.
July
6

0

July

7

3

July

7

4

July

8

5

July

8

fi

July

8

7

July

13

R

July. 19

q

July

19

10

July

23

11

July

26

T h e steamboat W a t e r W i t c h , her
- tackle, &c.
1 case, marked L M 135, containing photographs, &c.
6 cases, marked P. S. & B., Nos. 1
to 6, 39,000 1-5 boxes, and 10,000
i-boxes cigars.
20U bundles, rnarked W , containing
iron wire.
3 cases, marked T B S , containing
cigars.
41 tubs Swiss cheese, R G, 2 casks
sapsago do., S, and other arlicles.
I case, marked A 6 & C, No. 119,
containing mounted bracelets and
Olher arlicles.
12 cases, marked F W, 1 to 12, containing cigars and olher articles.
II cases, marked S & B , 8 to 18, containing hatters' furs.
T h e barque John Benson, her tackle,
apparel, &c.
1 parcel, without any m a r k , containing watch movements.

*$35 63

'
1

S e c . 66, act of Mar. 2,1799,
and sec. 4, act OfMay 28,
1830.
do

1

(Jo

1
1859.
July T .

do

$5,804 06

5,804 06

$5,804 06

1
1

do
1

do..
do

July

T.

10,000 02

10,000 02

1

,

Sec. 50, act of Mar. 2, 1799.
1860.
Secs. 46 and 68 of same act. J a n . T .

148 50

' 50 26

650 00

573 25

1

1

1859.
July T .

1

12

July

26

1 case, raarked G A 11, containing
watch materials.

Secs. 66 and 68, act Mar. 2,
1799 ; sec. 4, act May 28,
1830.

13

July

27

SPC

14

July

28

1 case, marked 1346—L B, containing veils, collars, and stereoscopic
views.
100 1-10 boxes cigars, viz : 7,000 Esculapias, and 3.000 Centamas,




1

Act of July 7, 1838, and act
of Aug. 30, 1852.
Sec. 28, act of Aug. 30,1842.

2 8 a o t AufT 30

act Mar. 2, 1857.
Sec. 50, act March 2, 1799.. Oct.

* Did not pay costs.
^

''
1

1842 •

T.

359 90

245 96

1

2

to

No.. 2.—Statemeni qf suits for fines, penalties, and fiorfeitures, d)C.—Continued.
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK—Continued.
Judgments.
Against whom or w h a t .
Under w h a t act.

In rem.

In personam.

B

<
1859.
July 28
July

29

17 Aug. 2
18 Aug. 16

19 Aug. 19

a
o

Aug. 19

21 Aug. 19
22 Aug. 19
23 Aug. 24
24 Aug. 29

I case cigars, " P o i l P o z o , " v i z :
4,000 C o n c h a s ; 2,000 Conclutas,
and 500 L o w Coil.
24 cases F. T . , 4 cases M T, and 5
cases U B.,containing c a l f s k i n s ;
1 case G A S T , containing blacki n g ; 48 cases F . T., containing
c l a r e t ; 10 bbls. F T , containing
brandy.
1 case, marked J. B. &. Co., No. 4,
' containing cigars.
6 cases, A. M. & Co., Nos. 23, 28,
,30, 3 1 , 32, and 33, and 1 bundle,
containing manufactures of silk,
corsets, &c.
3 cases, marked E & N , Nos. 11 to
13, containing calfskins.
17 hhds., marked E &, N—N D C,
containing vvhite w i n e ; 43 hhds.
red wine ; 32^ hhds. red w i n e ; 16
|- cask's Burgundy port.
1 case, marked K 4, containing china;
1 case, marked L 3, containing artificial flowers and other arlicles.
1 box, marked J a s . McCreery, containing 1 mahogany stereoscope,
25 photographs, and other articles.
6 cases, marked St. H. 708, &c., &c.,
containing corsets, &c
1 case embroideries, marked [C] 58..




1859.
Oct. T.
S e c s . 66 and 68, same a c t ;
sec. 4, act May 28,1830.

July

$244 50
11,628 15

T.

$122 16
11,385 43

Same acts.
*$4,002 75

Aug. T .

$4,002 75

4,002 75

3,876 81

Aug. T.

410 00

410 00

338 40

Aug. T.

do. . . .

200 50

200 50

134 10

.do.
.do.

Secs. 46 and 68, act March
2, 1799.

Same act, and sec. 4, act
May 28, 1830.
S a m e acts
,

900 80

Nov. T.

900 80

621 40

761 35

629 19

25
26

Sept,
Sept.

27
28

Sept.
Sept.

29

Sept.

30
31

7
7
7
8

P. Epplesheimer...
P . Epplesheimer,
N u m a Nongant.
do

Sept. 17
Oct.

6

36

Oct.

6

37

Oct.

12

38

Oct.

14

39
40

Oct.
Oct.

14
14

41

Oct.

14

42
43

Oct.
Oct.

14
26

44

Oct. 27
Nov. 2
Nov. 2
Nov. 2

807 80
*205 00

1 package containing 5 dozen cigarholders, 38 meerscnaum pipes, and
olher articles.
Sept. 17 4 cases, marked G J if 106, 107, 108,
and 109, containing calfskins.
Sept. 17 175 gross hock bottles; 38 patent
1 wine bottles, and other articles.

Sept. 17

3,093 37
5,862 54

50 cases, A J .containing a b s y n l h e . . .

9

Sept. 17

47

^

*3,003 80
*274 00

1 case, marked M P , No. 110, containing 38 dozen Paris embroidered
slippers.
1 case marked M , A. Moller & Co.,
No. 6, containing jewelry.
4 cases, marked J B, containing 5
Raymond maps and other articles.

Sec. 66, act March 2 , 1 7 9 9 . .
Same act
do
S a m e act, and sec.~4, act
May 28, 1830.
Secs. 46 and 68, act March
2, 1799.

T.

205 00

205 00

128 60

S e c . 66, same act, and sec.
4, act May 28, 1830.
Secs. 66 and 68, act Mar. 2, Sept. T.
1799; sec. 4, act May 28,
1830.
Same a c t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. T .

3,003 80

3,003 80

3,003 80

274 00

274 00

196 22

•5,003 19

4 cases, marked C L. 39775 to 39780,
containing ultramarine; 10 casks,
marked G A S , 3526 to 3535, containing chains and other cases and
articles.
The steamboat Josephine, her t a c k l e ,
&c.
I parcel jewelry, (seized from one
Lacoste, passenger o n t h e Fulton.)
30 cases, marked S. B., and other
cases, containing cheese.

1
1

....

1
1

1
1

Same acts, and sec. 28, act
Aug.30,1842; c h . 6 3 , act
March 2, 1857.
Secs. 66 and 68, act Mar. 2,
1799; sec. 4, act May 28,
1830.

Oct.

"

1

do
*1,045 13

.,,..

1

Oct.

T.

337 19

337 19

224 92

1

Oct.

T.

5,003 19

5,003 19

4,865 15

I

Oct.

T.

800 00

800 00

725 60

1

Oct.

T.

6,800 23

6,800 23

6,634 23

1

Nov. T.

377 00

319 54

210 24

1

1

500 00

•6,800 23

Secs. 46 and 68, act Mar. 2,
1799.
Same acts, and s e c . 4, act
May 28, 1830.

"

....

do

2 cases, marked S & L & [S L , ]
containing plain and edged Chenille
1 package, marked N R No. 7, containing embroideries.

377 00

do

J o h n K. H e r r i c k . . . 125,000 00
1 case, 1 package, and 1 trunk seized
from a passenger per sieamer Fulton, containing w a t c h e s , jewelry,
laces, &c.
1 gold and diamond snuff box ; 1 diamond brooch, set in silver; and 1
gold and diamond bracelet.
T h e brig J. P. Hooper, her tackle,&c
441 bales, marked P H—A C, &c.,
&c., containing tobacco.
1 parcel, marked Gantril, containing
1 jewelry and precious stones.




*

Secs. 46 and 68, act Mar. 2,
1799.
Same a c t s . . . . . . . . . * . . . . . . . . Nov. 15

*16,407 00

Sec. 1, act March 2 , 1 7 9 4 . .
Sees. 46 and 68, act Mar. 2,
1799.
Sameact.

^
* Appraised value of goods.

1
1

Nov. T .
Dec. T .

16,407 00

16,407 00

16,097 70

1

4,713 06

4,389 28

1

•

No. 2.—Statement ofi suits fior fines, penalties, and fiorfieitures, Sc.—Continued.

to
oo

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OP NEW YORK—Continued.

Against w h o m or w h a t .

-3

1
1
CJ

B
3

t2
-3
OJ

m O

Under vi'hat act.
c

3
3
O

3
O

B

In personam.

In rem.

fl

S

<

aj

1
1859.
Nov. 2

49

Nov.

2

'SO
51

Nov.
Nov.

4
4

52

Nov.

5

'^'^

Nov.

5

$113 50

Nov.

Nov. 14

1 package, marked Mr. F o r n i e s , c o n iainin<r gold watches, jewelry. Sec.
30 parcels, marked F . B. & Co., containing tools, &c.

56

Nov. 28

1 parcel, containing jewelry
precious stones.

57
*i8

Nov. 15
Dec. 3

59

Dec.

60

Dec. 5
1860.
Jan.
6

and

1 case, marked H No. 102, containing galloons.
1 case, marked R S, No. 253, containing silk and oiher arlicles.
30 casks porter and 3 casks whiskey.
1 case, marked T C E No. 80, containing m e e r s c h a u m pipes and
other articles.-




do

...

Nov. T .

Sec. .'iO, same act
Sec. 66, same a c t ; s e c 4,
act May 28, 1830.
Sec. 28, act Aug. 30, 1842;
sec. 1, a c t M a r . 2, 1857.

2 ca^es, marked T [D] S, containing
calfskins.
2 cases, marked G & N 986 and 987,
containing photographs, &c.
1 parcel, marked Simon, containing
• jewelry.

'=)'!

5

CO

-3 "3
• 3 ;3 O

'B
3 Q

*4,123 67
*929 50

Secs. 46 and 68, act Mar. 2,
1799.
Sec. 66, same a c t ; s e c . 4,
act'May 28, 1830.

$113 50

$38 02

1

96 75

$113 50

1860.
• J a n . T.

1 53

1

2,820 92

T.

2,586 41

03

1

i

1

1859.
Nov. T .

4,514 00

4,514 00

4,514 00

1

Nov. T .

4,123 67

4,123 67

3,998 81

1

705 46

574 73

1

930 00

788 50

1

1860.
Secs. 46 and 68, Mar. 2,1799.. Feb. T .
S e c . 1, act March 2, 1794..,
Sec. 66, act Mar. 2, 1799; F e b . T .
sec. 4, act May 28, 1830.

.....

"

S e c . i03, act March 2, 1799.
Same act

"B ''B
c

1
Jan.

*4,514 00

-3

a--

1859.
10 cases, marked C R S—1, containing cigars.
1 package, marked " D e n n e a d e , "
containing ribbons, trimmings, &c.

54

9

<

o
O

PI

5
m

s -3

.

. 3

48

61

1

15

o
C
a

s
S

o

Collections.

Judgments.

.,

.•••••»•
•

1

62 Jan.

7 1 parcel, marked " W a l l m a n , " con-

63 Jan.

7 7 cases, marked C V T. 40 a 44 and

taining w a t c h e s .
46, containing hats.

64 Jan. 10 1 case, marked W W , N o . 1781, containing engravinas, &c.

65 Jan. 10 3 cases:, marked [R R C] Nos. 238,

*567 00

Secs. 46 and 68, act March
2,1799..
Sec. 66, same act; sec. 4,
act May 28, 1830.
Sec 28,act Auoust30,1842;
sec. 28, act M'arch 2,1857.
Same acts

Mar. T.

373 75

Mar. T .

66 50

Mar. T .

321 78

Mar. T .

154 07

261 88

1

239,240,containing painlings,hangings, &c.

66 Jan. 10 1 case, marked M T, No. 2, conialn-

*327 62

67

*138 28

68
69
70
71
72
73

7 ing spectacles, &c.
Jan. lo' 1 case, marked H & T , No. 67, containing optical instruments.
Jan. 13 1 parcel, marked " L i z a r d s , " containing jewelry.
Jan. 19 16 cases, marked C L, 166, 174, 44,
B. B, 177, S t e , containing flowers
and confectionery.
Jan. 19 1 leather bag, marked Goroglu, containing jewelry.
Jan. 19 3 cases, containing mathematical
instruments and
photographic
views.
Jan. 19 1 case, marked L . M. & Co., containing cignrs.
Feb. 4 17 casks, marked R, S, &c., containing prunes; alsoj other cases.

*1,803 82

.do.
Secs. 66 and 68, act March
2, 1779.
Secs. 66 and 68, same a c t ;
sec. 4, act May 28,1830.

Sec. 50, act March 2, 1799.
*2,503 46
*171 50
*13,745 50"

May T .

Secs. 66 and 68, act March
2, 1799; sec. 4, act Aug.
30, 1 8 ^ .
Sec. 68, act March 2, 1799.

Jan.

Secs. 66 and 68, same act;
sec. 4, act May 28, 1830.
Sec. 4, act March 2, 1799..,

Feb. T.

sewing silk and wool,caps.

cases, containing
calf-skins,
marked E D—C F , &c., &c.

82 Mar. 22
83 Mar. 23




* Appraised value of goods.

2,399 49

93 09

May T .
13,745 50

13,745 50

13,472 33

Mar. T .

166 20

Same act.

Mar. T .

137 00

39 43

165 00

101 38

200 00

135 68

Sec. 28,.act August 30,1842;
amended March 2, 1857.

80 Feb. 22 1 case, marked S. B. & Co., 6,919,
81 Mar". 2

2,503 46

Feb. T.

*302 00

silk and ribbons.
4 gold and 2 silver watches

containing snuff boxes, pencils,
and Olher articlf^s.
1 box, marked E. Band'elin, containing cut coral ornaments.
10 cases, marked R F,and numbered
1 lo 10, containing albumine.
54 bales, marked C—K » , and numbered from 54 to 63, and from 1 to
44, inclusive, containing 23,075
pounds unwashed wool.

t84 38

T.

Secs. 24 and 68, same act .,

•77 Feb. 10 1 trunk and 1 bag, containing cigars.

79 Feb. T.

1,709 97

Sec. 28, act August 30,1842,
amended March 2, 1857.

75 Feb. 10 48 casks oil, &c., &c., S F , 91 lo 138.

78 Feb. 10 1 tin box and 1 package, containing

1,803 82

Same act,

74 Feb. 10 1 case, marked M. 100, containing

76 Feb. 10 10

1,803 82

Secs. 24 and 68, act 1799...,

*5,191 82

200 00

Sec. 66, act IVIarch 2, 1799;
sec. 4, act May 28, 1830.
Same acts

to
f Did not pay costs.

CO

to

No. 2.—Statement ofi suits fior fines, penalties, and forfieiiures, &c.—^Continued.

o
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK—Continued.
Colleclions.

Judgments.

'3
o

hi
0)
Xi

.B
.5?

a

-s

B

Under w h a t act.

IU

3

1
fl
.a

5
2 QQ
mP

Against w h o m or w h a t .

'3
O
S3

[n rem.

I n personam.

84

1860.
Mar. 23

85

Mar. 23

86

Mar. 23

87

April

6

88

April

7

89

April 18

90

April 19

91

April 24

92

AprU 26

93

May

2

P4
95

May
May

4
9

g

2

B
•

r

c

C.
3
O

es
Q

<

p.

Ill

PI

0) i i "3

4-

6

1«
3
S
•3

C
C
• 3 •3
w (U
•3

"3

'I

3




•3

1

3

'•3

04

Q

1860.
30 cases, marked C, and numbered,
respectively, 17 to 26, and 34 to 53,
inclusive, containing unwashed
wool.
38 bales, marked R T , and numbered 1 to 10 ; W A, and numbered
1 to 8, and 10 to 22 ; X L, and numbered 1 lo 5, and 7 and 8, containing 14,985 pounds unwashed wool..
1 package, marked John Arthur,
containing 2 gold and diamond
necklaces, and other articles.
1 case, marked T and T 2, containing books, &c.
1 parcel, marked S. &. L. Praeg, containing watches.
24 cases, marked N and S, numbered, respectively, 390 to 413^
containing plate glass.
2 bales_ woollens, marked H , and
numbered, respectively, 2 and 3.
T h e barque Charlotte E . T a y , her
tackle, &c.
150 bales, marked C J M, C J M—L,
C J M—C H, containing u n w a s h e d
wool.
2 cases, marked [Sj—S, 553 and 554,
containing handkerchiefs, &c.
10 barrels ale
1 tin case, raarked G. J o a c h i m ,
containing gold leaf.

2
fci

S

Sec. 66, act March 2,1799;
sec. 4, act May 28, 1830.

1

*3,378 16 . . . . . . d o . . . . . . . . . d o . . . . . . . .

1

*$2,903 00

*475 00

Secs. 46 and 68, act March
2,1799.

Mar. T .

1

$475 CO

$395 20

152 20

63.89

I

156 25

$475 00

55 18

1

I;

*152 20
*169 00
*5,551 54

....................

*1,691 93

Sec. 28, act August 30,1842;
amended March 2, 1857.
Secs. 46 and 68, act March
2, 1799.
Sec.'66, same a c t ; and sec.
4, act May 28, 1830.

April T .
July

T.

1
1

Same acts

1 .*..

........T... . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Slave trade
*15,504 00

152 20

Sec. 66, act March 2 , 1 7 9 9 ;
sec. 4, act May 28,1830.

1

Rpc 2 8 n o t Aiifriist.^0 1R42>

1

sec. 28, a c t March 2,1857.
Sec. 103, act March 2,1799 .
Secs. 46 and 68, same a c t . . . Oct.

1
T.

116 00

18 07

1

••

96'. Mflv

98

18 . T h p hark " C o r a . " h R r tankle. & R . .
and lading.
The schooner Josephine, her tackle,
& c . , a n d lading
June 4

99

June

4

100

June

8

101

J u n e 12

97

S e c . 1, act March 2, 1794;
sec. 2, act April 20, 1818.
Same a c t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

May 28

ino J u n e 16
in*^ J u n e 16
104
105
106

J u n e 16
J u n e 16
J u n e 16

107
108

J u n e 16
J u n e 18

109

J u n e 20

Mrs. Pratt, wife of
J a s . Pratt, N. Y.
Mrs. Taylor, wife of
Taylor, No. 91,
W. 29lh St.,N.Y.
J. M . Friedlauder,
ofthe city of New
York.
John Rein
John Graubau. . . .
Paul Spofford,Thos.
Teleston,andEd' ward S. Howard.
Mr. Leitch
Mrs. Leitch
John Doe, for the
purposes of this
writ.

30 00

Sec. 15, act M a y 23, 1 8 5 0 . . .

30 00

Same act

30 00

*
*

,

do

.30 00
400 00
500 00

do
Sec. 50, act 1799
Sec. 4, act March 22, 1794

30 00
30 00
30 00

Sec. 15, act May 23, 1830...
Same act
do

T h e schooner Marguerite.
T h e brig Falmouth, her tackle, a p parel, and furniture.
1 case fancy goods, marked MW—N .

....

Sec. l , a c t March 22, 1794;
sec. 1, a c t April 20, 1818.

1

64,704 62

106,829 57
6,694 51

101,824 37 48 3 1 55 109
5,493 31 8 12 26 9

64,704 62

239,574 83
Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fi seal y e a r . . . .

113,524 08

107,317 68 56 15 27

....
....

n

EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA.

1

1859.
Nov. —

2

Nov.

?

Nov. 23

4

1860. .
J a n . 12

5

Feb.

2

3

5 casks of a l e , (imported by Messrs.
Ashley & Strange.)
215,000 cigars, (i mported in brig W m .
Hall and schooner Fannie.)
20 cases and 5 hhds. brown stout,
. (imported in bark Ceres.)
56.800 cigars, (imported by Mr.
Seger.)
24 casks of wine, (imported, in bark
Elizabeth, by Louis Poh.)




* Appraised value of goods.

$12 72

S e c . 103, act Mar. 2, 1799...
*$4,166 04

*1,782 40

1
1

t$253 20

*2,696 24

••

SeCi 66, same a c t . . . . . . . . . .

S e c . 66, act Mar. 2 , 1799;
s e c . 4, act May 28, 1830.
Same a c t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

•
1
1

t Not paid over by collector.

No. 2.—Statement ofi suitsfiorfines,penalties, andfiorfieitures,Sc.—Continued.

to
to

EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLYANIA—Continued.
Collections.

Judgments.
Agamst whom or what.

io
"5
X
B
3

a

fl
CJ

B
B
o
o
c
o

•3

Under w h a t act.

3

In rem.

In personam.

JZ

6

May

11

8

May

11

9

May
May

14

11

May

15

19

May

15

13

May

17

14

May

11

15
16

J u n e 23
J u n e 23

T h o s . Cummings,
master of brig
Olive.
Ant'y Inland, master of bark American Eagle.
Bernard Hurtigan,
master of schr.
Village Belle.
B. Pink lian, master
of bark Acadia.
A. L . Vaughan,
master of bark
John Niles,
J. H. Phenney,
master of brig
Hayward.
Wm. Young, m a s ter of schooner
Brunette.
Geo. Payson, master of-the Alice
Franklin. .
Cyrus Cooper, m a s . ter of ship Lion. .

11

10

C
3 •
O
s
•

fl .
3
O

6
a

S

2
a.

1

I:

m
• PI
*j o '"

48 cases of hosiery
42 casks of wine, per brig Hemrick,
John Eckert, claimant.

a
•3

•3

a:
•a

'v

T3
0)
3
C -3
tt)

c
o

CJ

1

.2
'•B

'3
B
o

Q

1
1
1

•

•

-

-

•

1
1
1
1

Sec. 26, act Mar. 2 , 1 7 9 9 . . . .

1
$500 00
*3,252 05

S e c . 26, act Mar." 2, 1799 ;
"Sec. 4, act May 28, 1830.
Sec. 66 act Mar. 2 1799
Same act, and sec. 4, act
May 28, 1830.

....

: . . . . . . ..:;....,..:
1

$6,000 00
$253 20
4,230 40

1
1

1

6,012 72
1,315 58

4,483 60

12,396 73
Decisions and colleclions in suits commenced previous to the present fi seal year




6

'3
q

<

1860.
April 20

7

O

2

7,328 30

1
1

- 2

11
11

'i
4
1

16

_ ,
^

DISTRICT OF MARYLAND.
No suit commenced during the fiscal year
Decisions and collections iu suits commenced previous to the present fiscal year ,

$304 68

$392 45

EASTERN DISTRICT OF YIRGINIA.

2

1859.
Oct. —
1860.
Feb. —

3

April

X

4

2

1 barrel of Scotch ale

Sec. 103, act Mar. 2, 1799...

10 i-caska and 10 i-casks Rochelle
brandy.
T h e brig Virginian

S e c . 6, act Mar. 28. 1 8 5 4 . . . .

$20 13

1

Act May 10,1800 ; act Mar.
22, 1794.

T h e schooner Alice Rogers, her
tackle, &c., and cargo.

Act Mar. 2, 1807 . .

.

1

1

•
*

1860.
April 19

$1,209 76

233 80

1

1,209 76

^

April 16

253 93

1

$127 00

$66 27

1

Decisions a nd collections in suits commenced pre vious to the present fiscal vear . ..

- -

2 1

4

DISTRICT OF SOUTH CAROLINA.

1
o
3
4

1860.
J a n . 22
Feb. T .
Mar. 20
Mar. 20

5
6

Mar. 20
June 6

Sec. 66, act Mar. 2, 1799
Slave trade a c t s . . . .
Sec. .50, act Mar. 2,17 9 9 . . . .
Sec. 24, same act . . .

400 cisrars
T h e bri«' Delicia, (a slaver)
T h e steamship Isabel
Wm. Rollins, master o f t h e Isabel.
25,000 cigars, seized on the I s a b e l . .
Geo. T . R e y n o l d s . . .

$1,600 00




1

Sec. 50, same a c t . . . . ,
A c t M a r . 3, 1823

1,600 00
Deoisions and collections in suits commenced nrevious to the nresent f iscal year . . ,

* Appraised value of goods.

*i

1

127 00

^

66 27

1 1

•>

1

1
1
3

5

No ^.—Statement of suits for fines, penalties, and forfeitures, <&<?.—Continued.

to

DISTRICT OF GEORGIA.

Againsi w h o m or w h a t .

-3
O

*3

O
.3

s
3

1
• 2

a

c
QJ

' s

1"

Under w h a t act.
Q)

3

In rem.

i

In personam.

fl

*1
fl
3

fl
3
0

5:
1860.
April 10

John Richardson,
master of British
ship Pilgrim.
W. F . Black, master of brig Gem.

5

$500 00
500 00

"

D.

B

3

0

•<

QJ

May

Colleclions.

Judgments.

•

2

<

il

0

•3

rt

-6

11

'3

1

1

Sameact

^

- - -

$151 00

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA.

Sec. 4, act May 10, 1 8 0 0 . . . .
Sec. 4, same act, and sec. 1,
act March 22, 1794.

fee
'•3

0

1

No suit commenced daring the fiscal year
'..
Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fiscal year .




1
•3
QJ

Q

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA.

T h e brig Cygnet
T h e bark Wildfire and cargo.

QQ

Sec 54, act Mar. 2 , 1 7 9 9 . . . .

i-fifin nn

1859.
Nov. 24
May
5

2
2
5

1860.
Jan. T.
June T.

$3,662 61
6,454 38

$1,679 88i
3,043 88

\

1

2

Same acts, and secs. 4 and June T .
5, act May 15, 1820.
Sec. 4, act May 10, 1800.... June T.

The bark William .

May 28

The bark Bogota . .

879 12A

4,571 96

2,171 88|

16,712 47
4,289 89

Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fiscal year.

2,023 52

7,774 77-^
3,222 75

21,002 36

May 15

10,997 52i

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF ALABAMA.
^ 1859.
Nov. 18 T h e schooner Annie Sheppard
1860.
o J a n . 17 23,500 cigars
3 J a n . 1?"

1860.

1

*$25 00

$25 00

1

••

Sec, 44, act. March 2, 1799..
Same a c t . . . .

John Chamberlain .

1
1
25 00
438 20

rjopicinnfs nnH pnllpptinns in snit« cnmnipncpfi nrpvinns tn thp nrpsp.nt fispol vpnr

463 20

**"$326'i6"
320 16

2

1

- - ^

* Spent in repairs of boat.

EASTERN DISTRICT OP LOUISIANA.
1

1859.
July 15

9

July

3
4

July 20
Dec. 5

•
s
fi

D e c . 12
1860.
Jaa.
4

7

J a n . 25

R

Feb. 14

q
10

Feb. 14
F e b . 25

16

1860.
1 case cigar.?, marked [ B ] 105, containing 14.200 cigars.
1 case R F , No. 1, containing 13,300
cigars.
T h e steamship Philadelphia

$550 00

2 trunks laces




Secs. 14 and 27, act December 3^, 1792.
Same acts
7,500 00

-.

1

Sec. 50, act March 2 , 1 7 9 9 . .
Sec- 2, act July 7, 1838;act
August 30, 1852.

$563 17

Peb. 18

Sec. 3, act April 20,1800
Sec. 29, act July 7, 1800;
act August 30, 1852.
Sec. 50, act March 2, 1799.. J a n . 25

T h e Memphis and
N. 0 . Packet Co.
2 casks whiskey, marked H 174 and
H175.
T h e bark Eglantine, her tackle, apparel, and furniture.
T h e brig Richard, her tackle, apparel, and furniture. .
2 cases, containing 26 pieces linen . .
T h e steamboat Yazoo Belle, her
tackle, apparel, and furniture; (15
forfeitures claimed.)

Sec. 66, act March 2, 1799;
sec. 4, May 28, 1830. '
Same acts

$373 50

298 48

500 00

J a n . 13
Feb. 18
284 00

219 00

'i

3

No. 2.-^Statement ofi suits fior fines, penalties, andfiorfieitures,Sc.—Continued.

to
as

EASTERN DISTRICT OF LOUISIANA—Continuedo
Collections.

Judgments.
Against w h o m or w h a t .

- 3
QJ

'i
B

rz

-3

Under w h a t a c t .

GJ
3

o
a>
X

a

• QJ

'

s
QJ

'

In rem.

In personam.

Si

fl
3
O

55
11

1859.
Mar. 8

l'^

Mar. 13

13

Mar. 27

11

Mar. 27

15

Mar. 27

16

May

3

17

May

9

18

May

11

19
90

May 21

I860.
T h e ship Zetland, her t a c k l e , apparel, and furniture.

S a m e a c t ; sec. 4, act May
28,1830; sec. 21, August
30, 1852.
Secs. 2 and 4, act March 3,
1819




0"m

•tz
QJ

O

2 Oo
ft ft

a•
<

QJ

TZ
V
;3

'p

•3
QJ
3

-8
C

o

2
to 'B
•B
•3

'i

1

$75 00

April 18

$16 55

1

1
1
1

Jeremiah B. Potier,
master of ship
Elvira O w t n .
M.OIivo, master of
Spanish brig Errigue.
J. A. L o c k w o o d ,
master of schooner Emily Keith.

Decisions a

a

3

B
a

Sec. 103, act March 2,1799.

The steamship General Miramon,
her tackle, apparel, and furniture.
T h e steamship Marquis de H a v a n a ,
her tackle, apparel, and furniture.

2 clocks and 97 pieces silver and
plated w a r e .
-.
The steamboat T . H. Judson

P
b

*j o «

fl
3
O

i

3

1 1-

Ill

o
CJ

2

1s

$400 00

1

Sec. 50, act March 2,1799

1

400 00

1

Sec 3, act March 3 1823
S e c 68, act March 2, 1799 .. May

/
Charles Marvin and Charles E . Marshall, master and
owner of sieamer
B. L. Hyde.
[/inne tn thp nrpspn fi

500 G
O

167 00

T.

103 60

1
1
1

Sec. 2, act July 7,18,38
Sees. 9 and 11, a c t February
18, 1793.
863 50

9,350 00
Aug. T. * $ l 0 ^ i i 2 85 I
10,112 85 1

•

'' Execution in hands of raarshal.

1,700 80
312 30

1 0 7 7
2

863 50 1 2,013 10 1 71 11 ol71

....

20

WESTERN DISTRICT OF TEXAS.

No suit .
. ••
«
No cnit commenced durine the fiscal vear

.
12

WESTERN DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS.
1860.
J u n e 12 I 1 box jewelry .
1860.
Aug. 10

Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fiscal y e a r .

"$1,275 00

* Penalties remitted.

EASTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI.

1
o
3
4
5
6
7
8
q
10
11
T>
13

1859.
Aug. 9
Aug.- 9
Aug. 9
Aug. 9
Aug. 9
Sept. 3
Nov. 22
1860.
Feb.
2
Mar. 29
April 18
Mav
7
May 13
May 13

The
The
The
The
The

steamboat
steamboat
steamboat
steamboat
steamboat

Elvira
Tennessee B e l l e . . . . .
Henrietta
Orion
Die Vernon

$500
500
500
500
500

00
00
00
00
00

Jno.McComb.... .
The steamboat ForestQ.ueen

500 00

The steamboat David Tatum . . . . . . .
The steamboat Northerner
The steamboat Regulator
The steamboat Silver L a k e
6 casks white wine
The steamboat Courier

500
500
500
500

Sec 2, act July 7,1838
...do
...do
...rn.
do
do
do

1860
Mar. 2
Mar. 2
xMar. 2
Mar. 2
Mar. 2
Mar. 2
J a n . 11

do
Mar.
do. :
Mar.
...rio
. .do
*Sec 6, act March 28, 1854 .
500 00 S e c 7, act July 2 1838
00
00
00
00

5,500 00

5
5

00
00
00
00
00

$506 75

500 00

'i
1

1,112 21

S

1,663 83

3,500 00

3,500 00




505 50

500 00

Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present fi 3cal y e a r . . . .

,

1
1
1

100 00

$500
. 500
500
500
500

••

2,775 04

3

1 7 2

-

6 8
7 15

13

No. 2.—Statement ofi suitsfiorfines,penalties, andfiorfieitures,Sc.—Continued.

-a
CO

MIDDLE DISTRICT OF TENNESSEE.
Judgments.
QJ
0

'3
0
QJ

a

c
B
B

•3

In rem.

S

0

In personam.

*:
c

c

2'

0

S

<
1859.
Dec. 1
Dec

1

Under w h a t act.

3

c

30

The steamboat Winnifred

$1,000 00

The steamboat E. Howard

1,000 00

ii

IS

CJ

0
0

3

1

Collections.

Against whom or w h a t .

-3

0

3
0
B

<

GJ
0

-3 0 >>

- 1
0

£ « 0

2,000 00

6

a
•3

QJ
^

•

1859.
Dec. 29

$500 00

F e b . 14

500 00

3

'3

0

$2 40
2 40

•3
QJ

^

1,000 00

Jno. K. Sullivan .
Jeff. Dickerson ..

$100 00
100 00

107 20

1

$100 00

1

100 00 I 1

Decisions and colleclions in suits commenced previous lo the present fiscal year . . . . . . . . . . .

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF. ILLINOIS.
1860.
J a n . 14

8 barrels^whiskey".




Sec. 103, act March 2,1799.

S

2
0

Ou

_1

2

2

Act August 30, 1832.

200 00

C

2

1
1

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF OHIO.
1859.
Sept. 24
Sept. 24

1

tp
•3

1

104 80

Decisions and collections in suits commenced previous to the present f seal y e a r . . . .

-3
QJ

-3
iJ
;3

ft ft

1,000 00

Sec. 2, act July 7,1838; s e c
1, act Aug. 30, 1852.
do

.

3

....

DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN.
1859.
July 29

$200 00

T h e schooner Queen o f t h e West.

DISTRICT OF WISCONSIN.
1

1859.
July 22

2
3
4
5

July 22
July 22
Aug. 3
Aug. 3

Chapman
N . Gebhard
A. Briggs
Elias Simms

fi

Aug,

7
8

1859.
July
1
July
1

_

E . P . Hopkins

3

$100 00
70 00

T h e propeller I o w a , her engine, machinery, boats, tackle, 8ic.
E. E.Collins
W. H. Rounds

1860.
Secs. 16 and 17, act Febru- J a n . 14
ary 18, L793.
do .
do
J a n . 14
...do
,
Secs. 9 and 10, act Febru- J a n . 14
ary 18, 1793.
Sec. 17, act Feb. 18, 1793...
S e c . 16, act Feb. 1 8 , 1 7 9 3 . . .
...
do . . , <
;
' .
Jan.

....

$70 26

$70 26

$50 00

1

t
120 62

1
70 00

90 56

1
1

100 00

70 62

70 62

50 00

J

352 16

14

170 00

140 88v

270 00

3

- -

*i

2 1

8

3

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA.
1

1859.
Sept. 13

2

Oct.

19

3

Oct.

24

T h e steamship Washington,
tackle, &c.
300 cases juniper cordial

--

her

1
1

S e c 103, act March 2 1799

1 package diamonds, and other
packages of goods, w a r e s , and
merchandise.

1859.
Nov. 22

.

$6,905 25

$6,518 70

1

6,905 25

Secs. 66 and 69, act March
2, 1799.

6,518 70

1

DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON TERRITORY.
1859.
Nov. 29

1860.
Feb. T.

The schooner Black Diamonds.




* Did not pay costs.

$71 50

-

-

2

3

No. 3.

.

bO
00

O

Statement ofi warehouse transportation honds rep)orted fior suit by the collectors qf thefollowing districts during the fiiscal year ending
Jttne. 30, 1860.
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS.

Judgment.

Bond.

Names of parties.

-3
QJ

O

i^.
3
(M

O

XI

B

Pi

B
B
£
o
o

C
X

W h e n due.

Principals.

QJ

Amount.

O
Pi
H

Collections.

^ - ^
1
2

1859.
Nov. 16
1860.
May 29

O
i2!
Foster &, T a y l o r . . . . . .

W. H.Wood . . .

Haywood P. Cushing .

1859.
Mar.
25

Elisha Moseley .

189

$322 00
15,000 00
15,322 00

O

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.
1859.
Dec. 3

Potsdam and .Watertown Railroad
Company.

1859.
Aug.
5

Edwin Dodge and Hiram Holcomb,

$7,548 90

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.

1
9
3

1859.
July
7
July
7
July
7

Wells, Butterfield & Co
T h o m a s J. Bayard
do




Geo. L . Pride and L. H. W i l l a r d . . .
do

2340

1859.
July
5
June
20
June
20

- .
$220 00
446 00
260 00

1
1
1

....

4 I July

7

Charles King & Co

, CharlesE. Eck

Jacob Straus .

Charles Landrie.

Aug. 16

Clinch & D i k e . .

H. Nicholl.

Aug. 16

John S. Holden .

Robert S t e w a r t . . . .

Aug. 16

S. Z i m m e r m a n

Charles S. T a p p a n .

Au£j.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Ang.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

16
17
17
17
17
19
22
1
8
8
8
8
8
8
26
26
30
30
25
25
25

Leacraft &. Co
E. Cazet
do
W . H. Starbuck
L e w i s & Wm. Herischom.
Abraham Solomon
M. D. L. Sharkey
Gustavus Schwab
Leon Hernandez
Alfred Waller
do
do
F . Spring
do. . . :
Michael Pastacaldi
Charles T. White
.
Jones & Tibbitts
do.
Robert Renfrew
Udolpho Wolfe
T h o m a s McDonald

Lafayette Smith . .
J. Bluxuin
do
H. Bancroft;
John A. Seivers . .
Henry S. H e n r y . . .
M. B. May
Samuel Sweetzer .
Mat. C l a r k s o n , j r . .
Samuel Chapman .
. ...do..
do
H, Carnerder
do...\
Jonas Phillips . . . .
B. R. Arnold
J. Montrose
do
J a m e s Lee
Joel Wolfe
Robert Renfrew . .

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

25
25
25
25
25

C. L . Lazarus —
Townsend et a l .
J. C. Robillard . .
E. Wood, jr
,
J . Clinch

W . H. F r a n c i s c o . .
Henry Nicoll
H. P. Bushe
L. H. Bigler
Henry Nicoll

Oct.

25

Aug. 16

176

310
460
1176
1178
1244
2918
1256
1274
1339

June
28
1858.
Oct.
1
1859.
May
1
1855.
Dec
2
1855.
Jan.
19
1859.
July
6
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.

Oct.

25

John Mullett.

P. Holman . . .

Oct.

25

H . D . Hull

J. E. Bulkley .

79

James Louter .

N. Nelson . . . .

47

Alex'r K-urshear, assignee, & c .
M. H. Harbuck
Jose Pesant
Ramon Canedo

C. L . L a z a r u s . . . .
do
Daniel W . T e l l e r ,
C. L. L a z a r u s . . . ,

1^65
1588
1407
1923

Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Jan.
Jan.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
1856
Jan.
July
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
. -1857
Feb.
1856
July
1857
April
1858
May
1859
Oct.
Sept.
Aug.
Nov.

E . J. Claason &, S o n .
M. L a n z e n b u r g

Robert Wynkoop .
C. L . L a z a r u s , . . .

1674
1481.

Oct.
Sept.

Oct.

25

Dec. 9
Dec. 9
Dec
9
Dec. 9
1860.
Jan.
6
Jan.
6

.do.




.do.

608
611
612
.1365
1366
1443
1544
1545
1496
1508
2322
2049
565
837
1027
1310
1795

202 20

$202 20

1

804 00
132 00
236 00

13
13
13
17
17
26
3
22
22
7
9
16

1,290
38
194
157
80
48
342
1,255
600
250
471
347
550
525
80
1,619
2-<i2
124
138
84
2,760

00
40
20
40
00
48
00
20
00
56
60
40
00
00
64
04
00
00
94
00
00

14
11
2
2
11

110
392
308
214
238

00
00
00
00
00

2

'"">

1,290
38
194
157

00
40
20
40

1
1
1
1

48 48

1

1,255 20

1

38 00

5

248 00

27

4,930 00

7

1,216 00

12
20
20
9

218
411
37
668

00
60
44
00

90 00
440 04

1
1
1
1

to

N o . 3.^—Statement ofi warehouse transportation honds reported fior suit hy the collectors, ( ^ c — C o n t i n u e d .

GO

" SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW Y O R K — C o n t i n u e d ,
72

'B

6

Judgment.

Bond.

Names of parties.

•3
C

QJ

o

s
s
o

B

X

tli

•3

-c

«
c

Principals.

QJ

No.

Sureties.

Amounl.

When due.

Date.

Amount.

Colleclions.

-3

i

ft

-3
C

2
c

tt n

4=>
46
47
48
49
50

'1860.
Jan.
6
Jan.
6
Jan.
6
Jan.
6
Jan.
6
J a n . 23

51
52
53
54
55
56
57

Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.

58

April

J. Bluxum

Morlizar & O'Pergelin
Leopold Weizler
Everhard Focke
P. O. Riley
H. Paulin
Charles Stirling..

J a m e s A. Seivers
H. B. Hawkins
' . . . . A. Ma^nin, j r
. . . . . John Towers
..

10 John M. Meyer
10 Geor^^e C Barclay
10 R. J. L a w l e r
10 . ;
do
10
do
10
do
30 E . B, Blocker
7

J. H. Schlau^brick
W . R. Lothrop
do
W . Stewart
W. R. Lothrop . . . .
H. P. Sturcis

G.H.Barclay

.\..

......

,
678

........
.. . .

Phil.^Bessinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eihil Magnus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r . .
J . M . Openheiraer
John Randall
.... .
....

61

May 24

Solomon Brother
Naylor & C o .
D.Torrance
Edward R o w e




Moritz Meyer
."^^
J . M . Cross . . . . . . .
E . Boas

1850.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
March
Feb.

$106
80
45
296
226
400
334
109
2,628
1,086
1,266
5,680
153

10
10
7
18
21
1
9

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

]
1
1
1
1

00
00
20
00
26
00

$2,628
1,086
1,266
5,680

"i ....

00
00
00
00

...
*i

....

1859.
May
10

109 00

1

17.3.5
74

1860.
Jan.
19
Jan.
16

1.436-00
'410 08

J
1

758

April 9
May 23

May 24
May 25
May 23

251
253
1605
1666
1686
1796
260

1859.
Nov.
2
Nov.
13
Dec
1
May
25
Dec.
4
Dec.
25

436

J. H. Strarbuck

^59
60

62
63
64

1178
3083
2111
80

1859.
July
16

2,792 00

1

490
491
642

1860.
March 18
March 19
April
24

-

1.58 00
340 00
24 00

158 00

1

....

'i

1

...

65 j May 23 i Robert E. Kelly & Co
66 J u n e 16 Charles Luling

I G. W . Faber . . ,
A. H . Cadasgo..

667
887

April
May

19
18

660 00
70 00

'660 00

41,512 16
A m o u n t settled and disposed of in suits commenced previous to the present fiscal year by the withdrawal of 16 bonds from suit .

66

14,703 88
22,424 00
37,127 88

EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLYANIA.
1859.

150 I Sept.

Sept. 30 I F. S. Dos Santos
..;
| Richard George.
Collected on old judgment vs. Clement & N e w m a n

29 I

$141 74
$2,500 00

EASTERN DISTRICT OF LOUISIANA.

5
6
7

1859.
Sept. 3
Sept. 3
Sept. 3
D e c 19
1860.
J a n . 13
Jan. 13
J a n . 13

8
9
10

F e b . 14
Feb. 14
F e b . 14

T . B. Blanchard ct al
A. Bed ault
P. A . G e r a u d . . . . .
,. S Gardner
Souihern Railroad Company, M i s s . . G A. Sanders et dl

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
IP

Mar.
Feb.
Mar.
April
April
April
April
April
April

B A. Dyer & Co
A. Genelld
Luneschloss Brother & Co

1
2
3
4

6
21
22
11
11
11
11
11
11

J n o . E. Hyde
. ...do..
L. Scherer
J. E. Hyde

Goddard & Burgess
Barre & W e s t . . . .
J no. E. Fischer . . . .
J . E . Caldwell & Co
B. [sier
do
, . do

. . do
E Linnet & Co
do
Pedrauville Broth ers
do

. ...

....

W . H. Sheppard
J. J. Albert
do
.
Jules Bennett
do
A Moulton
....do

May
May
June
Nov.

23
23
9
17

540
541
542

B. Irish
do
do

William Levy

222
221
277
25

............

864
231
55
114
107
255
344
345
394
3.50
285

$278
642
1,266
266

00
68
00
00

1859.
Dec.
22
Dec.
22

$278 00
642 68

1
1

••"l859.'*"
Dec.
15
Jan.
29
Dec.
9
1860. .
Jan.
20
Jan.
20
Feb.
19
March 11
Marnh 1 1
1. March 11
1 March 11
! June
1

286 1 June-

1

*61 44
*85 20
*.50 64

1
1
1

844 00
1.53 60
2,078 00

844 00

1

2,078 00

1

276 00
2,574 00

1
1

406
126
1,077
501

1
1
1
1

276
2,574
51
57
57
406
126
1,670
802

00
00
36
00
00
00
00
Od
00

'i

1
1

920 68

00
00
70
80

9,612 78 ~2
to,396 00
15,008 78




i

61 44
85 20
50 64

1 1 - 744 «49.
Amou It settled and disposed of in suits comi nenced previous to the present fiscal year by ths withdrawal of 16 bonds from suit

" Collections reported by collector on bonds withdrawn.

1

$1,266 00
266 00

2

li

13 4
4
17 4

t Including a bond for $2,014, which w a s settled by payinent of $302 10.

19

No. 3.—Statement of warehouse transportation honds reported fior suits hy the collectors, Sc.—Continued.

OO

DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN.

^1^

3
O

1
S
1

Judgment.

Bond.

N a m e s of parlies.

-3

i

.0

CJ

S
-c

Principals.

1859.
1 Sept. — Detroit, Monroe, & Toledo R. R. Co.
o Sept. —
do
? Sept. —
do
do
c
4 Sept. —
do..
5 Sept. —
fi Sept. —
do
7 Sept. — Detroit and Milwaukie Railroad C o . .
R Sept. —
do....
q Sept. —
do
10 Sept. —
do
11 Sept. —
do
do
19 Sept. —
13 Sept. — . . . . do
14 Sept. —
do
15 Sept. —
do
16 Sept. —
do
do
17 Nov. —
18 Nov. —
do.
Nov. —
do
m
do
on Nov. . \—
91 N o v do
do....
9^ Nov. —
1860.
9? J u n e — . . . . . . d o . . . . T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i . . . . .
04 J u n e —
do
1859.
9,5 Nov. — Michigan, Souihern and Northern
Indiana Railroad Company.
96 Nov. —
do




No.

Sureties.

W h e n due.

Amount.

. Date.

Amount.

Collections.

Si

•3
QJ
;3

o;
fl

1

Ransom Gardiner et al
E . C. St E. B. Litchfield
do
do
do
do
N. P. Stewart
do
S a m e and P. W h i t m a n
Same and E. B. Ward.
Same and P. Whitman
S a m e and same
Same and E. B. Ward

Same and J. P . W h i t m a n . . .
..
Same and E. B. Ward
S a m e and same . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
do
do
do
do
do

82
117
116
118
119
120
78
81
96
105
95
104
109
123
97
111
113
110
112
100
101
124

C. J. Bridges-ctaZ
. . . do

150
152

.

............. ,

E. C. & E. B. Litchfield
do

122
121

1859.
Sept.
21
$12,625 80
Sept.
21
6,128 40
Sept.
21
12,660 60
Sept.
21
2,149 20
Sept.
30
2,552 10
Oct.
1
5,782 20
Sept.
20
12,6.53 10
Sept.
20
6,139 20
Sept.
20
3,757 00
Sept.
20
13,088 10
Oct.
29
6,093 30
Nov.
4
60 30
Dec.
1
1,271 10
Nov.
19
10,529 40
Nov.
10
1,027 20
Nov.
10
13,536 60
Nov.
16
2,463 80
NJV.
14
. 389 40
N<?v.
16
4,547 70
Nov.
14
12,424 20
Nov.
14
903 90
Dec.
31
7,820 70
1860.
123 60
June
5
June
"3
" 14,287 80
1859.
Dec
6
6,326 10
1860.
Feb.
8
15,963 90
176,304 70

•3

c

QJ
•3
'3
'/J

1
3

•3

'B

0

%
.
'3

0

m E-t

23

$13,007 49

...

1

,
--.

....
'"

1
Detroit and Milwaukie R.
R. Co., paid at difierent
times

36,000 00
49,007 49

-

1
1 25

26

DISTRICT OF WISCONSIN.

1
0

Dec

>

1859.
July 21

Racine and Wisconsin Railroad C o . . R. M. Norton et al,
11. M. D o u s m a n . . . .

—

$20,000 00

1

778 00

1

1859.
Nov.
28

20,778 00

-

•• •• ••

2

2

DISTRICT OF IOWA.
1859.
Nov. —
Nov. —

,

W m . Leighton.
do

Hugh T. R e e d . .
D. W. Killborn.

1859.
Sept.
3
Nov.
12

$11,054 70
-12,115 30
.23,170 00

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA.
1860.
May 12

N. E c k e r m a n .




A. Eugel ,

O
H
O

w

$190 00

o
xn

00
C7(

No. 4.

CO

Statement of miscellaneous suits under charge ofthe Solicitor of the Treasuiy, commencing July 1,1859, and ending June 30, 1860.
MAINE.
cn

T3
QJ
O

a

S
B

c
X

Against w h o m .

s

rz

3

Nature of suit.

p

3'

o
CJ

B

O
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o
C

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i

<

X
•

1
2

c
5
tD
rs
Q.

1859.
Dec. T .
Dec. T .

Indictmenl, assault on high seas
do

Alber Ball
John Doorilv aZias J o h n Dogherty

1859.
Dec. T .
Dec. T .

•

B

tfl
'3
3
tw
O

c
.o
o

CJ

• fl
3
O

<

CQ

o
o

c
3
o
B

s i

B
O

3

a
rz
QJ
QJ

i

fcfl

•3

-3
QJ

O

•1

•3

O

ti
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5

3

Pi

H
O
H

ft

1
1

$1 00
1 00
2 00
$20 00

in suit brought prior to the present fiscal y e a r . . .

o
NEW HAMPSHIRE.

1
2
3

1859.
July 29
July 29
Nov. 4

John C. Buswell

-

..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Daniel F a r r i n ^ t o n . . . .
., . .
John C. Buswell, principal; J . Buswell and P.
T r u e , sureties.

$100 00
3,500 00

3,600 00.
Decisions and collections in snits brought nrior to nrp.sftnt fi seal y e a r . . . .




QQ

V

Penalty for illegal use of postage stamps
Forf'.'ited reco"nizance

--48.59.July T .

1
1

$100 00"

100 00
2,500 00

$2,500 00

1
1

1
9

MASSACHUSETTS.
1

1859.>
Sept. —. J. S. Coolidge et al. vs. A. W . Austin, collector,

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct."
Nov.
Nov.

—
—
—
—
—
—
—

do
r S Mu=;Dratt us. the s a m e . . . . . .
. do
S. Scolfield vs. the same
p . S Shelton et al. vs. the same
John Tolbitt
E. R o w e , principal; Joseph Rowe, surely

,

9
10
11
12
13

Nov. 8
Nov. 8
Nov. 8
Nov. 8
Dec. —

T . Tufts, principal; George Tufts, surety
do
do
,...do
T u c k e r m a n , T o w n s e n d & Co. vs. A, W . Austin.

14

Dec. —
1860.
May —
Feb. —
Mar. —
May —
June —
May —
May —
May —
May —
May —
.May —
Mar. —
Jan. —

I s a a c D. Gates
W . T . Worthington ciaZ. rs. A.W. Austin, col'r.
do
JasigijGoddard & Co., us. J. S.Whilney, collector
T h e sarne vs. J. W . Preston, depuly collector..
C. A. Whifnore et al. vs. C. H. Peaslee, collector.
C. L . Cunningham et al. vs. the same
E. Atkins vs. the same
Win. P. Parrott vs. the s a m e .
Parker Fowle et al. vs. the same
Otis Norcross et al, vs. the same
C Spriii" et al. vs. the same
J. R. L a m b & E. Cumberland

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
06
27

do

$200 00
200 00
2,075
2,075
2,075
2,075

00
00
00
00

1

T o recover duiies alleged lo have been illegally
exacted.
do
do
do
do
do
Forfeited r e c o g n i z a n c e . . . .
do
Forfeite d bail bond
do
do
do...
To recover duties alllged t o h a v e been illegally
exacted.
do
T o recover allegnd excess- of duty
do
do
do
do...
do
.
do
do
do
do
do.
.
Mutiny on schooner Empire .

8,700 00
•nfipisions and pnllRotions made in suits broufht nrior to the conmienceuK Jul of the present fiscal y e a r .

1
1
1
$200 00
1860.
Sept. 10
Sept. 10
Sept. 10
Sept. 10

2,075
2,075
2,075
2,075

$200 00

00
00
U
O
00

1
1
1
1
I

....:. .
;...

,
8, .500 00
200 00

.

200 00
200 O
U

RHODE ISLAND.
1859.
June T.
1860.
June T.

J . S Billings..

Penalty for assault

S. C. H o l m e s .

Violation 3d section act 1825.

Decisions and colleclionsMn suits brought prior to commencement of the present fiscal year .




1
1

1

1859.
June T .
1860.
June T

$20 00
10 00
30 00
20 00

10 (!0
20 CO

1
2

5
9

21

INS
QO
CO

No. 4.—Statement ofi miscellaneous suits under charge ofi the Solicitor of the Treasury, Sc.—Continued.
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.

c

-3
tJ

g

Against w h o m .

B
B
o

a

i

B

Nature of suit.

rz

t

QJ

!

CJ

c

X

fl
GJ

"B

c

B

>Q<^
QJ

3
O

B
1

1859.
Aug. 13

2 Oct.

5

1

tX)
-3

(4-1

o
fl
3
O

B

<

<:
Gabriel Burnais vs. H . Moody, collector, and
G. King, w a t c h m a n .
J. S. Fairchild, principal, C. Burbanks and H .
R. Rensen, s u r e i i t s .

fl

o
•s
o

QJ

3

m

a

1
o

c

a

3

o
B

CJ
"3
QJ
QJ

c
o

-3

1

%

1
1860.
Aug. —

Forfeited recognizance

i.9.nn nn

$1,200 00
41 60

1

1,241 60

Decisions andr.oller.tions in snits hronorht nrior to nnmmpncfimpnt nf thp. nrpspnt fisnal vpar

._

1

1
$76 38

. .

1

.... ....

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.

1
9,
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

1859.
July
2
July 11
July 12
July 12
July 12
July 12
July 18
July 18
July 27
July 27
July 29
July 29
Aug. 3

/
Donald Mcllvaine vs. A. Schell
Anthony Scheitlen vs. the same
C. Winzer e t a l . vs. the same . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F . Victor vs. the same
R. Tischer et al. vs. the same
F. W . Rei mer et al. vs. the same
H. Henschen et al. vs. the same . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M Maas vs. the same
H Taylor vs. the same
T h e same vs. the same
J. C. Johnston vs. the s a m e
W . V. W i c h t vs. the same
C. Smilh vs. the same




,

.....;

do
do
do.... ..........
do
do
....... .do
do
do
do
do
. . . do

*...,!

ido

..

.............,
......

, ....

fci)
-3
fl
QJ

fi

<

T o recover value of-gig seized and sold for
alleged violation o f t h e revenue laws.
$1,200 00

-3

....

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
H-l 23

Aug. 3
Aug. 3
Aug. 3

3
3
Aug. 3
Aug. 3
Aug. 3
Aug. 3
Aug. 3
O 24 Aug. 3
25 Aug. 3
26 Aug. 3
27 Aug. 3
28 Aug. 3
29 Aug. 3
30 Aug. 3
31 Aug. 3
32 Aug. 3
33 Aug. 3
34 Aug. 3
35 Aug. 3
36 Aug. 3
37 Aug. 3
38 Aug. 3
39 Aug. 3
40 Aug. 3
41 Aug. 3
42 Aug. 3
43 Aug. 3
44 Aug. 3
. 45 Aug. 3
46 Aug. 13
47 Aug. 13
48 Sept. 13
49 Sept. 13
50 Sept. 13
51 Sept. 13
52 Sept. 13
53 Sept. 16
54 Sept. 13
55 Sept. 13
56 Oct. 21
57 Oct. 21
58 Oct. 21
59 Oct. 21
60 Oct. 21
61 Oct. 21
62 Oct. 21
63 Oct. 21
' 64 Oct. 21
65 Oct. 21
Oct. 21

Au?.
Aug.

Marlin Maas vs. the same
E m a n u e l Giro et al. vs. the s a m e . . . . .
C. Wiiiger et al. vs. the same
;
H. S. Greer rs. the same
.K. Fischer vs. the same
B. H. Field vs. the same
F . M. Hoose ct aii vs. ihe same
W . H. Fogg I'S. the same
V. Fleury"T;s. the same
N. Knoidler vs. the same
F . Hoose vs. the s a m e . .
W. Chamberlain vs. the s a m e . . . . . . . .
C. E . Boisdorff'vs.ihe s a m e . . . . . . . . .
George Christ vs. the s a m e . . . . . .
A. & E. Scheitlen ct al. vs. the s a m e .
C. G. Clark et al. vs'. G. C B r o n s o n . . .
F . W. Reimer vs. Augustus Schell
E . Cay lers et al. vs. the same
W m . Depeu et al. vs. the same . . . . . .
P. Balen et dl. vs. t h e same
B. H. Field vs. the s a m e . .
H. A. Richards vs. the same
J a m e s Knight us. the, s a m e
F . Cousinnery vs. the same
J. G. Hollins vs. the same
B . H. Field vs. the same
R. C. Blaucan vsl the same
Jos. Oliver us. the same
-..
John Poiter vs. the same
C. A." S jheibler vs. H. J. Redfield
H. J. Fairchild vs. the same
E. H. Troiier vs. the same
A. Richard vs. A Schell
R. S. Stenson vs. the same
R. L . Chance et al. vs. the same
Louis J a y vs. the same
V. Thirion vs. the same
C. Lenning et al. the same
J n o . W . Scheitlen cs. the same
Parker Handy vs. the same
R. M. Gomez et al. vs. the same
P. C. Blaucan et al. vs. the s a n i e . . . . .
J a m e s Benkard et al. vs, the same . . . ,
Jos. Oliver ef aZ. vs. the s a m e . . . . . . .
E. Giro el al. vs. the same
,
L . Curtis et al. vs. the same
R. M. Gomez e t a l . vs. the same
,
Victor Thirion et al. vs. the same . . . . .
O. W . Pollilz et al. vs. the same
,
D. L . Draper et al. vs. the same . . . . .
R. C. Greenleaf ei al. vs. the same . . . ,
William Chamberlain vs. ihe s a m e . . . ,
B. H. Field vs. the same
,




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.do.,
.do.,

No. 4.—Statement of miscellaneous suits under charge ofi the Solicitor ofi, the Treasury, c§c.—Continued.

CD

o

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK—Continued.

Nature of suit.

Against w h o m .

I
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82

1859.
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oot. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Oct. 21
Nov. 11
Dec. 2
Dec. 2
Dec. 2

83 Dec. 2
84_ - D e c
2
85 D e c 2
2
86 D e c
87 D e c 2
88 Dec. 2
89 D e c 2
90 D e c 2
91 Dec. 2
92 Dec. 2
93 Dec. 2
94 Dec. ,2
95 D e c 2
96 1 D e c . 2

J. W . Scheitlen et al. vs. A. Schell.
C. Lennig vs. the same
•...
George Christ et al. vs. the same . . .
H. D'Goer et al. vs. the same
A. Richard vs. the fcame
B. H. Field vs. the same
G. A. Lawrence vs. the same
B. H. Field vs. the same
D. Lane et al. vs. the same . . . . .
M. Knoedler vs. the same
E . Cayler et al. vs. the same
F. F. Bush vs. the same
J a s . Knight et al. vs. the s a m e . ' . . . .
A. L . Chaise vs. the same
H. Benedic vs. H. J. Redfield
R. L . Chance et al. vs. A. Schell . . .
Wm. Brummer et al. vs. H. J . Redfield.
Henri Gourd vs. the same
O. Zoliikoffer etdlT vs. t h e s a m e r.-..-. r.
C. P. Van Blankenslyn vs. the s a m e . . . .
C. P, Cochran vs. the same
....
H. Fleitman vs. A. Schell
H. D. Plimsoll vs. the same
F. Cou winery vs the same
F. R. Fowler vs. the sarae ,
ii. M Scheifflin vv. the same
H. A. Richards vs. the same
A. Schwerin vs. the same
L . Herkenvvorih vs, the s a m e .
C , E . Habicht et al. vs, t h e same




T o recover excess of d u t i e s .
do
do
i
do
do....
do
do
do
do
do.;
.'
do
do
do
do
do
do
.do.
.do.
.do,
.do..do.
.do.,
.do.,
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.

1660.
April 23
May

23

April 23

97
98
99
100
101

Dec. 2
Dec. 2
Dec 2
Dec 2
Dec. ,2

102
103
104
105
106

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec

107
108

2
2
2
3
3

Dec. 3
Dec. 3
1860.
109 Feb. 10
110 Feb. 10
111 Feb. 10
112 Feb. 10
113 Feb. 10
114 Feb. 10
115 Feb. 10
116 Feb. 10
117 Feb. 10
118 Feb. 10
119 Feb. 10
120 Feb. 10
121 Feb. 10
122 Feb. 10
123 Feb. 10
124 Feb. 10
125 Feb. lO
126 Feb. 10
127 Feb. 10
128 Feb. 10
129 Feb. 10
130 Feb. 10
131 Feb. 10
132 Feb. 10
133 Feb. 10
134 Feb. 10
135 Feb. 10
1.36 Feb. 10
137 Feb. 10
136 Feb. 10
139 Feb. 10
140 Feb. 10
141 Feb. 10
142 Feb, 10
143 Feb. 10
144 Feb. 10
145 Feb. 10
146 Feb. 10

P. A. Spies et al. ».s. H. J. Redfield.
H. U. F. Masi vs. A. Schell
C. F. Schneider vs. the same
C. P. Dumbman vs. the same
F. Passavant vs. the same

.do
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.

W m . Loeschigk et. al. vs. the same .
Jas. Oliver vs. the same
,
B. Babcock vs. G. C. Bronson
P. A. Speis et al. vs. the same
,
A. L a Chaise et al. vs. the same .....

.do.
.do.
.do.
• do,
.do.

Henri Gourd et al. vs. the same
W m . Loeschigk vs. the same . .

.do.
.do.

S. Guillaume vs. H. J. Redfield
S. Guillaume vs. the snme
B. Habcock et al. vs. the same
0 . W. Pollitz et al, vs. the same
C F . Dumbman vs. the same
W m . Loeschigk et al. vs. the same
E . B . Strange e t a l . vs. the same ..'
A. La Chance et al. vs. the same
F. Grund vs. A. Schell
J. M< Davies et al vs. H. J. R e d f i e k l . . . .
Peter Balen et al. vs. the same
J. Benkard et al. vs. A. Schell
E. B. Strange et al. vs. H. J. Redfield...
Jos. Oliver vs. A, Schell
H. D. Plimsoll vs. the same
T. Passavant vs. the same
E. W. Bailey et al. vs.' the same
F. Andrae vs. the same.,;
R. L. Chance et al. vs. the same
B. H. Field vs. the same
F. Schuchardt et al. vs. H. J. Redfield..
B. U. Field vs. A. Schell
David Lane et al. vs. the same
B. H. Field vs. the same
Louis Curtis et al. vs. the s a m e . . . . . . . . .
T . Passavant vs. H. J. Redfield
E. Cay lers et al. vs. A. Schell
'...
P . R. Fowler et al. vs. the same
H. H. Munsellvs. H. J. Redfield
M. Knochdier vs. A. Schell
C. E. Boisdorff'vs. H. J. Redfield
E. Heinemann vs. A. Schell
F. R. Fowler vs. the same
E . Giro et al. vs. the same
...
W m . Laltimer et al. vs. H. J. Redfield.
Thos. N. Dale et al, vs. the s a m e . . . . . . .
A. S. Anson vs. the same
C. payen et al. vs, the same.




...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
. . do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
,.. d o . i
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
. . . do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
....do

April 2J

1859.
May 23

1860.
April 23
April 23
April 23

April 23
April 23

May

8

May

9

May
May

23
23

May

8

.

No. 4:.—Statement ofi miscellaneous suits under chdr'ge of the Solicitor of the Treasury, c&c.—Continued.
SOUTMERN DIST^RICT OF NEW

to

YORK—Continued.
.J
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1.

CJ

fl

1

1
s
1
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177




p

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3
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1860.
F e b . 10 J. Syz et at. vs. H. J. Redfield
ef j . u . / o l \ s a m
F e b . 10 C.. Dord Vl/ t aL tvs• Ltl h^e ^ C X I tel v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
V^
l . / \ J i \A
F e b . 10 J-A, W aCIIl i lnl e^r DC. tt ih \p O l l l i l C ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R TT r l l I / O l ^ <;ninp
Feb. 10 R. M. Gomez et al. vs. A. Schell
'
F e b . 10 Jos, Rosenthal et al vs. H. .T. Redfield .
F e b . 10 F. A. Spies ei al. vs. the same
Feb. 10 p . . W.. Reimer et al, vs.. the same\ . « . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A*
TT
X V O l I i i l e t &0 tJiV, I / O I-JIIO O U J « l
F e b . 10 C. G. Borm vs. lhe s a m e .
F e b . 10 R. A. Wilihaus et al. vs. the same
F Ui l
p « >; t
F e b . 10 V . . X a U iVf^ hl ^f. . &!/ZKA.V,Z .€i o .9 L lhl ^pCsC:XaI ImVp^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T
I
F e b . 10 T . J. Burlhampt et al, vs. the same
Mar. 10 T . Gunimat et al. vs. AU«T. Schell
S
(>h nl L / o . ^ ^ ssnmp
Mar. 12 .A.. K Jp^ll il pli tt llvp^ nl CU V.U. i)« . t^h ^p O u l i i \ ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
/X
^
i
Mar. 12 Wm. Depeu vs. the same
Mar. 12 x v . 1 %. , W i A l liam>?^ uc . tLhl p. . ^ n lmi p . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . . . .
Ji. A TF 11 i - t A J J J C O l x .311. l o
Mar. 12 W m . H, Fogg vs. the same
,
Mar. 12 W. Shepherd et al, vs. the s a m e ,
Mar. 12 M. Maas vs. the same
«
,
Mar. 12 V . Thirion et al. vs. the same'
..,.,,....
Mar. 12 ^A7Richardvs. the s a m B T ^ . . . i . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . > .
Mar. 12 L. Curtis ef. al, vs. the same
Mar. 12 p. Grund el al. vs. the same
Mar. 12 T . Galway et al, vs, t h e s a m e .
Mar. 12 D. J. Draper vs. the same
Mar. 12^ W i n O h a i n h p r l a i n «? ilip s a m p
IT I I I . V y i l ( , L I I J L / \ . / A l C C | i | t / . ^ . L l i o C C X I i l O . . . . . . . . . . .
• • • *
Mar. 12
Fischer vs. the same
Mar. 12 R. L- Becknagle vs. the s.a,m e . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . . . .
C.
Mar. 12 E. Giro vs. the same
1
,
Mar. 12 F . Cou.sinery vs. the same
Mar. 12 H . .T. H e n c o h f i n pt a l . «« t h p s n m p
Mar. 12 . . . . . I# . AX v / J i . . . ^ ^ ( i \ ^ | t t f l i « . . c/o . t X I O O U l J i \ > . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. E . Borsdorff et al vs. the s a m e . .

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1860.
May 11
May 23

T o recover excess of duties.
do
do
do
do....
do
do
do
...
do
do
do
do
do
do
,,
,
do
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Against w h o m .

CD

•••
"

••

....

178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
908
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
330

Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
May
May,
May
May
May
May
.May
May
May
May
May
May
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

12
14

6
6
20
20
20
20
2(r
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20

F . W . Reimer et al. vs. the s a m e . . .
Ch. Winger et al. vs. the same . . . . ,
Ernest Caylers et al. vs. the s a m e . ,
F. Hoose vs. the same
H. Plimsoll vs. the same
F . Victor et al. vs. the same
R. Fischer et al, vs. the same
,
Wm. Brugere et al, vs. the same . . .
M. Maas us. the same
G. Ashton et al, vs. H. J. Redfield..
M. Knochaler et al. vs. A. S c h e l l . . . ,
V. Thirion et al, vs. the same
,
A. Scheitlen vs. the same
L . Herekenraih vs. the same
R. H. Gomez et al. vs. ihe s a m e , . . . ,
M. Sorehon et al. vs. the same
,
P, Balen e t a l , vs. the s a m e . . . . . . . .
R. C Greenleal et al.vs. the s a m e . .
V. Fauchi vs. the same
C Gignoux et al. vs. the same
Wm. Loeschigk et al. vs, the s a m e .
C. p . Dumbman vs. the same
W. p . Holland vs. the same
,
L e w i s Curtis et al. vs. the same
B. H. Field vs. the same
Peter Balen et al, vs. the s a m e . . . .
B. H. Field vs. the same
,
D. S. Draper vs. the same
A. Rickard vs. the s a m e . . . .
W. Chamberlain etal. vs, the s a m e .
H. Henschen et at. vs. the same
J . W . Scheitlen et al. vs. the s a m e ,
F . Victor et al. vs. the same
,
W. W . G i l b e r t vs. H. Maxwell
do
J . S. M a s s e t t v s . the same
R. H. Winslow et al.vs. the s a m e . .
S. Crooks vs. the same
,
C. E . Boisdorff'et al, vs. the s a m e . .
V. Fleury vs. A .Schell.
,
P. Grund vs. the same
E. Caylers et al. vs. the same
;
M. A. Sorehon et al, vs. the s a m e . .
B. H. Field vs. the same
,
P. C. Blaucan vs. the same
E. Giro et al. vs. the same
W. Brdwn et al. vs. the same
O. W . Pollits et al. vs. the s a m e . . . .
J a m e s Hervey et al. vs. the s a m e . . .
VVilliam Depeu vs. the same
J. H. Hervey et al. vs. the same . . . .
R. B. Williams vs. the same
T . J . Bruthampt vs. the s a m e . . . . . .




..do
..do
..do
..do
..do.
..do
..do
..do
..do
.,do
..do
..do
.do
..do
..do
..do
.do\
..do
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..do
..do
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..do
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..do
..do
..do
..do
. do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do

April 23
May 23

1
1

....

»
.

\
May

8

May

1

8

....

....

....

No. i.-^Statemeni qf miscellaneous suits under charge qf the Solicitor of the Treasury, ^c—Continued.

to

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK—Continued.

i

When commenced.

X

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Against w h o m .

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Nature of suit.

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F . R. Fowler et al. vs. A. Schell

237

J u n e 20
J u n e 20
J u n e 20
J u n e 20
J u n e 20
1859.
Sept. —
i860.
Peb. —

23S

April —

239

June —

William L i n d s e y , principal, J . A. Braddock,
surely.
0 . Mayhew, priucipal, Charles J . Rigberg,
surely.

240

June —
1859.
Aug. -

236

S41

H. L a w r e n c e , j r . , and William Paulks

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$500 00

1

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500 00

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.00.

U2

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Rpfn<;al to take on board destitute seamen
37
...>....«•

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1

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300 00

O
H
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1

Penally for using frank of another to avoid
• payment of postage.
Forfeited recc^nizance

aiid collections i n suits brought prior to c^ommence mehi of prese nt fiscal vear . . . . . . . • . .




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1,800 00
] Decisions

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500 00
J. McKie, master of barque f' W e a t h e r G a g e " . ,

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Replevin

....

D. B. Lockwood

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To recover excess of duties . v . . . . .
; do
do
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;

A. Scheitlen et al. vs. the same
W . H. Fogg et a l . vs. the same

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231
232
233
234
235

1

$29 76

18

203

1

3

1

...

EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA.

1
2

1859.
July —
Sept. —

T h e Philadelphia Steam Propeller C o m p a n y . . .
L e w i s & Co. vs. J. B. Baker, collector

. 3
4
5

Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —

T h e same vs. C. Brown, collector
William McKee & Co. vs. J. Brown, collector..
T h e same vs, C. Brown, c o l l e c t o r . . . . . . . . . . .

$188 20

1859.
To recover value of one box of goods
Oct. —
T o recover excess of duiies alleged to have
been illegally exacted.
do
do
do
do
.. . . . . . . . d o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .'.1. d o . . . . . . . . . .

188 20

$233 48

$233 48

1
1
1
1
1

233 48

233 48

1

4

.... ....

npr»isir«ns n nrl pnllpptinns in siiifs hrniiorht nrinr tn pnmmpnp. pmpnt nf thp present fiscal year

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MARYLAND.

1
0

3
4
5
H
7
8
q
10
11

1859.
Feb. —
June —
Aug. —
Sept.
Oct. —
Oct. —
Oct. —
1860.
Jan. —
Jan. —
Mar. —
Feb. —

O
H

D. & J. C. Gamble vs. J. T. Mason, collector.
The
The
The
The
The
The

same
same
same
same
same
same

vs.thesame
vs. the same
vs. the s a m e . . . . .
vs. the same
vs. the s a m e . . . . •
vs. the same

T h e same vs, the same
T h e same vs.the same
T h e same vs. the s a m e . ,
Benj. Brown




....'..

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................

c......

,do,
do
do
Charged with murder

do..........
. . . do
.
do
i......
.•••

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T o recover excess of duiies paid on caustic
soda.
, . , do
do..........
do
; . . . do
..do
I.
.', d o . . . . . . ^ . .
do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
do . . . . . . . .
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Mo. 4:.-r—Statement qf misceUaneous suits under charge of the Solicitor of ihe TreoMiry, Sc-r-^Opntmned.
NORTH

ci)

CAROLINA,,

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1859.
J u n e T . . George A. W i l l i a m s . . . . ,
June T . .
J u n e T . . W. R. Youri<»

4

FallT...

5
6
7

Nov. T . .
Nov. T . . J . M . S m i t h
Nov. T . .

1859.
Dec. —

Forfeited r e c o g n i z a n c e . . . . . . .
do
Defaulting juror,

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Defaultinf^ juror
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r i p p i c i n n c nnri pnllpi^tinns; i n .cnitfl h r n i i r r h t n r i o r t n p o m m f i n p p m p . n t n f t h p n r p . s p n t fiscal v e a r

'

.
SOUTH

41 73
23 21
19 25

$41 73
23 21
19 25

1
1
1

84 19

6

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500 00

559 67

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CAROLINA.

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to commencement of present fiscal year




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1,002 28

1860.
July —
1859.
Nov. —
...do
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$400' 00
18 09

Fraud on Pension Office

Nelson R. Howell

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$400 00

$400 00

GEORGIA.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

1859.
July
9
July
9
July 18
1860.
May —
May —
May —
May —
Mar. —

1859.
J. D. Keaton, principal, N. T. J o h n s o n , s u r e t y . .

C W Stvles
J M Midfllpton

$5,000 00
5,000 00
5,000 00

Forfeited recognizance
do
do
Indictment for rescue ;
do.
do
do
Forfeited r e c o g n i z a n c e . .

.•
.. . ...

Aus. T .
1860.
June T .

.,
Win. Hone
...... .
B. H. Hardee

....«*

«••

00
00
00
00

6,000 00

FLORIDA.

George W . M a r t i n . , ,
A. J. Lanier
J. B. Finch
L. H. Bryan
P. H. Svvaine
E. A. H e m m e n w a y ,

2.50
250
250
250

$5,337 34

1
1
1
1
5,3J7 34

NORTHERN DISTRICT.

1860.
Indictment for depredating on the public lands, J a n , T ,
,
do
do
Indictment for forgery.
•
do,
Sei. f a . to revive judgment
Indictment.—Embezzling, taking, &c., letier
from post office.

$115
115
102
102
4,151
1

90
90
35
35
30
00

$100 00
102 35
102 35

4,588 80

FLORIDA.—SOUTHERN DISTRICT.
1859. .
May T . . Henry Robinson .

Indictment for stealing from a wreck on high
seas.

May T .

$ 1 00

1859.
Dec, T .

$100 00

MISSISSIPPI. —NORTHERN DISTRICT.
Decisions and colleclions in suifs brought prior to c o m m e n c e m e n t of the present fiscal year.




1

i

15,000 00

1860.
Jan. T . .
Jan. T . .
Jan. T , .
Jan. T . .
Jan. T . .
Jan. T . .

1
1
.$5,000 00

$ 1 00

5

1
3

No. 4,^—Statement of miscellaneous suits under charge of the Solicitor ofi the Treaisury, Sc.—Continued.
GO

TEXAS.—WESTERN DISTRICT.

"

QJ'

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Against w h o m .

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3

1859.
Nov —
Nov. —
Nov. —

John L. More.
Simeon English
William Clary

Q
ri

1860.
Spring T .
do. . . .
do.,.

$100 00 Sei. f a
100 00 . . . . do
100 00 . . . do

TENNESSEE.
J. W . W h i t e , J. Mitchell, J. F . W h i t e , T . .R.
Mitchell, J. C. Brush, W , J.^Siandfer, E.
Howard.

O

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fl

o

I

s
<

<

$500 00

On replevin bond .
Indictment
do
do

500 00
Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to c o m m e n c e m e n t of the present fiseal year.,




tfl
rs

$1,000 00

1860.
May 11
May 2
April 24
Oct.
2

$500
178
145
75

00
42
20
00

898 62
3,023 60

28 87

"3
QJ

.^

bb

S
sd

Cu

QJ
GJ

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3

$16,090 00

rt
QJ

1
1
1

TENNESSEE.—MIDDLE DISTRICT.
John Bell, principal, J a m e s W o o d s , surety
Jon. M. Smith
.Peter A- Brown....^
John Hinson
.*

c;
m

$100 00
IOO 00
100 00

Bill in chancery lo subject about $800 in the
hands of these creditors to payment of debt
due Uniied States from J. W . White.
1859.
Dec. -

OQ

o

-EASTERN DISTRICT.

Decisions in suits brought previous to c o m m e n c e m e n t of present fiscal year .

1860.
May —
May —
May —^
May —

i

3UU 00

. 300 00

I860.
April 6

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3

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Nature of suit.

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MISSOURI.—EASTERN DISTRICT.
. 1859.
Juno —
June —
June —

Sei f a . on forfeited recognizance.
do

John W a r r e n .,
The same
Sundry j u r o r s .

$72 50

$72 50

72 50

72 50

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to commencement of present fiscal y e a r .

ARKANSAS.—WESTERN DISTRICT.
1
2

18.59.
Nov. —
Nov, —

3
4
5
6

Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

7

Nov. —

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

Dec —
i860.
May —
May —
May —
May- —
Mar. —
Mar. —

15

Mar. —

16

Mar. —

-

—
—
—
—

Indictment for murder
Indictment for introducing liquors into Indian
, country.
Indictment for murder
,
Indictmenl for larceny
do
Indictmenl for giving liquors to Indians in Indian country.

Alex. Henrv
A. P. Hurst
R. ThomD«on

•

George Singleton

Henrv W^hittinjrton
L . D Yates

$519 15
244 75
682^40
47 52
206 74
600 15

...do
...do
...do
...do

...do.....
1860.
Indictment for selling spirituous liquors in In- July —
dian country.
Indictment for larceny
, . . . . . . May T . .
..
. . . . do
...do
..do
Contempt of court . . . .

-

J a m e s Benge, principal, George D. Kenney and
J. J. Walton, sureties.
P. McKenney, principal, James P. Spring and
S. F. Clark, sureties.
W m . Walker

1859.
Nov. T . .
.,.do

,

156 85
1,110 40

do

9 00

800 00

792 00

1

801 00

13

3,878 75

1,050 23

9

May T . .

1

do
:i. 100 00

Oftpisions n nd colleclions in "suits brought prior to commencfrnpnt nf thp present fiscal year . . . . . . . .

....

MICHIGAN.
Collections in suits brought prior to commencement of the present fiscal y e a r .




1
1

do.

800 00

70
30
70
00

4,818 66

$800 00
1,500 00

209
98
90
52

$100 00

3

No. 4.—Statement of miscellaneous suits under charge ofi the Solicitor ofi the Treasury, Sc.—Continued.

CO

o
o

TENNESSEE.—WESTERN DISTRICT.

.

Against w h o m .

•3

8

X •
fl
3

fl

8

1860.
April —

1

_
Willis N. Arnold

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3
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QJ

<
Indictment—false, fraudulent, and fi)rged applications for bounty land warrants, 8 cases.

1860.
Oct. —

m

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£

QJ

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3
0

.1

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Nature of suit.

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Robert Jordan, principal, U . J . Findley, surety,




Forfeited recognizance.

I860.
July 10

0
QJ

QJ

1
150 00

$309 88

$309 88

$1,827 82

1,827 82

OHIO.—NORTHERN DISTRICT.
1860.
April 1

0

i

s
.2
Q

7

1

172 28

1859.
Oct. -

rs

<
$250 00

KENTUCKY.

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to c o m m e n c e m e n t of present fiscal year .

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3

250 00
Decisions and colleclions in suits brought prior to c o m m e n c e m e n t of pre sent fiscal year

cc

.2

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fl

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....

7

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OHIO.—SOUTHERN 3>ISTRICT.

1
0

1859,
Sept. ~
Jan.

—

Allen Dunlop, principal, M. E v a n s and C.
Dunlop, sureties.
Isaiah Patterson Lvle C. Moore

$1,000 00

1

Debt on r e c o ^ i z a n c e
Debt on recognizance conditioned for recogni
zance of John Patterson.

1,000 00

1

'

9.

INDIANA.
1859,
Sept. —
Sept. —

Solomon Romig, Phebe M. Romig .
do
do . . . . . . . ,

,

Penalty for using postage stamp twice .
do
do

1859,
Nov. -

$50 90

50 eo
100 00
1,500 00

Decisions and collections in suits brought prior to c o m m e n c e m e n t of fiscal year .

ILLINOIS.—NORTHERN DISTRICT.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

1859.
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —
Sept. —

Henry Curtis . . . . . . i . . .
John Hatch
Adam Godman
•
Jefferson Miller
T h o m a s Bryant
David Sears
Peter Castile
Timothy O'Daniell
W m . H. Griflin
Jerome Harper

IV
19
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

W . B. A. Skelton
J.H.Kennedy
P . Willard
J. L a c k e y . . . . . . . . . . . . ,
C. Conkling
H. VV. Chamberlain
B. C. Smilh
W m . H. F a i r c l o u g h . . . . . .

—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—




•
"
.,,. .

.....
.
,
..

1859.
Ejectment- -possession o f l a n d on Rock island. O a . —
. . , do
do . . ,
... do..
do....
do..,..,.,..
do.....
. . . . . . d e . . . ,j_
do.... ...... ...do,...
.do....:
do,..
do 1, . . . . . . . . d o , , . . . . . . . d o . . . .
do....
do....
do . . .
do
do.,,.
do....
do .
. . . do
do..,.
do . . . . .
. . . do . ,
. ........do
do
do..,.
do....
do...
do....
do
do....
do....

"YseoV"

, .

do .

..... do.....
, . , do
do , .
do
,.do

$17 05
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17

05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05

April —

....
~....

CO

No. 4.—Statement ofi miscellaneous suits under charge ofi the Solicitor ofi the Treasury, Sc.—Continuecl.

o

ILLINOIS.—NORTHERN DISTRICT—Continued.

iCJ

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X

B
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Against w n o m .

•

fl •
QJ

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m

P

fl
3

tfl

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07
28
oq
30
31
32

April
April
April
April
April
April

o

o

3
o

fl
3
o

Q

B

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• •

do..,.

The Moline Water-power Manufacturing Company.
Henry Greenbaum
,...,.
J. ,vi Kennedy
....
P.Eddy
J. M. Adsitt
<;. V. Clark
W A. Olark

do

QJ

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ft

1

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fcb

1

fl

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Bill in chancery lo abate nuisance arising from
bridge between Rock island and Moline.
Altar-hment
.,
do
,
do
do.
do
do
..

1
May
May
May
Mav
May
May

T.
T.
']'.
T.
T.
T.

$ 8 15
8 15
8 15
8 15
v 15
S
4 65
198 85

D f t o i s i o n s a n d nollfio.tions in s u i t s h r o n o r h t n r i o r t o r o m m f t n cement of th e present fiscal y e a r . . . «

Replevin ,

Henry Ratienberg vs. J. Elwell, J. D. Reymert,
and O. Everts,
1,000 00

1
1
1
1
1
1

llll

17
2

WISCONSIN.




a
<

rc

1
1
1
1
1
1

1

1859,
July —

'B

Ejectment—possession ofland on Rock island.
......do.,,.
,
do
do. ...
......do
,,.,.... do....
.,,. do.....
. . . . . . do
do
••.do
do
do;
do. , , .

,

C. T . ©hurch
G. Raub

—
—
—
—
—
—

"o

p

a
<
T. H. W a t e r m e n
D. W. Stewart
C. F . Caulkins . . .

p

o

N a t u r e of suit.

o

X

'>6

O J

94
O'i

i

fl
to
rs

fl
fl
Sb
rs "

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QJ
3

o
o

1589.
Oct. —
Oct. —
Oct. —
Oct. —
Oct. —
Oct.
~
1860.
April —

0|)

21
22

1

fl
_c
QJ

1860.
May —

1,000 00
26 62
1,026 62

-^

15

IOWA.
1859.
Oct. T,

Action of right to recover the ground at Burlington on which the hospital is located.

Heirs at law of Enoch. Wade, deceased, vs.
Dr. J. B. Eiielin, resident physician al United
States hospital, Burlington, Iowa.

CALIFORNIA.—NORTHERN

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

1860.
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Ma.i. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar.. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —.
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar. —
Mar, —

W . W . Meyer
J. W. Sullivan
Mrs. C. Lally
Wm. Wisker
W m . Waugh
J a s . Brow^n...
J. Drake
J. Dawes
L. Cole
W m . Barry
,..'.
P. Molloy
Mrs. Wilison....
R Olpharte
P. T . Postel
R. Liddale & Co
L. Co bu rn
Jas. L. Burtis
C. VVeinbrant.

Ejectment
. . . . do
. . . . do
....do
...do...
....do
.... do.,
. ; . . do
do
....do
. . . . do
. . . do
....do
. . . . do
. . . . do
do
do
....do....
do
. . . do

J. Stratman
W. F . Caubam

DISTRICT.

...

,

.... do

...

....

,

....

}:
:'• . .

21

UTAH TERRITORY.
1860.
Mar. —

A Mormon, name unknown ,




$250 00

Replevin

No. 5.

O

Statistical summary ofi business under charge ofi the Solicitor qf the Treasury during thefiscal year ending June 30, 1860.

Judicial districts.

T r e a s u r y transcripts.

Fines, penalties, and
forfeitures.

N6.

No.

Miscellaneous.

W a r e h o u s e transportation bonds.

i^

^^a

ii
rt r s

No.

A m ' t sued for.

Am't sued for.

Am't sued for.

No.

A m ' t sued for.

Total amount (re-ported) of judgments for United
States.

Suits brought during the fiscal year ending J u n e 30,1860.

C

QJ

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pi

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4
5

$3,600 00

$3,600 00

$2 00
100 00

2

*
$15,332

00

27

8,700 00

24,022 00

8,506 C
O

New York, southern disirict
Pennsylvania, eastern district
Pennsylvania, western district

,.

2
2
241

1,200 00
1,800 00

8,748 90
307,742 56

30 00
1,241 60
64,704 62

116,528 25

1
1

5

188 20

12,726 67
279 77

233 48

6,012 72

2
109

$239,574 83

1
66

7,548 90
41,512 16

16

$24,855 57

12,396 73

1

141 74

297 77

... .

....,,.

........

1,600 00
1,000 00

8
6
1

4
3
20

25 00
9,350 00

19

11,744 92

15,000 00

1,600 00
16,000 00

25 00
21,094 92

6,000 00
4,588 80
1 00

••
920

'




......

w. . .

84
66
5,337
304
7,775

19
27
34
70
77

11,313 58

68
-p^

T e x a s , eastern district

H

253 93
1,002 28

7
Georgia

10 00

11

.. 4
..
6.
2

*^

182 04
200 00

Rhode Island
3

$143 44

2
3

1

Maine

, ^ ^.

Q

1

.......

3

300 00

300 00

300 00

1
13

3,100 00

5,500 00

16
3

9,958 57
5,500 00

4.818 66
3,572 50

2

Texlis, w e s t e m district

2,000 00

1
4
8

•'*^"*"500*66*

2,500 00

V
2

......
1

Kentucky
l O Ohio northern district
Illinois, southern d i s t r i c t . . . . .
Michigan . . .
Wisconsin

6,858 57

....

2
1
1
1

,

i,7()6
6,418
4,040
6,797

27
30
24
81

11,885
34,690
20.8rt8
9,287

60
25
81
73

...*•....

Minnesota
Calit'orfdi northem d i s t r i c t . . . . . . . . ^

1
1
2
2

'

3,154 76

3,154 76
1
2

i

1
8

1
2
2

200 00

1,000 00

32
200 00
170 00

26
2
2

176, .304 70
20,778 (10
23,170 00

1
1

1

190 00

21

1,000 00

2,900
6,418
4.040
6,797
17tU504
33,}-33
5*,86i»
20,8*-8
9,477

27
30
24
81
70
60
25
81
73

1

Total




146,337 68

250 00

210

5,017 97

2 40
1,827 82
ion 00
4,900 00

198 85
1*378*78'•

49,007 49
270 00

272,016 56

120

296,712 42

411

36,638 20

751,704 86

3.446 00
4,920 00

6,5i8 70
71 50

250 00
15,500 00

15,500 00

19

62
00
80
82

71 50

3
1

1

1,898
2,50
.3. .380
1,827

801 00
1,184 71

w
o
pi
H
O

118,405 96

212,b95 85

m
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No. 5.—Statistical summary of husiness under charge ofi the Solicitor ofi the Treasury, Sc.—Continued.

o
05

1

<<- a ,

m

Judicial districts.

rz

1

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2

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QJ

rs

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5

Pennsylvania, eastern disirict
Maryland
Disirict ofColumbia
Virginia, eastern district . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Carolina
South Carolina
Florida northern district

•

40

2

2

N e w York, southern district

4

11

7
2

1
' 6*
1
5
6
5

Alabama, middle di.-^trict.

7

......

Mi^sissippi, northern district
T e x a s , eastern district




.
•

c

2

I

' '

c •«

3
3
4
34

4
313

2
5
419

* " 5 * ' *"*22'
1
1
4
11
1

4

i

7
6
10
6
5

3
4

7

' " 2 "
11

3**
39

t»

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tso

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QJ

13
^

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W

......

Louisiana, ea.*<tern'distri<'t

1

rz

in

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2
1
27

2
1
48

Rhodelsland

s
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3
1
3
1

Maine

2
m

tD

a

X
B

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1

QJ

fl,

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a 75

QJ

C OJ

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$3,535 00
200 00

2
1
3

23,491 90

2
2
14

120 00

QJ

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1

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rz
QJ

•3

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il.
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2
1
12

"36**

2
3
96

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52

05

C *3

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Suits brought prior lo the present fiscal year.

Suits brought during the fi.-cal year ending J u n e 30,1860.

Qjx:

^

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Qjx: «

ii.r
QJ

w

^^

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fd-

QJ w » r

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$2 00
3,635 00

200 00

3
3
4
4

8,700 00

$163
3,555
182
400

4,670 00
18,458 94
45,088 97

= 4
3
62

150 00
1,241 60
88,196 52

4,680 00
18.4.=.8 94
161,61/ 22

$^0 00
3,555 65

44
65
04
00

1,515 06

4

....

4

4,039 64

6

i,748 54

10,052 36

5,135 66
24 00
5,945 15

1
1
4

1

2
1
4

52,985 43
5,775 53
146 82

1
1
5

5,135 66
24 00
5,945 15

52,985 43
5,775 53
400 75

500 00
40U 00

1
1

1
1

559 67
400 00

25,000 00

3
1

4
1

151 00
3,222 75

7
2
5
9
6

10,112 85

2

6

2,596 74
6,299 10
5,708 30

1
9

100 00

1

.....
1

4

1

......

1

1,.502
400
6,000
29,588
1

28
00
00
80
00

**ii;033"53"
100 00

643
466
5,337
455
10,998

86
27
34
70
52

2,596 74
6,299 10
17,021 88

w

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CQ

Texas, western district
Arkansas eastern district . . .
Missouri, eastern disirict

3
.......

1

4

10,318 22

13
4

6
2

ig

5,153 75

7

25

1
1

3

17
•Wlscon^in

4

***2*

2
2

•

16
1
6
8
1
2
6
3
1
34
27
12
4
2
27

16,090.00
3,023 60
172 28
309 88

9.

3

5

9

3
15

12
15

1
1
2
2

1
3
2
2

5

i,656 23
1,663 83
1,000
1,33
150
309

00
67
00
88

1
1
1

1
1

5
1
1
1
1
3

f

1
1
1
17
26
6
4

2

1,500 00

1

^
^

,
979 70>

2

2

9,972 41
3,572 .50

1
6
3
3

2

2

10,618 22

22
4

"i"

3
1

16.(;90
4;922
422
3,690
1,827

00
22
28
68
82

""6;5i7"97""
17
100
3,581
719
5,422
51,133

00
06
43
92
33

2
2

1,000
l;i6
150
209
1,827
100
4,900

00
07
00
88
82
(lO
00

49,107
3,851
719
5,422
57 652

49
06
43
92
03

. 198 85
" * * i * 378*78*
979 70
3,446 00
4,920 00

1,851 23
2,848 54

California southern d i s t r i c t . . .
1

Total




151

59

42

36

472

760

h3
O

113,627 05

62

42

85

189

2,162 58
221,305 47

213

71 50

232,033 01

71 50

Pi
H

2,162 58

1

O

434,201 32

a
I—«

O
CQ

CO

o

308

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Eegister's Office, November 27, I860. .
S I R : I have the honor to report that during the last fiscal year
the business of this office has been, in the main, conducted with the
usual dt spatch and punctuality in all its branches.'
The accounts revised by the First Comptroller and Commissioner of
Customs, received at this office, have been re^J^ularly entered and
registered in the proper books, and filed as required by law.
'J he papers required by law to be kept on file in this office are so
metliod ically and systematically arranged in the new file room that
any paper, voucher, or settlement, can be found with facility and
without trouble or delay, and I may say, w.ithout exaggeration, that
since the ioundation of the government the papers on file in the room
set apart ior such purpose have not been so conveniently and systematically arranged as now. The facility thus aff'orded to accounting
officers, and others requiring reference to the vouchers and papers on
file, is a matter of great importance to the operations of all the departments of the government, and more especially the treasury.
In consequence of delay at a few of the ports in sending on the
abstracts of commerce, and one or two other unavoidable circumstances,
the statistics for the annual report on commerce and navigation will
not be completed till the last of this week. The public accounts,
receipts and expenditures will be completed at an early day, and ready
to be laid before Congress during the first or second week of the
session.
The tables, statements, and reports to accompany your annual report
prepared in this office will be completed in a day or two, and* would
have been ready by this time, but the excessive labor required by the
head of the division and some of the clerks to complete these tables
has almost prostrated them, and no others can, at once, be successfully
substituted in their places.
In conclusion, it aff'ords me pleasure to state that the elerks, have,
as a general thing, .fiaithfully and promptly discharged their respective
duties, and thus am I enabled to report that the business ofthe office,
specially, and generally, is in good condition.
Q
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
F . BIGGEE.
Hon. HOWELL COBB, Secretary of the Treasury,




REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

309

Statement showing the amount of moneys expended at each cus'omJiquse
in the United States during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, per
act of March 3, 1849.
Districts.

Present collectors.

Robert Burns
.
Passamaquoddy, Me
^
A. F. Parlin
Machi..is, Me
Thomas D Jones
Frenchmau's Bay, Me . J. R. Red man .
Penol)SCOt. Me
Johu H.Kennedy
Waldoboro', iVle
Thomas Cunningham,.,
Wiscasset, Me.Bath, Me
J. H. Nichols.
'.
Portland and Falmouth, Me
Moses Macdonald
Saco, Me
Thom^is K. Lane
,
Kennebimk, Me
John Cousens
York, Me
G.G. Bowden
Belfast, Me
Jonathan G Dickinson ,
Bangor, Me
-. D. F. Leavitt.
Augustus .J enkins
Portsmouth, N. H
Vermont, Vt
C. Linsley
-.-.
Newburyport, Mass.
James Blood
Gorham Babson
Gloucester, Mass
Williain B. Pike
Salem and Beverly, Mass
William Bartoll
Marblehead, Mass
Boston and Charlestown, Mass .-.., J. S. Whirney
Plymouth, Mass
, Wait Wadsworth
Phineas VV. Leiand
Fall River, Mass
S. B. Phiney
Barnstable, Ma.ss
New Bedford, Mass
, C. B. H. Fessenden . . . .
Edgartown, Mass.
-. Ira Darrow
Nantucket, Mas.s
— Eben W. Allen
James A. Aborn
-.
Providence, R I
George H Reynolds
Bristol and Warren, R. -I
Newport, R. I
Gilbert Chase
Middletown, Conn
. . . Patrick Fagan
New London, Conn
-. John P. C. Mather . . . .
Minott A. Osborn
.
New Haven, Conn
William S. Pomeroy
Fairfield, Conn
E. Williams, jr.
Stonington, C nn
«
,
Sackett's Harbor, N. Y
- William Howland
Pliny M Broudey
Genesee, N.Y_
J. B. Higgins.-Oswego, N. Y . . .
-.._.-*
George P. PMdy
Niagara, N. Y
-«Warren Bryant
-Buffalo Creek, N. Y
Horace Moody....
Oswegatchie, N. Y
Jason M. Terbeli
Sag Harbor, N. Y
Augustus Schell
NewYork, N. Y.
Henry B. Smith
Champlain, N, Y
'
Cape Vincent, N. Y
- Theop. Peugnet
0. IT. Dickinson . , Dunkirk, N. Y
William S. Bowen
Bridgetown, N. J
Henry J. Ashmore
Burlington, N. J
Amos Robins
Perth Amboy, N. J
Great Egg Harbor, N . J
. . Thomas D. Winner
J. S. Jennings
Little Egg Harbor, N. J
Edward T. Hillyer
Newark, N. J
-T. B. Atkinson
Camden, N. J
Joseph P. Baker
Philadelpbia, Pa
C. M. Tibbals
Presque Isle, Pa
James A. Gibson
Pittsburg, Pa
Jesse Sharp . . -.
Delaware, Del
.•



Amiumt.
$26,891
2,710
4,784
3,981
7.315
6,597
7,610
36,421
1,477
739
638
6,046
.5,797
6,174
14,839
3,469
6.(>75
12,738

86
09
81
81
19
96
10
54'
99
14
9L
41
52
55
32
58
70
24

2,21H 04

375,483
2,248
2,749
11, !01
7,569
2, 179
2,304
12,453
3,024
5,699
2,404
12,249
14,804
1,959
1,303
2,710
5,660
19,412
12,698
14,443
6,398
790
,235,768
11,537
6,105
1,167
353
154
3,810
679
490
1,734
304
211,558
5,134
2,984
15,136

84
00
23
9463
15
44
02
04
61
50
60
14
46
32
86
74
50
37
92
89
07
89
74
00
50
65
63
37
20
82
54
87
68
71
69
15

310

E E P O E T OP THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.
Baltimore, Md.
Annapolis, Md
Oxford, Md
Vienna, Md
-.
Town Creek, Md
-.
Havre de Grace, Md
-..
Georgetown, District of Columbia
Richmond, Va
Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va
Tappahannock, Va
-.
Cherrystone, Va
Yorktown, Va
Petersburg, Va
Alexandria, Va
,
Wheeling, Va
,
Yeocomico, Va
,
Camden, N. C
,
Edenton, N. C-.,
Plymouth, N. C
Washington, N.C
-.
Newbern, N. C-Ocracoke, N. C
^--J..
Bea.ufort, N. C
Wilmington, N. C
_
Charleston, S. C
...Georgetown, S. C
Beaufort, S. C"
Savannah, Ga
St. Mary's, Ga
Brunswick, Ga
Augusta, Ga
Pensacola, Fla
St. Augustine, Fla*-'
..Key West, Fla
St. Mark's, Fla.l
St. John's, Fla
,
Apalachicola, Fla.-•
Fernandina, Fla . . .
Bayport, Fla
Paiatka, Fla
.,,.
Mobile, Ala
Selma, Ala
j
Tuscumbia, Ala
>
Pearl River, Miss
Natchez, Miss
Vicksburg, MissjNew Orleans, La
Teche, La
Shreveport, La., (no returns)
Texas, Texas
Brazos de Santiago, Texasf
Saluria, Texas - . .
Paso del Norte, Texas
.
Nashville, Tenn
Memphis, Tenn
„Knoxville, Tenn^'^
,
Chattanooga, T e n n . - . - .
Louisville, Ky
^ To March 31, 1860.
t To



Present collectors.
John Thomson Mason . . .
John T. Plammond
Tench Tilghman
William y. Jackson
James R. Thompson
William B. Morgan
Henry C. Mathews
,
W. M. Morrison
J. J. Simkins
George T. Wright
JohnS. Parker
W. F: Presson
Timothy Rives -Edward S. Hough
Andrew J. Pannell
Gordon Forbes
Lucien D. Starke
Edward Wright
Joseph Ramsey
Henry F. Hancock
William G. Singleton
Oliver S. Dewey
•James E Gibble
James T. Miller
William F. Colcock
John N. Merriman.,...
Benjamin R. Blythewood
John Boston
J. J. Dufour
Woodford Mabry
T. W. Fleming
Joseph Sierra
Paul Arnau
John P. Baldwin
A B. Noyes
-.-Thomas Sed with
N. B ker
Felix Livingston
A. J. Decatur
George Lucas
Thaddeus Sanford
•.
Jonathan Haralson
L
James W, Rhea
L
R. Eager
L
John Hunter
-J. Bobb
1
Francis H. Hatch
Robert N. McMillan
P. H Rosson
Hamilton Stuart
Francis W. Latham .
Darwin M. Stapp
S, J. Jones.-i
,
Jesse Thomas
Henry T, Hulbert...
John McMullen^
Halsey F. Cooper . . .
Walter N. Haldeman
March 1, 1860.

Amount.
$148, 039 93
920 19
271 91
932 34
152 31
159 66
2, 313 34
6, 293 95
24, 790 50
1, 605 86
468 27
431 30
838 25
442 13
417 18
152 09
631 00
452 93
567 46
349 68
587 39
188 98
755 85
7, 666 94
70, 542 97
459 70
250 26
39,404 24
500 90
733 96
003 13
1,848 99
2, 335 50
1,
071 61
10,
8S9 62
3,
566 11
2,
642 71
5,
409 75
3,
351 48
350 00
29
43,254 95
517
350 00
57-4 52
716 57
333 77
168 81
285, 383 00
1,
23, 674
8,457
7, 596
6, 781
759
275
262
910
2,637

J To December 31, 1859.

54
05
95
80
02
75
50
39
73

311

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES;

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.
Paducah, Ky
Hickrnan, k y
„..-.
Columbus, Ky
„
Miami, Ohio . . . - - . . . .
Sandusky, Ohio
.
Cuyahoga, Ohio
«
Cincinnati, Ohio
„
Detroit, Mich
Michilimackinac, Mich
Evansville Ind
New Albany, Ind
Chicago, 111
Alton, I I L .
„
.Galena. Ill
..-..
Quincy, III
Cairo, III
Peoria, III
".
St. Louis, Mo
Hannibal, Mo
Burlington, Iowa
.
Keokuk, lowaf
Dubuque, Iowa
Milwaukie, Wis
...Minnesota, Minn
Puget's Sound, Wash. Ter,'
Oregon, Oregon
Cape Perpetua, Oregon
Port Orford. Oregon
San Francisco, Cal
Sonoma, Cal
San Joaquin, Cal
Sacramento, Cal
.....
San Diego, Cal
Monterey, Cal
San Pedro, Cal

Present collectors.

Amount.

William Nolen
W. G. Roulac
F. Stewart.
E. D.Potter
George S Patterson . .
Benjamin Brownell
T. J. Sherlock
U. W. Davis
J. A. T. Wendell
Charles Denby
J. B. Norman
•
B F. Strother
B. S Dorsey
Daniel Wann
...
Thomas Benneson
Levi S Lightner
H. S. Austin
D H. Donavan
Alfred W.Lamb
Philip Harvey
William Stotts
Edward Spottswood
G. W Clason
J McFetri(.lge
C. C. Phillips.
John Adair'
^
«
Barclay J. Burns
B Brattain
Benjamin F. Washington
C. P Gilliss
A. Lester
.
Lewis Sanders, jr
H. Hancock
James A. Watson
Patrick H. Downey .'

$415
350
686
4,114
4,315
6,935
5,093
22,244
10,191
637
362
12,408
430
447
394
814
350
6,694
1,000
350
484
650
11,429
1.928
19,372
26,665
11,482
3,255
221,347
3,935
3,540
3,243
3,118
5,868
5,360

3,313,057 93

Total.
•» To.March 31, 1860.

t To December.31, 1859.
F ! BIGGER, Register.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 24, 1860,




30
00
10
06
54
37
89
24
94
78
27
32
00
00
26
85
00
62
00
00
46
00
56
13
01
26
30
75
47
18
00
04
00
75
00

312

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement of the numher of persons employed in each district of the United
States for the coUection qf customs during the fiscal year ending Jane
30, 1860, with their occupation and compensation, per act March 3,
1849.
tn

a

S,^

Districts.

Occupation.

Compensation
to each person.

Collector
Surveyor,,
Inspectors
do
Deputy collector
;.....-..-.
Aid to therevenue
.....do...
Weigher and measurer
do
Boatman
.
.-..do
Collector
.-.
Deputy collector and inspector.
.--.
do
do
Inspector
....
--.do...:
Boatman
Collector
Deputy collector and i n s p e c t o r . . . . . - - . .
do
do
do
do
Inspector. . . .
..
.
Boatman . .
....do
Measurer
.
Aid to the revenue
Collector
Deputy collector
:
Deputy collector and inspector
\
do
do
.-.-_•
--.do
do
Collector
Inspector
....do
Inspectors
.
.-.do
.—do
-...,
....do
:
....do
Measurer
,.
Collector
.-..
Inspector
„
-..-do
.-..do
..-.do
Measurer.-.---....--.-_- . - - . - . - . .
Collector

$3,000
1,263
1,095
730
730
1,095
730
1,081
963
360
240
1,439
730
5(;0
547
250
300
1,330
1,095
1,080
300
730
360
240
285
36
1,F20
600
1,000
750
730
1,743
1,095
1,083
936
850
730
350
300
124
906
1,098
l,07t
915
488
264
•1, 200

•So'
CJ

^
Passamaquoddy, Me.
10

Machias... .

"

Frenchman's Bay

Penobscot

......

Waldoboro'

'
Wiscasset

Bath



.

00
36
00
00
00
00
00
53
40
00
00
62
00
00
00
00
00
53
00
00
00
00
00
00
43
00
64
00
00
00
00
92
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
31
00
00
00
00
42
44

313

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Compensation
to each person.

Occupation.

District.

a ^
Bath—Continued..,

Portland and Falmouth..

Saco . .

KennebunkYork,
Belfast..

Bangor-

Portsmouth, N. H .




Deputy collector, inspector,

weigher.

Deputy collector^and inspector...
Inspector, weigher, gauger, and measurer.
.-..do
...do
.-..do.-.-::-....
...do
....do
-.
Colleotor
Deputy collector
Surveyor
Superintendent of warehouses
Weighers, gaugers, and measurers .
Inspectors
,.
Occasional inspectors
Occasional inspector at Yarmouth
Boatmen
do
..
....do
Porter
Collector
Inspector
....do
Aid to the revenue
-Col lector
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspectors
Collector
.,
Deputy collector and inspector
InspectorCollector..
-._
Deputy collector, inspector, weigher,
gauger, and measurer
do
,do
^
do
do.do
doAid to the revenue ..
....do
Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectors..
Weigher and gauger
Deputy collector, inspector, weigher, and
gauger
Aid to the revenue
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor
Deputy collector and inspector
do
do
Inspector ,
..-.do.-..
do

$1,036 70
650 00
1,438 65
1,095 00
600 00
500 00
350 00
250 00
3,193 01
1,500 00
1,562 45
1,500 00
1,500 00
1,098 00
1,098 00
1,098 00
457 25
366 00
350 00
374 97
500 00
450 00
100 gOO
150. 20
600 00
112 00
271 28
200 00
120 00
1,343 35
1.329
975
778
1,095
1,095
200
2,036
1,098
264

95
92
67
00
00
00
93
00
57

1.330
200
450
432
379
821
200
1,098
1,053
500

34
00
88
46
61
33
00
00
00
00

314

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

Portsmouih—Continued.
Vermont, Vt

Newburyport, Mass..

iGompensation
to each per-

Occupation.

.,

Inspector and measurer
Porter and watchman
Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectors
do
do.--do
do
...do
do
.-..do
do
Deputy collector
Deputy inspector
..-.do
Revenue boatmen
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor

-.
-.--.
.--.
„...
--..
..-.
-.

.f..do.

Gloucester-

Salem and Beverly.

Marblehead.




Deputy collector and inspector
'
Inspector
.
Inspector, weigher, gauger, and measurer.
Col lector
•.
Surveyor
-Deputy collector
°
Inspectors
_
--.do
.---do
„-...
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
„
do
do
Boatman
.'
Keeper of the custom-house
Aid to the revenue - .
Collector
Naval officer
.,
Surveyor
-.
...do
Weigher and gauger
...do
Clerk
Measurer
......
Inspectors
--.do
--.do
...do
Boatman
Messenger and porter
Collector
Surveyor
-..^.
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspector, weigher, gauger, and measurer
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspector
Boatmen ..^
.
..
--.do

$1,200 00
153 33
1,090 84
1,000 00
912 50
600 00
500 00
360 00
750 00
360 00
240 00
240 00
905 83
473 64
497 07
250 00
1,000 00
900 00
800 00
2,321 40
677 62
600 00
1,095 00
300 00
150 00
687 37
500 00
248 28
150 00
18 00
1,159 52
972 18
643 27
186 23
1,375 19
1,311 04
1,000 00
400 00
1,095 00
600 00
642 00
183 00
300 00
120 00
519 00
174 17
647 00
547 00
'365 00
182 50
150 00
100 00

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES,

815

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

Boston and Charlestown..

1
3
1
1
1
3
3
13
7
2
1
1
2
56
1
2
21
6
6
14
3
1
2
2
2
4
5
1
3
2
2




Collector
Deputy collectors
Cashier
Assistant cashier
Clerk
.-..do
-.-do
,
-..do
,-..do
.-..do...
-..do..
Messenger
Assistant messengers
Inspectors
,
...do
....do
Night in.spectors
,
Night watchmen
Revenue boatmen
Weighers and gaugers
..
Measurers
General appraiser
Appraisers
Assistant appraisers
Clerks
...do
...do
,
Special examiner of drugs
Storekeepei s
'.
...do...
...do
...do
...do
c
Superintendent of warehouses
Clerk
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
Naval officer
Deputy naval officer
Assistant deputy naval officer
Clerks
...do..--:
.'...do
Messenger
Surveyor
.-.'
Deputy surveyor
Assistant deputy surveyor
Clerk
Messenger

o

Compensation
to each person.

$6,400 00
2.500 00
2,500 00
1,600 00
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,200 00
1,100 00
900 00
1,000 00
760 00
540 00
1,095 00
800 00
700 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
1,485 00
1,485 00
2,500 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
1,400 00
1,200 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,200 00
1,100 00
1,095 00
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,200 00
939 00
782 50
800 00
5,000 00
2,000 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
1,250 00
1,050 00
^ 750 00
4, 900 00
2,000 00
•2,000 00
1,500 00
700 00

316

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued,

Plymouth-

C(»llector
Inspector

- . --

do

Fall River.

Barnstable.

New Bedford-

Edgartown

Nantucket
Providence, R I .




.-..do
,
...-do
Collector
Inspector
,-..do
---..
:...do
-Weigher
.Measurer
Gauger
1
„Boatman
Collector
,
Deputy collectors
....do
,
do
,
-...do
,
Inspector
,
...do
....do
,
....do
..,,
....do
„-.,
Cierk
Boatmen
,
Keeper
Collector
Inspectors
Inspector, vveigher, measurer, and gauger
Inspector '.
Inspector and measurer
Inspector
....do
Inspector, measurer, and weigher -.„
Aid to the revenue
Clerk
Boatman
Collector
Inspector
„
....do..
,
„-...
Temporary inspector
....do
Boatman.
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector...„
Inspector
•.
Collector..
Deputy eoliector
Clerk
Naval officer
Surveyor at Providence
Surveyor at Greenwich
Surveyor at Pawtuxet

0

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES.

317

STATE MENT—Continued.

Districts.

cu n 3
p . a?

Occupation.

^ a

Providence, R. L—Cont'd,

Coastwise inspectors
...do

Bristol and Warren .

Newport .

Middletown, Conn.

New London.




Foreign inspectors, $3 per day when employed—total
In.-pector at Pawtucket
Insptctor at Pawtuxet
'
Iuspector at East Greenwich
Weigher
Gauger
^
Measurer
Boatman at Providence
Boatnian at Pawtuxet
Boatman at East Greenwich
,
Messenger
Collector
Inspectors
....do
Temporary inspectors
...do
Weigher
,
Gauger
Assistant storekeeper
,
Boatman
,
...do
Surveyor
...do
Collector
..
Naval officer
Surveyor
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspectors
(all)
Occasional inspectors
I
(all)
Weigher
Gauger
Measurer
Boatman
Suiveyor at North Kingston
Occasional inspectors at N. Kingston -(all)
Boatman at North Kingston
Surveyor at Tiverton
Inspector
Collector
,
Surveyor at Middletown
Surveyor at Hartford
.,
Surveyor at Saybrook
Deputy collector, inspector, and ganger..
Inspector, gauger, weigher, and measurer
at Hartford
Inspector, gauger, weigher, and measurer
at Saybrook
Weigher and measurer at Middletown
Collector
Surveyor

Z!om pensation
to each person.

$547 50

136 87
2,484 00

75 00
450 00
300 00
1, 500 00
135 84
1,156 99
75 00
420 00
33 00
300 00
512 28
549 00
105 00
114 00
99 00
1 21
199 56
138 00
216 00
21 00
324 48

281 36
1,098 11

481 68
435 62
546 00
681 00
993 00
33 50
478 92
82 38
450 00
250 00
191 69
270 00
200 00
250 00
809 72
260 72
394 28
312 16
650 00
278 84
300 00

84 41
1,986 22

354 67

318

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued,

Districts.

Occupation.
O c

New London—Continued,

New Haven.

Fairfield.

Stonington ,

Sackett's Harbor, N. Y . .

Genesee.

Oswego ,




Inspector, weigher, gauger, and measurer:
do
:
do
»..
Inspector
....do
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
Surveyor
,
Weigher and measurer
,.
Weigher and gauger
Inspectors.
Day and ni ht inspector....
„...
Inspector
„...
do
,
Aid to the revenue
....do
Watchman and porter
Messenger and porter
Collector
Inspector, weigher, measurer, and gauger.
do
do
do
do
Collector
Surveyor
Inspectors
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
Revenue boatman....
„
Collector
„
Deputy collector and clerk
„
Deputy collector and inspector
,
..-.do
do
— do
do
Night watch
Collector
Deputy collector
...do
....do
Inspectors and aids .
Inspector and clerk .
Collector
Deputy collector
Clerks
....do
...do
...do
Inspectors.
...do
...do
...do
...do
Revenue aids .
...do
...do
...do

Compensation
to each per-

319

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

Compensation
to each person.

o ^
^, p.

<
u

Oswego—Continued

Niagara ,

Buffalo Creek

Oswegatchie

Sag HarborNew York..

24
20
6
22
47



Revenue a i d . . . . .
,...do
do..
Night watchmen
..-.do
....do
Collector
Deputy collectors
.-.do
Deputy collectors and aids
Deputy collector and inspector ,
....do....
....do
Inspectors
Clerk
Watchmen
,
Night watch
Collector
Deputy collector
....do
....do
,
Inspector
....do
«
....do
....do
Night watchmen . . .
Clerk
do
Collector
,
Deputy collector
Aid to the revenue..
Inspector
,
,
Deputy collectors . . .
....do...:
do
....do
Night watch
Collector
Coastwise inspectors.
Inspector
Collector
Auditor
Cashier
Assistant auditor . . .
Assistaut cashier
Deputy collectors
Clerk
....do
,
....do
do
.
....do
do

do

.i

.(all)

$30 00
20 00
130 00
366 00
365 00
244 00
1,413 62
900 00
732 00
732 00
732 00
399 94
366 00
732 00
• 732 00
549 00
366 00
1.954 23
1,000 00
900 00
730 00
1,000 00
900 00
600 00?
822 00
* 732 00
912 00
784 50
1,460 10
900 00
900 00
730 00
463 75
450 00
350 00
300 00
240 00
679 36
249 00
93 00
6,340 00
4,000 00
3,000 00
3,000 00
2,500 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
1,600 00
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,200 00
1,100 00

320

REPORT

ON, TIIE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

New York—Continued - -




13
6
1
4
2
1
1
2
7
14
2
4
1
4
2
1
1
1
4
63
1
19
6
8
193
75
4
2
11
1
3
1
1
1
63
6
1
18
1
2
1
1
1
4

Clerks
„,
....do
....do
....do
....do
....do
Keeper of custom-house
Messengers _
....do
..-.do
....do
Porters
„
Fi reman
Watchmen
....do
Warehouse superintendent........
Assistaut storekeeper
....do
Warehouse clerks
do
... do
Weighers
Measurers
.,
Gaugers
-.
In>pectors
Night inspectors
Measurers of passenger vessels . . . .
Measurers cf wood and marble....
Debenture clerks
Captain of night watch
Lieutenants of night watch . . . . . . .
Superintendent of marine hospital
Examiner of drugs
^
Marker
....do
Laborers
....do
Bargemen
Deputy collector at Albany . . . . . . .
Inspectors at Albany
„
^Surveyor at Albany
Deputy collector at Troy
Surveyor at Troy
Temporary aids of revenue . . . . . . .
Appraisements.

1
3
5
1
10
6

General appraiser . . . - . ,
Appraisers -.
Assistant appraisers
Examiner of d r u g s . . . . Appraisers' clerks
.-..do

..
..„.

REPORT ON T H E FINANCE?.

321

STATEMENT—Continued.
p
o
GQ

Districts.

'" _:
t*..4

Occupation.

P*^

Compensation
to each person.

t-l P l

JZ5

New .York—Continued .

2
7
1
4
3
21
1
1
1
5
2
5
2

Appraisers' clerks.
do
...do
,...do.
...do.
,...do.
Storekeeper, 12 Broad street.
Clerk to storekeeper
....do
...--.:..do.......
.-..do...
do

$1,300 00
1,200 00
1,150 00
1,000 G
O
800 00
650 00
600 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,100 00
1,000 00
800 00
600 00

Naval office.

1
3
2
8
6
25'
3
1
3'
2

Naval officer
Deputy naval,officers
Clerks
— do
.-..do
....do.....do
..do
....do
Porters .

4,950 00
2, 000 00
1,500 00

n,4oo 00
1,200
1,000
900
600
500
500

00
00
00
0.000
00

Surveyor's office.

Surveyor
Deputy surveyors .
Clerk
....do
do
...do
...do
Messenger
....do
Porter
Collector
Deputy collector, inspector, and clerk.
Deputy collector and inspector
do
do
do
do
Deputy collectors and aids
Deputy collector, aid, and clerkDeputy collector and inspector . .
..-.do
do
do
do
Deputy collectors and aids
Boatman
-...-..---....-

Champlain.

--..do

21



4,900 00
2,000 00
1,200 00

i.aoo 00
1,095
1,000
700
650
433
480
1,252
800
1,000
750
600
600
600
550
500
400
400
240
180

00
00
00
00
34
00 .
57
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

322

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

3s

Cape Vincent ,

Dunkirk Bridgetown, N. J
Burlington
Perth Amboy . . -

Great Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor

Newark

.

Philadelphia




1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
4
10
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
6
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
1

Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectors ,
do
do
do
do
do
, . do . - - . .
Aid of revenue
.„.
Boatman
Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectors
Collector
....do
...do
Deputy collector.
Inspectors
....do
.-..do
Surveyor
Collector
Inspector
Collector
Deputy collector
.-.
Inspectors, $3 per day wdien employed,
(all)
».Coilector
,
Deputy collector aod inspector
...
Temporary inspector
Messenger.
Surveyor
.'.
i
Collector
Deputy collectors
,
Cashier
Clerks
....do
Clerk, 9 months and 21 days..;
Clerks
....do
Clerk, 6 months and 11 days
.......
Keeper of custom-house
Messenger
-.
Porter
Watchmen
„..
Naval officer
„
Deputy naval officer
Clerks
....do.
Messenger
Surveyor
.„
Deputy surveyor
Clerk
....do
„.-..
Messenger ,.
General appraiser
;
„
Messenger to appraiser

Jompensation
to each person.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

323

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

Philadelphia—Cont'd

1
1
1
4
6
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
. 2
1
1
1
1
2
- 1
1
4
1
6
2
2
1
1
44
1
9
1
3
1

25
1
5
1

Presque Isle..
Pittsburg . . . . .

Delaware, Disl

1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1




Compensation
to each person.

Principal appraiser
.
Assistant appraiser.....
,
Assistant appraiser, 9 months and 3 days.
Examiners
Packers
—
Clerk, 5 months
Clerks
Clerk, 5 months
Messenger of appraiser's office
,
Clerk of appraiser's stores
,
Foremen of appraiser's stores
Marker
Watchmen
Storekeeper of port
,
Superintendent of warehoases.
Assistant storekeeper.
..,
Storekeeper, ^assistant)
,
Markers
...do
,
Frincipal weigher.
Assistant weighers
Foreman....^
Beamsmen
Gaugers
Measurers
do
Measurer, 11 months
,
Inspectors
.-..
Inspector, 11 months and 16 days
Revenue agents..
Revenue agent, 10 months and 28 days .
Revenue agents
,
Captain of night inspectors, 11 months
and 20 days
Lieutenantof night inspectors, 11 months
and 28 days
Night inspectors
Night inspector, 5 months
Night watch on wharves
Night watch on wharves, 8 months and
15 days
Messenger in the inspector's office'Revenue bargemen
Revenue bargeman, 11 months and 8 days
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
Surveyor
Clerk
-..do
Watchman
Collectori.
Deputy collections and inspectors
Inspector . . - . ^
-.-.

$2,500
2,000
1,516
1,098
732

00
00
3.0
00
00

600 00
1,000 00

416 66
600 00
1,000 do

640
540
549
1,500
1,200
900
600
540
480
1,485
1,200
732
540
1,485
1,485
1,200
1,100
1,098
1,056
915
666
549

50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00.
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

778 02

. 628
549
226
549

57
00
60
00

390 00
649 OO

600
562
407
732
2,017
834
600
456
1,038
1,095
800

00
07
03
00
72
^,0
00
25
50
00
m

324

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued,

Occupation.

Districts.

Delaware, Del,-r-Cont'd
Baltimore, Md

Anmapolis..--.

Oxford...
Vienna
Havre de Grace



1
2
1
1
1
4
1
2
4
2
1
4
1
1
27
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
24
1
2
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
4
6
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Inspector
,
Messengers
,
.
Collector
.'„...
Deputy collector
Cashier _.,
Clerks
,-..do
....do
....do
....do
....do
Messengers
Porter
Superintendent cf buildings.
Inspectors
,
Weigher
.
Deputy weighers
....do
Gauger
,
Measurer . . . j
Deputy measurer
Watchmen
....do..!
General appraiser , .
Appraisers
Clerks to appraisers
....do
Porter . . . . . . ..,'.
Superintendent of warehouse
Assistant storekeepers......
....do
....do
Clerk to storekeeper
....do
....-Porters to storekeeper
Boatmen
Examiner of drugs
Naval oflicer
Deputy naval officer _
Clerks to naval officer.
....do
Messenger
Surveyor
Clerk to su rveyor
Keeper of Lazarette
Collector
Surveyor
.-..do
....do
Collector
....do
Deputy collector-.,
Surveyor

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES,

325

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.
0 .2
u CX

IGompensation
to each person.

1 B

Town Creek . . ;
Georgetown, D. C

Richmond, V a . . . .

Norfolk and Portsmouth.

Tappahannock.

Cherrystone
Yorktown Petersburg .

Alexandria.

Wheeling . . . .
Yeocomico - . .
Camden, N. C




Surveyor
Collector
......
Deputy collector and inspector
do
do
Temporary inspector
Collector •.
Deputy collectors, inspectors, weighers,
and measurers
Inspector, weigher, and measurer
Gauger . . . , .
, .. . . . . * . . . . . . . .
Watchman
Aid to revenue...
Collector
j
--...
Deputy collector
--....*...
Clerk to collector
Naval officer
Clerk to naval officer
Surveyor...— ,do
Weigher and gauger
Measurer
Inspectors
..„
Temporary inspector
Watchman and porter
Coxswain, revenue boat
Boatmen
;
Collector
Deputy collector
Surveyor
— do
...do
......--..
...do
...do...
Collector
i
Surveyor...
Collector
•.
...do
Surveyor of customs
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
Deputy collector
Inspectors
Temporary inspector
•..
Collector
...-.
Deputy collector, inspector, weigher, and
measurer
.,
Inspector..-i
Gauger
,
Surveyor
Boatman and messenger
Surveyor
*.....do
Collector
„
Temporary inspector, &c..
...........

$173 60
980 88
821 00
800 OO
200 00
3,000 00
1,098
1,098
401
500
312
2,391
1,500
900
977
730
720
250
1,500
706
1,095
730
547
360
192
314
300
301
276
252
164
158
325
312
691
574
467
1,100
730
1,095
64
1,212

00
00
00
00
00
97
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
25
00
00
50
00
00
78
00
25
00
00
75
60
01
00
85
37
03
00
00
00
00
68

1,500 00
1,098 00

25
527
360
823
210
672
289

32
76
00
65
00
16
00

326

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

Camden, N. C.—Cont'd
Edenton
Plymouth

.„

Washington . . . . . . . . . .
Newbern
Ocracoke

Beaufort
Wilmington

Charleston, S. C .

22

Beaufort
Georgetown, S. C
Savannah, G a . . .




Temporary inspector, &c..
Collector
.-...
Temporary inspector Collector
„
Surveyor
„
.Inspector, gauger, weigher, and measurer.
Collector
-..do
Inspector, gauger, weigher, and measurer,
Collectdr
„
i-..
Deputy collector and inspector
Temporary inspector
Boatmen
„
Collector
,
Inspector, gauger, weigher, and measurer
Collector
Naval officer
,
Surveyor
,
Surveyor at Jacksonville
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspectors
Measurers
,
Weigher and gauger
Messenger and porter
,
Collector.
Naval officer
1
Surveyor
Deputy collector
:.
Clerk.:
:
.-.do
--.do
Assistant naval officers
Appraisers
Examiner of drugs
Storekeeper
Inspectors
Boatmen
„
Messenger
«...
Porters
Weigher
..„.....
Measurer and gauger
Collector
„
.-..do
,
Deputy collector
„
....
Collector
„
Deputy collector
Surveyor
„. . . ^ j . . .
Naval officer
Appraisers
—
Weigher and gauger
Storekeeper
Clerk
....do...„.--.

Compensation
to each person.

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCEP.

327

STATEMENT—Continued.
a
o

C
O
Ul

Distiicts.

.

< Ti
D
Pl O

Occupation.

f-i c x

Savannah, Ga,—Cont' d - .

Saint Mary's
Brunswick
Augusta

,
--

Pensacola, Fla..
Saint Augustine
Key West

Saint Mark's.

Saint John's.,
Apalachicola

Fernandina.
Bay P o r t . . .
Pilatka
Mobile, Ala

Selma
IHiscumbia
PearlRiver, Miss.
Natchez
Vicksburg
,
New Orleans, La




Inspectors .
Porter
,-..do....Revenue boat hands.
Collector
.-..do
Inspector
Keepers of light-houses
Surveyor
Colliector
Inspector
Boatmen
Collector
Inspector
Messenger
Collector
Deputy collector
.*....
Inspector
Inspector at Indian Key
Temporary inspector and night watch
Collector
.'
Deputy collector and inspector at Tampa.
Deputy collector and inspector at Cedar
Keys'
Boat hands
.--do
—..-•...,
Collector
Inspectors
Collector
Inspectors, (all)
Weigher and gauger
Boat hands, (all)
Light-house keepers, (all)
Assistant light-house keepers, (all) .
Collector
Deputy collector
Surveyor
-..,
.--.do
Collector
Inspectors and c'erks
Inspectors
Weighers and measurers
Examiner in aid of revenue.
Revenue boat-keeper
Surveyor
..-.do
Collector
Deputy collector.
Collector..
..--do
.--.do..--.
Deputy collectors .
Naval officer

Compensation
to each person.

$1,0.95 00
600 00
360 OO
360 00
335 78
406 ,^4
248 00
375 OO
350 OO
1,718 72
1,095 00
300 00
600 00

550
420
1,992
1,098
1,098
500
72
615
730

00
00
45
00
00
00
00
60
00

500 00
300 00
240 00
780 00
724 00
1,200 00
1,914 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
1,400 00
1,020 00
2,280 00
1,000 00
350 O
O
350 OO
3,260 74
1,500 00
1,095 00
1, 500 00
942 00
480 00
363 52
350 00
546 50
250 00
500 00
1,000 00
6,000 00
2,500 00
5, 000 00

328

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES,

STATEMENT—Continued',

Districts.

Occupation.

=New Orleans—Continued

Deputy -naval officer.
.......
Surveyor..
^...
Deputy • surveyors
Auditor and general bookkeeper
Impost bookkeeper
Cash clerk
L..
Warehouse bookkeeper
Co mm ercial abstract clerk
,
General storekeeper.......
..
Export and clearance clerk . . . . .
Corresponding clerk
,
Assistant cashier
Register clerk
Second warehouse bookkeeper ..,
Liquidating clerks .•
,
Calculators..
..-.
Entry clerks
.Extension c l e r k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.-..do
Assistant storekeeper at appraiser's store.
Bond clerk
Superintendent of warehouses.
,
Assistant general storekeeper
..,
Permit clerks
..,
Warehouse registering clerk
Assistant registering clerk
Assistant generail bookkeeper
Manifest clerk...Porter and messenger -'^.
..
Bookkeeper
„•




Naval office.

Warehouse c l e r k . . . . - . . . . ,
Impost clerk
.....
Calculators
.
Manifest clerk
Assistant warehouse clerk
Surveyor's office.

3
1
1
1
1
3
2
65
10
8

Gangers..--..
.
Weigher
Assistant weigher . . .
Measurer
Assistant measurer..;
Local surveyors
Night waitchmen
Inspectors
.
Night inspectors
Aids of the revenue.

|Compensation
to each person.

EEPOET ON T H E FINAKCES,

329

STATEMENT—Continued.
fl
o

Distncts.

P^ <v
"4-. tr>
O-O

Occupation.

Compensation
to each per-

Surveyor's offi'ce.

NeW Orleans—Cohtinued.

10
10
4
4
12
1

Aids, river s e r v i c e . . . . . .
Temporary inspectors-.. - .
Messengers and boatmen.
Boatmen__-.- . . - ....do--------Marker-

$1,095 00
1,095 00
720 00
730 00
540 00
720 00

Warehotise departinent.

Assistant storekeepfei:.
Markers....
Chief laborers Laborers - - - - - -

1,200
600
660
600

00
00
00
00

Appraiser's office.

Tech6.
Texas, Texas-

Saluria

BazoB de Santiago::.

1
2
2
5
1
2
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
.4
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1




Appraiser generjil.-Appraisers
Assistant appraisers .
Examiners . . - _ - - - - Clerk----:
.--.
.--:do---.-------Porter and messengerPorter and messenger to appraisergeneral.
Packers-.;:-.:
.
---..-Examiner of d r u g s : . - ---Collector
.».----Deputy collector and inspector
.. - Collector
^...
Deputy collectdrs - - - - Stoorekeeper.-..----.-,.•Inspectors...... , . . . ^ L

Clerk
«....--.Collector.-.
•Deputy collector and inspector...
-do.-.--- --------db
„ .-do:.----.
------do
Surveyors..-- : . . . - - :..---:do
----•--.
Mounted inspector._
--------Collector...
,
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspector, measurer, gauger, ahd weigher.
^Clerks...
....-..-.do..
.-Deputy collector and inspector at the
mouth of the Rio Grande
'
Deputy collector and inspector at Rio
Grande city
^..
Deputy eoliector and inspector at Ranche
Rosareo
-.--

2,500 00
2,500 00
2,00O 00
1,400 00
1,200 00
1,095 00
900 00
720 Ob

60O ob
1,000 00
1,246 15
891 00
1,750 00
1,000 00
1,098 00
1,098 00
1,000 00
1,340 00
1,095 00
1,000 00
750 00
600 00
500 00
720 00
1,750 00
1,000 00
800 00
1,000 00
800 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
1,000 00

330

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES,

STATEMENT—Continued,

Districts.

^V.

Occunation.

«-! P.

Brazos de Santiago—Con.

Paso del Norte .

Nashville, Tenn.
Memphis
^..
Knoxville
Chattanooga.--Louisville, K y . . .
Paducah-.
--,
Hickman...--Columbus.---..,
Cincinnati, Ohio

Miami

Sandusky

Cuyahoga.

Detroit, Mich.




Deputy collector and inspector at Laredo.
do
do
- - . a t Carrizo
do
-.do
at Roma..
Deputy collector and inspector at Edinburg
Deputy collector and inspector at Brownsville
inspector at Brownsville
do
at Brazos Island
-.
do
at Brownsville
Storekeeper at Brownsville
Night watch
Measurer
„„
Collector
Deputy collectors and ijispectors.-do
do
...-do.
and clerkMounted inspectorSurveyor
.....do
.do-do.
-do.
Clerk
Porter and messengerSurveyor
.--do
,
.---do.---doClerk-.
..--do.. do
warehouse.
Collector
Deputy collector
Inspector
Messenger
Collector
Deputy collector
do
....do
Clerk
Collector
D.eputy collector,...
Inspector and clerk .
Inspector
....do
Clerk
Collector
Deputy collector . . .
...-do
do
-.
do
„.
do

Compensation
to each person.

E E P O E T ON THE FINANCES.

331

STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

Detroit, Mich.—'Cont'd.

Michilimackinac .

Evansville, Ind
New Albany
Chicago, 111

Alton
Galena
Quincy
Peoria
Cairo
Saint Louis, Mo

Hannibal
Burlington, Iowa
Keokuk
Dubuque
Milwaukie, Wis..

Minnesota, Minn
Puget's Sound, W. T .

Oregon, Ore




Occupation.

Deputy collector
...do
...do
Clerks
...do
Inspectors
...do
...do...
Collector
,
Deputy collector and inspector
do
do
do
do
do
do
Surveyor
,
...do;
:
Collector
Deputy collector
...do
Clerks :
,
Inspectors
,...do
...do
...do
Surveyor
...do
do
-...
...do
....do
...do
Clerk
....do..
....do
Warehouse man
Aid
Messenger
Surveyor
do
....do...............
...do....
Collector.
Deputy collector
..-.do
Inspectors
Watchman
Collector
Deputy collector
Surveyor
Inspector at Bellingham Bay..
Inspector at San Juan Islaud .
Inspector at Port Townsend...
Inspector at Tekalit
Inspector at Steilacoom
Collector
„.

Compensation
to each person.

$180
150
120
1,095
600
480
360
240
835
500
'400
200
155
631
413
1,250
1,000
300
800
732
600

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
95
00
00
00
00
71
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

684 00

574
350
508
390
800
350
3,000
1,321
1,150
1,000

00
00
34
03
00'
00
00
00
00
00

600 00
202 78

38
1,000
350
350
354
1,290
1,000
300
900
480
1,200
800
1,000
1,095
1,095
1,095
1,095
800
3,000

82
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

332

REPORT ON THE FINANCiES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
OQ

Districts.

*• _:
-

Oregon, Ore—^Continued.
Cape Perpetua'.
Port Orford .
San Francisco, Cal.
3
'2
6
5
1
2
3
1
2
3
2
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
6
1
1
-1
2
21
i

a
6

Soridma;
San Joa^quin.



1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
i
1
1

Compensation
to each person.

Occupation.

'sola

Deputy colleetor
Surveyor
'
.i
Inspector
Collector
„
Boat hand
Collector . . ^ . .
^... „
Deputy collector
.^..
Collector
Deputy collectors
-.-...-;.......
Clerks .
:-......
....^o....
....do
Captain of watch
Watchmen
,^..-..i......
Messengers
-....
--.
General ap raiser
....—.:
Appraisers
>....»...
Examiners . ^ . - - .
Clerks .
Watchman and superintendent of laborers
Messenger.......
i...„
Laborers .
.L
Temporary laborers, $3 per day
Superintendent of warehouses
Clerk . . . . . . .do..
-.
'Storekeeper . . .
.-.:do
.-..do...--..:..............
Messenger . . . - - . . . . . :
„
Watchmen . . :
...-,
:
Laborers
. i , . . . . „=...
Temporary laborers, $S per day
Surveyor
Deputy surveyor......
Messenger
Inspectors.......
-.-.do......--:.
...........
....
Weigher and measurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gauger
Laboreirs . . - . . . . . . . .
..........
Temporary laborers, $3 per day
Boarding officer
Bargemen .,
Naval officer
Deputy naval officer and clerk
,
Clerk . . . . . . . . . .
do
...do.-..
„.„.
Messenger . . . . . . .
-Collector...
,
.....
Temporary inspector . . . . . . . . . ;
Collector...-.

..;....

... .„

$1,500 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
2,072 95
720 00
2,000 00
1,000 00
7,900 00
3,125 OO
2,500 00
2,250 00
2,100 00
1,368 75
1,080 00
1,080 00
3,125 00
3,125 00
2,250 00
1,620 00
1,620 00
1,170 00
1,080 00
1,687 08
2, 500 OO
2,250 00
2,100 OO
2 , 100 00
1,642 50
1,642 50
1,080 00
1,080 00
900 00

2.083 41
5,625 00
2,700 00
1,170 00
1,642 •60
1,368 7^
2,250 00
2,250 00
900 00
1,659 00
1,642 50
900 00
6,250 00
2,700 00
2, 500 OO
2,200 00
2,100 00
1,170 00
3.084 64
15 00
3,173-iSjO

333

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
CQ

fl

Districts.

(V Ti

Occupation.

P H <V

o o
u

Compensation
to each person.

......

$3,446
3,750
3,050
2,745
3,060
2,000

^

M-B

a"

5s

Sacramento
San Diego
Monterey .
San Pedro

1
1
1
2
1
1

o

Collector .
....do.
do...
Inspectors
Collector.
Surveyor

........
. ........,.

70
00
00
00
00
00

F, BIGGER, Register,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register 's Office, November 24, 1860.

No. 12.
NEW YORK, Octoher 25,

1860.

SIR : The board of supervising inspectors, now holding their ninth
annual meeting pursuant to appointment, in accordance with their
custom, heg leave to submit to you their annual report of the operation of the steamboat law of August 30, 1852, and their own proceedings and those ofthe local boards during the past year.
The general operation of the law continues to be very satisfactory^ ,
the loss of lite by explosion or by fire when under way being comparatively smalL The aggregate loss of life during the past year is
larger than was anticipated, arising principally from the recent serious
collision ofthe '^ Lady Elgin'' with a schooner, on Lake Michigan.
Many fires have occurred to steamers while lying at the wharf or
landing ; some have undoubtedly arisen from incendiarism, while in
' many other cases the origin of the fires could only be ascribed to the
same cause.
Fires occuriing to steamers when at wharves or landings or at
anchor have been attended with the loss of several lives, and it will be
noticed as a singular feature, preserited in the report of the past year,
that there has been much less loss of life from the burning of steamers
when under way. than by those burnt at a wharf or landing or at
anchor. When we take into consideration the necessarily very combustible character of steamboats, and the much greater liability to
accident by B e when under way, from the number of fires and lights
used on board, this result can only be ascribed to the much greater
degree of care and vigilance exercised when under way, than when in
port. It is very desirable that, if possible, more efficient measures
should be adopted to guard against the occurrence of fire on board
steamers, and for its extinction when discovered;. but with the great



334

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

variety in coustruction and arrangement of these vessels, it is very
difficult of accomplishment. Our attention has from time to time been
called to paints or washes designed to render wood work comparatively
incombustible, but none that we have met with appears to meet the
necessary requirements in a satisfactory manner.
But the most frequent and serious accidents which we have now to
report are those arising from collision with sail vessels. Accidents of
of this character have always been frequent, but since the present
steamboat law has been in force and other classes of accidents have
been reduced in number, those by collision with sail vessels stand out
with greater prominence, and consequently arrest the attention ofthe
community and receive comment and criticism.
This board has been fully aware of the evils resulting from lack of
system and law in regard to lights on sail vessels, not only by personal
observation, but by many memorials and petitions that have been
presented on the subject. They have therefore made all possible
efi'ort for the past four or five years to obtain some action of Congress
which shall have a tendency to remove, in a greater or less degree,
this cause of accident and disaster ; and they are pleased to be able
to state that a bill passed the House of JElepresentatives the last session
of Congress which, if concurred in by the Senate, they believe will to
a great degree accomplish this object.
The ^^ Lady E l g i n " case, attended with such extensive loss of life,
the particulars of which we give in a subsequent part of this report,
as well as others of a less serious character occurring during the past
year, show most conclusively the necessity of some legislative action.
The case of the '* Lady Elgin'' produced much excitement in consequence of the great sacrifice of lite caused thereby. Inspectors were
severely and publicly censured, that the sail vessel had not proper
lights, and for other matters over which they had no control, in connexion with this disaster.
Thafc this board has been fully aware ofthe importance ofa system
of lights on sail vessels, and that their attention is not now given to
it for the first time, but that, on the contrary, they have not ceased
to call attention to the iinportance of correcting this evil, will appear
by reference to their reports. In the very first report made at Cincinnati in 1853, appears the following: ^'Third. We would call
attention to the importance of requesting Congress to pass a law [for
the more safe and successful navigation of lakes, bays, and rivers by
steamers] compelling all sail vessels, including freight steamers and
tow boats, also fiatboats and rafts^ to carry lights, under certain restrictions and penalties, as it is known that the absence of such a law
has caused loss of life and destruction of property by collisions, which
might have been avoided had lights been carried on the vessels, &c.,
referred t o . " So also in the Detroit report of 1854 : "
^^ We would again urge upon your attention the amendments to
the law, suggested by us in our last annual report. Our experience
ofthe past year has shown conclusively the necessity of such amendments."
;
And in the St. Louis report of 1855 attention is again called to the
subject, and the recommendation repeated.



REPOttT ON THE FINANCES.

335

In the Boston report of 1856 the same matter is again mentioned as
Being embodied in a bill before Congress.
In the Louisville report of 1857 we state ^^ and the frequency of
collisions thus occurring with uninspected steamers or other vessels
cannot be affected by any action of the board, except so far as such
action may influence and control the management of the inspected
steamers."
And in the Buffalo report of 1858 we again allude, to this matter as
follows, viz: * But collisions with steamers not ,under the law and
^
with sail vessels do often take place, and will continue to be of frequent
occurrence so long as these steamers and sail vessels are not compelled by law to take the necessary precautions, by carrying lights
and by other means^ to avoid them."
Our report of last year, from New Orleans, is as follows : ^^Collisions
with sail vessels have been by far of the most frequent occurrence, and
the investigation of accidents of this character has shown that in very
many if not all cases they have been in a great degree caused by
ignorance, on the part ofthe officers of the sail vessels, ofthe signals
and lights used on steamers.
^'So frequent are collisions of this character that this board have
deemed it their duty to endeavor in some way to remedy the evil, by
furnishing masters of sail vessels such information in regard to the
system of lights andthe whistle signals used on passenger steamers, and
the rules adopted for meeting and passing, as will enable them to manage
their vessels with reference thereto, when meeting such steamers."
And from the same report: '^ We desire again to call attention to the
number of accidents arising from collisions with sail vessels, and
the necessity of some legislation by Congress, the object ofwhich would
be to reduce the number of such accidents. In regard to this subject
we would respectfully refer to our fbrmer reports, as setting forth more
fully our views."
It will thus be seen that the board has not ceased constantly calling
attention to this defect in the present law, in this particular respect,
from the very first year ofits organization.
In regard to the circular of information proposed at our last meeting,
to be presented to masters of steamers (other than passenger steamers)
and sail vessels, i't was thought that the board might prepare thera
and furnish them to the several custom-houses for distribution, but
upon examination of the law under which we act, no authority could
be found for incurring the expense, nor could we call upon customhouse officers to aid in their circulation.
We are, however, still ofthe opinion that inthe absence of any law
regulating lights on sail vessels, the issue of such circulars would produce beneficial results by giving such information as would lead to
greater security from collision, fully justifying the expense that might
be incurred.
Of accidents during the past year to passenger steamers by explosion of boilers, there have been few attended with loss of life, the most
serious being that of the steamer ^^ Ben Lewis," at the mouth of the
Ohio river, a more detailed account of which will be given in a subsequent part of this report.



336

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

A very serious explosion, attended with great fatality, occurred to
the uninspected steamer *' Alfred Thomas," on the Delaware river,
while on an excursion; particulars of this,case are also given in a subsequent part of this report.
The regulations for the meeting and passing of passenger steamers,;
and the system of whistle-signals and lights adopted by this board,
together with the rules for the government of pilots, continue to ope-.,
rate very favorably and give most satisfactory results.
The system of lights established by this board at its last meeting,
for steamers navigating the western rivers, has been generally approved
and adopted without hesitation, and is operating in a very satisfactory
manner and may be considered as firmly established.
It is a gratifying evidence of the opinion of the public generally^ as
to the operation ofthe steamboat law, that many features of the law.
have been adopted and applied not only to freight and towing steaniers,
but so J a r as the features of the law are applicable to land engines and
boilers also.
"
In some of our cities measures have been adopted to secure a careful
and proper inspection of all boilers of land engines within their limits,
which from complaints made, information or observation, are supposed
to be unsafe.
Most of the contracts now made for the construction of steamboat
and other boilers contain a clause requiring the constructor or builder
to submit them to a hydrostatic pressure, and guaranteeing that they
shall withstand the prescribed pressure in a satisfactory manner.
Pilots of many ferry-boats have, by an arrangement made between
themselves, adopted the whistle-signals established by this board, and
use them as regularly in case of necessity as the passenger steamers;
this is true also of many freight and towing boats.
The hydrostatic test required by the law has proved beneficial, not
only in detecting wep,k points in boilers already in use, but has in
many cases developed inferior or improper modes of construction and
bracing, so that at the present day the general construction of boilers
is far superior as regards strength and safety to the standard construction when the law went into operation.
In regard to the frauds committed in the manufacture and stamping
of boiler iron, we would simply refer to our former'reports, and state
that our experience during the past year, and particularly in one case
of explosibn, fully confirms the statements therein made.
The annexed tabular statement presents a view of the operation of
law, andi the proceedings o f t h e several local boards, number, of steamers inspected, pilots and engineers licensed, number and character
of the accidents which have occurred, loss of life, &.c., &c.
Only accidents involving important loss of property, or loss of lifoj
are embraced in this tabular statement; of course many accidents of
comparatively small moment and necessarily incident to steam navigation are not reported.




A tabular statement embracing the various matters and occurrences relating to steamers navigated under the act of Gongress approved
August 30, 1852, which have been acted upon, or have come to the notice ofi the several hoards ofi local inspectors fior the year
ending October 1, 1860.
FIRST D I S T R I C T .

s
o

li

bO
• rz

SECOND

rs

1
«

w

c <u
O.A

o

. 1

N u m b e r o f steamers to which certificates of inspection

2
3

1
X

a

o
25

CQ

X

a
m

Cd

s

a

2

5

2

ai

c
O

i

'

S

rt
CO

!

^C
.5 o

5

N u m b e r o f cases reported by local board for violations

10

^

Number ef boilers condemned from f u r t h e r u . s e — . . . .
Niimhpr of stpfimers refu'sed insnpctor's certificate . . . .
Number of investigations by local board for violations

9

o
B

rz
• a

Number of steam pipes that have given way under

6
7

00

2

Number of boilers that have given way under hydro-

5

FOURTH D I S T R I C T .

Number of boilers found defective on inspection or ex-

4

THIRD DISTRICT.

.2

JA

o

DISTRICT.

Numtier of appeals taken from the decision of the

9
3,920

31
18,5&3

22
9,775

49
18,724

40
15,483

13
2,497

3

5
3

172
99,096

119
43,295

51
13,658

1

35

21

1

7

1

21
9,275

15
3,040

•
2

2

30
4,986

1
8

1

2

43
23,493

1

7

6

1

1

5

2

1781
1

3

1

11

Number of pilots that have received original license

12
13
14

Number of pilots that h a v e received renewal of license.
Number of pilots that have been refused license
Number of pilots whose licenses have been suspended

15

Numher of c r e w lost by explosiori or accidental escape
of steam
;
.;.......

• 12
76
. 1

8
20

10
21

13
27

30
312
26

1

2

19

9

80

80

12

8

9

18

16

13

14

39

24

357

90

69

23

23

26

410

75

12

5

1

1

I

4

8

N u m b e r o f passengers lost by explosion or accidental

20

15
60

Number of explosions or acciderital escape of steam by

19

50
188
1

N u m b e r of engineers and assistants whose licenses

18

6
24

2

16
. 17

8
34
1

8
N u m b e r o f engineers and assistants t h a t have received
original license
N u m b e r of engineers and assistants ihat have received

3
12

1

2




3

Tabular statement ofi various matters relating to steamers, c§^.-—Continued.
SECOND D I S T R I C T .

FIRST DISTRICT.

c
o

0)

rz

1

O

c
o

Qi

rz
xa
rz

91 ' Number of accidents bv fire when under wav
....
99 Number of crew lost by fire whilst at a wharf or lying by.
23 Number of passengers lost by fire whilst at a wharf or

1

1

1
1

2
1

6

o

CQ

4
•

•

c

i

C
rt
o>
15

1
1

o

rt
X

55 ,

1

94

1

"3

X
CM

!5

FOURTH D I S T R I C T .

THIRD DISTRICT.

rt

rz

oo
00

........

9.=i

96
97
98
99
30
31
32
33
34
3=1

36
37
38
39
40
41

Number of accidents by snags . . .

..........

c

3
1

Amount of property lost bv explosion
Amount of nrooertv lost bv
fire

.

.

....

6

4

2

.
,po,ooo

1
21
17

O

4
2,025,613 410,487

^15,000

o

.Pi
H

m

4

2
70,000

31,007'
$ 6 , OiOO

23,400
$25,000.
52,500

....

Pi

2
1

1

1

$1,500
3,400
2,000
13,570

13

$40,000

3

.f 135,000
^2,340

Amount of property lost by snags.

CQ

Number of steamers gone out of service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number o f s t e a m e r s sunk by ice .
...
Number of accidents to inspected steamers caused by

1
-

2

1

3

1

Number of lives lost by accidents caused by vessels
1

43
44

1
2

Number of passengers lost by s n a g s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of steamers lost by fire whilst at a wharf p r
Number of steamers wrecked or foundered . . . .
....
N u m b e r o f liv€is saved by means oflife-saving apparatus,
as required by l?w
..
'
.. . . . . .

3
CQ

C3

m
1

1

1
42

i"

. ..

.5 s

rt

c3

1

8
Number of accidents by collision . . . . . . . . . .

a

'5
c

Number of crew lost bv fire while under wav




....

1

i

Tabular statement of various matters relating to steamers, Sc.—Continued.
FIFTH DISTRICT.

.
.2
3
O

1 .
1
2
3
4
5
fi
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

N u m b e r of steamers tp \yhich certificates of
inspection have been granted
A m o u n t of tonnage o f s t e a m e r s i n s p e c t e d . . .
N u m b e r o f boilers found defective on inspection or exiimination
Number of boilers that have given way un^er
hydrostatic pressure
.'
Number of steam pipes that have given way
under hydrostatic pressure.
Number of boilers condemned from further use
Number of steamers refused inspector's certificate
Number of investigations by local board for
violations of the law
Number of cases reported by local board for
violations of the law
Number of appeals taken from the decision
of the local board
Number of pilots that have received original
licenso since last report
....
Nurnber of pilots that have received renewal
N u m b e r o f p i l o t s t h a t h a v e heen refused license
Number of pilots whose licenses have been
suspended or revoked
Nuinber of engineers and assistants that have
reeeived original license
N u m b e r o f engineers and assistants t h a t have
received renewal of license
Number of engineers and assistants whose
licenses have been suspended or r e v o k e d . .
Number of expIosion.s or accidental escape of
sieam by which life has been lost
Nuniber of passengers lost by explosion or
accidental escape of steam
Nuniber of crew lost by explosion or accideniiil escape of s t e a m . . . . . . . . .




a

•

c

SIXTH D I S T R I C T .

> 9.
S 5,
= .5
OQ

96
26
35,481 5,805

a
>

•>

"B

69
20,546

27
5,873
2

88
17,068
/

3

3

4

. 2

2

78
20,927

21
11,223

• Q

35
12,117

6

•68

24

'%

15

1

7

2

30
7
16,493 5,175

CQ

2

3

cq
8
3,594

44
28,057

1,208
458,857
149

1

24
1
46

31
179

2

9

1

80

5

35

6

16

6

19

7

15

7

20

9

14

1

19

338

85

119
2

52
1

220
8

38
3

65

41

56
1

14

127
5

2,109
63

2

37

12

17

14

6

9

20

8

10

1

11

438

66

173

85

197

38

54

33

53

13

102

2,490

2.

........
1

12
13

O

1

14

2

2
•60

18
2

7

2

290
10

347

6

1

2

4

33

25
4,700

1

1

7

25

.1

o

2

.

2

30

o

1
2

2

x

3

39
5,973

C

C

a
>
a
5 •

ll

'5

a
'B
c

X

NINTH D I S T R I C !

rz

i

'6

1

6

.....

EIGHTH D I S T R I C T .

ic

fcJD
_C

X

a

75

24

SEVENTH DISTRICT.

10

47
1

8

2
2

* Qomprisihg original and renewed licenses.

16

4

34

Tabular statement of various matters relating to^ steamers, Sc.—-Continued.
FIFTH DISTRICT,

.5 0
0.

1

1

>

42
43
44

i
1

1

1

•So
a

i

ea

1. 1
5'

a
0

0

4

2.
1

1
3
PQ

0

i

5

&

3
CQ

15

8

17

Number of passengers lost by fire whilst at a
1

.
*::::::: .:::::

25
2
15
9

33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

a

X

CO

1

N u m b e r o f accidents by fire w h e n under w a y .
N u m b e r of c r e w lost by fire whilst at a wharf

24
25
26
27
28
2930 N u m b e r of steamers lost by fire whilst at a
31
32

NINTH D I S T R I C T .

c

a

2
23

EIGHTH D I S T R I C T .

•2

1 •*

21
22

SEVENTH D I S T R I C T .

SIXTH D I S T R I C T .

5

2

5
2

1
N u m b e r o f lives saved by m e a n s o f life-saving

1

22
33,000

$i75*566*
345,746*
Amount of property lost by wreck or founder.
Number o f s t e a m e r s gone out of s e r v i c e . . . . . '
Number of accidents to inspected steamers
caused by vessels not under law of 1852 . . .
Number of lives lost by accidents caused by
Number of crew lost by fire while u n d e r w a y .
N umber of passengers lost by fire while under
wav . . . . . .
.




5*
1

$5,000
117,000
30,000

$3,000
75,000

$66,660

* si

$3,700
5,000
2

2

$50,666
4 1

2

i

2

8
27
7
1
39
23
32
22
10
22
2,593,507
$40,500
0565,900
109,340
482,510
55,000
41
1
g

1
^

304
6

t300

1

6*

10 J

10

1
t " L a d y Elgin;" 38 crew;'262 passengers.

........ . . . . . . I

REPORT ON THE FINAKCES.

341

I t will be observed by an examination of this tabular statement
that the loss of life during the past year from explosion has been exceedingly small, and of those lost by fire much the larger portion
have been lost upon steamers lying either at a wharf or landing, or at
anchor, and not under way.
By far the most disastrous accidents have been those occurring from
collisions with uninspected steamers, or sail vessels. Collisions of inspected steamers with each other rarely occur.
Of collisions with sail vessels the most serious is that of the ^^Lady
Elgin'' with a schooner on Lake Michigan, in Septeniber last, by which
about 300 lives were lost.
Except for the immense loss of life caused by this collision, it will
be observed that the total loss of life for the past year has been much
less than for any previous year since the law went into effect.
Indeed, it may be said that, with the exception named, the tabular
statement in every respect presents a highly favorable result, as compared with any previous year, and more particularly if the increased
number of passenger steamers be taken into consideration.
We now present a more dilated statement of the circumstances attending the more serious accidents reported in the foregoing table, as
they have occurred in the several districts, and been reported by the
inspectors.
FIRST SUPERVISINa BISTRICT.

In this district no very serious accident has occurred during the past
year, and only one by which life has been lost.
November 9, 1859.—Steamer '^Connecticut," of Norwich, while in
afog on Long Island Sound, came in contact with sloop/'Kitty A n n , "
with little damage, however, to either vessel. The sloop's bowsprit
entered the upper works of the steamer into the cook-room, upsetting
the stove and severely bruising and scalding one of the crew of the
steamer, who died the same day.
November 15, 1859.—Steamer '^Island Belle" was burned while
lying at a wharf in Essex, Connecticut. The cause of the fire is unknown ; the steamer had been laid up for the season.
November 25, 1859.—Steamer ''City of Hartford" was run into
near East Haddam, Connecticut river, by schooner "David Kussel."
The steamer was struck about amidship, the jibboom ofthe schooner
penetrating the larboard boiler of the steamer. The suddenness of
the crash and the noise of the escaping steam caused great consternation among the passengers; fortunately no lives were lost. Every
effort was made on the part;of the steamer to avoid the collision, but
was of no avail, as the schooner was not properly managed.
.March 20. 1860.—Steamer "Eastern Queen" was destroyed by fire
at Wiscasset, Maine, while lying at the wharf and fitting up for the
approaching season. She burned to the water and sunk, was afterwards raised, and is now nearly rebuilt. The loss of property was
about $80,000. The fire is supposed to have been caused by stoves, in
which fires were kept night and day.
May 20, 1860.—Steamship "Cambridge" came in collision with



342

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

schooner " J . L. Bowers," of New York, a short distance from
Pollock's Eip, near Monomoy Point. The night was very dark and a
very strong breeze was blowing at the time. The schooner was deeply
laden with coal and sank in three minutes aftf^r the collision. The
entire crew were got on" board the steamer and carried into Holmes's
Hole. No lights were seen upon the schooner, and she was seen too
late to avoid the collision.
From the great number of sail vessels navigating the waters of this
district, collisions with these vessels will continue to occur ^o long as
no law is in existence requiring uniform lights to be carried on such
vessels. In fact, the only wonder is so few now occur, considering the
reckless mariner in which sail vessels are frequently managed.
SECOND SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.

In this district has occurred several accidents of minor importance.
The most serious, not involving loss of life, is that which occurred to
the " New W o r l d " on the evening of OctolDer 26, 1859, when on her
passage to Albany with a full load of freight and passengers. Shortly
after leaving New York broke the head off" her gallows frame, threw
the lever beam out of place, broke the connecting rod into three pieces,
and drove part of it through her bottom.
The vessel sank to her promenade deck, but her hurricane deck and
the deck between that and the promenade deck were above water, the
vessel being floated by her upper works. No lives were lost, the
passengers being all taken, off safely ; the gallows frame and connecting rod were examined carefully, and also the boat, before she
was raised.
Testimony was also taken, but the inspectors could come to no
certain conclusion as to the cause of the accident; the most probable
cause being that the wood of the frame had become weakened through
long use, and had also become iron-sick in the vicinity of the bolts.
The wood showed no signs of dry-rot.
The steamer " Champion," on the 3d of November last, when near
Matinicook point. Long Island^ and running in a dense fog, was run
into by the propeller " A l b a t r o s s . " The " C h a m p i o n " was struck
amidship, and cut down below the water's edge ; the boiler was struck,
forced out of place, and the boat sunk.
All the crew and passengers were saved, with the exception of one
passenger, who was drowned in the cabin ; it is supposed that he
returned to the cabin to save some valuables after the collision had
occurred.
The boat was examined after the accident and her hull was found
to be sound, a fact which had been doubted, owing to the extent of
the fracture caused by the collision.
This case was investigated by the local board with no certain result.
It appeared most probable either that the " Albatross" did not blow
her whistle often enough, or that her signals were not heard on board
the " Champion."
The steamer has been raised and is now running.
O n t h e 14th of September last the steamer " Empire State" ran



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

343

down a sloop in Hurlgate ; one man on the sloop was drowned. The
steamer was backing at the time of the collision, and the sloop had
just gone in stays ; it appeared that all that was possible to avoid a
collision was done on board the steamer ; the narrow^ crooked, and
rocky channel at this point rendered a collision almost unavoidable.
The steamer "Young Anierica," on the 8 th of September last, while
on her regular passage from Chester to Philadelphia, oil the Delaware
river, came in collision with an oyster schooner when nearly opposite
Gloucester. It appeared upon examination that a light being exhibited
by the schooner in the manner usual on vessels at anchor was therefore
mistaken for a vessel at anchor, ahd the error not discovered until too
late to avoid collision.
Two men were knocked overboard from the schooner and drowned;
no assistance could be rendered them, as in the darkness they could
not be found.
THIRD SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.

On the 7th of December last a collision occurred on the Chesapeake
bay between the steamer " City ofV Norfolk" and schooner "Splendid."
By this accident the schooner was sunk and the steamer slightly injured, but no lives were lost.
The testimony in this case shows conclusively that the collision was
caused by mismanagement on the part of the captain of the schooner.
The steamer " St. Nicholas," on the 27th day of July last, came in
collision with a small boat near Alexandria, on the Potomac river.
The boat was very deeply laden with sacks of wheat, and was capsized so
soon as struck by the steamer, and a young man who was managing
the boat was drowned.
The inspectors investigated this case, and it was decided that the
officers of the steamer were not in fault, but that the man in the boat
lost his life by his own imprudence.
On the 29th of August last the steamer " S t . Nicholas" and schooner
" Plutarch" came into collision on the Chesapeake bay ; the schooner
was sunk but her passengers and crew were saved. The examination
of this case is not yet completed.
The boilers of the stearner " K a t e McLauren" exploded on the Cape
Fear river on the 12th day of May last, by which accident the captain
and two of the crew lost their lives.
An investigation showed that the accident was to be attributed
entirely to the recklessness of the captain, who was in charge of the
boiler, and no engineer on board, the licensed engineer previously
attached to the boat having been discharged. No passengers were on
board at the time of the accident. The case was reported for prosecution.
On the night of the 12th of March last the boiler of the steamer
^'S. M. Manning," running on the Ocmulgee river, exploded while
on her route from Savannah to Macon. The boat had been for a short
time lying at the landing and had just started out; the engines had
made but two or three revolutions when the explosion occurred.
By this accident two passengers and one ofthe crew lost their lives ;
up to the time of the investigation not a vestige of the persons killed
nor of the boiler had been found. An investigation was made, but



34:4

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

no evidence could be obtained from any of the survivors that would
indicate the cause of the explosion.
FOURTH SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.

The steamship " N o r t h e r n e r , " while on her passage from San
Francisco to Oregon, on the 5th of January last, ran on a sunken
rock near Humboldt, which caused her to leak so badly that she was
run on shore, with the view of saving the lives of those on board.
Before the passengers and crew could be landed the wind began to
blow, causing a heavy surf, which swamped their life-boats, thereby
causing the loss of seventeen passengers and twenty-one of the crew.
Every effort was made by Captain Dalle, his officers and men, to
save life, and a number of them lost their lives in their fearless exertions to save others.
This disaster was investigated by the local inspectors of San Fran^
cisco. The captain and officers were exonerated from all blame, as
the ship was on her regular track, and the position of the rock unknown to navigators on that coast.
In the month of March last the steamer " J u d g e Porter," bound
from Mobile for New Orleans, cotton-loaded, was discovered to be on
fire when near the Pontchartrain railroad ; from the rapid spread of
the fire the boat and cargo became a total loss, and seven passengers
lost their lives.
This boat was fully equipped in complianQe with the law, and upon
investigation by the local inspectors at New Orleans no blame could
be attached to the officers or crew.
The steamboat " J o h n C. Calhoun," plying between Apalachicola
and Bainbridge, on Flint river, exploded her boilers while lying at
Kidleyville landing, on the 28th of April last, by which the captain
and seven of the crew lost their lives.
The case was investigated by the supervising inspector, and from
the evidence obtained he came to the conclusion that the explosion
was caused solely by the imprudence and negligence of the first and
second engineers ; their licenses were therefore revoked.
The supervising inspector of this district has visited the whole
range of the Pacific coast of the United States the past summer, and
presents the following report of his visitations and inspections :
PANAMA, June 14, 1860.
Met steamship " S o n o r a , " Captain Baby, of the Pacific United
States Mail Company, and took passage on her for California.
Whilst on board of her I made a careful inspection of all parts of
the ship, including boilers, machinery^ and outfit, which I found to
be in a very excellent condition. She has been refastened and coppered, and is sound and staunch in all respects.
I arrived at San Francisco June 28. Inspected steamer " Uncle
Sam." This ship has undergone a thorough repair, having been
docked and refastened in a very superior manner; her boilers have
been rebuilt and important alterations have been made in her engine,
&c. She has been fitted anew with life-boats and life-preservers;



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

345

also with steam fire-engine and hose, and bilge-pumps of the longest
dimensions ; which make her one of the best ships of her class on
the Pacific.
Inspected the steamers " Columbia,'' " S e n a t o r , " and " Oregon."
The " Columbia," is in excellent condition, and is performing her
work nobly. This little ship has made over two hundred successful
voyages between the ports of Oregon and California without damage
to herself or loss of life.
The " S e n a t o r " is still in the Lower California trade. She is
weekly supplying San Francisco with native wine and fruits. She is
in good order, and in all respects a fine ship of her class.
The " Oregon" is on the line between San Francisco and Portland,
Oregon, performing well. She is strong, and in all respects an able
ship. Her outfit is complete and new, with life-boats of the largest
size; her life-preservers of the best solid cork—one thousand in all.
She is ably commanded by Captain Hudson, a gentleman well known
to the travelling community.
Left San Francisco on board of the steamer Oregon, Captain Hudson, for the Columbia river, Oregon, July 1, and arrived in Portland
on July 4.
July 5.—Commenced the inspection of steamers on the Columbia
and Willamette rivers.
Inspected steamer "Mountain B u c k " at Portland; also the " Senorita," " B e l l , " " J u l i a , " "Carrie Ladd," " J e n n i e Clark," " Vancouver," " Carolitz," "^Eival," " Surprise" and " Multuanomah."
The above boats are high pressure, staunch built^ and constructed
of a very superior tiinber, which is Oregon pine and oak. Their speed
is much.greater than boats of the same class in the Atlantic States,
although they work their steam much lower, but use cylinders of
twice the capacity of our boats of the same dimensions. They are
well supplied with fire-pumps, hose, and other appurtenances, with
boilers unsurpassed in strength and economy of fuel.
July 6.—Left Portland for the Cascades or Forest falls on the
Columbia river.
Inspected the new steamer " Idahoe " at the Cascades, a very superior side-wheel boat of four hundred tons burden. She has a l a r g e
upper cabin of excellent workmanship, and a hull of splendid model;
she is owned by the Oregon Steam Navigation Company and will take
her place in the line between the Cascades and Dalies.City as soon as
completed.
July 8.—Leftthe Dalles for the upper Columbia or Des Chutes, and
made the inspection of steamers "Colonel W r i g h t " and "Tercino."
The '' Colonel Wright " i s a stron g and sound boat, with large power,
and in all respects according to the requirements of the law.
The " T e r c i n o " is new and unfinished, but is built with great
strength, both in timber and fastening ; her hull is completed and her
model very perfect,
July 10.—I returned to the Dalles and inspected the steamer
" Hassaloe," one of the company's line, a fine passenger boat plying
between the Dalles and Cascades. She is in good condition and in all
respects a fine craft.



346

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

July 11.—Left the Dalles for the Cascades. The steamers " Mary"
and " Wasco " are laid up at this port as spare boats, and are always
ready in case of accident for immediate use.
July 12.—Keturned to Portland and Oregon City, and made the
following inspections:
Steamers " Express," "James Clinton," " Onward" and "Moose."
The " Onward " and " Express " are fine, large, and staunch boats.
The " M o o s e " and " C l i n t o n " are of smaller dimensions for the
upper Willamette tiade ; they are sound and strong boats and in all
respects suitable for the river trade.
There is a number of steamers lying up on the headwaters of the
Willariiette river thafc I was unable to see on account of the great distance which I had to travel to get to them. There is a number of
freight boats besides those used'as passenger boats, which make it quite
a large tonnage for so new a country as Oregon ; but from the great
extent ofits beautiful rivers, the productiveness ofthe soil, the forests
of gigantic pines, its fisheries and furs, the healthfulness of its climate
and the enterprise ofits population, is destined to be one ofthe finest
countries in the world.
July 13.—Left Fort Vancouver for Puget Sound and Victoria on
board ofthe steamship Pacific, Captain Paterson.
July li.—Inspected steamship " Eliza Anderson ; " she was built
at Portland, Oregon, in 1858 ; has one beam engine, low pressure,
and is in all respects a staunch and sound ship ; she is equipped with
all the necessary appliances according to the* requirements ofthe law.
She is one of the packets between Victoria, British Columbia, via
Puget's Sound, to Steilacoom and San Juan island.
July 14!—Steamer " Wilson G. H u n t " is runiiing in the trade
between Victoria and Fraser river, and is in like good condition.
July 15.—Left Victoria on steamship " Pacific" for California, and
arrived at San Francisco on the 19th. Inspected the " Pacific," found
her in good condition ; having undergone a thorough repair in hull
and machinery, her outfit in boats, life-preservers, steam fire engines
is unsurpassed by any ship on the coast.
San Francisco, July 20.—Inspected steamers " E c l i p s e , " " Queen
City," Sophia McLane," " P a u l Pry,'] " Helen Hensley," " J a m e s
Bragdon," and found them to be in like good condition, and I am
happy to have it in my power to say that I believe the steamboat lawto be more strictly adhered to on the Pacific coast, than in any other
part of the United States.
July 20.—Visited Benicia and made the following inspectiotis :
Steamship " G o l d e n Gate;" after a thorough examination of the
hull, machinery, &c., &c., she proves to be sound, strong, and in all
respects a superior vessel. She has been bored in frame, knees,-beams,
and transom, and no defective timber found; her outfit consists of
twelve largest class life-boats, of Francis's patent, all suspended to
cranes, supplied with oars, rudders, life lines, and water breakers to
each boat; she has fifteen hundred solid cork life-preservers, two
steam fire engines, which are capable of flooding the ship in case of
necessity.
July 21.— Continued inspection ofsteamers at Benicia.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

347

Steamer " P a n a m a , " examined and proved to be sound, her borings
show her to be built of superior timber, her outfit is complete. •
Same date, inspected the " Cortez." This ship is undergoing heavy
repairs at this port ; she has been bored, opened, and replanked amidship ; her frame is sound. She is receiving new knees, and heavy cross
or X braces in her midship body, and is refastend from stem to stern.
Her boilers have been rebuilt, with new furnaces complete, which
make her a good ship for any trade on the Pacific coast.
Inspected at the same time stearaships " O r i z a b a " and "Sierra
Nevada." These ships are in bad condition, their frames are small,
and defective in their top works, with scarcely fastening enough to
hold them together whilst lying at their docks. From sixty to seventy
thousand dollars would have to be expended on each of them before
they could be made seaworthy.
The steamers " F r e m o n t " and " R e p u b l i c " are also at this port,
and will require heavy repairs before they can be used.
Steamer " Brother Jonathan" has been rebuilt, and is now a strong
ship, and fit for any trade on the coast.
Steamer " J o h n L. Stephens" has been docked and opened. She
proves to be a sound and strong ship, and performs well. Her appearance at thfe water-line and the copper show her to be a superior
vessel. She was refastened and caulked, while on the dock at Mare
island, to the entire satisfaction of the local inspectors of the port of
San Francisco, California.
Steamship " Golden Gate." This fine ship is on the route between
California and Panama. Her superior qualities are too well known
to the travelling community to need mention of them in this report.
The attention of her commander and officers to their respective duties
whilst underway are untiring, and the ship is not surpassed by any
afloat. Her outfit of boats, pumps, and life-preservers is larger than
any ship in the world. She has midship pumps and bilge pumps of
the largest kind, to be worked by steam or hand. Her fire engines
are of great power, and well cared fbr. She is staunch and sound,
and performs to admiration.
In conclusion, I am happy to state that the ships on the Pacific,
from Panama to San Francisco, Oregon, and Puget Sound, are commanded by men of great experience and skill. Their attentiori and
watchfulness whilst at sea makes the passage agreeable to all under
their care.
Very respectfully,
0 . A. P I T F I E L D ,
Supervising Inspector, ith JDistrict,
FIFTH SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.

On the 4th of October, 1859, the steamer " W . M. Morrison,"
while lying at the landing at St. Louis, caught fire^ but by means of
the steam fire pump with which she was provided the fire was soon
extinguished, and but trifling damage done to boat or cargo.
The steamer " Hiawatha," on the Missouri river, burst her steampipe on the 4th of October, 1859, by which two of the crew were



348

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

killed. On investigation by the inspectors i t was found that the
boat had been lying by for the night, and, after raising steam in the
morning, the engineer attempted to start one of the engines without
first blowing the water from the cylinder and pipe, and the accident
was attributed by the inspectors who examined the case to this neglect.
Th© license ofthe engineer was revoked.
On the 15th of October, 1859, the " B r u n e t t e " was destroyed by
fire at the landing at St. Louis. The fire was said to be the result
of incendiarism. No lives lost.
The steamer " H i c k m a n " was destroyed by fire on the Arkansas
river on the 2d of March last. The fire originated in the wood pile.
The vessel was totally destroyed, and the lives of two of the crew
were lost.
On the 26th of April last the stearaer " A . T . Lacey" was destroyed
by fire on the Mississippi river, near Memphis. The fire was caused
by sparks falling amongst hay on the deck. The steamer a total loss.
By this disaster ten of the passengers and six of the crew lost their
lives.
The steamer " Prairie Rose" was sunk in the Mississippi river on
the 29th April last, by coming in collision with a freight steamier,
not inspected under the law of 1852. No lives lost.
The steamer " R . F. Sass" was snagged and sunk on the 9th of
May last near Clark's bar, on the Mississippi river. At the time of
the accident the steamer had on board about two hundred persons,
but by the energy, perseverance, and good management of the officers,
and with the aid ofthe life-saving apparatus with which fche boat was
provided, nearly all, of both passengers and crew, were saved. There
were drowned fifteen of the passengers and two of the crew.
On the 25th Junp the steamer " Ben Lewis" burst her boiler and
burned to the water's edge, near Cairo, at the mouth of the Ohio
river. Twelve of the passengers and eleven of the crew lost their
lives by the explosion or by drowning. The particulars of this disaster are given in a subsequent part of this report.
The steamers " Umpire" and " Deer Drop" were destroyed by fire
on the 28th of June last, while lying at the landing on the Osage
river. The fire originated on board the " U m p i r e , " through the
carelessness ofthe watchman. No lives lost.
On the 19th of August last the steamer " Hesperion" was destroyed
by fire at the landing at Atchison, Kansas Territory. The cause of
the fire could not be ascertained. No lives lost.
The steamer " Ben Campbell" was destroyed by fire on the 28th of
August last at the landing at Buffalo, on the Mississippi river. The
fire was caused by the sparks of a passing steamer. No lives lost; :.
In this district there have been sunk during the past year, from
snags and other causes, twenty-five steamboats, of which number
eleven were subsequently raised.
SIXTH SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.

. In August last the steamers " Chancellor" and " S. P. Hibbert"
came in collision in the Ohio river, about a mile below New Albany,



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

349^

by which the " H i b b e r t " was sunk, and one deck passenger supposed
to be lost.
This collision occurred at about one o'clock in the morning, and,
from the investigation which was had, it appeared that the firsfc cause
ofthe collision was an accident to the safety valve of the " Hibbert,"
which rendered it necessary for the engineer to go to the valve to put
it in order. While engaged at the safety valve the pilot rang the
bells to stop and back the engines. They were stopped by the watchman, who was in the engine-room at the time, but he did not understand the working ofthe engines sufficiently to back them, and before
the engineer could get to the engines to reverse them the collision
took place.
The derangement of the safety valve of the " H i b b e r t " was such
, as to relieve the valve of the weight to so great a degree that both
steam and water were blowing from the boilers with great force, producing an immense amount of steam and creating great confusion
and alarm. The pilot and officers of the "Chancellor," supposing
from the cloud of steam and from the noise produced that the boiler
of the " H i b b e r t " had exploded, were directing their course to her
to render assistance, and the " H i b b e r t " being so much enveloped
in steam, they were not made aware of their mistake until they were
too near together to avoid collision, and although as soon as the pilot
discovered the " H i b b e r t " was a descending boat, he stopped and
backed his engines to avoid it if possible, and had the engines ofthe
" H i b b e r t " been backed when the bells were rung for that purpose
the collision would not have taken place.
. Upon a thorough investigation by the inspectors, it was decided
that the officers of both boats acted as good judgment and humanity
should dictate, and were not in fault fbr the accident occurring under
so peculiar a combination of circumstances.
The steainer " Sam Gaty " exploded one of her boilers when near
New Albany, on the Ohio river, on the
of April last, causing
thereby the death of two of the crew.
The circumstances attending this explosion of the boilers of a new
boat, on her first trip, are so very peculiar that we consider it a case
of considerable interest, and therefore give the details more fully than
is our custom with accidents of an ordinary character.
The steamer " S a m G a t y " was constructed in Louisville, in the
spring of the present year. She was intended and constructed for
the freighting business exclusively, and the inspectors were so informed at the time she was being built, but when completely finished
they were informed by the principal owner thafc he had changed his
mind, and as the necessities of their business might require or render
it necessary for them to carry passengers occasionally, he had concluded to have her inspected. This being the case, of course the
inspectors had not availed themselves of any opportunities which
offered to make themselves acquainted with the material and construction of either hull or machinery, as they were accustomed to do,
and when called upon to inspect the boat and machinery in their
finished condition, the boilers being complefcely enclosed in mason
work, they were compelled to resort to such means of acqiiiring the



"350

REPORT ON THE . FINANCES.

necessary information as were within their reach. In regard to the
machinery and boilers this was obtained from the builders, owner,
and engineer ; also.from a certified copy ofthe contract for their construction.
Upon an investigation of the disaster by the inspectors it was found
that in many important points they had been deceived, and had been
led to grant a certificate which, had they known the truth of the
case, would never have been granted by them. Confining our remarks to the boilers, they were represented to be by the owner, and
it was so set forth in the certified copy of the contract furnished to
the inspectors, that there were to be two boilers, 46 inches in diameter
and 26 feet in lengfch, with five return flues, 11 and 12 inches in
diameter, to be consfcrucfced of one-quarter inch iron, and in the application for inspection it was represented that the flues were 12 and 11
inches in diameter and constructed of iron, a large quarter of an inch
in thickness. Upon subsequent examination it was found that the
correct dimensions of the boilers were 48 inches in diameter, 26 feet
in length, with five return flues 13 inches in diameter^ and the thickness of the iron of both shell and flues bufc three-sixteenths of an inch.
The iron of the boilers was represented to be of the best qualifcy, and
was made by a manufacturer of known standing and reputation, and
was stamped " D. Wolf, Newport, Ky., C. H. No. 1 . " It was ascertained, however, that though the iron was so stamped as first quality
it was in reality quite inferior, and would scarcely come up to the
standard of second quality of iron.
The effect of these misrepresentafcions upon the certificate to be
granted was, first, to obtain a certificate for a higher pressure than
would have been allowed had the correct dimensions been known ;
second, to cause to be passed by the inspectors a quality of iron that
would not have passed had its true character been known to t h e m ;
third, to cause the inspecfcors to pass a boiler of such proportions in
the diameter of flues and shell as would have been considered at least
of doubtful safety had the correct proportions been given in the application.
The circumstances preceding and attending the explosion were as
follows:
The steamer went on a trial trip to test the engines and boilers, two
or three days previous to starting upon the voyage during which the
accident occurred, and all appeared to work satisfactorily.
Starting upon her first voyage from Louisville, she ran about ninety
miles down the river. Nothing had occurred, so far as known, while
running this distance, to excite suspicion or cause any apprehension.
I t was only noticed that the boilers produced steam very rapidly,
fluctuating much under the variations of firing, and there was no
intimation thafc there was any danger of accident up to the moment of
the explosion, which occurred while the boat was under way, with.the
engines and boilers working, and being managed in the usual manner.
Of course, so unusual an accident caused much excitement and
speculation in the community, and particularly among those interested
and engaged in steam navigation directly or indirectly, as to the cause
or causes which had led to the disaster, and all sorts of reasons and
hypotheses, probable and improbable, were asserted and advocated.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

351

To arrive at the probable cause—for no evidence could be obtained
from those on board upon which even an opinion could with any
plausibility be based—it will be necessary to call attention more
particularly to the proportions of the boilers.
As already stated, the boilers were forty-eight inches in diameter,
with five return flues thirteen inches in diameter, arranged as per
sketch:
Boilers of steamer ^^Sam Gaty.'*

Leaving the water spaces at A A A, &c., less than two inches in
width, and the height from flues to shell but seventeen inches. Each
boiler had a chimney fifty-four inches in diameter and fifty-five feet
in height, with a well-constructed furnace, producing a most powerful
draught and intense combustion in the furnaces.
The furnaces were under the boilers ; the fire passed under the boiler
to the after end, and then returned through the fire flues.
W i t h such ])roportions of boiler, chimney, and furnaces, the generation of steam with a clean and bright fire must have been very rapid j
in all probability carrying the water up between the flues mechanic
cally with it, and causing thereby much framing or priming. The
extent of this foaming would depend very much upon the condition of




352

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the fires, and when the fire doors were opened probably nearly ceased,
so that the water settled down to its true level.
With the extent of foaming that we might reasonably expect under
these circurastances, the engineer may have been deceived as to the
true height of the water, and some temporary cause have checked the
foaming and dropped the water to its true level, whereby the top of
the flues and a portion of the sides of the boilers became bare of water';
and upon a change in the condition of the fire, or careening of the
boat, the water was again thrown upon the hot surfaces of the flues,
and an explosion was the result.
That this view of the case is at least probable is borne out by the
manner in which the explosion occurred. The boiler had evidently
first ruptured nearly over the bridge-\yall, where the action of the fire
is most intense, and at or near the lower side, discharging the boiler
upon the main deck below, breaking down the deck and beams, and
driving two courses of the shell of the boiler through the upper deck
overboard, leaving the remaining portions in two pieces separated
about fifteen or twenty feet.
At the time of inspection the boilers had been proved by the hydrostatic test to a pressure of one hundred and sixty-five pounds per
square inch, which they stood, showing no signs of weakness, and a
certificate was granted allowing one hundred and five pounds pressure
per square inch, upon the basis that the iron of the boilers was onequarter of an inch thick and the boilers of the size stated in the application fbr inspection; whereas, had it been known that they, were but
three-sixteenths of an inch in,thickness, and the boilers and flues of
largest size, as stated, the pressure allowed would have been but about
seventy pounds per square inch.
As a further trial of the strength of the boilers, the inspectors, after
the explosion, had a blister repaired in the remaining boiler, and
again applied the hydrostatic test, increasing the pressure per square
inch to one hundred and ninety-five pounds, when one of the flues
collapsed, the shell of the boiler still showing no evidence of weakness.
One of the builders of the engines and boilers, who was on board at
the time ofthe explosion, and the engineer, testified under oath that
upon the trial trip already mentioned the weight was placed upon the
safety valve to blow off at less than ninety pounds per square inch;
that, in their opinion, it was not afterwards moved ; and the evidence
given at the invesligation of the inspectors was that eighty pounds
per square inch was indicated by the gauge just previous to the
explosion.
With all the evidence before us of the character, proportion, and
design of the boilers and their appurtenances, and the circumstances
attending the explosion, we can but come to the conclusion that the
immediate cause of the accident was the excessive priming or foaming
ofthe water, which either deceived the engineer as to the true quantity
or level of water within the boiler, or the priming was to that extent
(which is not without precedent) that it was fairly driven from its
proper contact with the metal of the boiler ; so that in either case the
water returning to its normal condition upon the heated metal, the
generation of steam would be too sudden and rapid for the safety-valve
to relieve.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

353

I t is due to the engineer of the steamer to state that he purchased
^n interest in the steamer, and joined her as engineer but a few days
before she started, and that he was also deceived in regard to the
character, material, and proportions of the boilers, in the same manner
as were the inspectors, and that he testified to this effect before the
inspectors,; and that, so far as he was concerned, the information given
by him to the inspectors was correct, to the best of his knowledge and
belief.
All the facts in this case have been laid before the United States
district attorney for prosecution of the culpable parties, by the local
inspectors at Louisville.
SEVENTH SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.'

In this district no accident has occurred to any passenger steamer,
navigated under the act of 1852, by which life has been lost or personal injury sustained.
Two accidents have occurred of steamers coming in contact with
sunken snags, and one small steamer capsized in a storm; loss of
property about $5,000, but no loss of life.
The operation of the law during the past year has been in the
highest,degree satisfactory.
EIOHTH SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.

On the 29th of May last, the steamer "Arctic " was run on one of
the Hunn islands, in a dense fog; a wind soon after sprung up, and
the steanier went to pieces before she could be got off. No lives were
lost.
The propeller steamer " Kenosha," on the 26th June last, exploded
her boiler at Sheboygan, by which accident two passengers lost their
lives and four of the crew.
Upon subsequent investigation by the inspectors, it appeared that
the boiler had, since the last inspection, been rebuilt to a large
extent, and had been braced in an insufficient manner. No notice
having been given by the officers or owner of the rebuilding, the
boiler was not inspected, but the steamer went on. to her route without
the hydrostatic test being applied.
This was a high-pressure boiler, and the braces on the flat work
were about fourteen inches from centre to centre, a distance much
greater than is usual, even in low-pressure boilers.
. The inspectors decided that there was no fault on the part of the
engineer, but that the bursting of the boiler was due entirely ta a
want of proper and sufficient bracing.
The steamer ." Gazelle," on the 6th of September last, was run on
a sunken rock at the entrance of Eagle harbor. Lake Superior. The
boat was a total loss, but there was no loss of life.
The particulars of the loss of the " Lady E l g i n , " in this district,
are given in a subsequent part of this report.
23



354

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
NINTH SUPERVISINa DISTRICT.

In this district there has been no loss of life on any inspected passenger steamer during the past year. The principal accidents involving loss of property are as follows:
There have been three collisions of passenger steamers with sail
vessels in this district, resulting, however, in no loss of life, and but
small loss of property. In two cases out of the three the inspectors,
upon investigation, decided that the fault was entirely with the sail
vessels. In the third case the pilot of the steamer was found to have
acted injudiciously in its management, and his license was therefore
suspended.
On the 26thof July last the steamer " P r a i r i e S t a t e " was partially
burned while lying at the wharf at Oswego. The fire originated in
the after part of the vessel, and was kept in check by the fire pumps
on board, until the arrival of fire-engines from the city, when, with
their assistance, the fire was extinguished.
The origin of this fire could not be ascertained, as the officers and
crew were engaged at the time in taking cargo on board., The
steamer was thoroughly repaired, reinspected, and ia now running.
Of the explosions the past year, one of the most serious, and one
which produced great agitation and excitement in the community
where it occurred, from the number of prominent and valuable citizens whose lives were lost thereby, is that of the small uninspected
steamer "Alfred Thomas," which occurred on the 6th of March last,
on the Delaware river^ near Easton, Pennsylvania.
This stearaer had been built to ply between Belvidere, New Jersey,
and Port Jervis, New York. She had already been out on a trial
trip a day or two previous to the accident, and on the day of the
explosion had an excursion party on board to go up to Belvidere, there
to coranience her regular trips.
No inspection of the boat had been applied for, and none of the
officers had been licensed, nor could it be ascertained that any person
connected with the stearaer as builder, owner, or officer, was aware of
the necessity of an inspection, or of any law upon the subject.
Immediately after the explosion becarae known to the inspectors of
the supervising district in which the accident occurred, they visited
Easton to investigate the raatter. Arriving there they were met by
the inspectors of the third district, who had, on account of the excitement produced by the accident, been directed by the honorable Secretary of the Treasury to proceed there for the same purpose; they
therefore entered jointly upon the investigation, in the course of
which the debris of the boat, engines, and boiler were closely exarained.
The testiraony of as many of those on board who survived the accident as could be found, was taken; also the testimony of several
persons who were engaged in the construction, and some who were on
shore and were looking at the boat at the tirae of the explosion.
The investigation was as thorough as could be made, and the result
was such as fully to satisfy the inspectors ofthe cause ofthe accident,
and was coraraunicated to the Hon. Secretary of the Treasury in a
report dated March 19, 1860, as follows, viz:



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

355

NEW YORK, March 19, 1860.

SIR : We have investigated the circumstances attending the explosion ofthe boiler of the steamer "Alfred Thomas," on the 6tli instant,
near Easton, Pennsylvania, and obtained from parties on board at the
time of the accident, and others connected with the construction of the
steamer, such evidence, tending to throw light upon the cause or causes
which have led to the accident, as they wer.e able to give, and beg
leave to^present the following report:
DESCRIPTION.

The "Alfred Thomas" was a small stern-wheel boat, intended for
navigating the river Delaware between Belvidere, N. J., and Port
Jervis, N. Y. Her dimensions were 75 feet in length, 15^ feet beam,
and 3 feet hold, with two high-pressure engines, 10-inch cylinder
and 2 feet stroke, and one locomotive or tubular boiler, 3 feet 6 inches
diameter of waist, and containing 98 tubes 2 inches in diameter and
about 8 feet in length.
The engines were placed on each side of the boat, within a few feet
ofthe stern, and the boiler was forward, within about 8 feet of the
stern; the pipes connecting the boiler and engines were run along the
upper side of the promenade deck and enclosed by a box the whole
distance; between the boiler and the engine was a cabin about 12 feet
in ^length, and forward of the cabin the remaining distance to the
boiler was occupied as a freight hold.
I Connected with each ofthe engines was a feed pump for supplying
the boiler with water, and in addition there was placed in the boilerroom a donkey engine and pump for supplying the boiler with water
when the main engines were not running; it was also used fbr sawing
wood for the boiler.
The boat was steered by a tiller aft, near which was the bell-pull, for
giving signals to the engineer.
CIRCUMSTANCES ATTENDINa THE ACCIDENT.

Steam was raised in the forenoon of the day for the purpose of taking
the boat up to Belvidere, a distance of about 12 miles—the boat
at this time lying in the Lehigh river, near its junction with the
Delaware. After running some |little time, the boat was passed out
through the locks into the Delaware river, and just above the Delaware bridge was laid at the landing, where she remained for some
time; mSiij of the persons who were on board left her at this place.
Between 11 and 12 o'clock the boat left for Belvidere; she ran up
to the head of. a small island, probably about three-fourths of a mile
above the bridge, where, finding the current too strong for the boat to
stem ifc, they dropped back into an eddy just below the head of the
island to accumulate steam for a second attempt; having laid there for
(as near as could be ascertained) from 20 to 40 minutes, they commenced
pushing off the boat for another start, and while so engaged the boiler
exploded.




356

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
.CAUSE OF THE EXPLOSION.

Boiler : The material of the boiler was generally of a fair quality,
some of it very good; the stamp where it was legible was C. H., No. 1;
the workmanship was in many respects defective; some of the parts
were badly fitted with too little lap of the seams; the tubes were so
badly set in the heads that they were all blown from both heads with
but little injury to the tubes or heads.
The thickness of iron used was sufficient, but there was great deficiency in the bracing; the screw stay-bolts of the furnace averaged
fromc6 to 6^ inches from centre to centre—they were loosely fitted and
had very little head; the crown of the furnace was flat or nearly so,
braced with crow-foot braces, averaging about 10|.to 1 1 | inches by
7^ inches from centre to centre; but at one point two of the braces had
been left off, thus leaving a flat surface about 15 by 29 inches withou
any brace whatever; from our examination of the ruins, we have little
doubt that the boiler first gave way at this point.
Fromthe testimony it appears that when the boat dropped back to
the island there was 60 pounds steam, and that just before pushing
off, the engineer told the pilot he had 125 pounds pressure; and the
pilot testifies that it was about three minutes after this that the explosion occurred; accordingly, there could not at the instant ofthe explosion have been less than about 135 pounds pressure per square inch.
This pressure, taken in connexion with the defective construction
and bracing of the boiler, we believe to have been the cause, and a
sufficient cause, for the accident; and notwithstanding that, according
to the evidence, there had been carried on former trials as high as 90
pounds per square inch, we are of the opinion that 80 pounds was the
utmost that could have been carried with safety.
There are some circumstances and some evidence which would indicate low water, but we think not enough to sustain the position ; nor
do we think it necessary in order to account for the accident, as a sufficient cause is shown without resorting fco such a supposition.
Up to the present time we understand that ten of those on board
(of which there were thirty-five to forty) have lost their lives.
We remain, very respecfcfully,
J O H N S BROWN3
Superintending Inspector, ^ d District.
CHARLES W. COPELAND,
Superintending Inspector, 2d District.
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary of the Treasury, Washington, D . 0.

^

Upon examination of the fragments ofthe boiler, the cylindrical
shell was still perfect, and had attached to it the back tube sheet and
a portion of the back of the fire-box. The front of the fire-box was
also in one piece, and had been blown away completely from the sides,
the line of the fracture being through the rivet holes and along the
flanges.




357

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The crown sheet, front flue sheet, front side of the furnace, and
nearly the whole of the two other sides of the furnace remained
attached to each other.
,
All the tubes were blown out of both tube sheets, and the sides and
semi-cylindrical top of the fiTC-box, or that portion of the boiler in
front of the cylindrical shell, were in many fragments.
The crown sheet of the furnace was bulged downwards from corner
to corner, the front tube sheet was bulged inwards towards the front
of the boiler, and the front side of the furnace was doubled under the
crown sheet.
The other sides of the furnaces were twisted and bent in various
directions.
The crown sheet of the furnace had been braced by crow-feet and
rods to the top^of shell, as per sketch of top of crown sheet below.

o
, o

I

—F^//-

<^-

o

/^

o"

-~>
-15 Ms—
IO

!

[^

o
f

o

1

-i

?
•^
j

i

o
o

o
o

1

^<

•

From which it is shown that one row of crow-feet and braces had
been left out, thus leaving a large area of the sheet unsupported by
braces. The reason assigned for which was, that it was intended to
put in a dry-pipe, which could not be done had these braces been
put in.
,
The tubes of the boiler had been very carelessly put in, as was shown
by the fact of their being drawn from both tube-heads at the time of
the explosion, almost entirely uninjured.
The screw-braces, or bolts which stayed the flat surfaces of the furnace to the shell, averaged from 6 to 6^ inches from centre to centre, and
^ of an inch in diameter ; they had but slight rivetting over the ends,
and were badly fitted, being so loose in the sheets thafc most of them




358

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

could be turned with the fingers. None of the threads, either on the
holts or in the sheets, were entirely stripped, and a large proportion
of them were but little injured. But three of the brace-bolts had been
broken, all the rest had drawn out.
The thickness of iron used in the boiler was suitable for a boiler of
its dimensions.
Thus it will be seen that the boiler was very defective, both in its
bracing and workmanship.
As already observed, this steamer had not been subraitted to an
inspection, and there can be no doubt, had the boiler been submittea
to the hydrostatic test, as required by law, these defects of construction
woulS have been detected, and in all probability the disaster been
prevented.
By far the most serious accident by explosion of inspected passenger
steamers during the past year is that of the explosion of the boiler or
boilers (for the boilers having sunk, and not yet been raised, it is not
known whether one or more exploded) of the steamer " B e n Lewis,"
about one o'clock on the morning of the 25th of June last, at the
mouth of the Ohio river, and but a few moments after leaving the
landing at Cairo. The stearaer also took fire frora the explosion, and,
was burned to the water's edge.
This explosion caused ranch excitement and indignation, not only
by the loss of life directly resulting from the explosion, but from the
greatly increased loss of life by the drowning of those who, after the
explosion, were compelled by the fire to leap in the river and endeavor
to reach the shore.
At the Cairo landing, which was but a short distance from the exploded steamer, were steamboats having steam up, small boats, and
other conveniences for rendering assistance to the injured and saving
the lives of those driven into the water; but so little were they availed
of, or so great was the delay in proceeding to the rescue, that many
of them were drowned, before assistance reached them, who were
comparatively uninjured by the explosion. Indeed, in one case of a
steamboat just arrived at the landing, and with steam up, relief was
positively refused by the captain. The officers and crew, after urging
the captain by every consideration that could be presented to start out
his steamboat to the aid of the injured and drowning, and his refusal,
took possession of the small boats and proceeded to the scene of the
explosion, and were successful in saving many lives.
It is supposed that not more than one-fourth ofthe total loss of life
was the direct result of the explosion; the remainder were driven overboard and drowned.
The conduct of the captain alluded to has been condemned in the
severest terras, as not only the most common dictates of humanity
should have led him to render all possible assistance to the sufferers,
but he was, in addition, urged and implored by those surrounding
him, and by every consideration that should influence a human being j
even appealing to his cupidity by offers of compensation, guarantee,
&c., to the fullest extent; but all was of no avail. Since the accident, this man has been publicly censured and repudiated by the




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

359

whole community, and especially by those more immediately connected
with steam navigation; so that, as the result, he has been compelled
to give up his steamboat and abandon the river.
The investigation of this explosion has been commenced by the
board of inspectors at Sfc. Louis, but is not yet completed, as they
desire to examine the remains of the boilers before making their
report.
The circumstances attending this disaster, as set forth in the testimony already given, were as follows:
The boat was on her trip from Memphis to Sfc. Louis, and had made
a landing at Cairo of fifteen to thirty minutes ; they had started out
again on her roufce, (whilst at the landing at Cairo the second engineer, then on watch, blew off a large quantity of water from the boilers,) and as the boat struck the current ofthe Mississippi river, when
passing out of the Ohio, she was careened down very much. As soon
as she was fairly headed to the current, she again righted, and the
explosion immediately occurred.
I t appears further, from the evidence, that the second engineer,
then on watch, had been frequently noticed to run with water lower
and carry a higher pressure of steam than was done when the chief
engineer was on watch; in fact, an engineer, who was a passenger on
board, had noticed this state of things, and had warned a friend of
his (also on board) to be on his guard when the second engineer was
on watch.
Without wishing to anticipate the report of the local board engaged
in investigating this matter, we may say that, from the evidence
already received, there can be but little doubt that the water in the
boilers was blown down to so low a point that when the boat struck
the current ofthe Mississippi and careened, a portion of the flues was
laid bare, and when the boat again righted, and the water returned
over the bare and heated flues, the generation of steam was too rapid
to be relieved by the safety valves, and the explosion followed.
By this explosion and the fire resulting therefrom twenty-three
persons lost their lives by the explosion and drowning ; among the
former was the second engineer, on watch, who paid for his temerity
the forfeit of his life.
Of all accidents arising from collision during the past year, that
occurring between the passenger steamer " L a d y E l g i n " and the
schooner " Augusta," on the morning of the 8fch of September last,
on Lake Michigan, has been by far the most disastrous.
The inspectors at Chicago have examined into this accident, and
from the testimony given and inforraafcion otherwise obtained, it appears that the history of this steamer and the clrcumsfcances attending
this disaster were as follows:
The steamer Lady Elgin was built in Buffalo, during the suramer
of 1851, by Bidwell & Banta, well-known builders, of established
reputation; and Mr. Banta, one of the partners, testified before the
coroner's jury that she was one of the best boats he ever built; that
her timbers were unusually heavy, and she was, in every respect, one
ofthe strongest and best boats ever launched by them.




360

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

There also appears from the inspector's certificate, &c,, the testimony that she was fully supplied with boats and oars, pumps, life
preservers, &c., as the law requires, and that in every respect she
was considered one ofthe first-class steamers on the lakes.
She left Chicago, bound for Milwaukie and Lake Superior, about
midnight on the 7th of September last, the night dark, and the
weather cloudy and threatening. She had on board, as near as could
be ascertained, about four hundred passengers, about fifty of whom
were bound to Lake Superior, the balance mainly to Milwaukie, a
distance of about ninety miles from Chicago; she had also on deck a
large numberof cattle. It should be remarked that the large number
of passengers bound for Milwaukie was chiefly composed of an excursion party returning from Chicago.
Soon after leaving port the wind commenced blowing, and increased
until about 1 | o'clock a. m., when a severe squall was encountered,
and during which the collision occurred, at about 2.30 a. m. The
schooner struck the steamer just abaft the water wheel, on the port
side, cutting entirely through theguard and hull below the water's edge.
During the short time that elapsed before the steamer went down,
efibrts were made to lighten her by forcing the cattle overboard, also
to stop the opening made by the collision with mattresses and blankets; but these efforts were attended with but little success, and the
steamer went down in from ten to fifteen minutes from the tfme of
the collision.
^
From the testimony it appears that the lights ofthe steamer were
seen from the schooner from thirty to forty-five minutes, and the light
of the schooner was seen from three to five minutes before the collision ;
and that the officers of both vessels endeavored to alter their courses
so as to clear each other, but that, on account ofthe squall and heavy
sea running, thb vessels worked so sluggishly that theyeould not
alter their course sufficiently in the short time before the collision
took place.
It also appears that the light of the schooner must have been hidden
from the view of those on board the steamer, by the sails or some
other object, so that they were not aware of the proximity of the
schooner until too late to avoid the collision. This we think may be
considered the immediate cause ofthe disaster.
On this point the coroner's jury say, " t h e y find that both the
steamer and the schooner had their lights placed on the night of the
disaster in accordance with the requirements ofthe law, and they consider the first cause of the collision to be the defective arrangement of
lights, as appointed by law, to be carried^on board of sail vessels."
And further: " T h e jury, as a further cause of the disaster, censure
the second mate of the schooner ' Augusta' for not informing the
captain of the light (on the steamer) when he came on deck previous
to the collision, and for neglecting to keep watch ofthe steamer's lights,
since he testifies that he saw them three-quarters of an hour previous
to the collision ; and they further find that the second made was incompetent to manage the schooner."
The Chicago inspectors, in their report ofthe disaster, say: "There
is no doubt the accident happened in consequence of the defective



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

361

manner of carrying lights on sail vessels, which no law regulating
steamers can provide for, and we will continually have such hearts
rending disasters to report so long as this is not remedied."
A vessel's light is always carried on the sampson-post or pawl-bit,
as it is called ; and when vessels are by the wind and careened over,
which they always are when they have headway enough to do any
injury, a steamer heading the wind, coming up under the lee, cannot
see the light until just at the moment of collision. This was the
case in the collision of the ill-fated " Lady E l g i n . "
The " Lady E l g i n " was not provided with water-tight bulkheads,
and on this point the co^^oner's jury say : " The jury are of opinion that all lake passenger boats should invariably be built with
water-tight compartments, and are confident that had this been the
case with the ' Lady E l g i n ' the community would have been spared
the shock of this lamentable disaster."
' The Chicago inspectors also say : " W e would respectfully recom^
mend that all lake sfceamers be compelled to have four water-tight
bulkheads, dividing the hold into five compartments, which will
prevent their sinking in cases of collision."
It will be borne in mind that this board have suggested the importance of water-tight bulkheads, and have advocated some legislative
action upon the subject. The number of lives lost by this disaster^
as near as could be ascertained, is 300, including both passengers and
crew.
.
The officers of the "Lady E l g i n " were of high standing, long experience and good judgment; they were.at their posts to the last—the
captain and engineer losing their lives; the two mates were saved
in consequence of their being in a boat to attempt to stop the opening
produced by the collision with mattresses at the time the steamer
went down.
The coroner's jury, in reference to the offieers, s a y : "They find
that the captain and engineers of the 'Lady Elgin' stood at their
posts after the collision, and did their duty nobly to the last."
This disaster to the "Lady E l g i n " is, one of those classed by us
as "accidents caused by vessels not under the law," and no provision
ofthe present law or any other, limited in its operation to passenger
steamers, could have guarded against it. We have been perfectly
aware of this deficiency of the law, and have constantly urged some
action which should meet the deficiency.
The inspectors have not unfrequently been censured for matters
over which they had no control, and in this very case they were publicly reproached, that the schooner was allowed to carry her lights in
a manner so inadequate to the object, and that the number of passen- ,
gers on board the steamer was so great: when, had those guilty of
this censure known the true state of the case, they would have reserved
their censures until it could be bestowed where less unmerited.
It will be seen by an examination of the tabular statement that the
loss of life during the past year from accidents which may be called
legitimate to passenger steamers, and against which the law was
intended particularly to guard, has been much less than any other
year since the law went into operation.



362

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The loss of life by explosions, it will be observed, has been very
small, the total being but 50, including both passengers and crew—a
number probably less than lost by camphene lamps alone in two or
three of our principal cities.
I t will also be observed that the number of lives lost by collision^
excepting those lost on the " L a d y E l g i n , " and which no management on the part of the steamer could have avoided, is only eight, and
of this number only one was a passenger.
The whole number of lives lost the past year by disasters, against
which the law was intended to guard, viz,: explosions, fires when
under way, and collisions, is but seventy-foi^r
At our last meeting we took action upon the matter ofthe limit of
tension allowed to the iron of low-pressure boilers, establishing that,
in our opinion, the limit prescribed by the third division ofthe ninth
section of the law applied with equal force to both low and highr
pressure boilers, and so instructing the local boards of inspectors.
We are pleased tb state that though somie complaints have been
made of the severity of this rule, it has been complied wifch in all
renewals of inspection and certificate.
In our last report we mentioned with approval the introduction of
iron bands for baling cotton in place of the rope bands formerly and
still to a great extent in use, on account of the greater safety from fire,
and its much less rapid progress when once ignited, giving more
time for effort in staying its progress and preventing its spread, inasmuch as the bales bf cotton, so long as firmly bound, burn at the surface
only.^
It is gratifying to us to be able at this time to report thafc such iron
baling is rapidly coming into favor and its use extended. We confidently hope and expect that as the use of metal baling becomes more
general, accidents by fire on board cotton loaded steamers will become
more rare.
The law continues to operate in a most salutary manner, and we
believe that should the amendments and additions be made that we
have from time to time recoramended, accidents to passenger steamers
will be of still more rare occurrence.
The opinion has been expressed by persons perfectly familiar with
the steam navigation of this country, and it is without doubt correct,
that so beneficial has been the operation of the law, so many hav6
been the improvements in the equipment and management of passenger steamers, conducive to the safety of life, that should the law be
now abrogated, its salutary influence would never cease so long as the
present systeni of steam navigation shall continue.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
J O H N S. BROWN,
Secretary of Board of Supervising Inspectors:
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary ofi the Treasury, Washington, D . G,




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

363

No. 13.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Office Light-house Board, Washington, October 22, 1860.
SIR : The Light-house Board has the honor to submit to you the following report of the condition of the light-house establishment of the
United States, and of its operations for the fiscal year ending on the
30th June, 1860:
The nuraber of light-houses and lighted beacons on the coast and
in the harbors of theUnited States, which at the date of the last
annual report of the board was 420, is now 425 ; eleven new lighthouses having been put in operation during the year, three
having been discontinued, and two having been totally destroyed by
a gale.
The number of light-vessels, which at the date of the last annual
report was 53, is how 47, six of them having been removed and replaced by light-houses. It thus appears that the aggregate number
of lights (houses and ships) is the same as last year.
The total number of buoys and day-marks, which was stated last
year to be 4,500, in round numbers, has been somewhat, though not
to any great extent, increased, to meet the new demands of commerce.
Indeed it is believed that the light-house establishment has about
reached its maximum under our present limits, and that very few
additional lights, no more perhaps than it may be found proper from
time to time to discontinue, need to be added to meet all the just
and reasonable wants of navigation.
The board takes pleasure in reviewing the very satisfactory manner
in which its agents generally have performed their various duties
during the year past. Its funds have been faithfully disbursed, and
its inspectors, engineers, and light keepers have been vigilant and
attentive to their respective duties.
Nor have the members of the board themselves been idle. Several
of them have made special visits of reconnoissance and inspection to
various points of the Atlantic and lake coast, and especially to those
localities for which new lights were provided by Congress at its last
session. As a general rule, they have found these new lights unnecessary, though there were some exceptions. These exceptions have
already been designated to you in a special report.
The new light-houses which have been put in operation during the
year are as follows, viz: St. Clair flats, 4th order, and beacon 5th
order ; Minot's Ledge, 2d order, being a substitute for a light-vessel;
Craney island, 5th order, being a substitute for a light-vessel; J u piter inlet, 1st order ; Merrill's shell bank, 4th order, being a substitute for a light-vessel; Southwest reef, 4th order, being a substitute
for a light-vessel; Ship shoal, 2d order, being a substitute for a lightvessel ; and Galveston, three beacons, 6th order, being substitutes for
a light-vessel.
With reference to this last light-vessel. Congress at its last session
directed her to be restored, and preliminary steps were taken for the




364

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

purpose; but it was found that she was so much decayed as to be
unworthy of repairs, and there having been no appropriation made
for the building or purchasing of a new ship, the board was unable
to execute the section of the act providing for her restoration, and
continued the exhibition of the beacon-light, under your order, until
Congress could again pass upon the case. Should Congress still entertain the view of restoring a light-vessel to this bar, the sum of
$25,000 will be required, for the purpose.
Under the second section of the act of 3d March, 1859, making
appropriations for "light-houses, lighted beacons," &c., giving the
board power to substitute light-houses on screw-piles for light-vessels
in all those localities where the substitution might be found practicable, considerable progress has been made, though not to the extent
desired, the board having been retarded in its operations for the want
of funds. The section of the act referred to only placed at the disposal of the board, from year to year, so much of the general fund
appropriated for the current maintenance of light-vessels as might
be safely used for the purpose, after all necessary expenses were paid.
This fund has proved to be small, and has only enabled the board to
put up two substitute light-houses during the year.
Many of the light-vessels in the inland waters of the United States
are old and decayed, and require constant and expensive repairs ; and
it would be a measure of decided economy to replace all such at once
by light-houses under a special appropriation for the purpose, instead
of waiting the tedious process of replacing them, one by one, at long
intervals, as at present. The first cost of a light-house of the description required is about one-third the cost of a light-vessel, and
the saving by the diminution of wear and tear and the decreased cost
of maintenance is in about the same ratio. The board, therefore,
respectfully recomraends, that a special appropriation of |50,000, be
asked for, for this purpose.
The lights which have been discontinued are as follows : viz:
Holmes's Hole, Massachusetts; Set Off Point beacon. New Jersey; and
Grand River beacon, Ohio.
On the l l t h and 12th of September last, a heavy gale occurred on
the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, destroying entirely the light-houses
at Bayou St. John and Proctorsville, Louisiana, (the keepers of the
latter station being drowned,) and doing much damage to the lights
at Round island and Cat island, on the coast of Mississippi.
Renovations and repairs of light-houses have been made in all the
light-house districts, and with the exception of some few houses requiring to be rebuilt, they may be said to be generally in good condition.
The Fresnel system of illumination is now in operation in all our
light-houses with a single exception. Light-vessels in all the districts
in which they are employed have also been under repair, some of
them extensively, and they are in good condition for winter service.
During the year the first' class light-ship Arctic was thoroughly
renovated and refitted, and despatched to Smithville, North Carolina,
as a relief vessel for the 6th district.
The buoyage of the bars and channels of the numerous harbors



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

'

365

and rivers along our entire coast has been well attended to, and is
believed to be in an efficient condition.
The usual buoy lists have been published and distributed to the
navigating community.
In consequence of the great extent of the northwestern lakes, and
the frequent, calms which prevail in that region, during the very short
season of navigation, the board respectfully renews its recommendation, made to you in its last annual report, of providing a steamtender for these lakes. The whole time of the sail-vessel now employed as a tender in the l l t h district, embracing the waters of Lakes
St. Clair, Huron, Michigan, and Superior, and Green bay, is taken
up in the delivery of supplies, and the inspector has to rely upon
chance private conveyance for his means of visit and inspection.
These are not always available, and when available, they do not always afford him the requisite time to perform his duties satisfactorily.
The sum of $20,000 would enable the board to build or purchase a
suitable propeller to accomplish this very desirable object.
The following is a detailed statementof the various renovations,
repairs, &c., made in the several districts.
FIRST LiaHT-HOUSB DISTRICT.

I n t h e firstdistrict, extending from the eastern boundary of the
United States to Hampton harbor, New Hampshire, repairs have been
made to the towers and dwellings at the following places, viz: Negro
island, Portland Head, Manheigin, Hendrick's Head, Boon island,
Whalesback, Saddleback Ledge, West Quoddy Head, Petit Menan,
Franklin island. Pond island, Narraguagus,, and Libby island.
In addition, a new tower, carrying a second-order lens, has been
erected at the Isle of Shoals.
The district is now in good condition. The fog-bells at Manheigin
and White Head have been repaired, and a new one placed at West
Quoddy Head.
The bell-boat at Alden's Rock has been taken in, cleaned, repaired,
and painted, and again moored at her station.
New buoys have been placed at Negro Island bar, and on a ledge at
the entrance of Saco river. Also, new buoys have been moored, to
replace those lost, on Simon's Rock, Moulton's Ledge, Monk's Ledge,
Upper Gangway, Muscle Ridge channel, and Hue and Cry Rock, near
Portland.
SECOND LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

^
In the second light-house district, extending from Hampton harbor,
New Hampshire, to Gooseberry inlet, Massachusetts, repairs have been
made at Monomoy, Chathara, Egg Rock, Cape Poge, Edgartown,
West Chop, Ten Pound island, Newburyport, Plum island, Nobsque
Point, and Ipswich light-houses.
At Cuttyhunk the light has been raised ten feet, the lantern placed
on the keeper's dwelling, to which aisecond story has been added, and
the old tower taken down.



366

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Two new towers of cut granite, to carry first-order lenses, are being
erected at Thatcher's island, which will be completed during the
coming year.
The light-house on Minot's Ledge has been completed in a manner
most satisfactory to the board and most creditable to the engineer in
charge.
The light-houses, with but few exceptions, are now in excellent
condition.
The light at Holme's Hole havingbeen deemed useless, was discontinued on the 1st December last.
The Vineyard sound, Polloch Rip, Cross Rip, Shovelful shoal, and
Succonnesset light-vessels have been repaired, and are in good condition and in fine order throughout.
The Minot's Ledge light-vessel will require some repairs for service
elsewhere.
The tenders have performed good service during the year. They
have all been slightly repaired, but the " W a v e " will not last much
longer ; the Ranger is in good condition.
The Harding's Ledge and Grave's Ledge bell-boats have been overhauled and put in good repair.
Black Rock and Londoner beacons have been restored, and all in
the district are now in good order, with the exception of Halfway
Rock, in Beverly harbor.
A temporary buoy has been placed on a rock recently discovered
in the channel at the entrance to Dartmouth harbor, and another off
Marsh Ledge.
THIRD LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

In this district, extending from Gooseberry inlet, Massachusetts, to
Squam inlet. New Jersey, embracing the coasts of Long Island and
Long Island Sound, and Hudson river, and Lake Champlain, repairs
have been made at Plum, island. Great West bay. Fire island, Bergen
Point, Passaic, Throg's Neck, Old Field Point, Lloyd's harbor. Van
Wie's Point, Stuyvesant, Coxsackie, Saugerties, Coeyman's, New Baltimore, and Five Hook island light-houses.
The light-house at Montauk Point has been thoroughly repaired,
and a new keeper's dwelling erected.
A fog-bell rung by an air engine has been.erected at New Haven.
The Bartlett's reef light-vessel has been repaired and new moorings
furnished for her. The other light-vessels in this district are in fair
order.
The spindles and day-marks remain as heretofore, except that at
Conanicut Point, which was destroyed last winter by ice.
The buoys have been carefully attended to ; five new ones have been
placed in Providence river.
FOURTH LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

In the fourth light-house district, extending from Squam inlet, New
Jersey, to Metomkin inlet, Virginia, the light-houses are in excellent
condition, but few repairs having been required during the year.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

357

The dwellings for the keepers at Cape May have been completed
and the grounds put in good order.
Small repairs have been made at Fort Mifflin ; a new lantern has
been placed in the tower at Reedy island.
A site has been selected for a new light-house at Assateague, Virginia, and a new site has been purchased for the light-house at Mahon's
river.
The Cross Ledge light-vessel has undergone extensive repairs. The
Five Fathom Bank and Relief light-vessels are both in excellent condition.
The tender also, after undergoing some slight repairs, is in very
good order.
The buoyage of this district hasbeen well attended to.
FIFTH LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

In the fifth light-house district, extending from Metomkin inlet,
Virginia, to New River inlet. North Carolina, and embracing the
sounds of North Carolina, new lanterns have been placed at Black
river. Point Lookout, and Ocracoke light-houses. Others are needed
at Turkey Point, Pool's island, Sharpe's island. Clay island, and Fog
Point. The substitution of Franklin for valve lamps is going on.
The light-stations at Pamplico Point and Cape Hatteras require
protection.
[
The title to the site for a light-house at Pungoteague has been
procured.
Operations are in progress for the completion of Cape Charles lighthouse, and for building the light-house at the mouth of North river,
(Albemarle sound,) provided for by act of Congress.
In consequence of the intended substitution of screw-pile lighthouses for most of the light-vessels in this district, the latter have
been generally kept merely in teraporary repair. The majority of
them are old, and have been frequently patched up.
The Brant island and Royal shoal light-vessels have been overhauled and put in thorough repair.
The Ship shoal light-vessel, recently removed from the coast of
Louisiana, will be fitted as a relief for the light-vessel at Smith's
Point.
Ninefoot shoal light-vessel has been fitted out, and sent to occupy
the station of the Upper Cedar Point light-vessel, on the Pofcomac
river, this latter vessel having been found to require extensive
repairs.
The beaconage and buoyage of this district have been well attended
to. New buoys have been placed in the new channel on Ocracoke
bar. North Carolina; in Wicomico river, (a tributary of the Potomac ;) on Smith's Point shoal, mouth of Potomac river ; in new
channel from Spesutia island to Havre de Grace, and in Brewerton
channel, Patapsco river.
The tenders have been overhauled, and repaired where necessary.
Parties are now engaged in putting down screw-pile light-houses
in lieu of light-vessels at Croatan and Long Point shoals. The work
will be completed during the coming winter.



368

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
SIXTH LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

In this district, extending from New River inlet. North Carolina,
to Mosquito inlet, Florida, the light-houses are generally in good
condition.
The light-vessels are generally old and worn out. Iron pile beacons are strongly recommended to be substituted for many of them.
Repairs have been made at Federal Point, Orton's Point, Campbell's island, and Hunting island. The tower at St. Simon's requires
rebuilding, but the necessary amount cannot be spared from the appropriation for " r e p a i r s , " and a special appropriation is recommended.
The steamer " Arctic" was altered and fitted out at Norfolk, Virginia, last spring as a first class light-vessel, and despatched to Rattlesnake shoals. South Carolina, to take the place of the vessel
formerly there, and which had been condemned.
The bell buoys off St. John's bar and Doboy have been repaired
and returned to their stations.
Additional buoys have been placed in the channel on the bar at St.
John's river, and in Maffit's channel, Charleston, South Carolina.
The day-marks through the inland route south have been repaired
and replaced.
The three sites for light-beacons in St. John's river, selected some
years ago, have had their titles investigated, and pronounced good
by the United States district attorney.
The tenders require some repairs. A small steamer is recommended as a substitute for the three tenders employed in this district;
SEVENTH LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

This district extends from Mosquito inlet to Egmont key, Florida.
The lights are reported to be in good condition.
. The new light-house at Jupiter inlet has been completed, and was
lighted for the first time on the 10th of July last.
The buoyage and stakeage have been well attended to.
The tender Florida has been repaired and furnished with] a new
suit of sails, and is now in a good condition for service.
Slight repairs have been made at the following light-stations, viz :
at Carysfort reef the revolving machinery and the tower stairs have
been repaired; at Sand key a boat-house has been erected, and an
* outhouse for the convenience of the keeper's family; at Dry Tortugas the roof of the dwelling has been repaired, and new windows
have been put to the tower, and at Northwest Passage repairs have
been made upon the roof of the dwelling, and the interior of the
house has been painted.
BIOHTH LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

The eighth light-house district extends from Sea Horse key, Florida,
to the western extremity of Lake Pontchartrain.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

369

Prior to the occurrence of the gales of August and September last
the light-houses, generally, were in good condition.
Extensive repairs have iDeen put upon the structures at Choctaw
point, Cat island, and St. Mark's. In consequence of the serious
damage received at the two first named light-houses, so soon after
they had been thoroughly repaired, and protected as far as practicable,
the board is of opinion that nothing will answer at those points but
screw pile light-houses, and it has therefore to recommend tha,t the
sum of $20,000 be appropriated for the two.
A screw pile light-house has been erected on Merrill's Shell Bank,
as a substitute for the light-vessel formerly at that place, and the
light was exhibited for the first fime bn the night of 10th August
last.
rBy the gale of the l l t h August the light-houses at Bayou St.
John and Proctorsville, Louisiana, were entirely destroyed, and the
light-houses at Cat island. Round island, Pascagoula, Choctaw point,
Rigolets, and Mobile point, sustained considerable daraage from that
and the storm of the 15th of the same month.
The buoys and stakes throughout the district are in a proper condition and in good order.
A new buoy has been placed in Mobile Bay tq mark the position
of the wreck of the steamer " Str ick," and those which had been lost
from the western edge of the " Middle Ground." The buoys in west
pass of Apalachicola bay, Horn island and Ship island channels,.,
have been replaced by new ones.
NINTH LiaHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

In the ninth light-house district, extending from the passes of the
Mississippi river to the Rio Grande, the new light-house at Ship
shoal has been completed and lighted, and the light-vessel which had
formerly marked that station has been removed.
Two ranges of beacon-lights at Galveston have also been lighted',,
and the light-vessel rempved.
The tender belonging to this district has been thoroughly repairedi
and is now in good order for service.
The buoyage has been well attended to. Plans and estimates arebeing prepared for the new light-house at the Southwest Pass of the*
Mississippi, and the preliminary steps have been taken for selecting
the sites and procuring title thereto for the new light-houses author^
ized at Calcasieu and Rio Grande.
Repairs have been put upon the houses at Pass Cavallo and Matagordo bay,
^
TENTH LIOHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

' In this district, which embraces the coasts of lakes Ontario and
Erie, and the St. Lawrence, Niagara, and Detroit rivers, thecondition
of the light-houses generally is very satisfactory.
Repairs have been made at Ogdensburg, Cross-over island, Rock
island, Galloo island, Erie Range, Horse-shoe reef, Buffalo,., Sodus
24



370

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

point, Cleveland, Fairport, and Mamajuda light-houses. Partial repairs for the preservation of the light-house piers at Oswego have
been made, and the repairs at Huron light-house will be completed
this season.
The light-house and beacon-light at St. Clair flats have been completed during the year, and are found to subserve admirably the purposes for which they were erected.
Preliminary steps have been taken towards the erection of the light- ,
house authorized at Sister's island, ih the St. Lawrence river.
Fairport beacon has been discontinued on account of the filling up
of the channel.
The buoys in the Sfc. Lawrence river have been placed and attended
tp as heretofore. The buoyage of the Niagara river has also been
satisfactorily attended to.
A balloon buoy has been kept on Charity shoal. Lake Ontario,
since the destruction by ice of the day, beacon ; and two new spar
buoys have been placed to mark the channel at Cedar point.
ELEVENTH LIOHT HOUSE DISTRICT.

In this district, embracing the coasts of lakes St. Clair, Michigan,
Huron, and Superior, and Green bay, several of the present lighthouse structures are recommended to be rebuilt, and some few repairs
on others will be necessary.
The lighfc-houses at Port Washington and Sheboygan have been
rebuilt, and a new lantern has been placed on the keeper's house at
Waukegan.
.
The light-house at Pointe aux Barques has been protected from the
wash of the sea. Substantial ladders and steps have been placed to
ascend the steep banks at Pottawattomie and Grand island. A dock
and storehouse have been erected at Detroit. Contracts for three iron
light-houses at Manitou island, Whitefish point, and Detour, to replace the present towers at those places, have been entered into.
The crib-work for the foundation of the light-house at Wangoshance
has remained fbr many years without any repairs, but is now in a state
requiring thorough renovation and protection. For this purpose an
appropriation'of $11,384 68 is recommended to be asked from ConThe tender is in a very decayed condition, and is not considered
worthy of repairs.
TWELFTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT.

In this district, comprising the entire Pacific coast of the United
States, the light-houses are in good condition.
The light-house and buoy tender, which had been laid up a greater
part of the time for want of funds, has been permanently commissioned under the appropriation granted at the last session of Congress,
and is in good order for service.
The buoys have been well attended t o ; and the heavy expenses




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

371

heretofore attendant upon the light-house service on this coast have
been brought within reasonable limits.
In addition to her regular duties the tender has done good service
in affording protection against the Indians at many points along the
coast.
The light-honse at Whidby's island, provided for by the act of
August 18, 1856, is in course of erection ; and the preliminary steps
have been taken towards fixing the sites and procuring titles therefor
for the light-houses at Cape Mendocino and Punta de los Reyes.
Repairs have been made at Point Bonita and Point Loma; and some
changes are recommended by the engineer and inspector to increase
the effective range of someof the lights and to protect others, for
which the required amount is asked for in the annual estimates under
the head of repairs.
The district is generally in good order.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
By order of the Light-house Board.
W . B. SHUBRICK,
Chairman L . H. Board.
RAPHAEL SEMMES,
W M . F . SMITH,

Secretaries.




No. 14.

.

-

oo

Blackfoot Nation

and Apaches of the
Arkansas river.
Do . . . . . .

For purchaseof goods, provisions, and
other useful articles, &c.; 9th article
treaty October 17,1855.
For purchase of goods, provi.sions, and
agricultural implements; 6th article
treaty July a?, 1853.
For transportation ol goods, &c

Chippewas of Lake Su- Money, goods, support of schools, provisions, t w o carpenters, and .tobacperior.
co; compare 4th article treaty Octoher 4, 1842, and 8th article treaty
September 30, 1854.
Twenty instalments in coin, goods,
Do
implements, & c . , a n d for education;
4ih article treaty September 30,1854.
Tvventy instalments for six smiths and
Do
assistants, and for iron ahd steel; 2d
and 5th articles treaty September
30,1854.
T w e n t y instalments for the seventh
Do
smith, &.C.
Do.

Chippewas o f t h e Mississippi.

1!
rt

=

og
c o5^
So .

<:

o

T e n instalments of f20,000 ; five instalments to be appropriated.

$100,000 00

Pi

Vol. 10, page 1 0 1 4 . . . . T e n instalments of $18,000; three instalments unappropriated..

54,000 00

O

21,000 00

H

Vol. 11, page 659

do
Vol. 7, page 592, and
vol. 10, page l l l l .

Transportation for three years, $7,000
per year.
Twenty-five i n s t a l m e n t s ; six yet to
be appropriated.

116,799 66

V o l . 1 0 , page l l l l . . .

Tvventy instalments of $19,000 each ;
fourteen yet unappropriated.

266,000 00

Vol. 10, pages 1109
and l l l l .

T w e n t y instalments, estimated at
$6,300 e a c h ; fourteen yet unappropriated.

89,100 00

T w e n t y instalments, estimated at
$1,060 e a c h ; sixteen yet unappropriated.
EcJtimated at ^2,600 per a n n u m

16,980 00

do

Support of a smith, assistant, and Vol. 10, page 1 1 1 2 . . .
shop, and pay of two farmers during
the pleasure of the P r e s i d e n t ; 12th
article treaty.
Money, goods, s.upport of schools, pro- Vol. 7, page 592, and
visions, and tobacco; compare 4th
vol. 10,page l l l l .
article treaty October 4, 1842, and
. Sth article treaty September 30,1854. 1




.Vumber of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

' i!

Am't held in trust by the U. S.
on whichfiveper cent, is
annually paid ; and amounts
which, invested at five per
cent., would produce the
perrhanent annuities.'

Description of annuities, stipulations, Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large. .
&c.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will be reqiiired
during a Umited number of
years to pay limited annuities till they expire, amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

N a m e s of tribes.

Annual amount necessary to
meet stipulations,indefinite
as to time, now allowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

Statement showing the jyresent liabilities qf the United Staies to Indian tribes, under stijDidations ofi treaties, Sc.

Twenty-five i n s t a l m e n t s ; six u n a p propriated.

Ul

$2,260 00

54,000 00

•

Do

Do
-

Chippewas, Pillagers,
and L a k e Wlnnebegoshish.
Do
Do
Chickasaws
Chippewas, Menomonies, Winnebagoes,
and N e w York Indians.
Chippewas of Sagan a w , S w a n Creek,
and
Black river,
Michigan.
Choctaws

T w o farmers, t w o carpenters, and
smiths and assistants, iron and steel;
4th article treaty October 4, 1842,
and September 30, 1854.
T w e n t y instalments in money, of
$20,000 each.
Money, $10,666 67; goods, $8,000;
and purposes of utility, $4,000; 3d
article treaty February 22, 1855.
F o r purposes of e d u c a t i o n ; same article and treaty.
For support of smiths' shops ; sarae
article and treaty.
Permanent annuity in goods
Education during the pleasure of Congress.
T e n instalments in coin, of $10,000
each ; and for the support of smith's
shops ten years, $1,240 per y e a r ;
same article, &c.
P e r m a n e n t annuities

.do.

Vol 10, pages 1167 .
Vol. 10, page 1168..
do
..do
Vol. 1, page 619
Vol. 7, page 304

T w e n t y iristalments of $3,000 each ;
fourteen unappropriated.
Fifteen instalments, estimated at
$2,120 each ; nine unappropriated.
Act February 28,1790; $3,000 per year.
5th article treaty August 11, 1827

•Vol. 7, pages 99,213,
and 236.
Vol. 7, pages 212 and
236.

Do

Interest on $500,000; articles 10 and
13 treaty J u n e 22, 1855.
Permanent annuities
,

Vol. I I , pages 613 and
614.
Vol. 7, pp. 36, 69, and
287.

Smith shops, &c.
Smiths, &c.; two for twenty-seven
y e a r s ; treaties March 24, 1832, and
August 7, 1856.
Wheelwright, permanent
,
Thirty-three instalments for education,
13th article treaty of March, 1832,
and 4th article treaty of J a n u a r y ,
1845.
T w e n t y instalments for education, 4th
article treaty of January, 1845.
iVllowance during the pleasure of the
President.

Vol. 7, p. 287
Vol. 7, pp. 368, & c . .

Interest on $200,000 held in trust, 6th
article treaty of August 7, 1856.
Life annuities to two c h i e f s . . . . . . . . . .
Interesi on $46,080, at 5 per centum .

Vol. 11, pp. 701 and
702.
V o l . 7 , p . 3 9 9 . . . . . . . . Treaiy of 1818, 1829, and 1832
Vol. 7, p. 327
Resolutionof the Senate, J a n . 19,1832.

Do
Do

Do
Do
Do
Delawares
Do

i




42,000 00
19,100 00
$3,000 00
1,500 00

Vol, 7, p . 287
Vol. 7, p. 368, and vol.
9, p . 822.

T w e n t y instalments of $3,000 e a c h ;
three unappropriated.
Sth article treaty of February 14,1833,
and Sth article treaty o f J a n u a r y 24,
1826.
Five per centum for education

Vol. 7, pp. 287 and
419.

o
9,600 00

192,000 00

920 00

18,400 00

25,000 00

500,000 00

24,500 00

490,000 00

1,110 00

22,200 00

H
O
12!

6,600 00

8th article treaty of January,1826, $600.
Thirty-three instalments of $3,0.00
each ; three yet unappropriated.

Vol. 9, p . 822

$60,000 00

93,200 00

2d article treaty Noveraber 16, 1805,
$3,000 ; 13th article treaty October
18, 1820, $600; 2d article treaty
J a n u a r y 20, 1825, S6,000.
6th article treaty October 18, 1820,
and 9th article treaty J a n u a r y 20,
1825, say $920.
Five per c e n t u m for educational purposes.
4th article treaty of August, 1790,
$1,500; 2d article, J u n e 16, 1802,
$3,000 ; 4th article treaty of J a n u a r y
24, 1826, $20,000.
8th article J a n u a r y 24,1826—say $1,110,
T h r e e of twenty-seven instalments, to
be appropriated.

Provisions for siniths, &c

Do....
Do

280,000 00
544,000 08

Five instalments yet to be appropriated, and two subsequent instalments of $18,800.

Do

Creek

8,400 G
O

Twenty-five i n s t a l m e n t s ; six u n a p propriated; one-third payable to
these Indians, v i z : $1,400 for six
years.
3d article treaty February 22, 1855;
fourteen unappropriated.
Thirty i n s t a l m e n t s ; twenty-four u n appropriated.

W

I
o

h-t

p^

02
600 00

12,000 00

9,000 00

9,000 00
4,710 00
10,000 00

200,000 00

2,304 00

...........
46,080 00

200 00

«<J
Oo

No. l.—Statement showing the present liabilities ofi the United States to Indian tribes, Sc.—Oontinued.
c 2 3
^^ -rz X

o 2i

'

O g Q
J

«5 rt 5
rs -^S

B 2^ « t i

rt QJ c
O X

I-

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&,c.

N a m e s of ..tribes.

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

rs

fz * ' Ora

t? ' ^ rt 73 p . -

•2 d « s
> , >>K_ cs

c B.<o-°

rt Q) r:'&i

I f |S

^ « 'rt « s

^^-Srt a

"rt o

o ^

gss-.S
<

QJ C

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c - &^ o

'•^a^-J

•H t i S
'B-^'BX '^

« ^
2 .' 2 -£S o

g o rt ^ o
Delawares

,

Florida Indians,
Seminoles.
Do

or
,

DO......C

Do
lowas
Kanzas
Kickapoos .
Do
Menomonies

.........

Do
Do
Do
Miamies

Do

•

Eight instalments of $1,250 each

Vol. 10, p. 1050 .

T e n instalments for support of schools, Vol. 11, p. 702 . ,
Sth article treaty of August 7, 1856.
Ten instalments for agricultural assist.do..
- a n c e , same article and treaty.
T e n instalments for support of smiths
and shops, sarae article and treaty.
Interest on $500,000, per Sth article
do
treaty of August 7, 1856.
Interest on $57,000, being the balance Vol. 7, p. 568, and vol.
' 10, p. 1071.
of $157,000.
Vol. 9, p. 842
Interest on $200,000
I n t e r e s t o n $100,000
. . . . , Vol. 10, p . 1079
do
Graduated payments on $200,000 . . . . ,

6th article treaty of May 6, 1854 ; one
instalment.
Seven payments of $3,000 each

21,000 00

Seven payments of $2,000 e a c h .

15,400 00

TJ

O
H
O

14,000 00

Seven payments of .$2,200 e a c h .
$25,000 as annuity

$25,000 00

,

2d article treaty of October 19, 1838,
and 9th article treaty o f M a y 17,1854.
2d article treaty o f J a n u a r y 1 4 , 1 8 4 6 . . . .
2d article treaty of May 18, 1854
2d article treaty of May 18, 1854,
$111,000, heretofore appropriated,
due.
Vol. 9, p. 953, and vol. 3d article treaty ofMay 18,1854, $9,000,
Pay of railler fifteen years
3,000 heretofore appropriated, d u e .
10, p . 1065.
Seven instalments of $916 66|- each ..
Support of smith's shop twelve years. . . . . . d o
4th article treaty of 1848; five to be
Vol. 9, p. 953
T e n instalments of $20,000 each
paid.
4th article treaty of May 12, 1854, and
Fifteen equal instalments to pay Vol. 10, p . 1065
S e n a t e ' s amendment thereto.
$242,686 to commence in 1867.
Perrnanent provision for smith's shop, Vol. 7,pp. 191 and 464. 5th article treaty of October 6, 1818;
Sth article treaty of October 23,1834,
a n d v o l . 10, p.1095.
&c., and miller.
and 4th article treaty of J u n e 5,
1854—say $940 for shop and $600 for
miller.
3d article treaty of J u n e 5, 1854; one
Twenty instalments upon $200,000.
Vol. 10, p. 1094
instalment of $7,500 appropriated yet
to be provided for.
3d article treaty of J u n e .5, 1854
Interest on $50,000, at 5 per c e n t . . .
do


Do
,


$1,250 00

$500,000 00

2,875 00

57,500 00

10,000 00
5,000 00

H

200,000 00
100,000 00

89,000 00

g

5,400 00
6,416 66f
100,000 00
242,686 00
1,540 00

30,800 G
O

2,500 00

50,000 00

192,500 00

Do

Interest on $221,257 86 in trust

Eel River Miamies . . . . Permanent annuities
Nisqually, Puyallup,
and other bands of
Puget Sound.
Do

Presents to Indians

,
,

Pay of instructor, smith, physician,
carpenter,.&c., for twenty years.

Vol. 10, p. 1099'
Vol. 7, pp. 51,91,114,
and 116.
V o l . 9 , p. 975

S e n a t e ' s a m e n d m e n t , 4th article treaty
of 1854.
4th article treaty of 1795, 3d article
treaty of 1805, and 3d article tre.aty
of September, 1809—aggregate.
10th article treaty of Septeinber 9,1849

1 Oth article treaty of Dec. 26,1854 ; estimated at $6^700 per y e a r ; fourteen
instalments yet to be appropriated.
Forty instalm'ts, graduated,($840,000,)
Six instalments paid, (see 4th article
Omahas
Vol. 10, p . 1044
extending over forty years.
treaty March 16, 1854,) to be appropriated.
Support of smiths' shops, miller, and
Sth article treaty ; estimated at $2,140
Do
Vol. 10, p. 1045 . . . ; . .
farmer ten years.
p e r y e a r ; four years to be provided
for.
4th article treaty March 15,1854; six
Ottoes and Missourias. Foriy instalm'ts, graduated, ($385,000.) Vol. 10, p . 1039
extending through forty years.
instalments paid, to be appropriated
hereafter.
Support of s m i t h s ' shops, railler, and Vol. 10, p. 1040
7th article treaty of March 15, 1854;
Do
,
farmer ten years.
estimated at $2,140 per a n n u m ; six
paid ; to be appropriated.
Ottawas of K a n s a s . . . . . P e r m a n e n t annuities, their proportion Vol. 7, pp. 54,106,179, 4th article treaty of August 3, 1795;
and 220.
4th article treaty of September 17,
of.
1818; 4th article treaty of August
29, 1821; and 2d article treaty of
November 17, 1807.
Interest on $200,000, at 5 per c e n t . . . . , Vol. 7, page 497
Resolution of Senate of May 19, 1836;
Ottawas and Chippe
$12,000 per year.
w a s of Michigan.
Education, $5,000; rnissions, $3,000; V o l . 7 , page 492
See 4th article treaty of March 28,
Do
medicines, $300; during the pleasure
1836.
of Oongress.
T h r e e blacksmiths, &c., one gun- Vol. 7, page 493
See 7th article treaty of March 2 8 , '
Do.
smith, &c., two farmers and assist1836, annually allowed since the
ants, ahd two mechanics and asexpiration of the number of years
sistants, during the pleasure of the
n a m e d in treaty. Aggregate, $3,440.
President.
Ten equal instalments for education, Treaty riot published. Five instalments due
Do
$8,000 each ; 2d article treaty July
31, 1855.
Support of four smiths' shops for ten
Five, of $4,250 each, to be paid
Do
y e a r s ; same article and treaty.
In part p a y m e n t o f $305,000; same ar$10,000 per year for ten y e a r s ; five
Do
,
ticle and treaty.
years to be appropriated.
$206,000, to be paid after ten y e a r s . . . .
Do
Treaty July 31, 1855
interest on $186,000, five years, same
Interest on unpaid consideration to be
Do
.^,
article, $55,800, and interest on six
paid as annuity.
unpaid instalments of $10,000 each,
$3,000.
Ten instalments of $3,500 each, to be
T o be paid as per c a p i t a ; five instalDo...
paid to Grand River O t t a w a s ; same
ments yet to be paid, $3;500 each.
article and treaty.




11,062 89

221,257 86

1,100 00

23,000 G
O

$5,000 00
67;500 00

Vol. 10, p . 1134

630,000 00
8,560 00
286,000 00

TJ
O

Pi
H

8,560 00
52,000 00

12,000 00
8,300 00

O

240,000 00
I—(

6,440 00

O
td
m
40,000 00
21,250 00
50,000 00
206,000 00
58,800 00

17,500 00

CO

No. 14.—Statement showing thepresent liahilities ofi the United States to Indian tribes, Sc.—Continued.

%a^^
N a m e s of tribes.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large.

N u m b e r of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &,c.

*^ O ^

e.'S 5 S ^ ^
a, "-I "3 TS rt rt
rt G f= 2 QTW .
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rt i3 S 2

?rt^-^la

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2 >'a ^ r s S
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"S-r ziX -rt

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2 Q?2s

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r'5''-'rtWfj..'>

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S o rt ^ C p.
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Pawnees.
Do,
Do,
Do.

Agricultural implements during the
pleasure of the President.
Five instalments in goods and such
articles as may be necessary for
them.
For support of two manual labor
schools.
For pay of two teachers

Vol. 7, page 488. . . .

See 4th article treaty October 9, 1853..

1st session 35th Congress, page 129.

2d article treaty September 24,1857;
three instalments appropriated, two
remaining.
3d article t r e a t y ; annually, during the
pleasure of the President.
3d article treaty; annual appropriation
required.
4th article t r e a t y ; annual appropriation during the pleasure ofthe President.
4th article t r e a t y ; annual appropriation required.
do..
do

.do. .
.do. ,

Do.

Por purchase of iron and steel, and
other necessaries for same.

.do. .

Do.

For pay. of t w o blacksmiths, one of
w h o m to be a gunsmith and tinsmith.
F o r compensation of t w o strikers or
apprentices in shop.
T e n instalments for farraing utensils
and stock.

.do. ,

Do.
Do.

.do. .
.do. .

Do.

F o r pay of farmer

.do. .

Do.

Ten instalments for pay of miller.

.do. .

Do.

T e n instalments for pay of engineer...

.do. ,

Do'.

For compensation to apprentices to
assist in working the raill.
Three instalraents for the pay of six
laborers.

.do.

Do.




.do. ,

4Lh article t r e a t y ; three instalments
appropriated; seven remaining to be
appropriated at the pleasure of the
President.
4th article t r e a t y ; annual appropriation required.
4th article t r e a t y ; three instalments
appropriated,>^everi remaining at the
discretion of-the President.
do
do
4th article t r e a t y ; annual appropriation required.
7th article t r e a t y ; two instalraents of
$3,000 appropriated, one remaining
unappropriated.

$1,000 00

pi
p^
O

H
$80,000 00

O

10,000 00
1,200 00

td

500 00

^^
t—1

1,200 oo'

a.

480 00
9,600 00

4,200 00
8,400 00
500 00
3,000 00

tg

P e r m a n e n t annuities in money

Vol. 7, pages 51,114,
185, 317, and 320;
and vol. 9, page 855.

Do...

Life annuities to surviving chiefs

Vol. 7, pages 379 and
433.

Do

Education duringpleasure of Congress. Vol. 7, pages 296,318,
and 401.

Do........

P e r m a n e n t provision for three smiths,
assistants, shops, &c.

Vol. 7, pages 318,296,
and 321.

P e r m a n e n t provision for
salt.

Vol. 7, pages 75,296,
and 320.

Pottawatomieg

Do

,

furnishing

Interest on $643,000, at 5 per c e n t . . . . .

Pottawatomies of Huron.
Q,uapaws

Vol. 9, page 854.

P e r m a n e n t annuities

Do

Vol. 7, page 10b.,

•

Vol. 7, page 425.,

Provision for education $1,000 per
year, and for smith and shop and
farmer during the pleasure of the
President.
Sixteen instalments, of $2,500 e a c h . .

Vol. 10, page 1019..

$2,000 annually for fifteen years

,

Vol. 10, page 1122..

Support of schools and farmer fifteen
years.

Vol. 10, page 1123..

4th article treaty 1795, $1,000; 3d article treaty 1809, $500; 3d article treaty
1818, $2,500; 2d article treaty 1828,
$2,000; 2d article t r e a t y J u l y , 1829,
$16,000; 10th article treaty J u n e ,
1846, $.300.
3d article treaty October 16,1832, $200;
3d article treaty September 26,1833,
$700.
3d article treaty October 16, 1826; 2d
article treaty September 20, 1826,
and 4th article treaty October 27,
1852, $5,000.
2d article treaty September 2 0 , 1 8 2 8 ;
3d article tieaty October 16, 1828,
and 2d article treaty July 29, 1829,
three shops, at $940 each per year,
$2,820.
*
^
• '
3d article treaty 1803, 3d article treaty
October, 1826, and 2d article treatv
July 29, 1829; estimated $500.
7th article treaty J u n e , 1846; annual
interest $32,150.
2d article treatv November 17, 1807,
g400.'
3d article treaty May 13, 18,33, $1,000
per. year for education, and $1,660
for smith, farmer, &c., $2,660.

Vol. 10, page 5 4 4 . . .

3d article treaty September 10,1853;
nine instalments yet to be appropriated.
3d article treaty Noveraber 18, 1854 ;
nine instalments yet to be appropriated.
Sth article same treaty ; estimated for
schools, $1,200 per year, and farmer,
$600; $1,800 per year for nine
years.
Same article, four years, at $1,060 per
year.
2d article treaty October 21,1837

P e r m a n e n t annuity

Vol. 7, page 85
Vol. 7, p a s e 5 4 1 . . , .
Vol. 7, page 5 9 6 . . . .

Do

Thirty instalments, of $20,000 e a c h . .

Vol. 7, page 3 7 5 . . . .

Do

Provision for smith and shop, gunsmith and shop, and for tobacco and
salt.

2d article treaty October, 1837
2d article treaty ^October 11 1842,
$40,000.
3d article treaty September 21, 18.32;
one instalment yet to be appropriated,
4th article treaty September 2 1 , 1832;
one instalment of $2,880 yet to be
provided.

Rogue River
Shasta, Scoton, and
Umpqua Indians.
Do

,

Do
Sacs and Foxes of Missouri.
Sacs and Foxes of Mississippi.
Do
Do

Physician, medicines, &c.,, for
years.
Interest on $157,400




ten

do

do

$446,000 00

900 00
5,000 00

56,400 00

Pi
Pi
500 00

10,000 GO

33,150 00

643,000 00

400 00

8,000 00

o
o

2,660 00

w

td-

3d article treaty November, 1804.

Interest on $200,000, at 5 per cent
Interest on $800,000, at 5 per c e n t . . . .

$22,300 00

22,500 G
O
18,000 00

o

16,200 00

td
QQ
4,240 00
7,870 00

157,400 00

1,000 00

20,000 00
2,880 00

20,000 00

10,000 00
40,000 00

200,000 00
800,000 00

CO

No. 14.—Statement showing the present liabilities ofi the United States to Indian tribes, Sc.—Continued.

oo
.5 « °'B

I'll I

QJ <U p -* O
> i QJ ^

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, reraarks, &c.

^a s ^
B%%^

\ iz d ' x

Senecas

...,

Permament annuities ,

Vol. 7, pages 161 and
179.

,
Provision for smith and smith's shop, Vol. 7, page 349
and miller, during the pleasure of
the President.
Vol. 4, page 442
Senecas of N e w York Permanent annuity
Vol. 9,'page 35
I n t e r e s t o n $75,000
Do
do
,
Interest on $43,050, transferred from
Do
the treasury tcTihe Ontario Bank.
Vol. 7, page 179
Senecas and Shawnees. Permanent annuity
Do
Provisions for support of sraiths and Vol. 7, page 352
shops during the pleasure of the
President.
Shawnees
P e r m a n e n t annuities for education . . , Vol. 7, pages Sl and
. 161, and vol. 10,
page 1056.
do
Interest on $40,000
,.... ...
Do
Six Nations of N e w Permanent annuity in clothing, & c . . . Vol. 7, page 46
York.
Sioux ofthe Mississippi Interest on $300,000
, Vol. 7, page 539
Do
Fifty instalments of interest on
$112,000, being ten cents per acre
Vol. 10, page 9 5 1 . . . .
for reservation.
Fifty instalinents of interest on
Do
$1,360,000, at 5 per cent.
Vol. 10, page 950
Do
Fifty instalments of interest on
$1,100,000.
Vol. 10, page 9 5 5 . . . .
Do
Fifty instalments of interest on
$59,000, being ten cents per acre for
Vol. 10,page 9 5 7 . . . .
reservation.
Do




4th article treaty Septeraber 29, 1817,
$500; 4th article treaty September
17, 1817, $.500.
4th article treaty February 28,1831,
say $1,660.
Act February 19,1831
Act J u n e 27, 1846
Act J u n e 27, 1846

•= rt > , > . ^
J
O ei - ^ p< Q — rt
Qi X " o *•

4th article treaty August 3, 1795; 4th
article treaty Septeinber 29, 1817,
and 3d article treaty May 10, 1854.
3d article treaty May 10, 1854
6th article treaty November 11, 1794 ;
$4,.500 per annum.
2d article treaty September 29, 1837...
Senate's amendment to 3d article; 40
instalments to be provided for, at
1R5 6U0 each.
4th article treaty July 23,1851, $58,000
per annum ; tbrty instalmerits to' be
provided for.
4th article treaty August 5, 1851,
$58,000 per anrium; forty instalraents yet to be appropriated.
S e n a t e ' s amendment to 3d article
treaty August 5 , 1 8 5 1 ; forty instalments of $3,450 to be provided for.

5

ff ^

S o
$1,000 00

rt S; s •:o. ^ o C

g O rt l> o f^
-si

$20,000 00

Pi

o

pi

O

$1,660 00

$6,000 00
3,750 00
2,152 50

4th article treaty Septeinber 17, 1818 .
4th article treaty July 20, 1 8 3 1 . . .

o .tJ

m Q) ..'>QJ

Si 1 ^
t t w .5 ^ ^
QJ C 1- c3 a
t"nS 3 O a

rt

t^Brz'B.^

'^XTS'B

Names of tribes.

•

X "^ B ' ^ = '^

ei es

11,902 50
1,000 00

238,050 00
20,000 00

5,000 00

100,000 00

2,000 00
4,500 00

40,000 00
90,000 00

15,000 00

300,000 00

W
t^

1,060 00

$224,000 00
2,720,000 00
2,320,000 00
138,000 00

%
o
QQ

Treaty of Port Laramie. Five instalments, at the direction of
the President, of $70,000 each.
Umpquas—Cow Creek
band.
U m p q u a s , Calapooias,
&c., Oregon.

Senate's a m e n d m e n t
to treaty of Sept.
17,1851.

T w e n t y instalments, of $550 each . . . Vol. 10, page 1 0 2 8 . . . .
T w e n t y instalments; payment graduated.

Vol. 10, page 1126...,

Support of teachers, &c., twenty years

Vol. 10, page 1127...,
do

Physician, fifteen years
Smith and shop, and farmer, ten year?
Willamette
bands.

Valley

Winnebagoes
Do
Poncas........ c
Do.
Do
Dwamish, and other
allied tribes in Washington Territory.
Do
Do
Do
M a k a h tribe

.....do

Twenty instalraents; graduated payments.

Vol. 10, page 1144...,

Interest on $1,100,000
Thirty instalments of
$85,000.

Vol. 7, page 546.
Vol. 9, page 879.

interest

on

Five instalments for beneficial purposes, $12,000 each.
T e n instalments for manual labor
schools.
Ten instalments, during the pleasure
of the President, for aid in agricultural and mechanical pursuits.
For $150,000, graduated payments,
under the direction of the President.
T w e n t y instal ments for an agricultural
school and teachers.
T w e n t y instalments for smith and car' pehter shop nnd tools.
T w e n t y instalments for blacksmith,
carpenter, farmer, and physician.
For $30,000 for benefical objects, under
the direction of the President.

Do

Tw^enly instalments for an agricultural
and industrial school and teachers.

Do

T w e n t y instalments for smith and carp e n t e r s ' shop and tools.




Pamphlet copy laws
1st session 36th
Congress, page 67.
,
do
.do .
Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session
36th
Congress, page 2.
Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st session 36th
Congress, page 3.
do
.do .
Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st session 36th
Congress, page 14.
Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st session 36th
Congress, page 15.
do

5 instalments of $70,000 each for provisions and merchandise for paym e n t of annuities, and transportation o f t h e same, &c.
3d article treaty Septeraber 19,1853 ;
thirteen instalments.
3d article treaty November 29, 1854;
six instalments appropriated ; tourteen to be appropriated under direction ofthe President.
6th article t r e a t y ; estimated at $700
p e r y e a r ; six instalments appropriated ; fourteen payable.
6th article t r e a t y ; estimated at $1,000
per y e a r ; six instalmerits appropriated.
''
6th article treaty ; estimated at $1,660
p e r y e a r ; six instalraents appropriated.
2d article treaty January 10, 1855; six
instalments appropriated; fourteen
yet to be provided under the direction o f t h e President.
4th article treaty November, 1837
4th ariicle treaty October 12, 1836;
$4,250 per y e a r ; sixteen instalraents
to be provided for.
One instalraent appropriated

350,000 G
O

Nine instalments of $5,000 each to be
provided.
Nine instalments of $7,500 to be provided.

45,000 00

6th article treaty ; thirteen instalments
yet to be provided for.

$135,000 00

14th article t r e a t y ; nineteen instalments, estimated at.

57,0.00 00

7,150 00
22,700 00

9,800 00
9,000 00
6,640 00

t^

89,500 00

O
25,000 00

1,100,000 00

68,000 00

O

48,000 00

td
t-H

67,500 00

s»

O
td
U2

9,500 00
.do.
Twenty instalments, graduated payments ; nineteen yet to be provided
for.
Nineteen instalments to b s provided
for, estimated at.

87,400 00
27,000 00
57,000 00
CO

.do.

9,500 00
C5)

oo
oo
o

Makah tribe

T w e n t y instalraents for blacksmith,
carpenter, farmer, and physician.

Walla-Walla, Cayuses,
and Umatilla tribes.

F o r $100,000 for beneficial objects,
under the direction o f t h e President.

Nuraber of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large.

Paraphlet copy L a w s
1st session 36th
Congress, page 15.
Paraphlet copy L a w s
1st session
36th
Congress, page 20.
Paraphlet copy L a w s
1st session
36th
Congress, page 21.
. . . . . . do . . .

Do

T w o instalments for buildings, & c . , . . .

DO

F o r pay and subsistence of two raillers,
one farmer, one superintendent of
farming operations, two school
teachers, one blacksmith, one wagon
and plough maker, and one carpen7
ter and joiner.
do
T w e n t y instalments for raill fixtures,
medicines, books, stationery, furniture, &c.
do
For $500 per annura for pay to each of
the head chiefs of these bands.
For salary of $100 per a n n u m to Pio- . . . . do
pio-raox.

Nineteen instalments to be provided
for; estimated amount necessary.

$87,400 00

Nineteen instalments to be provided
for, in graduated payraents.

92,000 00

One instalraent of $25,000 appropriated.

25,000 00

Nineteen instalraents' to be provided
for, estiraated at.

212,800 00

. . .

57,000 00

Nineteen instalraents, of $1,500 e a c h ,
unprovided for.
, . Nineteen instalments to be provided
for.

28,500 00

Y a k a m a Nation . . . . . . For $200,000 for beneficial objects, ex- Paraphlet copy L a w s T w e n t y instalments to be provided
for; one appropriated.
tending a period of twenty-one
1st session
36th
years. •
Congress, page 27.
Do
Nineteen instalments to be provided
For the support of two schools, one
do . .
..
of which to be an agricultural and
for, estiraated at.
industrial school, keeping them in
repair, and providing furniture,
books, and stationery.
Do
For one superintendent of teaching . . .
do . . • • . . • . . . . . . . . . . .do
and two teachers, twenty years.

140,000 00

Do
Do




Pi
Pi

o
o
W
Pi

i2j

Nineteen instalraents for those purposes, estimated a t .

Do

•X d
^ X
ctf O

Am't heldin trust by the U. S.
on whichfiveper cent, is
annually paid; andamounts
which, invested at five per
cent., would produce the
permanent annuities.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will be required
during a Umited number of
years to pay limited annuities till they expire, amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

Names of tribes.

Annual araonnt necessary to
meet stipulations, indefinite
as to time, now allowed, hut
liable to be,discontinued.

No. 14.-—Statement showing the present liabilities ofi the United States to Indian'tribes, So.—Oontinued.

o
td

QQ

1,900 00

9,500 00

60,800 00

For one superintendent of farming,
and two farmers, two millers, t w o
blacksraitbs, one tinner, one gunsmith, one carpenter, and one wagon
and plough maker, twenty years.
T w e n t y instalments for keepirig in
repair grist and saw raill, and furnishing the nece?sary tools therefor.
For keeping in repair hospital, and
furnishing medicines, &c.

/Do.

Do

Do

For keeping in repair buildings for
employes.
For salary of head chief, twenty years.

Do
Do

Do

Do
Do

.

1)0
Do
Do

For $200,000 for beneficial objects, ex. tending over a period of tvventy-one
"^years, under the direciion of the
President.
. . . . . For the support of two schools; one
of which to be an agricultural and
industrial school; keeping them in
repair, and providing ^furniture,
books, and stationery.
^
For one superintendent of teaching
and W o teachers, twenty years.
For one superintendent of farming and
two farmers, two millers, two blacksmiths, one tinner, one gunsmith,
one carpenter, and one wagon and
plough raaker, twenty years.
T w e n t y instalments for keeping in repair grist and saw mill, and furnishing the necessary tools therefor.
For keeping in repair hospital, and
furnishing necessary medicines,&c.
, For pay of physician for twenty years

Do.............
Do
Flat Heads, and other
confederated tribes.
Do..

Do

.do.

Pamphlet Qopy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 27.
For pay ofa physician for twenty years,
do

Do

N e z Perc6s

.do.

,,...,

For keeping in repair buildings for
employes.
For salary of head chief, twenty years
For $120,000 for beneficial objects,
extending over a period of tvventy
years, under direction of the President.
For the support of an agricultural and
industrial school; providing the
necessary furniture, b o o k s , ' and
stationery.
For employment of suitable instructors therefor.




do.
do.
Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 32.
Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 33.
.do.
.do.

.do.

.do.

178,600 00

Nineteen instalraents, of $500 each,
to be provided for.

9,500 C
O

Nineteen instalments to be provided,
estimated at $500 per year.

5,700 00

Nineteen instalments to be provided,
estimated at.
do
do

26,600 00

Nineteen instalments of $500 each, to
be provided.
Nineteen instalments, to be provided
for.

5,700 00
9,500 00
140,000 00

w

Nineteen instalments to be appropriated, estimated at.

Nineteen instalments required, estimated at.
Nineteen instalments to be appropriated, estimated at.

Pi
•D
O

H
O
60,800 00

a

178,600 00

Nineteen instalments of $500 each, to
be appropriated.

9,500 00

Nineteen instalments of $300 each, to
be provided for.
Nineteen instalments to be provided,
estimated at.
do
do
,

26,600 00

.do.
Pajnphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 50.

do
do
Nineteen instalments to be provided
for in graduated payments.

9,500 00
84,000'00

Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 51.

Nineteen instalments, estimated a t .

P:

5,700 00

do.

5,700 00

5,700 00

o
QQ

• do.

34,200 G
O

OO
OO

05
00

No. 14.—Statement showing the present liabilities ofi the United States to Indian trihes, Sc.—Continued.

to
^'^r£t

;S

=s«

:•-: S e 3 o

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

= §si
Zi ^
O ~

s
.>QJ

BB.%^
rt '.3 c o

1 |?; o) rt
2S
c

= =2-S'g-SS

a^'B'^pttl

Do

Do
Do

,

Do

,

Do.....
Do
Confederated
tribes
and bands of Indians
in middle Oregon.
Do

Do
Do

,

For keeping in repair blacksmiths' Pamphlet copy L a w s ,
shops, one carpenter shop, one
1st sess. 36th Conwagnn and plough m a k e r ' s shop,
gress, page 51,
and furnishing tools therefor.
For t w o farraers, one hlacksmith, one
.do .
tinner, one gunsmith, one carpenter,
two millers, and one wagon and
plough maker, twenty yea^s.
For keeping in repair flouring and saw
mills and supplying the necessary
fixtures, &c.
For keeping in repair hospital and
furnishing the necessary medicines,
&c.
For pay of physician, twenty y e a r s . . ,
F o r keeping in repair the buildings for
employes, twenty years.
For $500 per a n n u m for head chief,
twenty yearsFor $100,000 for beneficial objects,
under the direction o f t h e President,
graduated payments, extending over
a period of twenty years.
For farnier, blacksmith, and wagon
and plough maker, fifteen years.
For physician, sawyer, railler, superintendent of farming, and school
teacher, fifteen years.
For salary o f t h e head chief of the confederated bands, t w e n t y years.

x '^ ^

rt *^ b c * - = :
bfi w c C* ' d T




rt

^

C -^

*^^rt^5.-3-Cff..

QJ

-

I 3"a^ ' \ ^ ff
u . ^ rt J5^ ^ a
= ^ 3 CJ * i G

.^ ^ 5 S c ^
-S ff ff - r QJ QJ
o rt ^ CJ ff,
I <

Nineteen instalments, estimated a t .

$5,700 G
O

Nineteen instalments to be provided
for, estimated at.

td

o

140,600 00

H
O

w
9,500 00
Nineteen instalments w a n t e d , estiraated at.
do.

26,600 00

do.

5,700 00

.do

do.

9,500 00

Nineteen instalments to be provided
for.

92,000 00

Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 3bth Congress, page 39.

Fourteen instalments to be provided
for.

49,000 00

Nineteen instalments of $500 to be
provided for.

o
td

Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 38.

.do.

Cd

5,700 00

.do

do .

Q J

CQJ

ff c rt ;z:

Flat Heads, and other
confederated tribes.

CJ G . ^ O

^

Q^ zn-Z. B

Names of tribes.

-Ipoj
5

S-S 1-5

78,400 00
9,500 00

QQ

Molel Indians

Do......

Do
Do

...,

Do

,

Qui-nai-elt and Quil
let-ute Iridians.
Do.....

Do
Do
S'Klallams
Do....
Do

;....

For keeping in repair saw and flouring mills and furnishing suitable
persons to attend the same, ten
years.
For iron and steel and other materials
for the sraith shop, and the shop
provided for in treaty of November
29, 1854, and for pay for services of
necessary mechanics, five years.
For pay of teachers to manual labor
school, and for subsistence of pupils,
necessary supplies, &c.
For carpenter and joiner to aid in
erecting buildings, making furniture,
&c.
For pay of an additional farmer, five
years.
For $25,000 to be expended for beneficial objects, under direction o f t h e
President.
For the support of an agricultural and
industrial school and for the employraent of suitable instructors,
twenty years.
For the supportof a smilh and carpenter's shop, and tools, tvventy years.
For the employment of blacksmith,
carpenter, farmer, and physician,
twenty years.
For $60,000, under the direction of
the President.
For support of an
industrial school
twenty years.
For eraployraent of
penter, farmer,
twenty years.

agricultural and
and for teachers,
blacksmith, carand
physician,

Pamphlet copy L a w s
I'st sess. 36th Congress, page 55.

Estimated a t .

15,000 00

do

Four instalraents of $1,800 e a c h .

do

Amount necessary, during the pleasure
o f t h e President.

do

Nine instalments of $2,000 each

do

Four instalments of $800 each

7,200 00

,

$3,000 00
18,000 00
3,200 00

Nineteen instalments, in graduated
payments, to be provided for,
amounting to.
Nineteen instalments to be provided,
estimated at.

22,500 00

td

47,500 00

O
Pi
H

Nineteen instalments of $500 each
required.
Nineteen instalments, estiraated a t . . . .

Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36ih Congress, page 46.
Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 47.

9,500 00

O
87,400 00

td
Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 8.
Paraphlet copy L a w s
1st sess. 36th Congress, page 9.
do

Nineteen instalments, graduated payments.

54,000 00

Nineteen instalments, estimated a t .

47,500 00

do

,




td
QQ

12,659,892 4 0 | $333,154 39
O F F I C E OF I N D I A N AFFAIRS", December 1,

o

87,400 00

$7,263 087 86

1860.

OO
OO

384

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 15.
Stocks held hy the Secretary ofi the Treasury in trust for the Ghickasgiw
national fund.
Remarks.

Amount.

Description of stock.
Six per cent, bonds of State of Arkansas, due
1868.
Six per cent, bonds of State of Indiana, due
1857..
Six per cent, bonds of State of Indiana, due
. 1856.
Six per ceht. bonds of State of Illinois, due
1860.
Six per cent, stock of State of Maryland, due
1870.
Six per cent, stock'of State of Maryland, due
1890.
Six per cent, bonds of Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad Co., due 1881.
Six per cent, bonds of Richmond and Danville
Railroad Co., due 1876.
Six per cent, stock of State of Tennessee, due
1890.
Five and one-quarter per cent, bonds of State
• of Tennessee, due 1861.
United States'six per cent, loan of 1842, due
186-3.
United States six per cent, loan of 1847, due
1867.
United States six per cent, loan of 1848, due
1868.
'

$90,000 00
141,000 00
61,000 00

,

17,000- 00
6,140 57

No interest paidby Arkan• sas since Jan. 1, 1842.
Interest only paid by three
per cent. fund to 1851.
Interest regularly paid.
Interest paid by applying
three pei cent. fund.
Interest.regularly paid,

8,350 17

Do.

512,000 00

Do.

100,000 00 •

Do.

104,000 00

Do.

66,666 66

Do.

104,039 77

Do.

135,250 00

Do.

37,491 80

Do.

1,382,947 97

SMITHSONIAN FUND.

Statement of stocks now held by the Secretary ofi the Treasury which loere
purchased fior the Smithsonian fiund, and held as security fior moneys
paid to the Smithsonian Institution; showing also the amount ofi interest due on said stocks up to November 30, 1860^ together ivith the
amount in the treasury at the credit ofi the fiund.
Description of stock.

State of Arkansas
State of Illinois
Stateof Ohio
United S t a t e s - . . . . . . . .

Amount.

$538,000
56,000
18,000
81,461

Interest due up In the treasury Aggregate on all
to November at the credit
accounts.
' of the Smith30, 1860.
sonian fund.
00
00
00
64

$478,490
1,400
450
2,036

482,376 82

693,461 64
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 30,




28
00
00
54

1860.

...
$226,035 53

$1,401,873 99

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES;

385

No. 16.
Balances ofi appropriations ofi trust or special fiunds on the hooks ofi the
treasury fior the fiiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
Smithsonian Institution
j
.......
$155,429 87
Claims on Spain, (old)
•
2,427 31
Claims on France, (old)
11,731 02
Awards under first article of treaty of Ghent
4,112 89
Awards under the convention with Denmark
2,453 53
Do
do
the Two Sicilies
166 67
Do
do
the Queen of Spain
^
Do
do
the King of the French
I
4,945 94
Do
do
„
. . Peru
2,038 79
Do
do
the Mexican republic
2,250 47
Do
do
Brazil
......"
15,672 95
Unclaimed merchandise
81,364 3,5
Carrying into effect a treaty with the Chickasaws, of October 20, 1832, per
actof April 30, 1 8 3 6 . . . . .
130,959 98
Chickasaw orphans, under article 8 of treaty of July 1, 1834
2,702 14
Incompetent Indians, under article 4 of Chickasaw treaty..
4, 053 66
Cherokee schools
4,529 85
Kansas schools
20,856 59
Choctaw education
2,657 75
Navy hospital fund
• 113,031 57
Navy pension fund
9, 679 47
Privateer pension fund
t*
- 859 93
Prize fund—a fund arising from captures paid into the treasury under act of
March 3, 1849, biit which is payable to captors.
25,822 77
Chippewas of Swan Creek ..."
1,193 76
Cherokee treaty of 1835-36
220 08
Chippewas and Ottawas
8, 663 26
Chippewas, Ottawas, and Pottawatomies, (mills)
24,429 35
Choctaw orphan reservation
_
Choctaws, under convention with Chickasaws
'-.
14,120 86
Creek orphans...
«
28,163 37
Delawares
C
^
9,487 36
Menomonees
20,445 14
Ottawas of Blanchard's Fork
..-..
—
9 865 90
Osages, (education)
r...
47 13
Ottawas of Roche de Bceuf
46 96
Senecas of New York
-.
Shawnees.-..
1,459 07
.468 36
Stockbridges and Munsees
..^
^
716 U% 00
F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 28, 1860.

25 .




386

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 17.
Gold and> silver coinage at the mint ofi the United States in the several
years firom its estahlishment, in 1^92, and including the coinage ofi
the branch mints and the assay ofiice, [New York,) from their organization to June 30, 1860. ,
.
Years.

1793 to 17951796...
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
....
1818
1819
1820--.;.-..
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826.
1827
1828
1829.
1830..
1831
1832
1833.
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842..-.
1843
---.
1844
1845...-..-.




Gold.

$71,485 00
102,727 50
103,422 50
205,610 00
213,285 00
317,760 00
422,570 00
423,310 00
258,377 60
268,642 50
170,367 60
324,505 00
437,495 00
284,665 00
169,375 00
501,436 00
497,905^00
290,436 00
477,140 00
77,270 00
3,176 00

242,940 00
268,615 00
1,319,030 00
189,325 00
88,980 00
72,425 00
93,200.00
156,386 00
92,245 00
131,566 00
140,145 00
295,717 50
643,106 00
714,270 00
798,435 00
978,650 00
3,954,270 00
2,186,175.00
4,135,700 00
1,148,305 00
1,809,595 00
1,376,760 00
1,690,802 00
1,102,097 60
1,833,170 50
8,302,787 60
5,428,230 00
3,756,447 60

Silver.

$370,683
79,077
12,691
• 330,291
423,515
224,296
74,758
58,343
87,118
100,340
149,388
471,319
"597,448
684,300
707,376
638,773
608,340
814,029
620,951
661,687
17,308
28,575
607,783
1,070,454
1,140,000
601,680
825.762
805,806
895,650
1,752,477
1,564,583
2,002,090
2,869,200
1,575,600
1,994,578
2,495,400
3,175,600
2,679,000
2,769,000
3.415.002
3.443.003
3,606,100
2,096,010
2,315,250
2,098,636
1,712,178
1,115,876
2,325,750
3,722,250
2,235,650
1,873,200

Aggregate.

80
60
45
00
00
00
00
00
00
60
50
00
75
00
00
60
00
60
60
60
00
76
50
50
00
70
45
60
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$444, 168
181, 806
116, 013
635, 901
636, 800
642, 056
497, 328
481, 653
345, 495
358, 983
319, 756
795, 824
1,034, 943
968, 966
876, 761
1,140, 208
1,106, 245
1,104, 464
1,098, 091
638, 957
20, 483
28, 575
607, 783
1,313, 394
1,398, 615
1,820, 710
1,016, 087
894, 786
967, 976
1,845, 677
1,720, 968
2,094, 336
3,000, 766
1,715, 746
2,290, 295
3,138, 605
3,889, 870
3,377, 436
3,737, 550
7,369, 272
6,629, 178
7,741, 800
3,244, 315
4,124, 845
3,474, 396
3,402, 980
2,217, 972
4,158, 920
12,025, 037
7,663, 780
6,629, 647

80
00
95
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
75
00
00
50
00
50
50
50
00
75
50
60
00
70
46
60
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
60
6060
00
60

.387

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 17—Gontinued.
•

Years.
1846
-1847
1848
--. '
1849
1850
1851
1852
1863
... 1854.
1856, (to September 30)
1856, (to September 30)
1857, (to September 30)
1858,(co September 30)
1859, (to June 30)
1860, (to June 30)
.

Total--..




•

....

Silver.

Gold.

$4,034,177
20,221,385
3,775,512
9,007,761
31,981,738
62,614,492
56,846,187
65,213,906
52,094,595
41,166,657
68,936,893
48,437,964
61,841,433
19,777,418
23,447.283

50
00
50
50
60
50
60
94
47
93
41
31
91
70
36

. - . . . 687,946,539 02

$2,558,580
2,374,450
2,040,050
2,114,950
1,866,100
774,397
999.410
9,077,571
8,619,270
2,893,745
5,347,070
3,375,608
9,028,531
4,699,223
3,250,636

Aggregate. "
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
49
01
44
95
26

125,253,475 05

$6,592,757
22,595,835
5,815,562
11,122,711
33,847,838
63,388,889
67,845,597
64,291,477
60,713,865
44,060,302
64,283,963
61,813,572
60,869,965
24,476, 642
26,697,919

50
00
50
60
50
50
50
94
47
93
90
32
35
65
61

713,200,014 07

388

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 18.
Statement exhihiting the amount of coin and hullion imported and
exported annually from 1821 to 1860, inclusive, and also the amount
of importation over exportation, and exportation over importation
during the same years.
Coin and bullion.
Year endingImported.

September 30

1821
1822
1823
1824
1826
1826
1827
1828
1829
18.30
1831
1832
1833
1834
1836
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
. 1842
9 months to June 30,1843
Year ending June 30,1844
1846
1846
1847
1848
1849
1860
1851
1862
1863
1854
1866
' 1856
1867
1868
1869
1860

Total.

Exported.

$8,064,890
3,369,846
6,097,896
8,379,836
6,160,765
6,880,966
8,151,130
7,489,741
7,403,612
8,165,964
7,305,946
6,907,504
7,070,368
17,911,632
13,131,447
13,400,881
10,616,414
17,747,116
6,696,176
8,882,813
4,988,633
4,087,016
22,390,659
6,830,429
4,070,242
3,777,732
24,121,289
6,360,224
6,651,240
4,628,792
5,463,592
6,605,044
4,201,382
6,958,184
3,659,812
4,207,632
12,461,799
19,274,496
6,369,703
8,550,136

$10,477,969
10,810,180
6,372,987
7,014,652
8,787,669
4,704,633
8,014,880
8,243,476
4,924,020
2,178,773
9,014,931
5,656,340
2,611,701
2,076,758
6,477,775
4,324,336
5,976,249
3,508,046
8,776,.743
8,417,014
10,034,332
4,813,539
1,620,791
6,464,214
8,606,496
3,905,268
1,907,024
16,841,616
6,404,648
7,522,994
29,472,752
42,674,136
27,486,876
41,436,456
56,247,343
45,746,485
69,136,922
62,633,147
63,887,411
66,546,239

340,161,876

688,646,608

Excess of im- Excess of ex-,
portation over portation over
importation.
exportation.
$2,413,079
7,440,334
1,275,091

$1,365,283
2,636,894

2,176,433
136,260
763,735

2,479,592
5,977,191
1,708,986

25ii^l64
4,468,667
15,834,874
6,653,662
9,076,645
4,640,166
14,239,070
3,181,567

465,799
6,045,699
726,623
20,869,768
376,215
4,636,253
127,536
22,214,265
9,481,392
"'1^246^692
2,894,202
24,019,160
37,169,091
23,286,493
34,478,272
62,587,631
41,637,853
66,676,123
33,368,661
67,617,708
67,996,104
112,361,546

460,846,277

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 28, 1860.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

389

No. 19.
Statement exhihiting tJie gross value ofi exports, and imports from the
heginning of the government to the 30th ofi June, 1860.
Exports;
Years eiiding—

Imports—total.
Domestic produce.

September

•

$19,666,000
18,500,000
19,000,000
24,000, 000
26,500,000
39,500,000
40,764,097
29,850,206
28,627,097
33,142,522
31,840,903
47,473,204
36,708,189
42,205,961
' 41,467,477
42,387,002
41,253,727
48,699,592
9, 433, 546
31,405,702
42,366,676
45,294,043
30,032,109
25,008,132
6,782,272
45,974,403
64,781,896
68,313,500
73,854,437
50,976,838
51,683,640
43,671,894
49,874,079
47,155,408
50,649,500
66,944,745
53,055,710
68,92]>91
50,669,669
55,700,193
69,462,029
61.277,057
;€3,1-37,470
70,317,6:98
81,024,162
101,189,082
106,!916,68O
95,564,414
96,033,821
1839 1 103,533,891 J

SO 1790
1791
1792
. 1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
, 1819 '
1820 •
1821
1822 •
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
3830
1831
- 1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838




Foreign merchandise.

Total.

$639,156 . $20,205,156
$23,000,000
512,041
19,012,041
29,200,000
1,753,098
20,753,098
31,500,000
2,109,572
26,109,572
31,100,000
6,626,233
33,026,233
34,600,000
8,489,472
47,989,^72
69,756,268
26,300,000
67,064,097
81,436,164
27,000,000 1 56,850,206
75,379,406
33,000,000
61,527,097
68,551,700
45,523,000
78,665,522
79,069,148
39,130,877
70,971,780
91,252,768
46,642,721
94,115,925.
111,363,511
35,774,971
72,483,160
76,333,333
13,594,072
65,800,033
e4:,6u,em
36,231,597
77,699,074
85,000,000
53,179,019
95,566,021
120,600,000
60,283,236
101,5.36,963
129,410,000
69,643,558
108,343,160
138,500,000
12,997,414
22,430,960
56,990,000
20,797,531
62,203,233
69,400,000
24,391,296
66,657,970
85,400,000
16,022,790
61,316,833
53,400,000
8,495,127
38,527,236
77,030,000
2, 847, 8.65
27,856,997
22,005,000
146,169
6,927,441
12,965,000
6,583,350
.52,557,753
113,041,274
17, 138, 156
81,920,452
147,103,000
19,368,060
87,671,560
99,250,000
19,426,696
93,281,133 . 121,750,000
19,165,683
70,142, .521
87,126,000
18,008,029 '
69,691,669
74,450,000
21,302,488 •
64,974,382^
62,585,724
22,28^,202 '
72,160,281
83,241,541
27,543,622
74,699,030 ;
77,579,267
26,337,157 i
75,986,657
80,549,007
32,590,643 ;
99,535,388
96,340,075
24,530,612 ;
77,595,322
84,974,477
23,403,136 :
82,324,727
79,484,063
21,595,017 ;
72,264,686
88,509,824
16,668,478 ;
22,358,671
74,492,627
14,387, 479 I
73,849,508
70,876,920
20,033,526 j
81,310,583
103,191, 124
24,039,473
87,176,943
101,029,266
19,.822, 735
90,140,443
108,118,311
23,312,811
104,336,973
126,521,332
20,504,495
121,693,577
i49,896,-742
21,746,360
128,665,040
189,980,035
21,854,962
117,419,376
140,989,217
12,462,795
108,486,616
113,717,404
17,494,525 1 121,023,416 1 162,092,132

390

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 19.—STATEMENT—Continued.
Exports.
Years endin cr
3

September 30 . . .1840
1841
1842
November 9 to
June 3 0 . . . „ . .1843
1844
1846
'
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1866
1857
1858
1859
1860
Total.-

Imports—total.
Domestic produce.

Foreign merchandise.

Total.

$113,895,634
106,382,722
92,969,996

$18,190,312
16,469,081
11,721,638

$132,086,936
121,-851,803
104,691,534

$107,141,619
127,946,177
100,162,087

6,552,697
11,484,867
15,346,830
11,346,623
8,011,158
21,128,010
13,088,865
14,951,808
21,698,293
17,289,382
17,558,460
24,850,194
28,448,293
16,.878,578
23,975,617
30,886,142
20,895,077
26,933,022

84,346,480
111,200,046
114,646,606
113,488,616
168,648,622
164,032,131
146,766,820
161,898,720
218,388,011
209,668,366
230,976,157
278,241,064
275,156,846
326,964,908
362,960,682
324,644,421
356,789,462
400,122,296

64,753,799
108,436,036
117,254,564
121,691,797
146,646,638
164,998,928
147,851^439
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,946,442
167,978,647
304,662,381
261,468,520
314,639,942
360,890,141
282,613,160
338,765,130
362,163,941

6,472,836,953 1,468,720,660 7,941,556,613

8,641,976,758

77,793,783
99,715,179
09,299,776
102,141.893
150,637,464
132,904,121
132,666,956
136.946,912
196,689,718
192,368,984
213,417,697
253,390,870
246,708,653
310,586,330
338,985,065
293,768,279
335,894,386
373,189,274'

,

!
NOTE —-Prior to 1821 the treasury reports did not give the value of imports. To that
period their value, and also thevalue of domestic and foreign exports, have been estimated
from sources believed tobe authentic. From 1821 to 1859, inclusive, their value has been
taken from official documents.
F. BIGGER, Register.
TBEASURY DEPARTMENT, Regisie/r's Office, Nmemher 27, 1860.




391

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 20.
Statement exhihiting the amount ofi the tonnage qf the United States,
annually, from 1789 to 1860, inclusive; also the registered amd enrolled and licensed tonnage employed in steam navigation in each year.

Years ending-

Registered Enrolled and Enrolled and Total tonRegistered
sail tonnage. steam ton- licensed sail {licensed steam]
nage.
nage.
tonnage.
tonnage.
Tons.

December 31,1789.
1790.
1791179217931794.
1795.
1796.
1797.
1798>
1799.
1800.
1801.
1802.
1803.
1804.
1805'18061807.
180818091810;.
1811L
I8I2I
I8I3I
18141815.
1816.
18171819.
1819.
1820.
1821.
1822.
1823.
18241826.
1826.
1827182818291830.
1831.
1832.
1833.
1834-




123, 893
346, 254
362, 110
411, 438
367, 734
438 863
629, 471
676, 733
597 777
603 376
662 197
559 921
632, 907
660, 380
597 157
672 630
749 341
808 265
848 307
769, 054
910 059
984, 269
768 862
760 624
674, 853
674 633
854 295
800 760
800 725
606 089
612, 930
619 048
619 896
628 160
639 921
669 973
700 788
737 978°
747 170
812, 619 !
650 143
676 056
619 575
686 809
749 482
867 098 1

i

1
j

1

I
1

1

1,419
877
181
646
340 1

77,669.
132 123
139 036
153 019
153 030
189 755
218 494
255 166
279 136
294 952
277 212
302 671
314 670
331 724
352 016
369 874
391 027
400 461
420 241
473 542
440 222
440 516
463 660
509 373
491 776
484 577
613 833
671 459
690 187
619 096
647 821
. 661 119
679 062
696 649
671 766
697 580
699 263
762 154
833 240
889 355
666 618
652 248
613 827
661 827
754 819
778 996

1

1
1

1

24,879
21,610
23,061
34,059
40,198
39,418
64,037
63,053
33,568
90,633
101,306
122,474

201,562
274,377
602,146
664,457
620,764
- 628,618
747,965
831,899
876,913
898,328
939,409
972,492
94t,677
892,104
949,172
1,042,404
1,140,368
1,208,716
1,268,548
1,242,596
1,350,281
1,424,784
1,232,602
1,269,997
1,166,629
1,169,210
1,368., 128
1,372,219
1,399,912
1,226,186
1,260,751
1,280,167
1,298,958
1,324,699
1,336,666
1,389,163
1,423,112
1,634,191
1,620,608
1,741,392
1,260,798
1,191,776
1,267,847
1,439,450
1,606,151
1,758,907

392

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 20.—STATEMENT—Continued.
Registered
Registered Enrolled and Enrolled and Total tonsail tonnage. steam ton- licensed sail licensed steam
nage.
nage.
tonnage.
tonnage.

'
Years ending—
*•

Tons.
886,481
September 30,1835..
1836..
897,321
1837..
809,343
1838.819,801
829,096
1839..
1840.896,610
1841-.
946,057
1842..
970,658
June
30,1843-. 1,003,932
•1844.. 1,061,856
1846-- . 1,088,680
1846.. 1,123,999
1.847-- 1,235,682
1848.. 1,344,819
1849-- 1,418,072
1850.-. 1,540,769
1851.- 1,663,917
1862-. 1,819,744
1853.. 2,013,164
1S54-. 2,238,783'
. 1855.. 2,440,091
1856.- 2,401,687
1857-. 2,377,094
1858-- 2,499.742
1859-. 2,414,654
18602,448,941

340
816,645
464
839,226
1,104
932,576
2,791
982,416
6,149
1,062,445
4,155
1,082,815
746
1,010,599
892,072
4,701
5,373
917,804
6,909
946,060.
6,492
1,002,303
6,287
1,090,192
6,631
1,198,623
16,068
1,381,332
. 20,870 .,1,453,469
. 44,429
1,468,738
62,390 . 1,524,915
79,704
1,675,456
90,620
1,789,238
95,036
1,887,612
2,021,625
115,045
89,716
1,796,888
86,873
1,857,964
78,027
2,650,067
92,7l8
1,961,631
97,296
2,036,990

122,474
145,102
163,661
190,632
199,789
198,184
174,342
224,960
231,494
265,270
• 319,527
3.41, 606
.399,210
411,823
441,625
481,005
521,217
563,536
614,098
581,571
665,240
683,362
618,911
651,363
676,005
770,641

1,824,940
1,822,103
1,896,684
1,995,640
2,096,479
2,180,764
2,130,744
2,092,391
2,158,603
2,280,095
2,417,002
2,562,084
2,839,046
3,154,042
3,334,016
3,636,464
3,772,439
4,138,440 0
4,407,010
4,802,902
6,212,001
4,871,652
'4,940,842
5,049,808'
5,145,038
5,353,868

F. BIGQEE, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 27, 1860,




No. 21.
Statement showing the revenue collected firom the beginning of the government t o J u n e 30, 1860, under the several heads ofi customs,
public lands, and miscellaneous sources, inchiding loans and treasury notes; also the expenditui-es during the same period, and
the particular tariff, and the price ofi lands, under which the revenue firom those sources was collected.
From customs.'

Years.

From Mar. 4,
1789, to Dec.
31, 1791.
1792
1793]
1794
1795]
1796!
1797

Date of tariff.

$4,399,473 09 July 4, 1789,
general; Aug {
10, 1790, general ; Mar. 3,
1791, general.
3,443,070 86 May 2, general-.
4,255,306 56
4,801,066 28 I June 6, special ;
June 7, gen'l.
6,688,461 26 I Jan. 29, general.
6,667,987 94

7,106.061
6,610,449
9,080,932
10,750,778
12,438,235
10,479,417
11,098,665

1805
1806

12,936,487
14,667,698




Price per
acre.

|$1, by act
of May 20,
1785.

From miscella- rhat portion of
neous sources, miscellaneous
includ'g loans arising from
and treasury loans & treasury notes.
notes.

Total receipts.

$6,810,562 66 $5,791,112 661

$10,210,025 75

Total expenditures.

Pi
$7,207,539 02

May 13, special.

Mar. 26, special;
Mar. 27, special.

6,297,695 92
1,465,317 72]
6,240,036 37

5,070,806 46
1,067,701 14]
4,609,196 78

8,740,766 77
5,720,624 28]
10,041,101 65|

9,141,669 67
7,629,576 66
9,302,124 74

3,831,341 53|
2,167,605 66

3,305,268 20|
362,800 001

9,419,802 79
8,740,329 65|

10,435,069 65
8,367,776 84

83,540 60

1,126,726 16

70,135 41

8,758,916 40,

8,626,012 78

1,091,046
6,011,010
3,369,807
2,026,960
2,374,527
419,004
249,747

$4,836 13 $2, by aet
OfMay 18,
1796.

443
167,726
188,628
166,675
487,626

75]
06
021
69
79

540,193 80
766,245 73

o
pi
H

O

11,963 11

7,549,649 65 Mar. 3, general .
July 8, special.

1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1808
1804

From public
lands.

w

o
Pi

308,574 27
03
63 5,074,646 53
66] 1,602,435 04
96
10,125 00
65]
6.597 36
33|
901
9,532 64

212,827 30
175,884 88i

128,814 94]
48,897 71

. 8,209,070
12,621,459
12,451,184
12,946,466
16,001,391
11,064,097
11,836,840

07
84
141
95
31
63
02

13,689,608 14|
16,608,828 78|

8,613,517
11,077,043
11,989,739
12 273,376
13,276,084
11,258,983
12,624,646

Ul

68
50
92
94
67
67
36

$13,727,124 41
15,070,093 97

03
CD
OS

No. 21.—STATEMENT—Oontinued
Years.

From customs.

1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816

$16,845,621
16,363,550
7,296,020
8,583,309
13,313,222
8,958,777
13,224,623
5,998,772
7,282,942
.36,306,874

1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828

26,283,348
17,176,385
20,283,608
15,005,612
.13,004,447
17,689,761
19,088,433
17,878,326
20,098,713
23,341,331
19,712,283
23,205,523

1829
1830

22,681,965
21,922,391

1831

24,224,441 77




Date of tariff.

July 1, special . .
July 29, special .

Feb. 6, special ;
April 27, gen'l.
April 20, special.
Mar. 3, special..

May 22, general.

May 19, general;
May 24, special.
May 20, special;
May 29, special.

03

Total expenditures.

From miscella- That portion of
neous, sources,
miscellaneous
includ'g loans arising from
and
treasury loaris & treasnotes.
ury notes.

Total receipts.

27
06
33
82
63
78
14
09
28
03

334 38
51 054 45
35 ,200 21
2,8.64 348 40
78 ,377 88
12,969 ,827 45
26,464,666 56
27,424,793 78
42,390 ,336 10
19,146 561 91

$16,398, 019 26
17,062, 544 09
7,773, 473 12
12,144, 206 63
14,431, 838 14
22,639, 032 76
40,524, 844 95
34,659, 536 96
60,961, 237 60
67,171, 421 82

1,991, 226 06
2,606, 564.77
3,274, 422 78
1,636,871 61
1,212, 966 46
1,803, 681 54
916, 523 10
984, 418 15
1,216,090 56
1,393, 785 09
1,495, 845 26
1,018,308 75

6,559, 017 78
1,810, 986 89
1.047, 633 83
4,240, 009 92
5,356, 290 11
839, 084 46
535, 709 72
5,618, 468 93
6,526, 054 01
625, 317 35
1,758, 235 41
539, 796 84

1,517,175-13
2,329,356 14

628,486 34
592,368 98

24,827,627 38
24,844,116 51

26,044,358 40
24,585,281 65

3,210,815 48

1,091,563 67

28,526,820 82

30,038,446 12

From public
lands.

$466, 163
647, 939
442, 252
696, 648
1,040, 237
-710, 427
835, 656
1,135, 971
1,287, 959
1,717, 986

Price per
acre.

$1,882 16
2,759,992
8,309
12,837,900
26; 184,435
23,377,911
35,264,320
9,494,436

26
05
00
00
79
78
16

734,642 59
8,765 62
2,291 00
3,040,824 13
6,000,324 GO

6,000,000 00
6,000,000 00

33,833, 592
21,593, 936
24,605, 666
20,881, 493
19,573, 703
20,232,427
20,540^ 666
24,381, 212
26,840, 868
25,260, 434
22,966, 363
24,763, 629

33
66
37
6S
72
94
26
79
02
21
96
2S

$11,292, 292 99
16,764, 584 20
13, 867',
226 30
13,319, 986 74
13,601, 808 91
22,279, 121 15
39,190, 520 36
38,028, 230 32
39,582, 493 35
48,244, 495<^61
40,877, 646
36,104, 876
' 24,004, 199
21,763, 024
19,090, 672
17,676, 592
15,314, 171
31,898, 538
23,586, 804
24,103, 398
22,656, 764
25,459, 479

04
40
73
85
69
63
00
47
72
46
04
52

o
pi

O

W
1—»

O

w
OQ

18321
1833
1834
ToDec 31,1835
18361
1837
1838]
18391
1840
1841
1842
ToJune 30,1843
1843--'44
1844-'45]
1845-'46|
1846-'47
1847-'48
1848-'49
1849-'50l
1850-'61
1851-'52]
1852-'53
1853-'54]
1854-'55l
1855-'56
1856-'57
1857-'58
1868-'59
1859-'60
Total ,

28,466,237 24 July 13, special; 2,623,381 03
July 14, gen'l.
29,032,608 91 Mar. 2, sp'l; Mar. 3,967,682 65
2, compromise.
16,214,957
4,867,600
19,391,310
14,757,600
23,409,940
24,877,179
11,169,290
6,776,236
16,158.800
3,081,939
23,137,924
7,076,447
13,499,502
3,292,285
14,487,216
1,365,627
Sept. 11, gen'l . .
18,187,908
1,335,797
Aug. 30, g e n ' l - .
7,046,843
897,818
26,183,570
2,069,939
27,528,112
2,077,022
26,712,667
2,694,452
23,747,864
2,498,355
]July 30,'46, gen'l
31,767,070
3,328,642
Mar. 29,'48, sp'l.
23*, 346, 738 Aug. 12,'48, sp'l
1,688,959
Jan. 26,'49, sp'l.
39,668,686
1, 869,894 25
49,017,567
2, 352,305 30
47,339,326
2, 043,239 68
58,931,866
1, 667,084 991
64,224,190
8, 470,798-39
63,025,794
11, 497,049 07
64,022,863
8, 917,644 93
63,875,906
3, 829,486 641
3, 613,715 87
41,789,620
Mar. 3,'67,gen'l
1, 756,687 30]
49,665,824
1, 778,657 71
53,187,511
1,635,670,454 28

174,947,802 66'

776,942 891

31,866,661 16|

34,366,698 06

948,234 79{

33,948,426 25

24,257,298 49
24,601, 982
17,573, 141
30,868, 164
37,265, 037
39,455, 438
37,614, 936
28,226, 533
31,797, 530
32,936. 876
12,118, 106
33,642, 010
30,490, 408
27,632, 282
60,520, 861
60,655, 143
56,386, 422

44
66
04
15
35
15
81
03
53
16
85
71
90
74
19
74

44, 604,718
48,476, 104
46,712, 608
64,677, 061
75,473, 119
66,164, 776
72,726. 341
71,274, 687
82,062, 186
83,678, 642
77,055, 125

26
31
83
74
08
96
67
37
74
92
65

719, 377 71
1,281, 175 76]
2,639, 675 69
9,938, 326 93] 2,992 989
19,778, 642 77 12,716 820
6,125, 653 66 3,867 ,276
8,240, 405 84 5,689 ,547
14,666, 633 49 13,659 ,317
15,250, 038 61 14,808 ,736
12,837, 748 43 12,561 ,409
2,956, 044 99
1,877 ,847
336, 718 90
292, 847 39
29,091, 948 66 28,900,765
21,906, 765 69 21,293,780
29,761, 194 61 29,075,816

36
00
48

21,791, 935 55
35,430, 087 10|
50,826, 796 08
27,883, 853-84
89,019, 382 60
33,881, 242 89
25,032, 193 69]
30,519, 477 65
34,773, 744 89
20,782, 410 45
31,198, 555 73
29,941, 853 90
29,699, 967 74
55,338, 168 52
56:992, 479 21
59,796, 892 98

6,120, 808 21 4,056,500
1,392, 831 03
207,664
46,300
510, 549 40|
,16,372
901, 152 30
1,107, 302 74
1,950
828, 531 40
800
1,116, 391 81
200
1,263, 820 88
3,900
25,069, 329 13| 23,717,300
30,451, 453 961 28,287,600
21,875, 338 25 20,776,800

00
92
00|
50
00
00]
00
00]
00]
00
00

47,649, 388' 88
52,762, 704 25
49,893, 115 60;
61,600, 102 8ll
73,802, 291 40
65,351, 374 68
74,056, 899 24{
68,969, 212 57
70,372, 666 9 1
6
81,773, 966 64
76,841, 407 83

15
86
21
51
38
64
19
95




*
v
o
Pi

o
fel

w
fe;

o
CQ

«476,034,293 44 380,621,170 72 2,184,093,266 26 2,161,098,327 14

^' The aggregate receipts show a less sum than the total of customs, lands, and miscellaneous, which is accounted for by deductions at sundry times
as per account of the Treasurer for unavailable funds.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Noveinber 28, 1860.

Pi

F. BIGGER, Register.

OO
CD

05
CD

No. 22.
Statement exhibiting the value ofi manufactured articles of domestic produce exported to fioreign countries firom the 30th day ofi June,
1846, to June 30, 1860.
Articles.

1847.

1848.

1849.

1850.

1851.

1852.

1853.

^161,527 $134,577 $121,720 $118,0.55 $122,835
Wax
$91,4991 $113,602 $87,140
Refined sugar
253,900
124,824
129,001
375,780
285,056
219,588 .149,921
370,488
Chocolate
2,207
1,653
1 941
2,260
3,267
10,230
3,255
12,257
90,957
Spirits from grain
67,129
67,781
48,314
48,737
36,084
141,173
282,919
Spirits from molasses
288,452
293,6091 269,467
268,290
289,622
323,941
329,381
809,965
Spirits from other materials . . . .
Molasses .
5,563
20,959
7,442
14,137
16,830
13,163
17,582
131,048
Vinegar
13,920
14,036
9,526
11,182
16,915 • 12,220
20,443 , 16,945
Beer, ale, porter, and cider
78,071
51,320
68,114
52,251
64,677
57,975
53,503
48,052
Linseed oil and spirits of turpentine
498, uol 331,404' 148,056 229,741 145,410 152,837 362,960 1,084,329
Lard oil
Household furniture
225,700! 297,358
237,342
278,025
439,182
362,8:i0|
763,197
714,556
Coaches and oiher carriages . . .
89^963
75,369'
95,923
95,722
17.2,445
199,421
184,497
244,638
55,493
59,536
Hats
64,967
68,671
80,453
103.7tj8
91,261
176,404
27,435
13,102
Saddlery
37,276
20,893
47,937
30,100
48,229
53,311
Tallow candles and soap, and
other candles
670,223
627,280
606,798
664,963
681,362
609,732
660,054
891,566
568,435
Snuff and tobacco
613,044
6.98,950
648,832 1,143,547 1,316,622 1,671,500 1,551,471
194,095
L e a t h e r , boots and shoes
151,774
243,816
193,598
673,708
458,838
428,708
896,555
99,911
Cordage
41.636
27,051
51,357
103,216
52,054
62,903
194,076
125,263
13i;297
88,397
Gunpowder..
190,352
180,048
154,2.57
121,580
212,700
73,274
82,972
42,333
Salt
75,103
119,729
61,424
89,316
159,026
84,278
30,198
124,981
Lead. ,
12,797
5,540
11,774
32,725
•26,874
Iron^
Pig, bar, and nails
168,817
154,210
149,358
154, €35
308,127
181,998
118,624
215,652
Castings
68,889
60,175
79,318
191,388
220,420
459,775
164,425
83,188
All manufactures of
886,639 1,677,792 1,875,621 1,993,807 2,097,234 3,472,467
929,778 1,022,468
Copper and brass, manufactures
of
64.980
66,203
61,468
91,871
108,205
105,050
92,108
103,039
Medicinal drugs
220,891
210,581
165,793
327,073
334,789
454,789
263,852
351,585
Cotton piece goods—
Printed or colored
353,534! 469,777
290,114
606,631 1,006,561
925,404 1,086,167 1,147,786
3,345.902 4,856,559 3,955,117 3,774,407 .5,571,576 6,139,391 6,926,485 4,130,149
Uncolored...
Twist, yarn, and thread
92,555
170,63.^
108; 132
17,405
49,315
22,594
37,260
34,718
Other manufactures of,
338,375
415,680
327,479
733,648
335,981
625,808
423,085
571,638
H e m p and flax—
Cloth and thread
477
2,924
1,183
1,009
495
5,468
1,647
24,456
Bags, and all rnanufactures of
13,860
6,218
5,305
4,549
8,154
55,261
10,593
6,376
W e a r i n g apparel
47,101
239,733
574,834
234,3881
75,945
250,228
207,632 1.211,894




1856.

1854.

1857.

1858.

1859.

$94,8501
$69,905
$74,005]
377,944,
200,724
526,463
360,444
368;206
2,444
2,304
2,771
1,476
1,932
273, .576
476,722
384,144
500,945 1,248,234
760,889
1,448,280 1,329,151 1,216,635 1,267,691
188,746
249,4.32
101,836
95,484
120,011
75,699
11.5,893
.189,830
154,6.30
108,003
24,336 • 35,156
17,281
26,034
30,788
78,226
59,532
45,069
43,732
45,086
1,186,732
82,945
803,960
290,525
177,914
64,886

1860.

131,803
301,674
2,593
311,.595
930,644
219,199
35,292
41,368
53,573

795,490 1,137,507 1,340,229 1,943,088
896,238
55,783
60,958
50,793
92,499
161,232
932,499 1,067,197 1,079,114
982,042
879,448
777,921
816,973
655,600
370,259 . 476,394
126,525
211,602
216,704
226,682
254,208
55,280
71,332
58,870
31,249
45,222

934,303 1,137,965 1,203,104
1,111,349 1,200,764 1,242,604
1,500,113 1,829,2071 1,458,553 2,410,224 3,402,491 3,383,428
1,052,406 1,313,311' 1,311,709 1,269,494 1,319,893 1,456,834
246,572
212,840
320,435
315,267
367,182
286,163
467,772
371,603
365,173
398,244
356,051
644,974
129,717
162,650 - 212.710
190,699
156,879
311,495
50,445
48,119
28;575
14,298
58,624
27,512
246,154
257,662
205,931
288,437
397,313
286,980
282,848
128,659
464,415
289,967
306,439
288,316
3,158,596 3,585,712 4,197,687 4,059,528 5,117,346 5,174,040
534,846
690,766
788,114 1,066,294

607,054 1,985,223 1,048,246 1,664,122
798,008 1,115,455
681,278
886,909

2,613,655 1,966,845 1,785,685 2,069,194 2,320,890 3,356,449
2,907,276 4^616,264 3,715,339 1,782,025 1,518,236 1,785,595
336,250|

384,200!

614,153 1,800,285| 4,477,096 5,792,752

2,506
34,002
223,801

802
25,2331
278,8321

1,066
33,687
333,442]

1,326
87,7661
210,695)

1,349
17,529
470,613

1,243
26,571
525,175

o:)

36,783|
32,119i
53,685|
47,261i
34.256|
34,5251
15,6441
18,3l«|
23,096|
10,6^21
65,086
8,5121
4,758!
' £ a r t h e n and stone w a r e
46,349
46,0871
39;799|
32,6.53
32,049
37,684|
31,395
28,833
27,334
23,987
23,345
38,136
16,461
17,026
Combs and buttons
44,638
49,1.53
9,501
6,612
7,3241
8,385
10,856
4,385'
" 8,257
61,377
2,827
2,924
2,160
2,967
Brushes and brooms
12,094'
3,204
1,673
8,79l'
733
2,778
1,08S
1,798
15,979
4,916|
2,295
701
12
615
Billiard tables and a p p a r a t u s . . .
Umbrellas, parasols, and sun6,339|
5,989
8,441
6,183
8,340|
11,658
12,260
4,837|
6,846
8001
4,862
3,395
2,916
2ri50
shades
31.3,379
1,409,107] 1,093,538
643,512
198,827
240,841
Manufactures of India-rubber..
L e a t h e r and morocco, (not sold
13,099
36,045
6,448
18,617
17,018
2,119
5,765
13,309
41,465
9,800
9,427
16,483
19,011
29,856
perpound)
14,829
9,652
16,784
7,220
6,597
29,088
9,488
3,213
21,.524
3,140
7,""
548|
9,948
3,443
Fire-engines and apparatus . . . .
• 36,405|
32,250
47,781
106,498
33,012
67,517
52,747
71,401
39,242
30,4031
68,868
28,031
157,124
17,431
Printing presses and types
106,8,57
52,3971
67,7331
126,128
13.3,517
99,775
127,748
55,700
21,634
.38,508
155,101'
23,7131
129,653
16,997
Musical instruments
207,2181 202.502
142,604i
217,809
187,335
209,774'
277,647
115), 475 153,912
75,1931
319,080|
94.427
278,268
44,751
Books and maps
185,637
122,212
119,535
192,339
229,991
224,767
203,013
155,664
99^696
78,30299,857
86;827
285,798
88,731
Paper and stationery
163,096
83,020|
85,369
121,823
22.3,3201 131,2171 185,068
217,179
109,834
67,597
50,739
55,145
223,809
54,1151
Paints and varnish
204.6791
170,561
194,634]
229,476
214,608
179,900
185,436
135,682
76,007
252,316
101,419
277,948 •
216.4391
71,155
Manufactures of glass
14,279
22,9881
23,420]
5,622
13,590
12,353
13,143
30,750
6,363
24,186|
13;610
27,823
39,2891
39,064
Manufactures of tin ,
Manufactures of p e w t e r and
27,327]
i8,460|
4,818
5,628]
5,233|
14,064
28,782]
16,4781
16,426
22,682
46,081
7,739
13,196
13,694
lead
Manufactures of marble and
138,590
111,403]
47,628
57,240
112,214]
168,546]
88,327
41,449
34,510
176,239
162,376|
20,282
22,466]
11,220
stone
Manufticturesof gold and silver,
15,477
9,051
' 1 1 , 8 7 3 1,311,513
20,332
140,187
35,947
26,386J
6,11
68,639
4,583
4,502
4,368
6,241
and gold leaf
,
665,4801
806,1191
258,682
129,184
831,724
442,383
Quicksilver
28,070
22,043
24,866
28,901' "'58,'570]
26,386
50,471'
66,397
114,73^
121,013
45,283
8,557
11,217
3,126
Artificial flowers and j e w e l r y . .
35,203
50,184
59,441
32,457
23,67.^
15,035|
37,748
27,148
12,2<7
10,370;
5,0991
6,126
5,270
T r u n k s and valises
42,153
57,393
154,045
103,821
64,297
33,3141
13,539!
68,002
32,625
22,045
16,3481
8,671
24,174
17,623
Bricks and lime
160,611
1,435,861 1,198,58! 1,609,328
Oil-cake
1,108,984 1,137,828] 1,408,278] 3,869,071 3,793,341 2,877,659 3,788,700 4,972,084 4,014,4;)2 3,559,613 3,292,722 2,601,7881 2,274,6521 2,397,445
Articles not enumerated

O

w

1-3

o

fel

H
W
Pi
l-H

10,476,345 12,858,758 11,280,075 15,196,451 ]20,136,967 18,£62,931 22,599,930 26,849,411 28,833,299 30,970,992 29,653,267||30,372,18O 33,853,660 39,803,080
Total
Gold and silver coin and bul956,874 2,046,6791 18,069,580 37,437,837 |23,548,535 38,234,566] 53,957,418 ',44,148,279 60,078,352 42,407,246 57,502,305]]56,946,851
62,620 2,700,412
lion

fe5

§

10,538,965 15,559,170 12,235,949 17,243,130 38,206,547 56,300,768 46,148,465 65,083,977 2,790,717 75,119,271 9,731,619 72,779,426 91,355,965 96,749,931
F . BIGGER, Register.
T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T , Regkter^s Qffice, November 27,1860.




03
CO

398

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES,

No. 23.

^

Statement exhibiting tlie value ofi fioreign merchandise imported^ re-exported^ and consumed; annually, firom. 1821 to ISQO, inclusive; and
also the estimated population and rate ofi consumption per capita during
the same period.

Value of foreign merchandise.
Population.

Years e n d i n g Imported.

September 3 0 . . 1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
,
1831
1832
1833
1834.
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
9 months to June
30, 1843
Year to June 30,
1844
-.
1845
1846
1847
1848
- 1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
Total

Re-exported.

$62,585,724 $21,302,488
83,241,541 22,286,202
77,579,267 27,543,622
80,549,007 25,337,157
96,340,075 32,590,643
, 84,974,477 24,539,612
7.9,484,068 23,403,136
88,509,824 21,595,017
" 74,492,527 16,658,478
70,876,920 14,387,479
103,191,124 20,033,526
: 101,029,266 24,039,473
108,118,311 19,822,735
126,521,332 23,312,811
149,895,742 20,504,495
189,980,035 21,746,360
140,989,217 21,854,962
113,717,404 12,452,795
162,092,132 17,494,525
107,141,519 18,190,312
127,946,177 15,469,081
100,162,087 11,721,538
64,753,799
108,435,035
117,254,564
121,691,797
146,545,638
154,998,928
147,857,439
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,945,442
267,978,647
304,562,381
261,468,520 •
314,'639,942
360,890,141
282,613,150
338,708,130
.362,163,941

6,552,697

58,201,102

5
9,960,974 $4 14
10,283,757
6 92
10,606,540
4 71
10,929,323
5 05
11,252,106
5 66
11,574,889
5 22
11,897,672
4 71
12,220,456
5 47
12,243,238
4 61
12,566,020
4 39
13,286,364
6 25
13,706,707
6 61
14,127,050
6 25
14,547,393
7 09
14,967,736
8 64
15,388,079 10 93
15,808,422
7 63
6 23
16,228,766
16,649,108- 8 68
17,069,463
5 21
17,612,507
6 38
18,165,561
4 87
18,698,615

3 11

11,484,867
96,950,168 19,241,670
15,346,830
101,907,734 19,784,725
11,346,623
110,345,174 20,327,780
8,011,168
138,534,480 20,780,835
21,128,010 ^ 133,870,918 21,413,890
13,088,865
134,768,574 21,956,945
14,951,808
163,186,510 23,246,301
21,698,293
194,526,639 24,260,000
17,289,382
195,666,060 24, 600, OflO
17,558,460
250,420,187 25,000,000
24, 850,194
279,712,187 25,750,000
28,448,293 . 233,020,227 ' 26,500,000
16,378,578
298,261,364 • 27,400,000
23,975,617
336,914,624 28.600,000
30,886,142
251,727,008 29,600,000
20,895,077
317,873,053 30,386,000
26,933,022
335,230,919 31,000,000

5 03
5 15
6 42
6 60
6 26
6 13
7 02
8 02
8.00

io 00
10 00
8 79
10 88
11.828 60
10 46
10 80

6,291,348,520 787,110,363 5,501.238,157

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Registers Office, Novemher 28, 1860.



.

is

Consumed and
on hand.
$41,283,236
60,955,3.:I9
50,035,645
65,211,850
63,749,432
60,434,865
56,080,932
66,914,807
67,834,049
56,489,441
83,157,^598
76,989,793
88,295,576
103,208,521
129,391,247
168,233,676
. 119,134,255
101.264,609
144,597,607
88,951,207
112,477,096
88,440,549

fl
O

F. BIGGER, Register.

No. 24.
Statement exhihiting the total value of imports, and imports consumed in the United States, exclusive qf specie, during
each fiscal year from 1821 to 1860, inclusive; showing also the value of fioreign and domestic exports, exclusive ofi
specie, the aggregate exports, including specie, and the tonnage employed during the sarne period.
Years.

Total imports, including specie.

Imports entered for
cousumption, exclusive of specie.

Domestic produce
ex'ported, exclusive, of specie.

Foreign merchan.dise exported, exclusive of specie.

Total exports, including specie.

Tonnage.

»—!

1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
9 months to June 30>. ...1843
Year ending June 3 0 . - ...1844
1845



$62,685,724
83,241,641
77,579,267
80,649,007
96,340,075
84,974,477
79,484,068
88,609,824
74,492,527
70,876,920
103,191,124
101,029,266
108,118,311
126,521,332
149,895,742
189,980,035
140,989,217
113,717,404
162,092,132
107,141,619
127,946,177
100,162,087
64,763,799
108,436,035
117,254,664

$43,696,405
68,367,425
51,308,936
63,846,567
• 66,376,722"
57,652,577
54,901,108
66,975,475
54,741,671
49,.575,009
82,808,110
76,327,688
83,470,067
86,973,147
122,007,974
168,811,392
113,310,571
86,652,598
, 145,870.816
86,250,335
114,776,309
87,996,318
37,294,129
96,390,548
105,599,541

$43,671,894
49,874,079
47,155,408
50,649,500
66,944,745
52,449,855
•57,878,117
49,976,632
55,087,307
58,524,878
59,218,683
61,726,629
69,950,856
-80,623,662
100,450,481
106,570,942
94,280,895
96,660, 880
101,625,533
111,660,561
. 103,636,236
91,798,242
77,686,354
99,531,774
98,456,330

$10,-824,619
11,476,022
21,170,635
18.322,606
23,802,984
20,440; 934
16,431,830
14,044,578
12,347,544
13,145,857
13,077,009
19,794,074
17,577,876
21,636,553
14,756,321
17,767.762
17,162,232
9,417,690
10,626,140
12,088,371
8,181,235
8,078.763
5,139,335
6,214,068
7,584,781

$64,974,382
72,100,281
74,699,030
75,986,657
99,535,388
77,695,322
82,324,827
72,264,686
.^ 72,358,871
73,849,508
81,310,583
- 87,176,943
90,140,433
104,336.973
121,693,577
128,663,040
117,419,376
108,486,616
121,028,416
132,085,946
121,861,803
104,690,634
84,346,480
111,200,046
114,646,606

1,298,958
1,324,799
1,336,566
1,389,163
1,423,112
1,534,191
1,620,608
• 1,741,392
1,260,798
1,191,776
1,267,847
1,439,450
1,606,151
1,758,907
1,824,940
1,882,103
1,896,686
1,994,640
2,096,380
2,180,764
2.130,744
2,092,391
2,168,603
2,280,095
2,417,002

6

pi
H

c
fej

H

a
fe:

a
02

CO
^£0

No. 24—Continued.
Total impoits, including specie.

Years.

1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1864
1865
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
Total

.,

Imports entered for
consumption, excrusive of specie.

$121,691,797
146,545,638
154,998,928
147,857,439
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,946,442
267,978,647
304,562,381
261,468,520
314,639,942
360,890,141
282,613,150
338,768,130
362,163,941

$110,048,869
116,257,595
140,651,902
133,665,168
164,032,033
200,476,219
195,072,695
251,071,368
275,955,893
231,660,340
295,650,938
333,511,295
242,678,413
317,888,466
336,280,172

6,291,348,520

6,394,671,668

Domestic produce
exported, exclusive of specie.

o
o
Foreign merchandise exported, exclusive of specie.

Total exports, including specie.

$7,866,206
'6,166,764
7,986,806
8,641,091
9,475,493
10,296,121
12,063,084
13,620,120
21,648,304
26,158,368
14,781,372
14,917,047
20,660,241
14,609,971
17,333,634

4,866,863,368

$113,488,516
158,648,622
154,032,131
145,755,820
161,898,720
218,388,011
209,658,366
230,976,167
278,241,064
275,156,846
326,964,908
362,960,682
324,644,421
356,789,462
400,122,296

567,142,370

$101,718,042
160,674,844
130,203,709
131,710,081
134,900,233
178,620,138
154,931,147
189,869,162 .
215,156,304
192,751,135
266,438,051
. 278,906,713
261,351,033
278,392,080
316,242,423

Tonnage.

2,662,085
2,839,046
3,154,042
3,334,016
3,636,454
3,772,439
4,138,441
4,407,010
4,802,9.03
5,212,001
4,871,652
4,940,843
5,049.808
5,146,037
5,363,868

6,102,652,346

o
Pi

o

fej

a

Pi
QQ

•

F . BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY-DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, N&vemher 28, 1860.




No. 25.
Statement exhibiting a summary view of the exports of domestic produce, S c , of the United States during tlie years ending on June
30, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851,''1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, and 1860.
to
as

Product of—
R a w produce.

Years ending—
T h e sea.

T h e fore&t.

Agriculture.

Tobacco.

Colton.

Specie and bullion.

Total value.

Manufactures.

$3,468,033
1,980,963
2,547,654
2,824,818
3,294,691
9,282,342
3.279,413
3,064,069
'
.%5I6,e94
3,356,797
. 3,704,523
3,5.50:295
4,462,974
4,1.56,480

J u n e 30, 1847
Ib48
lt<49
1850
1851
1852
1853
18.54
1855
1«56
] H57
-1858
]859
1860
Total

$5,996,073
7,059,1)84
5,917,994
7,4 42, .503
7,M7,022
7,864,2-.>0
7,91.5,259
11,761,185
12,603,b37
10,694,181
14,f)99.71l
13,475.671
14,4fc9,4()6
13,738,-559

$68,450,383
37,781,446
38,858,204
26,547,158
24,36y,210
26,378;872
.33,463,573
67.104,592
42,567,476
77.686.4.55
75,722.095
53,235,980
40,400,757
48,451,894

$7,242,086
7, £51,122
5,804,207
9,951,023
9,219,251
10,031,283
11,319,319
10,016,046
14,7l-.>,468
12,221.843
20,260,772
17,U09,767
21.074.038
15; 905,517

$.53,415,848
61,998.294
• 66.396,967
71,984,616
112,3.5,317
87,955,732
109,4,56,404
93,-595,220
88.14.^.844
128, .382,351
131,575,859
131,386,661
161,434.923
191,806,555

$10,476,345
12,85,8^,758
11,280,U75
15,190,451
20,13d,957
18,862,931
22,599,930
26,849,411
28,833.299
30,970,992
29,653,257
30, .-^2,180
33,8.53,660
39,803,080

$1,.526,076
974,042
904,980
95.3,664
1,437,680
1,545,767
1,83.5,264
2,764,781
2,373,317
- 3,12.5,429
' 3,290,485
2,32i>,479
2.676,322
2,279,308

$62,620
2,700,412
956,874
2,046,679
18,069,580
37,437,837
23,548, .535
38,234,565
53,957,418
44,148,279
60,078, .352
42,407,246
57,502,305
56,946,851

$150,637,464
1.32,904,121
132.666.955
135,946,912
196.689,718
19>,368,984
213,417,697
2.53,390,870
246,708,553
310, .586,330
338.985,065
29.3,758,279
335,894,385
373^189,274

45,4c9,946

141,.504,708

651,018,096

172,319,772

1,469,859,591

331,747,346

28,107,594

438,097,554

Pi
Pi
13
O
Pi
H

3,308,144,607

F . BIGGER, Register.

O
fei

W

o

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T , Register's Office, Novemher 27,1660.




o

No. 26.

4^
O

Statement exhibiting the valuesof certain articles imported duringthe years ending June 30, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847,
1848, 1849, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, and 1860, {afiter deducting the re-exportations f) and the amount oJ duty which accrued on each during the same pjeriods, respectively.
1846.

1845.

1844.

INS

1847.

Articles.
Value.
$9,408,279
Wollens
- Cottons - . . . - . . . . - . - . - . . . . 13,236,830
865,427
Hemnen eroods -- _ . - _ . . .
Iron, and manufactures of_. 2,395,760
6,897,245
Sugar..»_.......____261,913
Herap, unmanufactured __. „
892,112
Salt
203,681
Coal
Total

,




34,161,247

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

"

$3,413,495 $10,504,423
4,850,731 13,360,729
801,661
213,862
4,075,142
1,607,113
4,049,708
^4,597,093
140,372
101,338
654,881
883,359
133,845
187,962

$3,731,014
4,908.272
198,642
' 2,415,003
2,556,075
65,122
678,069
130,221

$9,935,925
12,857,422
696,888
3,660,581
4,897,239
180,221
748,666
336,691

$3,480,797 $10,639,473
4,865,483 14,704, 186
625,871
138,394
8,710,180
1,629,581
9,406,253
2,713,866
65,220
* 62,282
878,871
509,244
330,875
264,149

$3,192,293
3,956,798
121,688
2,717,378
3.160,444
19,452
228,892
162,008

34,003,256

14,671,413

32,813,633

13,653,796

45,360,929

O
H
O

13,658,853

15,472,368

W

ti

No. 26.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1849.

1848.

1851.

1850.

Articles.
Value.
Woollens
==^
$16,061,102
Cottons
-— 17,205,417
Hempen goods
606,900
Iron, and manufactures of.. 7,060,470
Sugar
— 8,775,223
Hemp, unmanufactured
180,335
Salt
1,027,656
Coal
.426,997
Total




50,344,Ibo

Duties.

Value.

$4,196,007 $13,603,202
4,166,673 15,183,769
121,380
460,335
9,262,567
2,118,141
2,632,567
7,276,780
478,232
54,100
1,424,629
206,531
382,254
128,099
13,622,398

47,970,658

Duties.

Value.

$3,723,768 $16,900,916
3,769,565 19,681,612
490,077
92,067
2,778,770 10,864,680
6,960,716
2,182,734
574,783
143,470
1,227,518
284,906
361,856
114,676
13,089,956

57,062,157

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

$4,682,467 $19,239,930
4,896,278 21,486,502
616,239
98,015
3,259,404 10,780,312
2,085,215 13,478,709
172,435
212,811
245,504
1,025,300
108,667
478,095

$5,331,600
5,348,695
123,048
3,234,094
4,043,613
63,843
205,060
143,429

16,547,865

18,493,382

67,316,898

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No. 26.~STATEMENT^0ontinued.
1852.

o
1853.

1854.

Articles.
Value.
Woollens..-Cottons
_Hempen goods.__
Iron, and manufactures of.
Sugar
Hemp, unmanufactured..,
Kalt
,
Coal
Total...




».-.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

$17,348,184
18,716,741
343,777
18.843,569
13^977,393
164,211
1,102,101
405, 652-

$4,769,083
4,895,327
68,755
5,632,484
4,193,218
49,263
220,420
121,695

$27,051,934
26,412,243
433,604
26,993,082
14,168,337
326,812
1,041,677
488,491

$7,459,794
6,699,338
86,721
8,074,017
4,250,601
98,044
208,315
146,647

$31,119,654
32,477,106
59,824
28,288,241
11,604,666
1,290,975
685,926

$8,629,180
8,153,992
11,631
8,486,472
3,4«1,397
100,689
258, 195
175,777

70,901,628

19,950,245

96,916,080

26,923,277

105,762,014

29,297,333

336,632

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No. 26.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1857.

1866.

1855.
Articles.
Value.
Woollens
Cottons
-Hempen goods
Iron, and manufactures of
Sugar
,
Hemp, unmanufactured --,
Salt
Coal
-.---o
Total--




Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

$22,076,448
15,742,923
239,593
23,945,274
13,284,663
55,458
1,692,587
893,825

$6,088,157
3.823,294
47,919
7,163.602
3,985,399
16,637
338,617
268,147

$30,705,161 $8,478,552 05
24,3.37,504 5,943,181 90
46,747 00
233,735
21,618,718 6,461,615 00
21,295,154 6,388,546 20
1,028 10
3,427
390,863 40
1,964,317
119,418 80
697,094

$30,848,620
28,114,924
604,214
23,320,148
41,596,238
411,662
2,991,365
769,486

$8,504,131
6,846,102
100,843
6,829,279
12,478,871
123,499
698,273
230,846

77,930,771

21,731,672

100,745,110 27,829,952 45

128,556,667

35,710,844

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No. 26.~STATEMBNT—Continued.
1858.

1860.

1859.

Articles.
Value.
Woollens , . .
Cottons
Hempen goods
Iron, and manufactures of
Sugar....
Hemp, unmanufactured ^..
Salt
,,„....
Coal....
Total

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

$26,288,189 $5,550,025 98
17,574,142 3,873,360 20
89,148 46
694,323
14,453,617 3,407,818 20
18,946,663 4,547,199 12
69,860 08
249,417
165,330 30
1,102,202
184,782 24
769,926

$33,301,509 $7,195,936 88
26,026,140 6,677,083 00
432,746
60,134 25
14,749,056 3,516,878 07
28,345,297 6,802,871 28
381,581
91,679 44
1,273,098
190,964 70
931,730
223,615 20

$37,735,914
9,079.676
726,916
18,464,346
28,931,166
308,563
1,431,140
839,334

79,978,479 17,877,514 57

105,441,167 23,759,062 82

97,517,055

Duties.
$8,155,618
6,120,056
115,370
4,395,784
6,943,479
-74,055
214.671
201,440

56
17
25
48
84
12
00
16

26,120,375 58

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F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASUEY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 29, 1860.




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No. 27.
Statenient exhibiting the value of foreign merchandise and domestic produce exported annuaUy, from 1821 to 1860.
VALUE OF EXPORTS, EXCLUSIVE OF SPECIE.

Year ending—

Specie and bullion.

Foreign merchandise.
Free of duty.

Paying duty.

Total.

Domestic produce. Aggregate value
of expi)rts.
O

Sfntpmber 30

1821
1822.
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827. - . . .
1828
1829.
1830.
1831
1832.
1833...........
1834.
1836.
- , -1836
1837.
1838.
1839
1840
1841
1842
9 montlis to June 30,1843



$286,788
374,716
1,323,762
1,100,530
1,098,181
1,036,430
813,844
877,239
919,943
1,078,695
642,586
1,345,217
5,165,907
10,757,033
7,012,666
8,534,896
7,756,189
4,951,306
5,618,442
6,202,562
3,953,054
3,194,299
1,682,763

$10,537,731
11,101,306
19,846,873
17,222,075
22,704,803
19,404,504
. 15,617,986
13,167,339,
11,427,401
12,067,162
12,434,483
18,448,867
12,411,969
10,879,520
7,743,655
9,232,867
9,406,043
4,466,384
5,007,698
5,805,809
4,228,181
4,884,454
3,456,572

$10,824,519
11,476,022
21,170,635
18,322,605
23,802,984
20,440,934
16,431,830
14,044,578
12,347,344
13,146,857
13,077,069
19,794,074
17,577,876
21,636,553
14,756,321
17,767,762
17,162,232
9,417,690
10,626,140
12,008,371
8,181,235
8,078,753
5,139,335

$43,671,894
49,874,079
47,156,408
60,649,600
66,944,745
52,449,856
67,878,117
49,976,632
65,087,307
68,624,878
69,218,583
61,726,529
69,960,856
80,623,662
100,459,481
106,-570, 942
94,280,895
95,560,880
101,625,533
111,660,561
103,636,236
91,798,242
77,686,364

$54,496,413
61,350,101
68,326,043
68,972,105
90,747,729
72,890,789
74,309,947
64,021,210
67,434,651
71,670,735
72,295,652
81,620,603
87,528,732
102,260,215
115,215,802
124,338,704
111,443,127
104,978,570
112,261,673
123,668,932
111,817,471
99,876,995
82,825,689

$10,477,969
10 810 IRO
6 372 087
7 014 552
8,787,659
4 704 5.^.R
8 014 8fi0
8,243,476
4 924 020
2, 178 773
9 014 931
5 656 .S40
2,611,701
2.076 758
6 477 775
4 .^24 336
5 976 249
3,508 046
8 776 74.S
8 417 014
10,034 332
4,813 539
1,520,791

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No. 2T.-^STATEMENTr-Gontmued.

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VALUE OF EXPORTS, EXCLUSIVE OF SPECIE.

Specie and bullion.

Foreign mercliandise.

Year e n d i n g -

Domestic produce.
Free of duty.

Paying duty.

Aggregate value
of exports.

$6,214,058
7,584,781
7,865,206
6,166,754
7,986,806
8,641,0*91
9,475,493
10,295,121
12,053,084
13,620,120
21,648,304
26,158,368
14,781,372
U,917,047
20,660,241
14,609,971
17,333,634

$99,531,774
98,455,330
101,718,042
150,574, 844
130,203,709
131,710,081
134,900,233
178,620,138
154,931,147
189,869,162
215,156,304
192,761,135
266,438,051
278,906,713
251,351,033
278,392,080
316,242,423

$105,745,832
106,040,111
109,683,248
156,741,598
138,190,515
140,351, 172
144,375,726
188,915,259
166,984,231
203,489,282
236.804,608
218,909,503
281,219,423
293,823,760
272,011,274
292,902,051
333,576,057

$5,464,214
8,606,495
3,905,268
1,907,024
15,841,616
6,404, 648
7,622,994
29,472,252
42,674,135
27, 486,'875
41,436,456
56.247,343
45,745,485
69,136,922
52,633, 147
63,887,411
66,546,239

657,142,170

4,856,763,368

5,413,905,538

688,646,608

Total.

fed

June 30

1844
1816.
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850.
1851.
1852.
1853
1854.
1865.
1856..1857.
1858
1859.
I860
Total

...
__.

$2,251,550
2,413,050
2,342,629
1,812,847
1,410,307
2,015,815
2,099,132
1^742,154
2,538,159
2,449,539
3,210,907
6,516,660
3,144,604
4,326,400
6,751,850
5,429,921
6,350,441
130,531,902

$3,962,508
5, 171,73U
5,622,577
4,353,907
6.576,499
. 6,625,276
7,376,361
8,552,967
9,514,925
11,170,581
18,4.H7,397
19,641,818
11,636,768
10,691,647
14,908,391
9,080,050
11,983,193
426,610,268

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 28, 1860.




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No. 28.
Statement exhibiting the quantity of luine, spirits^ &c., imported annually, from 1843 to 1860, inclusive.
No. l.—WINE IN CASKS.

Madeira.

Sherry.

Sicily.

Period of importation.
Gallous.

9 months ending June
Year ending
June
Do
Do
5 months ending Nov.
7 mouths ending June
Year ending
June
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do..— .....
Do.--.




30, 1843
30, 1844
1846
1846
30, 1846
30, 1847
30, 1848
1849
1860
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860

3 949
16, 7c4
101,176
169 797
.1
117, 1 7
13,806
44,634
193,971
303, 125
163,941
216,683
226 403
120,391
71,912
41,393
106,359
86,805
87,237
131,481

Value.

$9,075
30,575
145,237
122,895
128,613
5,717
21,630
105,302
160,096
116,008
103,917
105,628
54,270
46,445
32,031
65,880
72,420
52,902
70,613

Gallons.

4, 685
18,665
23,616
26,638 .
14,643
77,521
215,935
170,794
212,092
250,277
168,610
313,048
415,298
383,398
398,392
544,649
418,319
318,467
564,705

Value.

$6,491
23,418
38,289
41,761
26,194
66,061
109,983
128,610
118,952
154,668
97,680
155,819
244,028
208,414
270,317
364,906
343,100
262,849
440,293

Gallons. "

14,579
31,180
110,590
209,131
21,281
92,631
190,294
130,851
91,123
301,010
91,746
190,205
68,870
197,700
184,194
280,316
123.619
83.043
93,684

Value.

$6,617
15,000
46,033
74,000
^ 8,933
24.230
67,364
32,231
24,933
98,975
22,663
45,794
23,191
65,359
61,9.54
133,894
56,612
37,099
36,395

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No. 28.—STATEMENT—Continued.

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No. 2.—WINE IN CASKS.
Port.

Other red wine.

Claret.

Period of importation.
Gallons.
9 months ending June
Year ending
June
•
Do.
Do
6 months ending Nov.
7 months ending June
Yearending
June
Do
Do
Do
Do
DoDo
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do...
Do




30, 1843.
30, 1844.
18451846.
30, 1846.
30, 1847.
30, 1848.
18491850.
1851.
1852.
1853.
1854.
1855.
18661857.
18581859.
1860.

38,'593
223,616
260,593
372,528
80,991
8,075
601,123
711,268
626,211
762,967
614,816
662,791
393,197
186,460
264,816
600,219
352,677
115,874
366,716

Value.
$25,714
156,878
162,368
148,895
62,851
3,791
170,134
272,700
305,354
349,849
240,238
268,005
177,935
97,987
158,729
407,564
226,781
88,217
229,997

Gallons.
873,895
993,198
1,061,862
961,351
294,433
591,656
1,227,071
1.912,701
1,919,766
1,940,121
2,702,612
2,633,802
2,045,474
1,371,400
1,516,018
1,897,108
1,027,013
2,126,065
3,613,083

Value.
$134,598
218,239
249,633
249,703
111,453
119,844
221,416
263,836
267,445
"280,333
405,380
482,827
497,005
440,631
561,440
669,403
385,750
624,023
1,229.740

Gallons.

Value.
hj

340.387
495,558
954,646
1.072,589
539,454
781,073
994,458
1,469,266
1,245,201
1,172,316
1,374,416
1,854,885
l,619,60-5
697,334
1,186,293
1,078,926
984,251
1,988,372

$60,096
143,210
316,821
328,814
119,411
180,928
221,177
265,988
236,727
229,350
.377.482
450,195
459,985
285,111
500,527
442,641
306,647
838,233

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No. 28.—STATEMENT—Continued.
No. 3.—WINE, BRANDY, AND GRAIN SPIRITS.
Brandy.

Other white wine.

Grain spirits.

Period of importation.
Gallons.
9 months ending
Year ending
Do
Do
5 months ending
7 months ending
Year ending
Do
Do
Do
Do
JDo
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do

June 30,1843.
June 30,1844.
1845.
1846Nov. 30, 1846June 30,1847.
June 30,18481849.
1860185118521853.
1854.
185518661857.
1868.
1869.
1860.




Value

Gallons.

Value.

123,832
268,414
591,735
705,808
618,267
278,482
840,687
971,895
1,088,801
1,085,374
935,379
1,276,290
1,379,888
939,354
517,135
721,417
853,283
1,307,828
2,468,395

$28,205
76,090
211,183
310,241
296,736
69,831
193,358
210,139
215,363
209,847
195,870
305,287
380,204
322,257
189,499
306,739
335,235
415,767
1,929,846

191,832
782,510
1,081,314
963,147
331,108
623,309
1,370,111
2,964,091
4,145,802
3,163,783
2,751,810
3,854,956
2,162,366
1,024,497
1,715,717
1,513,328
1,180,484
2,528,356
2,616,154

$106,267
606,633
819,450
839,231
355,451
575,631
1,135,089
1,347,614
2,659,637
2,128,679
1,792,729
3,251,408
2,255,344
1,479,362
2,859,342
2,527,262
2,232,462

3,262,058
3,937,698

^Gallons.
259,129
416,918
606,311
677,785
136,323
327,635
676,683
796,276
751,18<
984,417
865,304
1,060,456
1,197,234
1,190,642
1,582,126
1,988,037
2,157,563
3,145,204
2,851,616

Value.
$121,547
171,015
262,543
345,362
86,073
143,549
327,493
327,957
361,078
364,204
294,386
424,638
564,669
575,560
772,276
1,125,160
1,158,517
1,465,243
1,211,335

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No. 28.—STATEMENT—Continued.
to
No. 4.—OTHER SPIRITS, BEER, ALE, AND PORTER.
Beer, ale, and porter, from
England.

Other spirits.

Beer, ale, and porter, from
Scotland.

Period Of importiation.
Gallons.

Value.

Gallons.

Value.

Gallons.

Value.

r

9 months ending
Yearending
Do
Do
5 months ehding
7 months ending
Yearending
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do-.

June 30, 1843
June 30, 1844
1845
.-.1846
Nov.30, 1846
June 30, 1847
June 30, 1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854....
1855
1856
1857 . . .
1858
1859
1860

-

135,399
2i0.477
270,484
221,344
65,477
160,747
228,671
542,492
339, 169
309,214
359,677
336,477
399,583
397,572
771,604
443 495
645,830
1,126,489
831,712

$32,095
78,027
78,957
81,713
28,862
67,806
75,943
145,784
113,779
100,850
98.940
106,501
128,308
151,378
288,494
218,907
324,906
444,207
360,209

62.612
107,489
79,302
117,621
46, 146
132,157
130,008
146,473
156,735
275,336
262,838
397,420
825,571
919,252
792,155
1,048,903
872,969
1,057,633
677,501

$57', 098
102,157
73,729
110,397
42,987
67,305
101,171
118,233
129,967
189,010
186,964
284,347
424,876
659,900
504,146
619,729
508,887
613,477
483,240

7,423
19,236
26,711
38,464
2,151
16,375
39,282
52,287
52,856
88,179
110,752
131,357
270,064
315,016
359,486
375,706
1^3,572
257.034
263,624

$6,335
18,343
21,294
39,831
1,895
8,657
21,533
30,088
41,790
66,736
67,804
77,414
128,667
188,457
193,600
221.316
112,555
136,652
137,906

F . BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 2 8 , 1&60.




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413

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 29.
Statement exhihiting the value of imports, annually, from 1821 to 1860.
V a l u e of m e r c h a n d i s e i m p o r t e d .
Years ending—
Specie a n d
bullion.

.1821
1822
1823
1824
1826
1826
1827
• 1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
9 m o n t h s t o J u n e 30 , 1843
Year t o J u n e 3 0 . . . . 1 8 4 4
1845
184 6
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1862
1853
1854
1865
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860

Septemher 30

Total

F r e e of d u t y .

$8,064,890
3,369,846
5,097,896
8,379,836
6,150,765
6,880,966
8,151,130
7,489,741
7,403,612
8,165,964
7,305,946
5,907,604
7,070,368
17,911,632
13,131,447
13,400,881
10,616,414
17,747,116
5,695,176
8,882,813
4,988,633
4,087,016
22,390,569
6,830,429
4,070,242
3,777,732
24,121,289
6,360,224
6,651,240
4,628,792
5,453,592
5,505,044
4,201,382
6,958,184
3,659,812
4,207,632
12,461,799
19,274,496
•7,434,789
8,650,136

$2,017,423
3,928,862
3,950,392
4,183,938
4,796,745
5,686,803
. 3,703,974
4,889,436
4,401,889
4,590,281
6, 15O,6h0
8,341,949
25,377,582
50,481,648
64,809,046
78,666,600
58,733,617
43,112,889
70,806,616
48,313,391
61,031,098
26,540,470
13,184,026
18,936,462
18,077,598
- 20,990,007
17,651,347
16,356,379
15,726,425
18,081,590
19,662,995
24,187,890
27, 182,152
26,327,637
36,430,524
52,748,074
54,267,607
61,044,779
72,286,327
82,291,614

$52,603,411
75,942,833
68,630,979
67,986,234
86,392,665
72,406,708
67,628,964
76,130,648
62,687,026
58,130,676
89,734,499
86,779,813
76,670,361
58,128,152
71,965,249
97,923,654
71,739,186.
52,857,399
85.690,340
49,945,315
61,926,446
69,634,601
29,179,215
83,668,164
96,106,724
96,924,068
104,773,002
132,282,325
125,479,774
155,427,936
191,118,345
183,262,608
236,595,113
271,276,560
221,378,184
257,684,236
294,160,835
202,293,875
259,047,014
279,872,327

$62,585,724
83,241,541
77,579,267
80,649,007
96,340,075
84,974,477
79,484,068
88,509,824
•74,492,627
70,876,920
103,191,124
101,029,266
108,118,311
126,521,332
149,896,742
189,980,035
. 140,989,217
113,717,404
162,092,132
107,141,519
127,946,177
100.162,087
64,753,799
108,435,035
117,254,564
121,691,797
146,545,638
164,998,928
147,857,439
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,945,442
267,978,647
304,562,381
261.468,620
314,639,942
360,890,141
282,613,160
338,768,130
.362,163,941

341,226,962

1,179,927,550 4,778,744,143

6,291,348,620

Paying d u t y .

Total.

'

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMIENT, Register's Office, Novemher 28, 1860.




414

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 30.
Statement exhihiting the value of dutiable merchandise re-exported annually, firom 1821 to 1860, inclusive; and shoioing also the value re' exported firom ivar chouses under the act ofi August 6, 1846.
Years.

1821
1822
1823
1824
1826
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839,
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1861
1852
1853
1854
1855
1866
1857
1858
1869
1860

:..

--

,
,
Total

Dutiable value of Value re-exportmerchandise reed from wareexported.
houses.
$10, 037,
11, 101,
19, 846,
17, 222,
22, 704,
19, 404,
15, 617,
13, 167,
11, 427,
12, 067,
12, 434,
. 18, 448,
12, 411,
879,
10, 743,
7, 232,
9, 406,
9,
4, 466,
007,
5, 805,
5, 228,
4, 884,
4, 456,
3, 962,
3, 171,
5, 622,
6, 363,
4, 576,
6, 625,
6, 376,
7, 662,
8, 514,
9, 170,
11, 437,
18, 641,
19, 636,
11, 691,
10, 908,
14:, 080,
9, 983,
11,

731
306
873
075
803
504
986
339
401
162
483
857
969
520
656
867
043
384
698
809
181
454
672

508
731
677

907
499
276
361
967
925
581
397
818
768
647^
391
050
193

$651,170
2,869,941
3,692,363
5,261,291
5,604,463
6,856,770
8,036,651
14,608,712
13,975,759
7,666,890
5,195,960
7,747,930
4,386,870
6,414,036

426,610,268

92,866,696

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 28, 1860.




REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

415

No. 31.
Statement • exiiibiting the aggregate value ofi breadstuffs and provisions
exported annually, firom 1821 to 1860.
Years ending—
September 30

1821

Nine months ending June 30
Year ending June 30

1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
..1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1863
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860

Total

Amount.
$12, 341,901
13, 886,856
13, 767,847
15, 059,484
11, 634,449
11, 303,496
11, 685, 65611, 461,144
13, 131,858
12, 076,430
17, 538,227
12, 424,703
H , 209,128
11, 524,024
12, 009,399
10, 614,130
9, 588,359
9, 636,650
H , 147,779'
19, 067,635
17, 196,102
16, 902,876
11, 204,123
17, 970,135
16, 743,421
27, 701,921
68, 701,121
37, 472,751
38, 155,507
26, 051,373
21, 948,651
25, 857,027
32, 985,322
65, 941,323
38, 895,348
77, 187,301
" 74, 667,852
60, 683,285
38, 305,991
46, 271,850
1,006,951,235

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 27, 1860.




No. 32.

•

.

Statement exhihiting the quantity and value ofi cotton exported annually, firom 1821 to 1860, inclusive, and the civerage
price per pound.
CO

.

COTTON.

Value.
Years.

Bales.

Sea Island.

Number of.
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
.183^
1836.--1837
18381839
1840
1841
1842



i

Other.

Dollars.

Pounds.
11,344,066
11,250,635
12,136,688
9,525,722
9,665,278
5,972,852
16,140,798
11,288,419 '
12,833,307
8", 147,165
8,311,762
8,743,373
11,142,987
8,085,937
7,752,736
7,849,697
5,286,971
7,286,340
6,107,404
8,779,669
6,237,424
7,254,099

113,549,339
133,424,460
161,686,582
132,843,941
16K,784,629
198,562,563
279,169,317
199,302,044
252,003,879
290,311,937
268,668,022.
313,451,749
313,535,617
376,601,970
379,686,266
415,721,710
438,964,566
588,616,957
408,566,808
735,161,392
523,966,676
577,462,918

fa
Cents.

20,167,484
24,036.068
20,446,620
21,947,401
36,846,649
25,025,214
29,359.545
22,487,229
26,575,311
29,674,883
25,289,492
31,724,682
36,191,105
49,448,402
64,961,302
71,284,925
63,240,102
61,566,811
61,238,982
63,870,307
54,330,341
47,693,464

16. 2
16 6
11 8
15 4
20. 9
12. 2
10
10.7
10
9. 9
9. 1
9.8
11. 1
12 8
16. 8
16. 8
14.2
10.3
14. 8
8.5
10.2
8.1

Total.

124,893,405
144,675,096
173,723,270
142,369,663
176,449,907
204,635,415
294,310,115
210,590,463
264,837,186
298,469,102
276,979,784
322,216,122
324,698,604
384,717,907
387,358,992
423,631,307
444,211,537
695,952,297
413,621,212
743,941,061
530,204,100
584,717,017

18431844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
18481849.
1850^1851.
1862.
1863.
1864.
1855.
18561867.
1868.
18591860.

2,303,403
2,991,175
2,265,688
2.454,529
3,005,536
3,812,345
Total-

7,515,079
6,099,076
9,380,625
9,388,633
6,293,973
7,724,148
11,969,269
8,236,463
8,299,666
11,738,075
11,165,165
10,486,423
13,068,690
12,797,225
12,940,725
12,101,058
13,713,556
15,598,698

16,832,576

387,668,556

784,782,027
657,534,379
863,516,371
538,169,622
520,925,985'
806,550,283
1,014,633,010
627,145,141
918,937,433
1,081,492,664
1,100,405,205
977,346,683
995,366,011
1,338,634,476
1,035,341,750
1,106,522,954
1,372,755,000
1,752,087,640
24,760,098,772

792,297,106
663,633,465
872,905,996
647,558,055
627,219,968
814,274,431
1,026,602,269
635,381,604
927,237,089
1,093,230,639
1,111,670,370"
987,833,106
1,008,424,601
1,351,431,701
1,048,282,475
1,118,624,012
1,386,468,656
1,767,686,338
26,147,757,328

49,119,806
64,063,501
51,739,643
42.767,341
53,415,848
61,998,294
66,396,967
71,984,616
112,315,317
87,965,732
109,456,404
93,696,220
88,143,844
128,382,351
131,675,859
131,386,661
161,434,923
191,806,555

6.2
8.1
5.92
7.81
10.34
7.61
6.4
11.3
12. 11
8.05
9.85
9.47
8. 7'4
9.49
12.55
11.72
12.72
10.85

2,574,834,091

>n
o
w

a
w
hrj

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Offfice, November 27, 1860.




F. m.Q(G^B., Register.

I
CQ

-CI

No. 33.

H-'OO

Statement exhihiting the quantity and value of tohacco and rice exported annually frora 1821 to 1860.
RICE.

TOBACCO.

Years.

1821--^
1822
1823
...
1824....
1825
1826...
1827..
1828
--.--:..
-.-::.."-.
1829
_
1830-...--..:.
1831
—.,::..
1832.
1833
.-...-,.
1834-....::.-.-.1835.-.:...-.
—
1836.
--...-...---1837
•...:..."
-._....
183.8.........:::..-....
1839
...---...
1840
. — --..-_...1841............
-.„.-:.--.
1842.....:.._........:.:,.:....
1843..............
:.
1844....:.•......
...........
1 8 , 4 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- .
18,46...:..:...:.....,..:....:...



Bales. .

Cases.

... _
_
•

•

..........

Hogsheads.
66,858
83,169
99,009
77,883
76,984
.64,098
100,025
96,;278
77,'131
83',;810.
86,'718
106,;806
83,153
87,979
94,353
109,042
100,232
100,593
78,995
119,484
^147,828
158,710
'94,464
163,042
147,168
147,998

Barrels.

Value.
$6,648,962
6,222,838
6,282,672
4,856,566
6,115,623
5,347,208
6,577,123
5,269,960
4,982,974
6,586,366
4,892,388
5,999,769
5,765,968
6,695,305
8,260,577
10,058,640
6,795,647
7,392,029
9,832,943
9,883,957
12,576,703
9,540,755
4,650,979
8,397,255 "
7,469,819
8,478,270

Tierces.

'

•

-

-

^

88,221
87,089
101,365
113,229
97,015
111,063
113,618
176,019
132,923
130,697
116,517
120,327
144,163
121,886
119,851
212,983
106,084
71,048^
93,320
101,660
101,617
114,617
106,766
134,715
118,621
124,007

Value.
$1,494,307
1 553,482
1,820,985
1,882,982
1,925,245
1,917,445
2,343,908
2,620,696
2,514,370
1,986,824
2,016,267
2,152,631
2,744,418
2,122,272
2,210,331
2,548,760
' 2,309,279
1,721,819
2,460,198
1,942,076
2,010,107
1,907,387
1,625,726
.2,182,468
2,160,456
2,564,991

Pi
Pi
T)

O
Pi
H
O

%
Q
02

1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1862
1853
1854
1865
1856
1867
1868
1859
I860

12,913
17,772
14,432
12,640
19,651
17,817

13,366
9,384
5,631
4,841
7,188
15,035

135,762
130,665
101,521
146,729
95,945
137,09.7
159,853
126,107
160,213
116,962
166,848
127,670
198,846
167,274

95,225

55,445

4,601,292

.---

-

'

-

Total

7,242,086
7,551,122
5,804,207
9,951,023
9,219,251
10,031,283
11,319,319
10,016,046
14,712,468
12,221,843
20,662,772
17,009,767
21,074,038
15,906,647
355,181,067

^ fiO'i 8Qfi

19,774
81,038
74,309
49,283
69,946
77,837

144,427
100,403
128,861
127,069
105,590
119,733
67,707
106,121
62,520
68,668
64,332
64,016
81,820
84,163

372,187

4,373,750

87,864,511

2 . ^ 824
Sl
2 569 362
2,631,567
2 170 Q27
2 470 02Q
1, 657, 658
2,634,127
1 717 Qf^^

2,390,233
2,290,400
1,870,578
2,207,148
2,667,399

Pi
PiO
Pi

^-

O
F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 28, 1860.




w
i2j

QQ

H-A-

No. 34.
O

Statement exhihiting the values of iron and manufiactures qf iron, and iron and steel, steel, wool and manufactures
of wool, manufiactures of cotton, silk and manufactures ofi silk, flax, linen and linen fiahrics, hemp and manufiactures of
hemp, manilla^ sun, and other hemps of Indict, and silk and worsted goods, imported from and exported to foreign
countries, firom 1840 to 1860, both years inclusive ; and also showing the domestic exports ofi like articles for dhe same
periods.
1840.

1841.

1842.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
exported.
ported.
ported.

Foreign im. Foreign ex- Domestic
exported.
ported.
ported.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
ported.
exported.

Articles.

Iron and manufactures of iron, and
iron and^steel.
...-,.
$6,760,099 $156, 116 $1,104,465
Cast, shear, German, and other steel.
33,961
628,716
Wool, unmanufactured .«.26,246
846,076
418,399
manufactures of
9,071,184
Cotton, manufactures of^
...
6,604,484 1,103,489 3,549,607
Silk, unmanufactured
...
200,239
234,235
manufactures of ,
.
9,601,522 1,015,532
Flax, unmanufactured
425,466
4,614,466
linen ^nd linen fabrics . . ,
Hemp, unmanufactured
686,777
8,242
manufactures of
226,347
1,588,155
-manilla, sun, ^ other, of India
Silk and worsted goods
Total




40,425,714 3,605,794 4,662,304

$8,914,425
609,201
1,091,953
11,001,939
11,757,036
254,102
15,300,795

$134,316 $1,045,264
24,848
44,226
171,814
929,056 3,122,546
227,113
356,264

$6,988,966
597,317
797,382
8,376,726
9,578,515
33,002
9,444,341

$177,301 $1,109,522
18,447
90,865
146,123
836,892 2, 970,690
420
266,159

o

pi
H

w
HH

t
02

6,846,807
661,039
2,666,381

280,459
50
167,506

13,400

15,812
58,903,678 2,351,464 4,181,210

3,669,231
267,849
1,273,534

210,176
553
162,866

1,311,770

777

42,337j631 1,908,639

1,038

4,081,260

No. 34.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1843.
Articles.

Foreign im- Foreign ex
ported.
ported.

Iron and manufactures of iron, and
$1,903,868
iron and steel.. .
201,772
Cast, shear, German, and other steel248,679
Wool unmanufactured
.......
2,472,154
manufactures of . . . . _ . . .
Cotton manufactures o f . . - - . - - - - . . 2,958,796^
63,350
Silk unmanufactured
..„....-..
2,662,087
• manufactures of.. . . - - . . 15,193
TTlnv nnmamif^riotnrpd.
1,484,921
litiPTi and linftn fabrics
228,882
TTpTnn iintTianiifactiirGd
<.••.«••
626,502
manufactures o f - . . . . .
...
42,149
manilla sun, & other, of India.
318,685
Silk and worsted aroods . . - - - . - - . .

1844.
Domestic
exported.

$50,802 $532,693
59,733
34,651
61,997
314,040 3,223,550
3,363
206,777
161,667
2,012
102,495
472
4,929

326

1845.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
ported.
exported.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
ported.
exported.

$5,227,484
487,462
851,460
9,476,782
13,644,478
172,953
8,310,711
67,738
4,492,826
263,365
1,003,420
209,385
1,292,488

$8,294,878
775,676
1,689,794
10,666,176
13,863,282
208,454
9,731,796
90,609
4,923,109
145,209
897,345
238,179
1,510,310

$107,956
16,416

$716,332

' 67,483
404,648 2,898,780
7,102
230,838
626
129,726
452
138,002
311
6,274
190

$91,966
20,052
22,163
166,646
602,553
4,362
246,272
6,544
169,626
4,837
95;684
1,446
16,916

$845,017

o

pi
H

4,327,928

§
w

14,762

>•
O

Total




13,117,028 1,002,928 3,756,669

45,495,652 1,108,712 3,615,423
...

53,034,716 1,328,057

5,187,707

GQ

9

0^

to

No. 34.—STATEMENT—Continued.

^
1N3

1846.

1847.

1848.

Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures of iron,
and iron and steel
Cast, shear, German, and other
steel _-,^
»«
Wool, unmanufactured
..--.
manufactures of -,„„
Cotton, manufactures of.
Silk unmanufactured
manufactures of.. . \ , . . . „..
Flax, unmanufactured--.. . . . .
linen and linen fabrics
Hemp, unmanufiictured
manufactures of
,
• ma,niUa, sun, and other,
of India
Silk and worsted goods . « „ ,
To tai




Foreign
exported.

Domestic ex- Foreign imported.
ported.

$7,835,832

$122,687

$1,151,782

1,234,408
1,134,226
10,083,819
13,530,625
216,647
10,667,649
16,337
5^098,505
180,281
766,664

32,564
41,671
147,894
673,203
23,999
195,763

467,276
1,778,202

73,139
.3,641

3,545,481

125,570
87,618

63,000,471 1,627,.439

12,129

4,913,388

Domestic ex- Foreign imported.
ported.

$8,781,252

$63,696

$1,167,484 $12,526,854

1,126,458
556,822
10,998,933
15,192,875
250,086
11,733,371
28,366
5,154,837
66,377
684,880

19,218
37,302
315,894
486,135
8,385
-334,173

278,675
1,965,096

203,996

Foreign
exported.

27,307
"22,992

97,601
1,157
69,009

56,817,026 1,472,769

89,460
4,082,623

6) 782

Domestic
exported,

$98,295 $1,259,632

41,397
1,284,937
"
1,840
857,034
179,781
15,240,883
15,421,689 1,216,172 '5,7l8,"'205
19,858
354,973
340,853
14,543,633
.
.
102,261
300,159
6, 624,648
7,570 . 27,657
187,905
61,176
6,713
658,075
342,445
2,456,652

5,345,249

Foreign
exported.

1,833
2,614

73,601,889 2,261,647

1
g

5C
t~^

§
H
y
W
g
g
W

7,012,207

•

No. 3l?—STATEMENT—Continued.
'

1849.
Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures of iron,
$13,831,823
and iron and steel . - —
Cast, shear, German, and other
1,227,138
steel
Wool unmanufactured . - - - . . _ _ 1,177,.347
manufactures of
- . . . . 13,704,606
15,754,841
Cotton, manufactures of
384,535
Silk unmanufactured. - - . . - .
13,791,232
manufactures of.----Flax unmanufactured--.-_ _ .
127,859
5,907,242
linen and linen fabrics
491,633
Hemp, unmanufactured
619,774
manufactures of.
manilla, sun, and other,
196,634
of India .
...--..
Silk and worsted goods
2,452,289

1851.

1850.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic ex- Foreign imported.
ported..

Foreign
exported.

Domestic ex- Foreign im- ^ Foreign
ported.
ported.
exported.

$109,439

$1,096,172 $16,333,145

$100, 746'

$1,911,320 $17, 306- 700

55,044
-6;891
201,404
671,082
66,615
.388,572
187,948
13,401
69,439

4,933,129

e

8,468
6,558

40,193
1,332,253
1,681,691
174,934
17.151,509
427,107
20,108,719:
7,408
401,386
352,637
17,639,624
128,917
8,134, 674^ • 129,878
6,031
579,814
98,369'
588, 446'
659,362
1,653,809

29,161
27,637

3,843
15,795

4,734,424

6,633
11,776

1,570,063
3,833,157
19,507,309
22,164,442
466,449
26,777,245.
176,197
8,795,740
223.984
661,768
508,709
1,783,076

^
Domestic
exported.

$100,290 $2,255,698
38,371
7,966
.267,379
677,940
43,856
600,168
107,382
7,876'
46,620

o
H'
7,241,205

O
55

H'

w
Pi

29,114
8,023

o

8,688
6,307

Pi
GQ

Total. ^ . ^ . - - , . . . - .




. . . 69,666,953 l,706j433

6,043j317

86,393,348 1,355,941

6,663,163 102,764,839 1,811,843

9,534,040

to
0:>

No. 34,—STATEMENT—Continued.

to
1854.

1853.

1852.
Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures of iron,
and iron and steel
„. $18,957,993
Cast, shear, German, and other
-1,703,699
steel
1,930,711
Wool- unmanufactured
17,573,964
mf^riiifanture-S of
19.689,496
Cotton, manufacturesof
'378,747
Silk, unmanufactured
- - ..
21,651,752
manufactures of
175,342
Flax unmanufactured
8,515,709
linen and linen fabrics
164,588
Hemp, unmanufactured
391,608
manufactures of
manilla, sun,and other,
942,422
of India
1,667,513
Silk and worsted goods
Laces, insertings, braids, and
embroideries of wool, cottoR,
silk, or linen . . . . . .
Total




93,743,174

Foreign exported.

$134,937
31,569
54,285
256,878
997,030
7,143
604,855
131,153
377
47,831
9,584
6,286

2,281,927

Domestic exported.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
exported.

$2,303,819 $27,265,425

7,672,151

18,649
13,622

$262,343

31,637
2,970,313
51,387
2,669,718
343,989
27,621,911
27,731,313 1,254,363
•282
722,931
607,294
30,434,886
135,684
10,236,037
149,399
329,122
2,310
46,667
479,171
1,591,791
1,880,918

4,572
3,981

10,008,241 134,059,220 2,757,124

$2,499,652 $29,341,775

$795,872 $4,210,350

2,477,709
53,247
2,822,186
41,668
32,382,594 1,262,897
8,768,894 33,949,503 1,468,179
1,099,389
7,966
34,696,831
843,164
250,391
10,863,536
179,598
18,195 _, 378,246
42,614
598,251
16,784
62,318
1,528,329
1,594,038

w5,535,616

H
O

93,699
79,717
O

66,679
21,037

11,303,525 151,982,777 4,825,229

El
O

02

9,919,282

No. 34.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1866.

1855.
Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures of iron,
$22,980,728
and iron and steel
Cast, shear, German, and other
2,593,137
steel
2,072,139
Wool, unmanufactured
24,404,119
mMnnfartiirf c! of
17,757,112
Cotton, manufactures of
751,617
Silk unmanufactured
24,366,556
286,809
Flax unmanufactured
-_*
,
linpn and linpn falirins
8,617,165
112,763
Hemp, unmanufactured
266,829
manufactures of
manilla, sun, and other,
2,045,653
of India
1,133,839
Silk and worsted goods
Laces, insertings, braids, and
embroideries of wool, cotton,
4,978,315
silk or linpn
Total.-




^ 112,366,811

1857.

Foreign exported.

Domestic ex- IToreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
exported.

$1,565,523

$3,753,472 $22,041,939

63,068
131,442
2,327,701
2,012,554
71,122
902,135
278,850
57,305
27,236

27,802
5,867,181

121,320
36,608

$423,221

25,598
2,538.323
. 14,997
1,666,064
31,961,793 1,256,632
25,917,999 1,680,495
4,255
991,234
30,226,532 ,576,613
132,461
179,666
11,189,463
64,249
57,676
19,636
253,730

$4,161,008 $23,320,497
27,455
6,967,309

2«,598
26,035

$472,910 $4,884,967

2,633,614
27,703
2,125,744
920
31,286,118
437,498
28,686,726
670,802
953,734
4,163
27,800,319
157,186
220,738
11,441,642 • 92,930
423,533
11,871
519,.582
15,368

198,136
118,667

1,946,044
1,335,247

12,256
14,963

2,353,891
1,580,246

6,265,963

77,757

5,894,890

6,115,177

o
w

46,907
34,763

86,182
1,169

165,865

o
19,007

!2J

O

9,632

7,909,494

9,796,283 136,522,468 4,240,237

GQ

11,210,405 139,240,174 1,888,234 11,100,811

to

No. 34.—STATEMENT—Continued.

to
a:)
1859.

1858.
Articles.
Foreign imported. Iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and steel
Cast, shear, German, and other steel...I — ,
„.
Wool, unmanufactured
manufactures of
Cotton, manufactures df
..-.-..
Silk, unmanufactured
manufactures of
.;.. .
.'.
Flax, unmanufactured.--.-..linen and linen fabrics
..'
Hemp, unmanufactured
-.
manufactures of
«.,
manilla, sun, and other, of India
Silk and worsted goods..,
Laces, insertings, braids, and embroideries of wool, cotton, silk,
or linen
•...

Foreign exported.

Domestic exported.

Foreign iinported.

Foreign ex- Domestic exported.
ported.

$14,454,928
1,873,111
4,022,635
26,486,091
17,965,130
1,300,065
20,222,103
197,934
6^557,323
331,307
614,666
2,298,709
1,249,385

$183,366
13,154
824,898
197,902
390,988
94,092
250,959
5,690
63,770
81,890
20,343
482,223
4, 000

$4,729,874 $15,000,866
2j047,730
4,444,954
211,861
33,521,956
5,651,604 26,365,081
1,330,890
26,745,527
146,707
10,340,605
405,173
47,875
432,746
89,092
2,157,895
1;623,106

$251,810
3,079
32,141
220,447
328,941
19.978
249,598
29,172
71,582
23,692
34,692
98,448
5,164

3,654,203

17,372

4,184,000

7,207

$5,603,667
356,563
8,316,222

^
S
Pi:
^

6

i2i
>j.

-

^W
9,279
18,878

..........

td
^^'

-

\f^.

a
•

td
QQ

Total




-

101,227,590

2,627,547

10,730,206 128,737,236

1,375,841

14,203,609

No.

34.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1860.

Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and s t e e l . . . .
t.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel.
.^
i...
Wool, unmanufactured.-„..
^
manufactures of..
P.o...«.-^^
Cotton, manufactures of....;..;....'.
.......o..,„
Silk, unmanufactured
.^..
—
manufactures of
^
^
Flax, unmanufactured
-.^^. r-.- -^,.»
- - . c.e-»- . . . o o--- 9-- —
linen and linen f a b r i c s . . . . . . - . - - . - . ;
^^..^.' 00-- .o«
Hemp, unmanufactured
.;..-p
.;..........^...........
manufactures of
-.
-.
.-^
manilla, sun, and other, of I n d i a . . . .
...a
>--. Silk and worsted goods
Laces, inserting, braids, and enibfoldefies of wool, cotton, sil^, or linen.
Total.

Foreign exported.

$18,726,657
2,799,937
4,842,152
37,937,190
10,139,209
1,341,676
30,767,744
213,657
10,736,336
371,317
769,135
1,820,137
2,193,376
4,017,675

$262,311
17,874
37.280
201,27«5
1,069,633
177,881
298,034

126,676,197

2,333,340

180,611
16,983
42,219
27,148

Domestic exported.
$5,703,024
389,612
10,934,796

Pi
td
O
Pi

i
9,531
27,814

w
td

I

12,190
17,064,677

o
td

QQ

F. BIGGER, Register.
TssASUET DEPAETMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 28, 1860.




to

No. 35.

to

Statement exhihiting the value of iron^ manufactures of iron^ and iron aoid steel, steely sugar^ wines, and all fiahrics ofi
which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp is a component part, imported annually, firom 1847 ^o 1856, both inclusive,
with the duties which accrued thereon during each year, respectively, and brandies, fior the years 1856, 1857, 1858,
1859, and 1860.
1847.

1849,

1848.

Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel...
Manufactures of wool
cotton
silk
flax
hemp
Wines....
Sugar
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp is
a component part, but which cannot properly be
classified with either, viz:
Silk and worsted goods
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear..
Laces, thread, and insertings
cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces, and braids
Cordage, untarred, tared, and cables..
Twine and packthread
Seines
Total.



Value.

Duties.

$8,781,252 $2,751,407 66
165,780 40
1,126,468
10,998,933 3,366,277 94
15,192,875 4,117,803 01
11,733,371 2,833,850 75
6,154,837 1,093,180 65
135,-764 88
684,880
439,873 22
1,801,961
9,877,212 3,376,815 63

00

Value.

Duties.

$12,626,864 $3,736,223 20
203,909 00
1,284,937
15,240,883 4,247,170 30
18,421,589 4,568,587 70
14,543,634 3,739,650 05
6,624,648 1,327,231 20
131,615 00
658,075
670,695 60
1,434,009
9,479,817 2,843,945 10

$13,831,823
1,227,138
13,704,606
15,764,841
13,791,232
6,907,242
519,774
1,821,157
8,048,900

Duties.
$4,132,780
194,688
3,780,863
3,911,677
3,653,488
1,184,665
103,954
726,374
- 2,414,670

60
95
65
55
55
50
80
60
00

Pi
Pi
O
Pi
O

W

td
H-(

o
td
1,965,095
676,404
370,*028
398,514
67,592
54,809
446

635,655 25
228,488
67,900
99,628
31,863
13,766
80

30
60
60
18
60
50

68,884,657 19,256,016 77

2,456,652

614.163 00

2,452,289

60
80
00
50
60
60

587,590
176,375
663,991
146,410
34,378
182

84,690,334 22,473,478 15

78,667,928

653,222
263,869
716,552
239,526
46,575
602

195,966
62,771
179,138
69,881
12,47'9
160

613,072 25
176,277
35,275
165,997
36,602
10,313
54

00
00
75
50
40
60

21,040,766 60

QQ

No. 35.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1850.

1851.

1852.

Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
Manufactures of wool
^
cotton
^.
...
silk
hemp-,,.^
Wines
Sugar
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp is a
component part, but which cannot properly be
classified with either, viz;
Silk and worsted goods Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen
..
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear
Laces, thread, and insertings
_.—
cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces, and braids.
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
Twine and packthread
^.,.
.Seines
^,.
-„
Total-




Duties.

Value.

$16,333,145 $4,876,811 00
1,332,253
211,10605
17,161,509 4,752,782 30
20,108,719 6,002,633 65
17,639,624 4,518,423 65
8,134,674 1,630,900 00
588,446
117,689 20
2,065,922
823,608 60
7,665,146 2,266,543 80

Duties.

Value.

$17,306,700 $5,170,213 70
1,670,063
250,706 15
19,507,309 6,407,688 85
22,164,442 5,616,962 00
25,777,246 6,674,792 65
8,795,740 1,765,497 80
661,768
132,353 60
2,359,279
941,190 80
13,841,426 4,162,427 80

$18,957,993
1,703,699
17,673,694
19,689,496
21,661,752
8,515,709
391,608
2,203,230
14,712,847

Duties.
$5,666,763
274,332
4,831,729
4,887,538
5,529,273
1,708,919
78,321
878,604
4,413,854

80
30
15
46
60
10
60
60
10

td
O

o
w
td

1,653,809
813,261
185,925
672,627
267,377
62,106
690

413,452 "26

1,783,076

445,769 00

1,667,513

416,878 25

243,978
37,185
168,156
64,344
18,631
177

1,058,994
223,115
. 756,661
213,785
60,282
299

317,698
44,623
189,162
53,446
15,084
89

20
00
76
25
60
70

1,368,812
160,385
635,056
205,417
45,014
742

410,643 60
32,077 00

116,070,174 30,977,706 75

109,292,867

29,327,780 60

30
00
76
25
80
00

94,655,133 25,146,423 50

133,764
51,354
13,604
222

00
25
20
60

o
td
QQ

to

No. 35.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1853.

oo
O

1855.

1854.

Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and irori and steel - - - . .
Cast, shear, Gernian, and other steel
-_---......
Manufactiires bf wool-.-'
cotton
silk--.:.
flax
hemp
_.
Brandies
.---.1'..Wines .'
..
1
Sugar _ - — - - - . .
...1
-.i
Afticies of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp is a
, component part, but which cannot properly be
classified with either, yiz :
Silk and worsted goods
«.
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear. - . . .
.
Laces, thread, and insertings
.
cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces, braids, &c.
Cordage untirred, tarred, and cables
Twine and packthread -.-.
Seines
,
Total-




$27,255,425
2,976,3i3
27,621,911
27,^31,313
30,434,886
10,236,037
479,171
2,996,631
14,987,776

Duties.
58,152,621
476,868
7,62.5,914
6,924,408
7,748,378
2,056,004
95,834

Value.
40
70
06
30
75
50
20

1,194,802 20
4,496,332 80

Value.

Duties.

$29,341,775 $8,777,066 80
403,624 95
2,477,709
32,382,594 8,986,151 85
33,949,603 8,513,717 86
34,696,831 8,805,359 66
10,863,536 2,178,895 90
179,475 30
698,251

$22,980,728
2, 593,137
24,404,149
17,757,112
24,366,556
8,617,165
266,829

1,198,614 40
4,110,236 70

3,114,824
14,673,647

3,370,802
13,700,789

Duties.
$6,873,058
431,757
6,755,005
4,319,033
6,129,583
1,723,573
63,366

00
10
80
45
95
90
80

1,098,304 40
4,402,064 10

fej
Q

O

!^

fej

1,880,918

470,229 50

1,594,038

2,507,135
252,170
841,757
121,660
58,646
404

692,140
'50,434
210,439
30,415
17,563
121

3,927,141
368,399
853,552
255,969
78,553
1,540

50
00
25
00
80
20

150,175,063 40,242,608 15

398,60? 50
1,178,142
73,679
213,388
63,992
23,666
462

30
80
00
25
90
00

168,460,982 45,104,883 15

^ Twine and seines are under one head for the year 1856.

1,123,839
3,892,749
i,976,662
318,511
767,055
187,124
«55,704
127,104,691

283,469
1,167,824
. 692,698
63,702
191,763
46,781
16,711

75
70
60
20
75
00
20

34,148,687 70

o
fel
QQ

No. 35.—STATEMENT—Continued.
1857.

1866.

1868.

Articles.
Value.




Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

$22,041,939
2,638,323
31,961,793
25,917,999
30,226,632
11,189,463
253,730
.2,859,342
.6,796,058
22,538, 653

,$6,587, 976
422, 746
8,835, 366
6,333, 7.40
7,604, .846
2,238, 384
5.0, .7.46
2,859, 342
2,718, .423
6,761, 695

70
86
40
06
15
70
00
00
20
90

$23,320,497
'2,633,614
31,286,118
28,686,726
27,800,319
11,441,542
6,19,582
2,527,262
4,274,205
42,776,601

$6,996, 619
437^ 958
8,633, 666
8,035, 194
7,010, 190
3,288, 999
103, 916
2,627, 262
1,709, 612
12,832, 950

70
20
60
76
45
60
40
00
00
30

$14,454,928
1,873,111
26,486,091
17,966,130
20,222,103
6,657,323
614,666
2,232,452
3,246,388
23,436,713

$3,450, 988
246, 533
5,653, 019
3,964, 099
3,867, 023
98.4, 076
^ .92, 199
669, 735
973, 916
.5,840, 811

05
46
47
15
87
85
90
60
40
12

1,335,247
4,664,353
1,978,344
410,691

333,811
1,399,3.05
593,503
82,118

75
90
20
20

1,580,246
4,443,175
1,918,988
321,961

395,061
1,332,952
675,696
64,392

60
50
40
20

1,249,385
2,846,029
1,283,538
189,494

2.37,383
682,806
308,049
28,424

16
96
12
10

1,191,019
132,172

297,764 75
33,043 00

1,129,764
156,632

619,680
170,259

-53,821

16,146 30

59,957

282,438 50
39,133 00
17,987 10

73,989

117,739.20
32,349 21
17,757 36

166,089,379

Iron, manufacturesof iron, and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
Manufaptures pf wool
— -•
cotton
-..!
:
silk.--.--..
.-..-...-,
,nax..—....................
hemp - - - J
-.
Brandies
--..Wines
.-,
Sugar
.-.-.
:.
;—
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, .flax, or
hemp is a component part, but which cannot
properly be classifi,ed with either, viz :
Silk and worsted goods
Embroideries of \fOol, cotton, silk, and linen..
Clothing, ready:made, and articles of wear
Laces, thread, and insertings
Laces, cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces,
braids, &c
^ 1. _. 1'
..- ..
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
.--.
Twine and packthread . . - - . .
„.,
Seines
.,
„
Total.,

Duties.

47,168,850 05

184,875, 979

54,282,931 20

123,520, 279

27,146,962,97

fej
>d
O
P^

o
H

w
fej
H-l

,

^ Twine and seines are under one head for the years. 1856, 1857, and 1858.

•

>

!2j

a

td
cn

03

No. 35.—STATEMENT—Continned.

oo
to
1860.

1859.
Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel
.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
_
Manufactures of wool
cotton
sUk flax
hemp
Brandies
Wines
Sugar
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp is a component part, but
which cannot properly be classified with either, viz:
Silk and worsted goods
..-.
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear
Laces, thread, and insertings
Laces, cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces, braids, &c
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
Twine and packthread
^
Seines . .
.
-.
Total

-

-

-

$15,000,866
2,047,730
33,521,956
26,355,081
26,745,527
10,340,606
432,746
3,262,058
3, 608,148
30,578,678

Duties.
$3,577,276
272,903
7,246,780
6,749,249
6,101,292
1,653,478
64,911
978,617
1,082,444
7,338,868

Value.
38
37
65
77
14
36
90
40
40
72

$18,726,667
2,799,937
37,937,190
10,139,209
30,767,744
10,736,335
769,135
3,937,698
4,776,119
31,082,005

Duties.
$4,458 ,606
362 ,726
8,155 ,518
1,379 518
6,889 ,739
1,613 647
115 ,370
1,091 ,309
1,432 ,535
1
7, 459




td

26

40
70
20
fej

1,623,106
3,286,408
1,537,284
276,292
621,300
61,217
54,374
1,582
169,354,858

14
92
16
80
00
23
76
68

2,193,376
2,963,616
2,101,958
397,542
656,517
132,927
49,238
730

34,616,440 68

160,271,633

308,390
788,737
368,948
41,443
118,047
ll,63i
13,049
379

416,743
711,267
604,469
69,631
124,738
25.256
11,817
176

44
84
92
30
'^3
13
12
20

33,825,316 14

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 28, 1860.

37
04
56
49
36
69

i

No. 36.

»

Statemeyit exhihiting the exports to and the imports from Canada, and other British possessions in North America, firom
the l^t day of Jtdy, 1851^ to the 30th day ofi June, 1860.
to
Exports.

00

Increase each r ucc 'Ssive 3^ear
over 1852.

Imports.

.

Years e n d i n g —

Foreign.

Domestjc.

Exports.

Total.

Imports.

Pi
td

o

'..
o...
.

0-...

$3,853,919
5,736,555
9,362,716
11,999.378
6,314,652
4,326,369
4,012,768
6,384,547
2,918,524

$6,655,097
7,401,087
15,204,144
15,806,642
22,714,607
1 9 , 9 3 6 , 113
19,6X8,959
21,769,627
11,264,590

$10,509,016
13, 140,642
24,566,N60
27,806.020
29,029,34^
24,262,482
23,651,727
28, 154,174
1 4 , 1 8 3 , 114

54,909,428

J u n e 30 1852
1853
1854
1855
la66
1857
1858
1859
I860

140,393,956

195,303,384

$6,110,299
, 7,550,718
8,927,561)
15,136,734
21,310,421 .
22,124.296
15,806,519
1!^ 727, 551
18,861,673
135,655,671

$2,631,626
14,057,844
17,297,004
1 8 , 5 2 0 , 333
13,753,46(i
13.142,711
1 7 , 6 4 5 , 158
3,674,098

$1,440,419
2,817,261
9,026,435
1 5 , 2 0 0 , 122
16,011,997
9,696,220
13,617,252
12,751,374

100,722,240

80,563,080

•

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H
O

td

c
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F . BIGGER, Register.
TRKASURY DISPART]\IENT, Register's Office, November 29, 1860,




OOOO

- •

•

No. t l .

05

General res:idt of all receipts dnd difposal of merchandise within the United Staie>^ during thefiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
1859.

Amount.

Duty.

Amount.

October.

September.

August.

July.

Duty.

Amount.

Duty.

1. Value of mercliandise in warehouse on the first of
$22,488,158 77 §5,988,625 87 .^23,885,353 37 -16,285,012 65 $22,649,542 25 i$.3,971,591 58
each month
2. Value of inerchantlise received in warehouse from
732,4JO 45
3,528,789 97
4,854,058 35 1,046,324 98
6,240,166 03 1,402,591 63
f<;reign ports (luring each month
3. V^alue ofmerchandise received in warehouse trans72,557 09
330,392 32
.305,081 71
75,034 63
90,703 95
387,843 52
ported from other ports d -ring each month . . . . .
4. Value of dutiubl*:; merehandi.-^e entered for consump22,931,391 80 4,339,124 34 • 16,972,-437 24 3,095,785 12
5,280,542 64
27,015,226 25
tion from foreigii porl^: during e a i h month
5. Valu« of free merchandise entered for consumption
6,552,134 37
7,372,773 74
5,432,502-46
fruii foreign ports duwug each month
6. Vame of nierchandiiie entered f(»r consumption from
4,773,378 75 1,082,781 24
4,924,194 10 1,103,776 70
983,083 55
4,305,062 93
warehouse during each month
,.
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to
619,652 03
145,403 87
110,109 03
112,167 O.i
464,073 08
447,939 02
other ports duriug each rar>nth
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation from
133,094 44
717,130 00
101,689 22"
218,866 95
1,006,684 on
477,813 00
vvarehouse during each month
9. Valuf of. merchandise in warehouse at the close of
20, .'396,563 76 5,415,299 57
22,649,542 2') 5,971,591 58
23,885,353 37 6,285,042 65
each month
10. Value of m'^rchandise in Iramitu at the close of
290,697 .56
.321,266 9.8
1,170,021 .43
313,941 8.3
1,130,388 08
1,041,897 72
each month




-

Amount.'

Duty.

Pi
td
$20,396,563 76

$5,41.5,299 57

3,351,763 35

687,701 04

421,145 42

94,582 22

12,901,800 02

2,369,489 73

n3

O
Pi
H^

O
H

7,112,624 75
4,686,-363 40

1,075,262 72

773,806 00

w

186,156 49

797,817 06

136,885 03

17,911,486 07

4,799^278 59

a

I , 5 l 0 , e 0 5 00

402,325 97

02

td

No. 37.—General result of all receipts and disposal of merchandise within the Uniied States, Sc.—Continuecl.
1859.
Noveinber.
Amount.

December.
Duty.

1. Valu«^ of m-^rchandi.^e in warehou.^e on the first of
$17,911,483 07 $»,799,278 .59
each month,
y •2. Value of im:;ri*handi-<e received in warehouse from
4,596,7^0 24
873,982 24
fijreigii poits during each uionth .
3. Value, of iiierchandi-e received in warehouse trans554,777 60
107,274 78
ported from:other ports du ing eaoh month
4. Vaiue of duriable merchantli.se entered-for consump14,804,482 29 2,565,766 67
tion/r>m-foreign port>; during each m o n t h . .
5. Vahie of:free merchandise entered for consumption
8,206,861 16
from f>»reig;a ports.during each inotith
;
6. Value of niHrehnndise entered Htr consumption from
3,656,898 7*5
814,725 81
warehouse, durinu'each uionth
...
7. Value of mercivafidise entered for transportation to
108,191 04
457,927 74
other ports during each' month.
8. Vaiue of merchandise entered for exportation from
140,299 77
858,860 21
warehou-e during;each month
.....
9. Value of nierchaudi.^e iu warehouse at the clo-;e of
18,089,297 21 4,717,327 93
each month
10. Value of merchandise: i n transitu at the close of
413,900 29
1,578,353 21




1860.

'

February.

January.

Ambunt.

Duty.

$18,'89,297 21

<4,717,.327 96

5,34.3,599 00

1,123,560 68

Amount.

.$18,850,594 0.) $4,881,550 66
4,613,417 00

Amount.

Duty.

.§18,589,162 93

$4,710,386 25

2,774,588 77-

565,170 14

284,816 10

69,226 81

877,204 96

287,03500

61,116 10

296,092 00

64,599 71

16,927,543 90

3,147,918 98

21,844,823 31

4,264,693 72

5,832,342 27

18,461,467 36 , 3,683,875 25
•

6,973,601 75

Duty.

w
td
na
O

Pi.

O

6,659,484 44

3, .538,125 21

777,720 99

4,428,5-25 07

952,490 89

3,763,891 75

829,888 67

693,464 00

156,063 50

480,978 00

105,681 41

453,753 39

101,641 84

634,748 00

88,659 57

28.3,437 00

54,796 78

603,827 00

77,6i>l 36

18,850,594 00

4,881,550 66

18,589,132 93

4,710,386 25

16,817,075 66

4,335,631 33

1,483,064 00

.385,228 09

1,549,441 00

416,632 29

1,638,807 00

424,470 65

H.
td

3
>.
o

td.
CQ

OO

NQ. B^."^Oeneral remU of oil receipts and disppml of merchandise- vsthin the United States, (f^c,—Ooiitinuad.

Apiil.
Duty.
1. Value of merchandise in warehouse on the first of
each month
g. Value of merchandise recejyed in warefiotjse from
foreign ports during each month . 3. Value'of merchandise received in warehouse transported from other port.« during each rnonth
4. Value of duciible merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ppits during each month
5. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption
from foreign ports dnring each month
C|. Value of merchandise entered for consumptioa from
warehouse during each month
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to
other ports during ef^ch inonth
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation from
warehouse during ei^ch month
9. Value (»f merchandise in warehouse at the close of
each month
..'...
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the close of
each month




May.

6,032,900 92
379,244 00

8 0 , I U 93

22,492,424 30

4,198,993 85

J18,765,665 Oil ^4,789,728 OS

$20,804,989 19

.$5,287,311 06

6,956,640 06

1,579,309 76

6,461,021 69

1,488,036 41

td

76,6::9 69

492,716 22

116,751 a5

507,002 73

111,179 33

pi

2,852,016 17

.15,129,140 06

2,805,259 57

15,933,101 99

2,979,124 32

H

1,366,935 00

6,081,838 07
3:)0,446 00 .
15,103,592 56

4,896,674 67

942,361 12 '

3,947,220 08

o

6

6,615,947 22

6,255,392 29

6,062,341 38

7,603,811 76

Duty.

Duty.

Duty.

$16,817,075 66 .§4,335,631 33 $18,242,488 66 $1,734,728 42
1,392,267 59

OO

3,828,388 37

852,168 61

572,485 60

121,562 75

454,148 00

107,608 91

561,670 00

- 130,328 48

652,678 83

153,880 69

585,939 95

99,551 07

551,283 00

105,89i 35

625,441 42

125,791 51

1,09.5,556 49

210,721 23

18,242,486 66

4,734,728 42

18,765,665 06

4,789,728 08

20,804,989 19

5,287,311 06

22,0:7,558 21

5,639,115 75

1,559,493 00

408,229 29

1,273,786 00

.341,068 14

1,309,181 00

343,702 15

1,254,228-00

335,670 68

1,175,074 76

4,222,920 73

88>,809 13
K

5*2

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OQ

No. 38.
Synojosis.ofi the returns ofi the banks in the different States at the dates annexed.

Date.

Dec,
18.34
D.C,
l-o.^
.Ian.,
1.-^57
Jan. 4,.18.38
Jan. 1, 18.39
.Jan.,
1860

$7,,3!U,2.32 $i:^, IHl, 908
7.899,793 13,066,9)6
8, 13.3,735 13,277,^20
11,210,2^5
7,6M,2U<
7,408,945 l l , 8 i S 137
7,506, t9(! 12,654,79

Dec,
18.34
Dec,
18.35
Dec,
18.36
Ian 4,185H
DHC. 6, 18.-8
Dec ,
1859

3,62f>,000
4,4 19,30«
4, ^31,(KM
5,041,000
5,04',00
5,016, Oi'O
.3, 27.=i, 6.36
3,603, •"

6, .372, 951
6,710,92'

11 : \ ^ 7H

3,8.36,946

7,302,951

4,028,710

1.36,1
123,237

$8.3,13- 1,079,686
49,428 I,l,30,;i62

82,<!i!(.i

'
140,86-'
1^1,875

176.434
2:^6.411
2:}6.0t3
275,933
294.42:
255,27-

124,86'-'
241.36:-t
1.38,-304
15-$. 132
170.994
181,964

12.5,902
54,538

$34,07
32,84

3.079,548
.3, .''89, 482
3,677,8^9
2,289:939
.•^,11.5.64.'
3,271,183

775.410
9>8.474
].058.803
'875,789
1,089.920
1,187.991

198.68;
201,.54

3.988,709
3,704,341

745.17(
801,039

4,08^416
4,029,240

6,39^992
6,940,523

$19.5=9
104, '7;{
121.743
76.069
9fU^82
87,165

15,715

979
7,647

114,5

135,268

52,88;

43,146

39,440

208,8.3' 3,970,720

797,5.35

138, .382

7,90.3,711

17, 18.

1225 92:<

36,351

188,588 4,27.^,517

746,557

2.32,62.n
69,667

178. .35(^ ,3,024,14!
198,409 3,882,983

61.% 874
787,834

1,639
.5.441
19,132

1.443
3,780

3.828.402 24.803.754,4''9,4C.2 '3, 116. OM
4. . . ? , ' ~ !8. .344,315
33)
3,611.097 i 8, 104.82'
11.112.715 20.839.' 438
7, .532,6 4 2,086,920

18,78.3.281
21,478.717
23.437.2.^6
17.831.191
30..5.^8,1.53
27,804,899

6.9.30.09)5.947.835
4,807.80
4.108,694
7,854,234
0,937,642

.563.313
494. .342
931.•68
1.,34.3,948
I,.537,851
1,444,338

2,772; .387 l,0!6.6.3H
2.914..598 1.192,449
3.141,65 1,475.221
2^-510^ 108

32«.425
3.37. .3:39
6.39,703
381j40^

7.^?
,'4

Aug.,
1834
Aug.,
18.35
O'.-i:.,
185H
Oct. 17, LS37
Oct,
1K38
Oct.,
1859

Rhodelsland. ...

Sept,
Sept.,
Dec,
i)ut.'l4j

17,511.162
18,682.802
20,275.899
20j334^777

25.233.304
26,383.4.58
28,679.343
254823il52

111.988
131.072
128^33V
145A 129

222,580
190,565

701,.545
73,95-;
176,4 K' 1,187,602

4'.78(
69,435

1,186, .309
l,28'!,6i'l
1,428,39}
l,6nH,61.M
I,.384.884
1,601^072

106, .300
176,401)

54,432,660 93, .341,9.33
58,632,350 99, '.08,7.11
: ^<, .398, 8l)i 101,1^2, 7 92
60,319,721
92, 45-', .572
61,8l9,e2-- m i , 602.947
64,519,200, n 0 7 , 4 l 7 , 3 2 3




6-, 0.S6
72,912

602,447
789,963
741,47:
829,169
f-89, 33
772,173

52, 34.M
56,-IP
75,893

$ 1,02.3.21 !> $-,891,815 $2,914,801 $17i.62H
753 08.^ 5.077.248 2.'011.028
118.975
705. !4-^- 4,Htl,6-!6 1;9:J4.782
14.3.«'8:«
6I=>.44I 2.9n4.:^7 1.74:^. 939
139.304
663.75^ 3.88^, .^39 2. .382,910
89.271
67;:>, 97'9 4,149,718 2,411,022
102,392

4,788

Massachusetts.

1854
18.55
18 6
1857

^1,781,085 $-^.39.97^
I, ,398, 430
484..381
1, 1.58,2.6
375:218
876, (.i2>:
213.12
1,47^,8927.{.303
1,019,90.290,224

$112,69-!
13 ,2M
l3•^25;^
145, .36
181,199

6,P9I,621
8,037,427
8,846, 4-2 .
7,.S89,H|3
8,2.3(1,7.34
8,591,688

Aug., 18.34
.fulyand An
gust, 1853.
Julyaiid Au
gust, 18.3«.
Jnly a»id Au
cus t, 1837.
Aug , 18.3H
July,
1859

N e w Hampshire ,

$8,850

8,22.5,682
7,010,323
7,574,791
5, 522, (!8
9,187,245
7,212,5-0

5,:^>,5y4
4. .347,71
5,248. 379
4.38.3,6,0
4,99.3.42
5,183.459

282,164
3>:{. 092
478,6.32
527;787

932.6'9
3.3.42!^
880.724
70,28J 1,242.362 1.1.37.251
70, I3;> 1,2.35.322 1^28>..7.34
50^760 1J 410,-675
860^778

312.60
.385.7n7
548, :^4>
570^830

5,035, Ci73
.5.414,104
.3..321. 909
3^I92i661

]^o. SS.—SynojDsis ofi the returns ofthe banks, wc.—Continued.

rti-

Date.

$24.08.5.894 $161,309
2.5,131,1
161,,309
26,719,877|
^4,102

R.jisland—Cont'd

May,
J 'n.,
Jan.,

18.38
1859
1860

$20,070,741
20.'321.089
20,865,569

Connecticut .

April, 18.34
April, 18.35
April, 18.58
April 1,18.37
April, 1858
May,
1859

15, .597.891
17.147,385
18.913,372
19.923. .553
20.917,16.S
21,512,176

Nevv York

Sept.,
18M
Se:)?... 18.55
Sept.; 18.38
D e c 26,. 18.^7
Maroh, 1"^ 8
J u n e , 18.38
Sept., 18.38
Dec 18,18.38
Df^c ,
1859

83,7-73,288
83,.589. .590
96,H8l,.30t
107.449,143
I09..587.7O2
109. .340,541
109. 998, .3.30
110.238,480
111,441,320

NewJersey

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan ,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1855
18^6
18.37
18.38
18.39
1860

5.314.88;
.5,882,282
6,582:770
7.494^912
7,3.39; 122
7,844,412

9.177,3:^4,
10.999,919
13,380,08:-'
11,-^64.319
12.449.46U
14,909,174

821.984
780.897
.581,773
721,098
785. .523
962,911

240.92
285.2281
224,711
344.045
421,793
446,202

158,398
71..38"
288,296
288-802
:39l.194
590;884

1,810,707
1,8.39,249
2,237,204
1.609,81"
2.223,<K35
2,395,028

Pennsylvania

Nov.,
Nov.,
Nov.,
Nov.,
Nov.,
Nov.,

18.54
18.35
18.36
1857
18.^8
1859

19,884,82.'
22,026:.5961
23,6 9. .344
2.5,691,439
24,56.5,805
25,565,582

48,641,393
.52, .549.199
53.287.23
49.149,323
48.8-'.5,2850,327,157

2,133,492
2,714,232
2.301,628
2. .389,119
2,9.34.443
2,513,674

1,159,710
1.128,874
1,208,589
1,3.5.3,285
1,42.3,2.33
1,719,136

.399,662
678.018
30:3.7.'^0
244.12(1
2.53, .521
685,561

4,840,118
5.647,642
5.143.3.3!
:3,77:3,2 7
4.418.43--:
.3,073,210

Delaware.

Jan.,

18.35
1856

1,393,175
1,493,185

37.4681
44,086!

124,3.56
1.37,524

Jan.,



2^. 292, ,32
23-704,4-81
28.511,149
.33.108,5228.799,43."
27;856,785

386,212
1,298.677
37.5,812
1,391.218
453,1.32
1.2I8.6.'^0
820.241
948.749
9.38,755 1,08.5,1731
1,267,405 1,915,047

183,216,,392| 20,820,6.33
1 9 ^ 161. Ill 20.59O,l.'=.0
205.892,4 9P 24,027.5;n
162,807,:J7H 22,62.3.755
170.4.30.240 >2.894.877
187,488.5ir >:^: 097.681
194.734.9981 25, 0:^1. 41R
200,577. 19- 2.3,28«.8S4
•200,351,332| 26.897,874

3,048,141
2,906,2.531

$538, 103
536,403
604,01

5,178,831
5,8.37.537
6,^88.945
7.423:614
7.681.904
7.899.9.381
8.182.92
8.261,425
8,725, .526

$7.32.822 .$2,644,195) .$2,624,228 !$!,!.30,667 $296,889
608,8.33 .3,318.681 .3,1.'^0.47.'. ' 9.%;08l' 296,889
450,929 3,55 ,295 3,553,lu4 1,022,277

$93,36.=' 1$ 1,700. 18:- $7.35. 049
93,385 1.491..3221 802.580
974,620
-100,22:1 1,143, .591
564. .52^
673.0:^7
488. \-3»
614.76:3
877.0!!'
799,244

2,205,068
2.27^^608
3.4:32,97.n
2.851, 14.J
2..384,8I9|
2,994,9.58

767,642 12.475,292
12,688.517
12,179,189
467,855| 11,728-973
2,803.51 •
>
331.60) 13, .389,231
:3.30^ 1.3.3 ! 2.880,88"
397.3:3" 5.189..3.59
1,418 12, .524,249

29,140|
3,8141

402,179
387,0791

459. .^02 $206,921 1.207.381 •1,219, .368
281,220 '810.101 6.871.102
341:754
246,24H 1,006,493 9. I97.76J
357.319
4!3,900 • 27.S7-22 l,lv9.7f'8 10, .590,421
262,59.=.
27.3.381
945:844 5,:380,247
2.55,044
326,8171
989,920 7,561,519
3.685.
2,958.
2,9.35.
1,8.57.
1,705.
1,914.
2,1 (•6.
2.044.
2,26i;

3,910.160| 1.008.6.55 1,022.940
945,844
3,43.3,081
482,975
4.i)90.8.35
875,287
911.4.58
4;68B:843

4,140,088
5,574,900

1,020.711 I..303,135
684:997 '89:3.155
5,808
926, .30t

3-^9 I.3.661..38: 3I,.307.760 84,970,840 21,081.4.38
4-.53,;
545
096.5 10,9I0,330| 31.310.003 8s;8^2,3^5 26,045,439
828
G7i,8 12.898.771 34,019.633 96,907.9:0 29.014,125
130.6 73 29,313.421 ' 3.899,964 83.04:3, :3.33 2 •,288, .36-.'
748
1.32,7 35.071. (i74 '22,710,1581 9.3,738:87^ 28.710,077
019,^241 33. .397.211 24,079. 19;-' 00.762.909 .34,290,788
7:31
740,7 29,90.3,295 28,605,40 103.481,74: 3<.610.44>9C7 28. .335.984 ;28.5U7,990 110,485.798 :35:i;34.049
43D. 9
17.376,750 20,921,545 [29,959,506 104,070,273 23,807;429

828,4.52
7? 2.8.39
849.928
l,:-;08,83l
9.32.231
940,700'

418.34
,302,949
710.072
494:197
.578,006
662,198

3, .552.585
4,285,079
4.759,8.35
3, .395.9.36
4,054,770
4,811,832

.3.290,462 • 48:3.8-5
3,994..541
618.:i21
4.891.9701 1,4:38.6.38
3:898,605:
507,077
4,239.235
770,9.3.^
5,741,465 l,141,664j

731,884
615,502
767.3:-3
829:6.36
292,940
442.812
5:;9,8?9
824-618
059,277

80,763

3.789,420 3,627,949 3,944,800 10,739,069 21.076.484 3,9.30,86-^ 12,716.872
1.35.3761 6.7:38.852 16,883,199 25.340,814 4,9.5.3,48;1 '
96,792
4,480,873
5,973.1.38 I7,:.368.i:'96 27,.393,.^.34 4,21.3,515i 127,059
.3,719.2:34 1,593.1
80.706
4,814.97i
75:829| 4,.380,528 11,8I0.458| 18.924,113 5.847.97(1
8:34,124 3,349,824 11.34.3. .3.38 14,980,481 28.6.5^..56?:' 4,589.6251 429,167
8,378,474 13,13:>,892| 26,167,843 3,837,554 975,192
4,277,;-i99|
39,051
39,830l

237,21
1.36,0551

90,149| 1,380,991
180,0511 1,192,2041

859,010
8.52,164

127,5101
125,3031

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

Maryland .

V irginia .

North Carolina.,

1857
1858
1859
1860

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.-,
Jan,,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1855 i
18.56
18.37
1.^8
8'.
1859
1860

3,021,3781
2,544.212
3.009:285
3,150,215

33,0761
18,610
2-3,610
4,750|

130.000!
.57; 6.55
81,499
85,182|

1,065]

10,411,874 17,588,718
11.202,6(61 20,616. (•0.31
12,297,276' 22,293,554
12,451,545 21,804,11
12,.360,6:'..'> 2!,854,y:34|
12,568,962 20,898,762

618.29
644,60.);
7.58.27r
644.318|
89-2,98
848,2831

333.931
318,8981
402,217'
417,925]
484,825
505,179

295,223
698.890
23, .528
14,74
67, .374
41,5001

1,490,60?-1,649,186!
1,894,79 '
3.226,112]
i;017.64
1,657,0161

96.518
1,568,381
82,961
1, 48 >, 744
9,18!r
•,668,683
3,164
1,47.3,413
69,863 1,521,663
1,897,218

788.9521
3,127,308
807.98
2,647,366
872.388|
3,184,988
910::394
3,591..584
951.629
.3, .389,4:3
3,584,0781 1,019:0:32

75,309
114,4:3:3
484,682
33.'. 98'
413,675]
433,423

1,596,434
•2,186,725'
2.405,21
2,085,4•2^
2, .3.37. 182]
2,756,04-

1,22,5,106
999,7(>4
!,.309,089
1,674,73'.
814,<-6ii
1,294,09,

247,909
25,9991
13.4.(2
6,2^7
496,683
• 29,83b

123,275
123,985

145,0,33
171,037

12,769]
4,067

672,99
785,8521

409,764
378,690

39,238

.1,291.436] 6,667,762
1,360,9951 5,750,092

94,116

192,475

7,9131

846,416

366,076

1,378

1,428,185]
l,a35,010
1,638,185
i;640,775'

Jan.,
1855
Jan.,
1856
Jan ,
18.57
Ji'.n. 1, 18.58
Jan.,
18.39
Jan.,
1S80

14,033,83s
i;3.6U0,U8|
13,86:3,000
14,85l.6Uf
14,645:3701
16,005.158

23,331,9391
25,319,948
24,899,57,
23-:338.41
22,419,512
24,975,79:^1

Nov., 1854
Nov. &Dec.,
1855
N o v , Dec,

5,205,07.3
6,031,945|

11,458,.52'
1J,558,4.30|

6,425,2,30

12,6.36,52

234;

506,514
.507,2.55]
308.22-:
411,932

40,680
58,6.39
61,448
122,125

146,3671 1,394,094
203,228 1,240,370]
217,342
960,846
208,924; 1,135,772]

863,4141
609,179
832,65"
976, 2-281

147,250]
72,2986,1801
102,166

2,987,22:)!
:3,398, I'O
3,522,56
2,614,7281
3, 120,01
2,779,418|

4,118,10'
.3,297.983]
5,155,096
4,041,02
3,977,971
4,106,8691

7,288,88&I
8,:370,34.'
9,6ll,324|
7,.Ml,l8f9.028,684
8,874,18i

I,.511,970
1,924,756
1,895.284
4,194,67^
1,725,801,324,74*

891,2.30
938,108
679,701
549,933
417,867
357,195

2,728,^482
3,1.31,109
3,092,74
2.7!0,773,077.68'
2,943,652

10,834,983
13,014,9-28
I2.6f.<5,6r
10,347.8741
IO,;.34 ,312
9,812,-97

81.3.830]
5,61.3,66r
663,99.=^
6,294.31729. .50"
7,:397.474
899,796
6,971.3251
982. :35
7,401:70
7,729,6.32 1,138,327]

51,.546
36,602
98:235
87,MIO
,58,780
34,600

1,130,329]
1,101,113

112.04"
234,832|

16.907
10,710

1,156,9931 6,301,262

1,170,026

224,821

6,645

1,035,869] 5,699,427

1,0.37,45"

82,317

66

1,248, .325 6,202,626
1,617,6871 5,594,057

195,601
108,516
114,812
103,?62

1,502,3121
1,487,-273

18.=-6 Jan.,
18.37
Dec, 18.57,
Jan. 1858.
18.39
Jan.,
Jan , 1860

6,525,100|

11,96.7,733

180,270

196,671

6..525,2001
6,826,478

12,247. .300
12,21:3,272

123,95
;363,82^'

216,347]
188,508

South CaroUna.

Sept., 1854
Sept., l^•.55
18.37
Jan.,
Dec 31 , lHo7
18.58
Mee,
1859
Dec,

16,603,25:J
17,- l8,(-;0(.i
14.837,642
14.885.63
14,88:^4.5
14,962,062

23,149,098
22,238,900
28,227.3701
22,058:561
24,444,044:
27,801,912

1.870,305
.3.483.01
3,-288,876
3,223,88'
:3,32i,969
2,994,688

Georgia.,

Aug., 185.5,
Mar. 1858.

11,508,717

16,758,4031 1,671,234j 4,853,503

135,298 1,285,624

846,675

513,697

Oct., N o v ,
Dec. 1858,
Jan , 18.57.
Sept. & O c t . ,
1857
Ap'l, 1858, to
Jan., 1-^.39
Oct.,
1859

15,428,690j

16,649.201 2,248,083J 8,368,280

534,619 1,358,971 1,480,570

31,928

16,015,2561

12,677,863| 2,358,584 8,470,709

549,639] 1,194,4651

454,156

259,576

1,417,.545 .5,518,4-2.51 2,215,85S|

12,479,11

17,929,066 1,605,127 4,791,022

678,271 4,073,6651

720,692

402,451

3,751,988 1,687,58-2

16,6^9,560!

16,776,282 2,583,1581 8,424,463 1,110,377! 2,005,768 1,083,710

101,939

3,211,974! 8,798,100]

4,738,285

787,733

183,640

129,516

Florida . .

Jan.,

1860

30 ^ 000

'464,630

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1855
18.31857

9,296,400
2,297.800
2,297;800|

4,397,298
5; 117,4-27
6yS45,209|

768-6.501
7143; 026
142,201




709,830

383,018

45,696! 1,291,34:3
68,009' 1,081,48:3|

317,362
601,115

510.585
,571,0491 1,198,42
600,880
95i.832 1,057,478
631.27:-:
698.882 1,180,938]
698:8881 1.0i5.448 u:i^3i,ioy]
677,641 2,984,540 2,200,4.50
681,24.31 1,45.3,488 1,592,644|

441,864
424,135
539,497
889,722
600,290
443; 478

100,02r,

Alabama .

^ 14,275

25,8J3|
53,588
80,648
78,1481

1,25-21

57,061
551,482
504,287

7,766
184. ,3,36]
100,139 1,196,478

.53,936
1.2:=3,284| 6,7.39,623 2,871,09.5 1,197.949]
46, .332
1,228.22 6,.504.679 3,068.188 1;100:299
•1,197:774 10; 6.54.6.52 3,50-2; 7.3:1 3,518,96 :3,35.5,119
i , ! 0 4 ; i 2 8 | 6.185.82.'i 2,9,55,8.54 3.07 <, 740] 1,700.612
2,601,4141 9,170, .3:3.3 3,897,840 3,746,604 3,214,920
! 2,3-24,12 i 1,475,6:34' 4; 465,615 1,499,218] 1,417,837

24,580

271,80
1,421,445]
665,3021

'51,64S
54,251

1,9.55,906| 10,092,8091

2,5-25,258 1,334,098

623,918

1,702,108 9,147,011

.3,l-26,53t

1,663,429

87-2,^44

533,819

832,662

5,317,92:5 1,7-27,995

552,254

32,876j
45,647

1,125.490 2,332,176 1.278,022|
Is274,944 3,467,242 2.837^556
1,139,3121 3,177,2341 2; 423,269]

1,287,268]
5,144
181,558
481,289
703,4431

15,000
10,000
5,000

".No. 3S.-^:Syn(^psis ofi the returns ofi the banks,{(pi.—Ooiitliiimd.
O

Date.

Jan. 1, 1858
Jan.,
18.39
Jan.,
1860

$:3.23.3.6.50
3.863,494,901,000

Louisiana

Jan.,
1855
Dec,
18^3
Dec,
1836
D e c 25.1857
f>oc,
18.38
Dec,
1859

20,179,107 -27.142.907 4.187.180 3.317:422
19,0-27,728 27.500. .348 2, .391,400 2.311.13:3.
21,7.10.40;
3l-200,->95 4,791,885 2. 470.883
22.800.5--.30 .23,-229.098 .5,318.418 2.49:3.494
2!,215-6 9 29,424.2
.5,.3b4:.39i 2. .395,500
24,493.886 35,401,609 5,84-2,092 2; 141,881

Mississippi

Jan.,
1835
Jan.,
18.38
Jan.,
1837
J a n . 1,1858

240, 16
240,185
3:5.000
1,110,600

.352,739
48.S, 411
6.37,0-20
393,218

Tennessee

Jan.,
1835
Jan.,
18.38
'an.,
1837
Jnly 1.18.37
J a n . , ' 1839
Jan ,
1830

6,717,
8,.59:3,69 (
15,454,423
9.083,0(39
8..381, ^57
8,057,0:37

11,7.55.7-29
14.880.809
10,8.9:1, :390
13.124,292
r3,28->:786
11,751,019

Kentucky . . . .

Jan.,
Jan.,

1855
18.38

.IH!|.,

18.37

Jan. 1, 1838
J.:n.,
185^
Jan.,
1850

10,369,717
10.434,572
10,598,305
10.78?, .588
12,218.723
12,83:3,67(1

17. .307. .367
2i:!32.5i9
23.30 1:55 i
17.88!, 283
24,401,942
-2:3,284,889

Nov., 1854
n.'c,
1853
Dec,
1855
J m . 1, 185X
Jan.,
18.59
Jan.,
1860

1.21.5,398
1.21.5,40
2,21.5,40:
2,6-20,61
5,798,781
9,082,951

;3.4 41.64:
4,:i9?.0;9
4.112,79!
4,6 20, .331
9,83-,426
1.5.461,192

Alabama—Cont'd

Missouri.




$5,.585,42J
9:0.38,:379
13, .370, 027

$148.5.39
160,219
,321,51:5

$1.50,141
180,4(0
171, 30{!

$24,505 $1,162-972
2.192.019
*28,29ii 1,208,5)8
I.985,373
2-2:<3.4l2
1,493,905
1,147.^87
873.471
1,082,041

60.710
81,1
237. .305
219,086

.$571,.5.5*
§1,:30-2.312 *2,.381,794 $1,408,8.3
3, :<71,9.3f^ 6,631,117 .3.8^0,807 1,006.83:
$-20,800 •2,747, 174 7,477,978 4,851,153
874,800
8..37 0..58>^
8: 191.62"
6.811.182
10,370.70!
16,218,027
12,115.431

5. 4.30
7.740
26..303
'97.3

6..588.601
7,922,611
9.19 4.1,39
4. .335.6-^4
9,094.009
11,579;313

11.688,298
14,747,470
13,478:^29
11,8.38,120
21.82',.3319,777,812

8,083
7,744
7,912
591

3.134.4:
6,099.8:30
8:416.7-28
3.95i.-2(J:9,2^38,2.34
7, 3U5, 115

11,9C4
50,000
5,911
12,813
4,891
519 . 11.4.3
780,787 "*30,*269
1,007

$151,728
872;746
643,6.57

221.780
324,080
536,34
169,400

42,7.3^
.35,60
83,4,35
49,781

486,45^
541.711
590.71"
.58:1.40n
486.82.=
595,759

168, .395
113,896
24.low
II8;.3-23
8,2i8
84,35-

1,0.37,140
491,80^1
2.617.688
839,9)8
2.380.700 1,069.408
3; 327, : . 3
i^
998.917
2. .375,485
581.723
495, .:62
2,613.910

68.209 1,47.3,040 5.8.30, .582
16.or 2.-231.418 8.518.,54
6 •,767 2, 094.6;3-^ 8,401.948
2.870.751 8,0.38.982
2,88:3. OIH 6,472,822
L287,
. 932,09 2,267;71 5,538,378

743,0:3:{
678.389
7:39,! 26
7.38,70.79.3,841
851,562

416.920
458. .304
46".: 907
.50). 2
,5t»8..503
477,97

218. .^.
'03
533.7.30
383,924
2.611
141.07.--.
188,391

3,319.718
3.7:31.463
4,ll5:4:3i»
4.4 1. 131
6.53^:2!5
.5.099:5:8

688,370
985,8' 8
840.9-^9
7:?.%46i
l,017,.'S?0
779,535

4.152,988 8.6.:8,946
4.611.768 12.834,.33:
4,408,108 3-68 .',21;
4,0-27,>''25 8,8 4,225
4.984,1 I 4,34.3,695
I
i; .502,25'' 3,520,207

7 >, 00
417,335
725,670

111,185
104.82>
98,2.34
29,773
169.549
228,609

49,98('
28,:<;3!
7.3,991
98,6-i8
597,879
1,090,506

33.870
198,910
:324,703
1,007,.575
1,016,015

871,076
1,486,45"
2,450,308
:3,3l7.08i
1,5-7. ,57?"
1,233,43-J

110,084

1:39
199
20,901

318.658

975,49!
4:.30^0
,{V,,>
1,2-45.18
l,424,0>^
3,921,789
4,160,912

.$2,131
196,049

l,151,.53^ .,2.32.973
1,687, .33' 2.301.747
'65:,5.35 2,207, .383
1,810.61V
2.198,982 1.7ai.f).38
1,165,675 •2,-201,138

31,792

60

211,68'
2.413.418
85..501
487.070
3.7-10, IOI
664-910
944.91
4.87.3.348
951.-262
4.545. 104 1.817.61 2,768.141
.4.639.809 1,073.289 441.185
264,624,324,799
462,420

.3,011,7!9
3.60S. 75
4.47f.37(
3,232:132
5, 14'.-879
5,682,892

2.577.82^
2,5.55.9.53
2 98:1.37:1
3, 195, .352
4,338.:36!
3,259,717

284,778
l,46-',630 "1.247.851
1,:331.128
172,425
2,8'i5,fi80
11J, 9 ^
*4
2, :8't.:380 1,188.98.'
2i->, 117
1,483,412
1,718,7.30
8,089,120 3,123,622 . 579,8.30
7,884;888 3.357,176 1,200,010

295.605
.532.000
50,000
1,915

Illinois

1854
1836
1856
1838
1838
1860

29
36
42
45
48
74

2,513,790
3,840,946
5 , 8 7 2 , 14
4,879,.3-25
4,Oi:0..334
5,251,223

316,841:
337,675
1,740,671!
1,146,770
1.298,616
'J87,229,

2,671,903
•3,777,676
6,129.613
6,161,017
6,48:1,65
9,8^'8,691

31,158
79,940
52,832
59,587
87,789
92,429

D^c,
1853
July & Oct.,
1851.
O c t , 1355, &
J a n . , 1K55.
Jnlv & O c t ,
18.38
N o v , 18.37,&
J a n , 18^8
N o v . , 18.38. &
J a n . , 1859.
Jan ,
1860

44
59

.5,534.532
7,281,934

7.247,:i66
9,305,651

3,2:37,084
6,143,837

289.87:<
249.298

4o

4,045,325

6,936,992

1,705,070

46

4,123,089

7,039,691

1,694,357

40

3,585,922

4,831,445

1,416,7:37

101.224

37

3,617,629

6,463,308

l,2.-i2,98i

195,711

37

. 4,313,210

7,875,851

1,349,488

258,3)9

Ohio

Nov.,
1854
F- b ,
1838
Nov.,
183)
F e h . 1, 1838
Ans.,
185-'
V o v . , • 1858
Feb.,
1880

•6
65
61
49
53
51
52

7,168.581
6.491.42
6,742,421
6x.5tiO,77i6-875,42-S
6,707,131
6,890,8:39

13..378.:3:39l
14,921.998
15:223.241
9 , .3.38,927
10,549,574
11,171,343
11,100,462

2,468.247
2.476,751
2.749.8!'^
2.088,778
2 . 0 8 . 97
2:089.78!-^
1,1.53,.3:32

Michigan

.Ian.,
1855
Dec,
18-35
Dec,
18.^6
D ^ c , 1857, &
J : i n , 1858
Dfic,
18.38
Dec,
18-i9

6
4
4
4

980,418
7.30,438
811.489
851,804

1,900.942
1,9.-8.087
1.90:3.603
i;ill,7tG

3
4

7 4 5 , 304
-- 7.55,485
1,400,000
1,870,000
2,9.35.1)00
5, n15:000
7.99.3.00'
7,620,00-.'

Indiana.
.CK^. 1(^1.^..

April,
Jan.,
Oct.,
J a n . 4,
Oct.,
Jan.,

. . . . .. .. ..

......

-

18.35
16.38
1857
1858
18.39
186f!

23
:i2
49
86
98
108

878,612
1,338,203
1 , 1 0 8 , 1 4 8 -2,:3.54..571
3,9.33.4.50
4.'7.57 2 . 8 1 3 . . 5 7 1.8:37 2 , 6 27; 6 9 0
1,679,-277 3 , 2 0 b, 416

3.85,3:39
517.056
433,717
2 5 5 . 0 34
2 71..5-28
313,289

37,165
19,297
6,433
9.272
39,397

127,238

1,985,114
:3,0.,'7,8-27

7 1 5 , 305
911,000

12^,880
173, 37:^'

231,929

'i;32,946

r, 274,992

.593-232

369,80M

227,599

380,94 1

1,3:38,418

.5-57,238

68,50^

10,891

920.441

395,536

1,231,720

111,089

1,177,489

505,685

36,62:3

l.?>:9,G00

221,457

9.50,835

418,991

80,799

29.«,222
<35O,70.<
3)0. H5
5-22,041
801.000
,588.670
718,91.M

1 , 0 0 6 . 5-2-3
1,195.047
8 8 7 : .-337
9 1 0 ; 4.38
7 J 9 . -81
711.1.37
961,72!

2.751,31-^
3.117,178
2,749.538
2 . i:39.:364
?, 3 4 7 . 0 4 1
2.6r3,f>r
2,687:7(33

905.555
1.6-12.9(39
l,l'^9.8n<
7 6 8 . 2 !3
798,99?
1. '5-2.4:31
• 898,337

535.4:31
517,91^
.588,;3K9
3-22,466

148,0.35
I2K48R
6 0 , MO
115,66!

1.3,34-21,.347
11.14-3
15,7-27

392.5.30
40 2. .320
243.081
77,03i

11H,.784
97.-285
1.59.489
31,411

1,1.5.3, .547
i^92,949

25.«,77^
192,8:31

124,337
13-1), 861

14.440
36.119

137.0.^.9
120.372

54.983
44,644

1,851.043
.3,906,079
5,280.834
6.2'30.88i
9.28-.>;4.37
7,59-2,361

1,044-021
I.2.;0,083
•2,025,160
3,826,488
5,114,413
5,031.504

24.3-2!)
8.791
94,-261
1,.301
1 3 0 , 315
1,892
229,-2,38
45,256
3'M,I42
3 J S , 4 6 1 1,:3>9, 6 5 8

3 18, 9.32
:363-18l
4.5:3.771
498.794
89^:775
b90,454

3 4 1 , 74
H1I3. M48
701,181
467,411
K32. 2--^
925,11 1

512

Wisconsin

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan ,
J a n . 4,
Jan.,
Jan ,

Minnesota....

Jan.,

18.39

2

.50,000

5,185

50,000

1,2.5=^

.30,8-06

Dec ,

18:39

12

460,450

724.228

101,849

4 9 , 308

248,817

Kansas Territory..

Jan.,

18.39

1

52,000

48,-2.35

Nebraska.

Jan.,
18.57
J a n . 1,-18.38
Nov.,
1858

4
6
2

2 0 5 , (-00
15,0(!0
55,000

418.097
15.679
97,087

3.975
3.8.3!i
1,155

294,034
241.903
157:981
131.764
525-, 344
552,338

4 4 5 , ,3.39
803,849

100,622

1,.599,014

4,.516,<:22

1,957,097

379,804

161,975

1,420,078

4,731,705

1,852.742

272,815

177,309

.3, .31,3,9 76

1,417,968

3 8 0 , .569

60,954

,5,3:9,935

1,723,840

1 7 6 , :368

68,215

1,.583,510

5,390,216

1,700,479

89.530

1^0,895

1.38,310 L 6 ' J 0 . 1 0
1 0 8 : 3 9 2.09->:809
39.0'!: 2.018.'8l •
121.354 1.7.-31.995
19.3.5-7 1 . 9 3 3 . 0 2 1.^0,741 1,81:3,441,
1 5 7 , ^7h l , H 2 8 . 8 4 0

8,074.1.32
9.080.589
9,1.^3.629
6.201,288
7. .388. >9i
8 - 0 4 0 . 3.14
7 , 9 8 : ^ 88 ^

5.4-.0,.56S
7.101,323
6.513.4-20
3.91.5,781
3.780.21 i
4,:389.8-<!
4,0i9,8l4

949,727
1,712.010
1,202,98'
28o:,78.8
.308.79:3
488.878
790,.58^'

4'1,652
298.^02
.392.7.38
282,071
(95.164
206,2^5
144,:81

14:3,12 <
l5->.08i!
92.75->
23,778

5 0 0 91-5
57.->.8l';i
6 7 ' ' , 349
3 6 4 , )76

1.170.974
1.386.9.3-!
1..-347,9.38
310,479

-

95..597
5-<. 43.3
118.982
78,975

187. .522
1-?8,2I6
52.8(6
124,198

22.5:9
23,871

4-2,018
24,175

.3-^1.978
222,197

553.693
375.397

3 5 . 6^^
13,969

128.011
76,206

10'3. 184
.57.2 8
73,-222
67.4.-9
^3.89:«
64,430

334.383
5 3 ' . 713
,542:9:3,37.;. 54:^
706.0-9
419,94';

740.76'
1 . 0 8 0 , 16-1
1.702-^70
2.913-07!
1.89.5. 170
4;429.835

1.482.05:1
2.808.341
^., 3 8 5 , .382
2.077,882
3.022.:-'84
:3,08,5,8i:^

235,85

8.182
6:43.-!
9,141
10,04:-

1.5.272

48,6i:<

255,345

553.8.(6

527, r,S

8,25-'

....

4,058

1,288,102
1,287,234
1,002,399 !"2l"6,'483
19,662
6.58.521
1.5.621
640.0-8
26,533
697,037
1.76 4 . 7 4 7
2,^^89,605

213,681

2,29.^.

2,2S3,.526
3,4-20.985
.3, .534.945
5,2-^8,9:30
.3,707,048
8,981,723

1,S20,76!> 7 , 1 1 6 . 8 - 2 7
1,-894, .35 7 8 , 1 6 5 , 8 . 5 6

4,22:1

1

56.5,1,52
7.59,474
63=1,810
333,2:39
269.585
223,8 ^

8.89.^
3.33.798
41.641
23,346

12% 291
3,673
23,748

'...

2.695

133.:325
5,8rt3
6,629

458. 7 ' 9
'.07:3 874
1."90.488
1,27 <. 8 7 2
1. .57:3,894
1,493,529

'

13,131

15,689

25,r56

•




2,154
' "

'l,'34l

129.804
35.60!
3 , 172

15,0811
1,000
1.;J99

210
" " " " 2 0

1,749
2,576
4,418

No. 39.
to

Comparative view ofi the condition qf the banks in difi^erent sections qf the Union in 1856-'5'r, 1851-'58, 1858-'59, and 1859-^60.
Capital paid in.

Banks and branches.

L o a n s and di.scounts.

Sections.
185S-'57- 1857-'58 1858-'59. 1859 .'60
Eastern States
Midclle .-States
f^outlnvestern States
W e s t e r n States

507
470
128
105
206
1,416

498 »
459
140
•115
210 ;
1,422

1857-'o8.

1858-'59.

1859-'g0.

505 $114,611,752' $117,251,990 $119,590,423
4.36; .362,227
1.54,442,049
485
140,298.878
48.578,132
.52.077, .587
50,5.34,582
146
54.234,042
44,630,333
4y.'63.<,:3.52.
138
23,171,418
20:7:30. 143
21,207,821
288

501
477
139
116
243
1,476

1856-'57.

1,562

'

'

370,834,686

394,622,799

401,976,242

185&-'57.

1857-'58.

18.58-'59.

.^123,449,075
1.59,091,051
.54,583.256
59,383,524
25,37J, 189

$187,750,276
299,874,750
82,412-6o7
82,8l:<,-2.37
31,605,937

$177,896,0 0
247,669,341
70,040,568
64,633,845
22,925,468

$179,992,400
284,716,143
77.039.922
85.980,791
29,4.34,.543

$190,188,990
-289,636,640
82.23l,t-88
101:468,716
28; 421,346

421,880,095

884,456,887

583,165,242

657,183,799

691,945,580

1859-'60.

pi

Pi

o

Pi
t-3

O

No. 39.—Comparative view of the condition ofi the banks in the different sections ofi the Union—Gontinued.
Other investments.

Real estate.

Stocks.
1856-'57.

1857-'58.

1858-'59.

$1,459,758
27,702,-286
8,796,041
8,127,039
13,187,205

$1,131,869
26, .576,900
9,354, .305
9.623,7-29
1:3,618,466

$1,208, .564
29,9-24,425
8.625,484
8.513. ,383
15;232,613

59,272,329

60,305,269

63,502,449

70,344,343

1859-'60.

1857-'58.

.$3.8-44,810
11,481.225
I0,3i:3,;i08
3,61.3, .520
1,5-29; 268

.$6il,r.2
618.619
1,72.5,876
1,883.2.5(1 .
1,08:3,4:39

$682,708 $1,044,319
1.01.% 7.5-''
1,309,619
1,951.349
4,102.185
1,4:39,020
1.02.5,804
841,114
987,077

$1,075,879
1,319. .383
3 087.297
1,3-^.3,083
4,277,549

30,78-2, ioi

5,9-20,336

6,075,906

8,^2.3,041

11,123,171

1858-'59.

1859-'60.

$1,6.57,908 $2,707,588
8,832.442
31; 227,492
9,6-2.3.777 10,064,398
9, 177,-273
3,715,120
18,6.55,893
804,976

$3,310,486
9,596,.524
10,278,462
4,5:37,783
1,03 4,,379

$,3,640,875
10,675,795
6,639,6:i9
3,720.584
1. y<4u Pnd

26,124,522

•28,75.3,834

25,976,497

1855-'57.

1858-'59.

i856-'57.

1857-'58.

1859-'d0.

«

O
Eastern States
Middle States
Sonthj^rn States
Southwestern States
W e s t e r n States




m

No. ^9.—^Comparative view ofi the condition of the banks in difi-erent sections of the Union—Continued.
Notes of other banks.

Due by other banks.
Sections.
1856^'57.

1857^'58.

1858^'59.

lB59-'60.

1856^'57.

-

1857-'58.

1858-'59.

Cash items.
1859-'60.

1856-'57.

1857-'58.

t858-'39.

1859-'60.

$15,304,943 $12,215,423 !$• 6,333,3.57 $14,310,756
21,961,008 20,843,384 2,3,137,793 20,061,485
7,461,775
5,320,828 10,122,640
.5,801,,536
1.3,911,6,36 13,188,3,5: 21,188,632 17,317,715
8,083,726
6,484,812
7,482.565
8,870,062

Middle States
SouthernStates..
Southv^'estern Slates
Western States

$7,4.52,318
11,071,854
3,895,2,32
2,638,067
3:066,537

$6,216,504 $6,49.5, .545
8,698,885
3,588,204
2,452,404
• 3,401,829
3,479,624
2,201,783
2,842,512
1,923,635

$7,026,319
9,220,661
.3,446,076
2,964,599
2,844,012

$285,688
24,477,093
46,708
62,767
209,385

$,307,073
14,318,182
265.863
47, .393
441,930

$495,220
23,4-2.3,286
9.30,756
1,635,943
303,646

$.125,511
17,480,612
186.031
973,792

67,^35,457

28,124,008

22, 447,436

18,858,289

25,502,567

25,081,641

15,380,441

-26,808,822

19,331,521

65,849,205

,58,05-2,802

78,244,987

o

pi
H

No. 39.— Comparative view ofi the condition of the banks in differtnt sections of the Union—-Gontmued.

O
Circulation.

Specie.

Deposiis.

Sections.
1856-'57.

1857,r'58.

1858,.'59.

1859^'60.

l856-'o7.

1857^'58.

ig5a,'59.

Ig59:.'q0.

1856=.'57.

1857-'58.

1858-'59.

1859-'60.

1

Eastern States
Middle States
.,
Sout.he'-n States
Soutliwestern States.
Western States




,«!7,250,-'.25 $5,391,617 $1.3,774,125 .$10,098,162 .$.5.3,.554,04l
2:3,:390,763 38,020.756 43,971,104 3:3,229.081 62,896,774
6.288,319 10,679.614 10,I3o;310 38,788, .5:52
7,149,616
15,704,:308 19,795,184 3l,3.59,(i2l 25,79:3,477 :37,792,261'
4,343,527 2-2,147,194
4,844,725
3,935,956
4,7.33,9.34
58,349,838

74,412,832 104,537,818

$41,417,692 $.•^9,564,689 $44,510,6)8 »34,.520,868 .^§8,186,426 .$41,877,420
44,187,749 49,482,057 5:3,148,871 1:39, 7:3,112 113,814:435 150.620,922
27,751,551 37,400.883 35,86.3,618 15,196,763 13:180,489 18;119,776
23,727,772 42,6:32,764 46,-000.759 26,.323,139 22; 3.36,416 ;38,581,4.55
18,123,.580 21,2.26,425 27,580;611 14,237,370
8,384,-282 10,.368,705

$41,319,.=1.50
145,829,987
18,250,347
37,973,832
10,428,413

83,594,537 214,778,822 i5i.,-208,344 193,305,818 207,102,477 230,351,352 18.5,932,049 •259,568,278" 253,802,129

o
m

No. 39.— Comparative view ofi the condition of the banks in the difi'erent sections ofi the Union—Continued.
1 ^

Other liabilities.

Due to other bank?.
Sec ons.
1856-'57.

18.58-'59.

1859-=60.

1856-'57.

$7,310,510
38,710.8:32
6.^:38.719
5.709,2 2
I;808,970

$8,929-5.52
31.8^'0;.383
4,590,702
6.999,046
'759,992

$ 9 . .370,024
42,2.88.596
8,64l,:iO.-i
9,197,277
72 1,4 48

$8,987.15!
33.21:3.553
4.03 ,096
6:764.829
9.37.289

$2,62.3,089
7, .574.09 ;
<
4. ^32:643

57,674.333

Bliddle States
Somherrh-S tates
Southwestern Slates
Weatern States

1857-'58.

51,189,875

6.1^,21.3,651

55,9:3-2,918

Er.'stern S i a l e s . - M a i n e , Nevv I!amp.»:hire, Vennont, Massaclln^?etts, Rhode Island, Connecticut.
Middle States.—Naw YorK, Nt-.w Je.sHv, Pennsylvania, D'.daware, Maryland.
Sotdhern Stairs.—\'\ra\u\i\, Norih Carolina, .South C:iroliiia, Georgia, .Klorida.
Southwctern States.—Alabama, Loui.-^iana, Mi.^^si.ssippi, T'ennesse^*, Kentucky, Missouri.
Western States.—lU'uiols, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nebraska Territory, Minnesota, Kansas.




18.57-'58.'

18.58-'59.

1859-'60.

2,i71,0>0

$-S:^04,.554
.3. .341.0.38
2.870.550
2,77o:il8
J, 88o: 4.35

$2,819,422
3,731,4.52
3.8:^3,720
2.224.3.34
2,49.9,499

$1.-541,091
4'391,664
3,438.648
2.8.39.607
2 4.3-:> 805

19,818,850

14,168,713

15,048,427

14,661,815

:3;2'3.8J5

O
Pi

O

>
a

Pi
oc

, No. 40.
GENERAL STATEMENT

THE CONDITION OF THE BANKS,
AC00rD.r.NG TO
•

/

RETORNS DATED NEAREST TO JANUARY 1, 1860„




446

KEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 40.—General stdtement ofi the condition ofthe banks

State.
o
rt

5
ei

o
68
52
46

Maine
.-.
New Hampshire.,
Vermont ..
....
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Conu'ciicut
Nevv York
New Jer.<ey
Pen nr=yl vania
Delaware
Maryland
Virj^in-a
North Carolina
South Carolina . . . .
Georgia
Florida
Alahama
Lduisiana
Tennessee
Keniucky
Mis.-ouri
Illinois
ludiana
,

174
91
73
303
49
909
31
24
13
18
• 25
2
8
12
16
11
9
74
17

Ohio
- Michigan
,
Wisconsin
Iowa
Kansas Territory..

52
4
108
12
1

Total.

1,392

Jan. 2,1880
D e c . .5,18.59
July & Aug.,
1859.
Oct. 29,18.39
Jan
2,1880
Mi.y -,18.59
Dec. 10,1839
Jan. — , 1 8 6 0
Nov.—,1859
Jan. — , 1 8 6 0
Jan. 2,1860
Jan. 1,1860
.. do
Dec—,18.59
Oct. —,18.59
Jan. — . 1860
do.. ..
Dec. 31,18.39
Jan. — , 1 8 6 0
do.....
,,...do..
.
...do
Nov., 1859, to
Jan., 1860.
Feb. 6,186*
Dec—,18.39
Jan. 2.1860
Dec. 5,18.39
Jan. 1,1860

$181,199
72,912
190,565

$7,506,890
5,016,000
4,029,-240

$12,6.34.794
8,.59i;6o8
6,946, ,523

$176,400

64,519,200
20,865,569
21.512.176
111,441,320
7,^84,412
25..565, .382
1.640,775
12.588,962
16,00.5,1.56
6.626,478
14,962,062
16,689,580
300,000
4,901,000
24,498,865
8,087.0:37
12,8:35,670
9,082,951
.5,2..1,225
4,343,210

107,417,323
28,719,877
27,858,785
200,331,332
14,909,174
50..327,1.37
3,1.50,215
90,t;98.782
24,9?.5,792
12,21:3,272
27,8(11,912
16,778,282
464,6.30
13,5 0,027
:35.4'1,609
ll:7.5^019
25.284,869
15,461,192
.387,229
7,67.3,861

214,102
1,'26 7,405
26,89-'.874
962.911
2,513,674
4,750
848,2^-3
3, .584.078
383,8-28
2,994,688
2, .383,1-^8
100,025
524,513
• 5,842,096
1,2:<;3,43.!
'851,582
72.3,670
9,826.891
1,349,488

6,890.839
755,465
- 7,620,000
460,4.30
52,n00

11,100.482
892,949
7,392.361
721,-228
48,256

2,153.552
192,'831
5,03I,.504
101,849

718.913
1:30,861
326,461

421,880,095

691,945,580

70,344,343

30,782,131

1,601,072
604.015
1,195,047
8,725, .526
448,202
1,719,1.36
85,182
505,179
1,019,032
188, .568
681.245
8,424,463
171,300
2,(41.881
595,759
477,971
228,609
92, -429
258,309

2,295

T'his table embraces, vvith a few unimportant exceptions, all the chartered banks in the ITnited .States that
vt'cre doing busim^s.'^ o.i'thH 1st of J a n u a r / , 1850
In California, Oregon, T e x a s , Arkansas, VVashington Territory, Utah, and Nevv Mexico,-there are no banks
ofissue.




447

REPORT ON TllE FINANCES.

according to returns dated nearest to January I, 1860.

i

C

s

.a
o

1
o

C

3
Q

.c
• o
o
o

100,223
799,-24 4
1,418
590,884
685,561
41,.500
433,42:3
68,009
1,45.5,488
1,110,377
28,298
1,082,041
84,3.55
188,391
1,679,277
221,457

$1,019,902
772,173
1,167,602

$190,224
181,964
69,435

7,212,530
5,18.3,459
1,14-1,591
974,620
2,994,9,38
326,617 '
12,524,249
2,261,723
2,39S028 •
662.196
3,073,2'0
4,277,399
411,982
122,125
1,6.37,016
J,897,218
2,7.56,047
1,294,093
1,081.463
601,115
44:3,4-8
1,.59-2.644
2,0 .5,768
1,083,710
25,8.33
24.580
1,208, .308
643,657
7,305.115
2,61.3,910 •"'49.% .362
5,099,6:8
779, .565
1,090,506
1,046,015
3,201,416
343.269
950,836
418,991

961,720
38,119
1,329,668
49,308

2,667,763
i20,:i72
890,4.34
248,817
4,058

11,123,171

67,235,457

898.337
.44,644
925.110
213,661

i

1

0)

5
0

6

• 1
0

o
$176,412

c
<A

$69,667

i
m
$670,979
2.55,278
1%<,409

0

ca.

5
$4,149,718
3,271,183
3,882,983

QJ

Q

.$2,414,022
1,187,^91'
787,834

. .IS
.2

$102,392

0
, $87,165

19,132

3,780

7, .532,647 22,086,920 27,804,699 6,9:37,042
3,5.38,-295
450,929
3..^.33:i04 1,002,277
7,.36I.5I9
"'25.5,'844
5,.57 4,900
989.920
926,:.308
17, .376,750 20,921,545 29.959,.508 104.070,-273 28,807.429
5,741,465 1.141,664
940,700 - 4,811,832
8,378.474 13.132.892 26,167,843 3,8:17, .5.34
1,135,772
"*i63;862'
976,228
102.166
208,924
4,106,889
8,874,180 1,324,740
2,779,418
9.8(2,197
29.838 2,943,852
7,729,652 1,138,327
5,.594,047
1.487,273
100,139
54,254 1,617,687
4.165,615 1,499,218
2,324,121 11,47.5,634
4,7.38,-289 1,287,-268
8,798,100
101,939 3,211,974
183,840
5.144
1-^9.518
32,876
874,800
7,477,9 6
20,800 2,747,174
4.851,1,53
12,115,431 11,.579.313 19.777,812 .1,16.5,875
4.324.799
.5.5:18,378
264.627
"•932,* 092" 2,-287,710
5,68-'.892 3,2.59,717
20,900 4.502.2,30 13.520.'!07
3,3.37,178 1,200,010
7,884,885
4,160,912
8.981,723
697.037
* "39,'397'
26,5:33
22.3,812
1,700,479
5,:390,246
80,799 1,583,140
89,530

1,444,338

1.57.378
2:3.871
64,130

1,828,640
24,175
419,947
2.55, .545
8,268

7,983,889
222,197
4,4 •?9,8.35
563,808
8,895

790, .368
4,039,614
13,969
375, :-(97
3,085,813
5-i7.378 ""i6,'689
2,895

.5,808
3,059,277
975,192
3,57,195
34,600
1,198,478
1,417,837
787,733
196,0492,201,138
462,420
552,338
140,895
144,781
78,206
1,493,.529
25,056

25,502,567 19,331,521 83,594,537 207,102,477 2:33,802,129 55,932,918 14,661,815

In Mississippi there is one small bank at Yazoo City, and there may be a few in Minnesota and Nebraska
but they can hardly be said to do a regular business.




No. 41.
oo

General view of the condition ofi the banks in the United States, in different years, from 1851 to 1860, inclusive.

...

731
148

1,0.39
149

1,163
144

1,2.35
143

1,263
133

1,-284
138

1.329
'147

1,208

Number of banks

1,307

1,;398

1,416

1,422

1,471

$301,376,071

$332,177,288

$343,874,272

$370,834,688

$391,622,799

1,392
170

Number of branches

Pi

Number of banks and branches
$227,807,553

.$401,976,212

$421,880,195

. Capital paid in
RESOURCES.

L o a n s and discounts
Stocks
Real e s t a t e . Olher investments
Duri by oth.-jr banks
Notes or other banks
Cash items
Specie .

413,7.56.799
22,:388,989
20,219,724
8,935,972
50,718,015
17,196;083
15;341,196
48,671,048

,
.^.
:
:

557, .397,779
41, .330.33:»
22,:367:472
7,.5sy.8.3o
.5.3,5l6:0d5
22,6.59.088
2%.579; 253
59,410,253

576,144.758
5-2,727,082
2 4,073.^501
8.734,540
55.7.38. 7.35
23,429:518
21. 9.3.5,73s
53,944,546

634,183,280
49,485,215
2.i.8o.=i.867
8,^2>,5l6
62,8.39, 725
24,779.049
19,937,710
59,314,063

684,458,887
5y,-272.329
28, 24,522
5,920,:3:38
65.849.205
28,1-24.008
25,081,611
58,349,8J8

5S:i,185.242
60,305,2n0
28,7.n.3,8:j4
8,075.9 6
=58.0.32.802
22.447,43 4
1.5;;380.44l
74,412.832

6.37.183.799
6:3. .302,449
2.5,9 6.497
8,323.1=41
78,2(4.987
18:8.38.2r9
28,r0f<,822
104,537,818

691,91.5,580
70,344,343
:30,7ci2, i31
11.123,171
67,2.3.5,457
25,502,5 i7
19, .3:31,.521
83,591,537

15i, 16.5,251
12'<,9.57,7n
48. 118,9-28
e;438,327

204,689,207
188,188,741
50,32-2,(62
13,439,276

183,9.52.223
19..»,400,.342
4.5,1,36,697
15,599,623

19.5,747,950
212.705,662
52,719.9.36
12,2-27,887

214,778,822
2.-10.331,3.32
57,671,:3,33
19,816,850

1.5.5,208,314
18.3,9.32,049
51.189,875
I4;i66,713

19.3.308,818
•259, .568,278
6-%2l5,65l
15,048,427

207,10-2,477
253,8'i-2,129
55.9.1<i,9l8
14,661,el5

330,5:J9,891

443,200,113

4-22,509,262

461,17.3,558.

502,804,.507

392,310,268

521,090,747

516,837,524

131,926,342
11,164,7-27
59,8.35,775

163,164,^57
25, 1:38,-25.'
81,.546,505

158,048,53'
27,18-,889
81,13 J, 435

186. 670, .547
2 i: 708,431
82,020,494

177,404.692
20, ((86. I 14
78,41.3,952

170,29.3,511
10,229.2-29
81,642,061

228,449,918
3.0:13.600
107,571,418

125,684,082
6.693, •.>25
90,2c9,762

o
pi
H
O
54

H

LIABILITIES.

Circu-ation
D:po.-;its
Due to other banks
Other liabilities

,

,

,^
.~

Aggregate of immediate liabilities, i. e., of circulation, deposits,
and dues to other banks
Aggregate of immediate means, i. e., of specie, cash items, notes
of Olher banks, and dne.s from other banks
,
Gold and .-ilver in Unitt'd Stales trea.^^ury depo.<it«»rie3
,
Total of specie in b.inks and ireasury depositories




N O T E . — T h e bank reports for the years 1852 and 1853 are omitted in the above table on account of their incompleteness.

o

449

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 42.
Statement in relation to the deposit accounts, receipts and payments, and outstanding drafits, condensed firom the Treasurers weekly exhibits rendered
during the year ending June 30, 1860.
Period.
1859.
July 11
18
25
Aug.
1
8
15
22
29
Sept. 5
12
19
26
30
Oct. 10
17
24
31
Nov.
7
14
21
28
Dec.
5
12
19
26
• 31
1860.
Jan.
7
14
21
28
Feb.
6
13
20
27
Mar.
5
12
19
26
31
April 9
16
23
30
May
7
14
21
28
June
4
11
18
25
30

A m ' t of deposits.

$6,089,858 82
6,471,435 11
7,107,393 47
6,829,564 57
6,566,281 12
6,455,693 79
6,617,338 10
6,602,935 09
6,374,122 77
6,688,146 95
6,555,236 84
6,746,344 59
6,384,873 29
6,235,201 51
6,208,727 17
6,101,248 43
6,339,592 03
6,222,282 13
6, .573,792 07
7,141,721 66
7,411,743 84
7,060,:372 89
7,144,431 57
7,290,464 96
5,824,331 00
6,695,225 05

Outstanding.

$1,912,712 54
1,654,108 40
2,151,970 30
1,865,888 51
2,293,524 99
2,331,475 53
2,494,4-29 39
2,888,129 32
2,029,906 25
1,960,028 31
2,150,405 62
1,582,885 48
1,409,248 39
1,665,353 93
1,531,142 66
1,592,724 34
1,473,050 43
1,480,557 50
1,384,237 98
1,854,495 94
1,851,533 25
1,305,621 28
1,189,268 63
1.453,550 22
i;836,129 93
2', 181,600 25

8,131,393 29
8,481,725 05
9,538,240 10
9,910,743 61
10,073,835 19
10,840,766 41
11,451,180 71
7,951,244 13
6,577,540 62
7,337,278 86
8,007, .524 39
, 8,163,683 25
8,206,603 90
8,355,089 02
8,445,162 71
8,288,421 16
7,930,498 19
7,777,303 55
7,995,797 92
8,653,536 38
8,58.5,151 19
8,326,190 84
8,427,473 65
8,358,842 18
8,153,680 57
5,560,459 44

29




1,385,501 17
1,.565,637 13
1,562,832 77
1,967,655 96
1,672,987 89
1,817,259 59
5,823,406 47
2,127,945 83
1,804,467 62
1,.505,376 18
1,374,717 78
1,386,893 17
1,795,035 41
1,830,798 05
1,452,590 59
1,611,024 48
1,581,917 47
1,343,604 95
1,263,740 44
1,385,242 08
1,232,583 81
1,752,681 26
1,661,028 83
1,536,318 37
2,563,522 35
1,694,452 50

Subject to draft.

Am't ofreceipts.

$4,177,146 28
4,817,326 71
4,955,423 17
4,963,676 06
4,272,756 24
4,1-24,218 26
4,122,908 71
3,714,805 77
4,344,216 52
4,728,118 64
4,404,831 22
5,163,459 11
4,975,6-24 90
4,.569,847 58
4,677,584 51
4,508,524 09
4,866,541 60
4,741,7-24 63
5,189,554 09
5,287,225 72
5,560,210 59
5,7.54,751 61
5,955,162 94
5,816,914 74
3,988,201 07
4,513,624 80

$2,045,345 80
1,854,403 62
2.251,871 39
1,573,370 35
1,490,723 78
1,119,984 68
1,606,003 04
1,180,146 54
1,503,052 96
1,003,044 56
834,832 39
1,598,730 70
925,664 48
1,136,099 99
1,021,028 62
1,105,731 41
1,309,503 93
819,070 99
1,175,968 83
1,366,183 67
801,843 12
1,042,583 45
1,028,742 90
878,468 73
1,434,320 15
2,073,076 87

6,745,892 12
• 6,916,087 92
7,975,407 33
7,943,087 65
8,400,847 30
9,023,506 82
5,627,774 24
5,823,298 30
4,773,073 00
5,831,902 68
6,632,806 61
6,776,790 08
6,411,568 49
6,524,290 97
6,992,572 12
6,677,396 68
0,348,580 72
6,433,698 72
6,732,057 48
7,268,294 30
7,352,567 38
6,573,509 58
6,766,444 82
6,822,523 81
5,590,158 22
3,866,006 94

2,855,193 98
1,143,525 85
1,806,226 79
1,174,975 76
1,494,596 60
2,054,781 04
1,483,376 23
857,842 63
2,706,421 13
1,656,305 17
1,412,490 08
1,167,619 40
1,227,047.01
954,039 69
1,142,006 80
816,482 47
1,096,660 06
615,281 37
884,895 54
1,181,218 87
873,079 61
774,742 60
982,714 26
697,490 70
1,117,778 90
1,433,969 08

A m ' t drafts paid.

$2,691,186 74
1,472,8-27 33
1,615,913 03
1,851,199 25
1,754,007 93
1,230,572 01
1,444,3.58 73
1,194,549 55
1,731,865 28
689,020 38
967,742 50
.
1,407,622 95
1,287,135 78
1,285,771 77
1,047,502 96
1,213,210 20
1,071,160 33
936,380 89
824,458 89
798,254 08
531,820 94
1,393,954 40
944,684 22
752;435 34
2,880,454 11
1,202,182 82
1,419.025 74
793,194 09
749,711 74
802,472 25
1,331,505 02
1,287,849 82
872,961 93
4,357,779 21
4,080,124 64
896,566 93
742,244 &5
1,011,460.54
1,184,126 36
805,554 57
1,051,933 11
973,224 02
1,454,583 03
768,476 01
666,401 17
523,500 41
941,464 80
1,033,702 95
• 881,431 45
766,122 17
1,322,940 51
4,027,190 21

450

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 43.
Summary statement ofi the value of the exports ofi the growth, produce,
and manufiacture ofi the United States during the year commencing
J July I, 1859, and endiiig June 30, 1860.
PRODUCT OF THE SEA.

Fisheries—
Oil, spermaceti
Gil, whale and other fish . . . . . .
Whalebone
'-.
Spermaceti and sperm candles. -.
Fish, dried or smoked
Fish, pickled

,789,089
537,547
896,293
51,829
690,088
191,634
$4,156,480

PRODUCT OF THE FOREST.

WoodStaves and headiogs
Shingles
.Boards, plank and scantling
Hewn timber
Other lumber
Oak bark and other dye
.:...
All manufactures of wood
i
Naval stores—
• Tar and pitch
Rosin and turpentine
Ashes, pot and pearl
Ginseng
Skins and furs

$2,365,516
169,546
2,777,919
231,668
705,119
164,260
2,703,095
151,404
1,818,238
822,820
295,766
1,533,208
13,738,559

PRODUCT OF AGRICULTURE.

Of animals—
Beef
Tallow
Hides
Horned cattle
Butter
Cheese
Pork, pickled
Hams and bacon,
Lard
Wool
Hogs
Horses--Mules
Sheep

-•
o.

2,674,324
1,598,176
1,036,260
1,052,426
1,144,321
1,665,630
3,132,313
2,273,768
4,545,831
389,512
377,604
233,368
158,080
33,613
20,215,226

Yegetable food—
Wheat
Flour
Indian corn
Indian meal
'Rye meal
Rye, oats, and other small grain and pulse.
Biscuit, of ship bread
o...
Potatoes .i^
Apples
-Onions
Rice
-




4,076,704
15,448,507
2,399,808
912,075
48,172
1,058,304
478,740
284,673
206,055
109,861
2,567,399
27,590,298

451

KEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 43.—STATEMENT—Continued.
PRODUCT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued.
Cotton
Tobacco
Hemp
Other agricultural productsClover seed
Flaxseed
Brown sugar
Hops

$191,806,555
15,906,547
9,531
$596,919
3,810
103,244
32,866
736,839

MANUFACTURES.

Refined sugar
Wax.....
Chocolate
J
Spirits from grain
-.
Spirits from molasses
»
Spirits from other materials.
Molasses
Vinegar
„
Beer, ale, porter, and cider, in casks
Beer, ale, porter, and cider, in bottles
Linseed oil.„
Spirits of turpentine
.Household furniture
Carriages and parts, and railroad cars and parts,
Hats of fur or silk
Hats of palrn leaf
,
Saddlery
Trunks and valises
.,
Adamantine and other candles
Soap

301,674
131,803
2,593
311,595
930,644
219,199
35,292
41,368
31,373
22,202
26,799
1,916,289
1,079,114
816,973
118,770
92,832
71,332
50,184
708,699
494,405
11,354
3,372,074
467,772
674,309
782,525
246,572
129,717
50,446

Snufe
Tobacco, manufactured
,
Gunpowder
Iieather
..„
Leather, boots and shoes.
Cables and cordage
Salt
Lead
Iron—
Pig
.Bar ,
Nails
-.Castings of
All manufactures of
Copper and brass, and manufactures of.
Drugs and medicines
-Cotton piece goods—
Printed or colored
White, other than duck
Duck
All manufactures of

.. .

19,143
38,257
188,754
282,848
5,174,040
1,664,122
1,115,455
21,620,526
$3,356,449
1,403,506
382,089
5,792,752
10,934,79 a

Hemp—
Thread
Cloth..-..
Other manufactures of ,
Wearing apparel




430
4,733
813
21,838
625,175

452

R E P O E T O N . T H E FINANCES.

No. 43.—STATEMENT—Continued.
MANUFACTURES—Continued.
Earthen and stone w a r e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combs. - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o . .
Buttons
-.
.
Brooms and brushes of all kinds
...
Billiard tables and a n n a r a t u s . . . . . . . - _ . - . . . . . .
Umbrellas parasols and s u n s h a d e s - . . - - . . - - . .
Morocco and other leather not sold by the pound.
Fire-engines
.--.--Printing Dresses and t v D e . . - . - . . . . . . . . . . - . . . .
Musical instruments . . . » . . . . . . . .
........
Books and maps
.
Paper and stationery
.
.
.
i
.
Paints and varnish . . .
............. .
Jewelry, real and imitation..-.
.
....
Other manufactures of gold and silver, and gold
leaf
Glass
Tin
Pewter and lead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
........
Marble and stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bricks, lime, and cement
,
.........
India-rubber shoes.
...
..
India-rubber, other than shoes
Lard oil
......,
^
Oil-cake..
.--.-.
Artificial
flowers.
..

^

$65,086
20,746
2,599
61,377
15,979
4,862
19,011
9,948
157,124
129,653
278,268
285,798
223,809
24,659
140,187
277,948
39,064
46,081
-176,239
154,045
58,826
182,015
65,783
1,609,328
207
$4,591,631
740,783
183,134
26,033,678
30,913,173
258,682

Coal
Ice
,
Gold and silver coin
.:..-.
Gold and silver bullion
Quicksilver
Articles not enumerated —
Manufactured
Raw produce

2,397,445
1,355,391

Total..

373,189,274
F. BIGGER, Register.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 27, 1860.

No. 44.
Amount ofi duties on goods in loarehouse in New Yorh on Decemher I,
1859 ; also for the same tim.e in 1860.
District.

Year.

.„..-.

1859
. . . . . . . 1860

xTew York
New York

Excess in favor of 1860




.---.

Amount.

Duties.

$10,334,627 00

$2,742,096 16
3,037,011 66
294,915 40

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

PHILADELPHIA, May

453

31,

1860.

: We have the honor to acknowledge your letter of April
23, requesting us to furnish you with estimates of the cost of exhibiting, in practical shape, the processes proposed by Dr. James T.
Barclay for protecting the coinage, and of adapting the present minting arrangements to Dr. Barclay's methods, and would, in reply,
transmit the enclosed communications from Mr. James F . Heiskell^
Dr. Barclay's representative, and from Mr. David Gilbert, machinist, and Mr. E. Gr. Chorman, engraver.
Desiring to place the responsibility where it should rest, we made
application, on the receipt of your communication, to Mr. Heiskell,
for the information called for ; and after receiving from him the estimates rendered byMessrs. Gilbert and Chorman, have, by ^personal
interviews with them, learned the grounds upon which they base their
calculations oifiorty-three hundred dollars for their joint work. Knowing the high personal character of these individuals, and their standing as workmen in their respective branches, we feel no hesitation in
testifying to the fairness and reasonableness of their estimates^, and
in expressing the belief that through their aid the results which they
promise can be accomplished.
Of the cost of substituting for the present system the minting processes of Dr. Barclay, we find it impossible to furnish an estimate,
but will endeavor, by conveying to the department the information
we possess, to enable it to arrive at some general opinion.
The devices of Dr. Barclay will require scarcely any alterations—
certainly no radical ones—^n the coining presses, nor in the machinery
for rolling the bars, nor any important changes in that for cutting
the planchets. A machine for each size of coin will need to be added
to such as now exist, the cost of which can only be arrived at after the
work proposed by Mr. Gilbert in his estimate has been executed.
In explanation of our delay in communicating this reply, we would
state that, being compelled to appeal to others for the estimates, we
have deemed it proper to allow them their own time to deliberately
make their calculation.
W e are, with great respect, your obedient servants,
E . E. EOGERS,
HENRY V E T H A K E ,
,
11'21 Girard street.
DEAR SIR

Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary ofi the Treasury.

PHILADELPHIA, May

22,

1860.

I t gives me pleasure to reply to your communication
of the 25th ultimo^ in which you state that you have been requested
by the Secretary of the Treasury to furnish him with an estimate of
the cost of machinery requisite for producing a [^ specimen coin'-' embodying Dr. James T. Barclay's proposed plans for protecting the
GENTLEMEN:




454

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

coinage of the*country ; also the probable cost of having the coinage
at the mint conducted according tp Dr. Barclay's method, and asking
me, as the representative of Dr. Barclay, to put you in the possession
of the desired information. In answer to the first query, I beg to
enclose the estimate of Mr. E. G. Chorman, engraver and die-sinker,
for the artistic, and that of Mr. David Gilbert, machinist, for the
mechanical branches. I have great confidence in the skill of both
these gentlemen, as well as their knowledge of the subject. As to
the second query, no specific amount could he named ; but I can see
no reason why the coinage according to Dr. Barclay's method should
be more costly than the present one, or, at all events, than the more
careful and exact work of the European mints, after the machinery
had been once adapted to the new mode, which adaptation, I imagine,
would not be more expensive than the renewals and alterations the
present machinery is subject to ; and if the success of the former
should inspire the department with confidence to undertake the latter,
it will afford me sincere gratification to communicate my views as to
the best manner of*introducing the same in the most creditable mode.
Awaiting your further commands, I am, with high respect, yours,
very truly,
JAMES F , HEISKELL,
Attorney fior Dr. James T. Barclay,
Prof's EOBERT E . ROGERS and HENRY VETHAKB,
Commissioners, &c.

PHILADELPHIA, May

19,

1860,

Being conversant with the plans proposed by Dr. J . T. Barclay for
the improvement of the coinage, (having been engaged in the recent
experiments connected therewith,) I will agree to engrave all the dies
(for the facial and peripheral devices) that may be required for the
production of a specimen coin, for the sum of twenty-five hundred
dollars, ($2,500.) I will guarantee the same to be in accordance with
recent experiments, embracing Dr. J . T. Barclay's method of improving the coinage of the United States.
Eespectfully, your obedient servant,
E. G. CHOEMAN,
41 N, Chestnut street.
Mr. JAMES F . HEISKELL.

.

PHILADELPHIA, May

19,

1860.

DEAR SIR : Having had several interviews with Dr. James T. Bar©lay, andby him been made acquainted with certain plans for improving the coinage of the United States, and my having been for about
fiiteen years in the employ ofthe mint of theUnited States as a practicil machinist, and having knowledge of. the machinery and coining



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

455

operations of the mint, and at the request of Mr. James F . Heiskell,
said Dr. James T. Barclay's agent, I herewith engage to construct
the machinery, and to produce the mechanical results as proposed by'
said Dr. James T. Barclay, or his agent, Mr. James F . Heiskell.
My estimate for machinery and services is for the sum of eighteen
hundred dollars ; payment to be made at such times and ways as may
be agreed upon at the time of contracting.
Very respectfully submitted by
DAVID GILBERT.

PHILADELPHIA, July 12, 1860.
: I am informed unofficially that at the recent
session of Congress an appropriation was made, to be expended under
the jointresolution passed February 26, 1857, to prevent the counterfeiting of the coins of the United States, and have likewise seen
the printed report of the commissioners appointed to examine the
proposed preventive plans, which, from their high attainments, I
l^rust will be a sufficient indorsement to those friends who have so
generously aided me in keeping this matter before the government.
Nevertheless, that there may be, in a matter of such magnitude, a
tangible demonstration, it is proposed to employ this appropriation
in constructing by machinery a coin embodying the principles suggested by Dr. Barclay ; and as it will necessarily require considerable
time and labor, I should be pleased to learn your wishes and instructions in the prosecution of the matter, and would also, if agreeable to
you, take pleasure in laying before you, for consideration, my plans
for the introduction of the improved currency, should this government
accept and adopt it.
Awaiting your commands, I am your obedient servant,
JAMES F . HEISKELL,
, Attorney for Dr. James T. Barclay.
HONORABLE

Hon.

SIR

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary ofi the Treasury,
P . S.—Please find enclosure clipped from newspaper.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, July 13, 1860.
SIR : Your letter ofthe 12th instant is received, asking my opinion
and instructions in regard to the appropriation made at the last session of Congress, to be expended under the joint resolution of J u l y
26, 1857.
My wish in the matter is that this amount be so expended as to
give the best opportunity of satisfying the public of the superiority of
the processes proposed by you over the present mode of coinage.




456

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

", Having no personal acquaintance with such matters, I shall be
glad to receive, at your convenience, a full and detailed programme
ofthe manner in which you propose that this appropriation of |5,000
shall be applied, in order to accomplish the object desired.
Very respectfully,
H O W E L L COBB,
Secretary ofi the Treasury.
Mr. JAMES P . HEISKELL,

Att'y ofi Dr. James T. Barclay, Philadelphia, P a .

PHILADELPHIA, Septemher 8, 1860.

HON. SIR: Your letter of 13th July last was received by due course
of mail, and my apology for not replying sooner is sickness on my
part, and the absence of those with whom 1 wished to consult before
so doing. Being pleased to learn that your views and wishes coincide
with mine, I would propose that the commissioners who have heretofore acted in this matter be directed to contract with the proper persons^
(as per the estimates submitted) for the execution of coins, in accordance with Dr. Barclay's proposed methods, which coins, in themselves,
I feel assured will clearly demonstrate the great value of the improvements proposed for protecting the future coinage from fraudulent
attempts on its integrity, or base imitations of the genuine, thereby
greatly lessening crime, and of course saving the very large amount
annually expended by the federal government in prosecuting this
class of offences, (rarely successfully,) besides imparting a degree of
confidence that the present coinage does not enjoy, independently of
preventing a large portion of the general loss resulting from abrasion
hy recoining under reduced areas not enlarged, as has been done
through ignorance of all laws on the subject, as in the three-dollar
piece, which, however, can only he done with safiety in connexion with
ihe protective peripheral device submitted by Dr. Barclay.
On the completion of these illustrative pieces, and the entire
approval of the same, it is proposed to ask of the government such
remuneration as the magnitude of the end attained may merit, in
which I trust to obtain your very favorable recommendation.
This point being reached, it is further proposed as follows:
We would undertake, after proper legislation, so as to be placed
independent ofthe mint officers, (for whose co-operation we can never
hope, bitterly arrayed as they have ever been against the improvement,) to remodel, prepare, and introduce the new coinage, calling to
our aid skilful designers and artificers to make the whole worthy of
this great coin manufacturing government, and would condition that
our compensation should be a percentage for a certain numberof
years on the amount that might be conclusively shown to be saved
over a like number of years under the old coinage. In conclusion,
allow me to express my thanks for the attention and consideration
this matter has obtained from the department under your direction;



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

457

and feeling confident of success should' the government continue to
foster our enterprise, and awaiting your commands, I remain, with
great respect, your obedient servant,
JAMES F . HEISKELL,
Attorney fior Dr. J a s . T. Barclay,
413J and 415 Arch street, Philadelphia.
Hon.

HOWELL COBB,

Secretary ofi Treasury, Washington City, D. C.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

September 12, 1860.
GENTLEMEN: Your letter of the 31st of May enclosed a letter from
Dr. Heiskell containing the estimates of Messrs. Chorman & Gilbert
of the expense of producing a specimen for the purpose of showing
Dr. Barclay's processes and discoveries. They offered to make the
necessary dies and machinery for $4,300, being $2,500 for the former,
and $1,800 for the latter.
Near the close of the last session of Congress an appropriation of
$5,000 was made applicable to this purpose. The amount beyond the
estimates, $700, will probably be requi^red to furnish the necessary
bullion for a sufficient number of the specimens to illustrate Dr.
Barclay's improvements, which I desire may be fully and fairly
done.
Soon after this appropriation was made I addressed Dr. Heiskell, as
agent and attorney of Dr, Barclay, as to the best and most satisfactory
mode of applying the appropriation. I have now received his answer
of the 8th instant, in which he suggests that you be requested to cause
a coin to be made in accordance with the estimates before referred to.
Allow me, therefore, to request you to take the necessary and proper
steps to have a coin of the denomination of eagle or half eagle, as
you may deem most suitable to exhibit Dr. Barclay's views, struck
off, at an expense not to exceed the $4,300 estimated by Messrs.
Chorman & Gilbert.
I have to-day sent a copy of your report to the director of the
mint, and requested him to furnish you with all proper facilities in
regard to such specimens.
Very respectfully,
H O W E L L COBB,
Secretary of Treasury,
Professors E. E. EOGERS and HENRY VETHAKB,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,




458

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
TREASURY DEPARTEENT,

Septemher 12, ISQO,
SIR. Your letter of the 8th instant is received. The object of my
letter ofthe 13th of July, to which it is a reply, was merely to obtain
from you, as the authorized agent of Dr. Barclay, a full and detailed
programme of the manner in which you desired the $5,000, appropriated near the close of the last session of Congress, to be expended,
in order to show the public the superiority of Dr. Barclay's processes
over the present coinage. The suggestions in your letter in regard,
to the terms on which those processes shall supersede the existing
mode cannot be rnade the subject of discussion at present, because no
one, except yourself and the commissioners, is possessed of the means
of being satisfied that Dr. Barclay's processes are, in fact, superior to
those now in use at the mint. When the public shall be convinced of
such superiority the time will have arrived for provision by law for
the introduction of those processes; and before that time any discussion with this departmerit or elsewhere on this subject seems to me
premature, there being no lawful power in existence for any change
in the present system.
In conformity with these views and the desire expressed in your
letter, I have requested the commissioners to cause a specimen coin to
be prepared for the exhibition of Dr. Barclay's processes, according to
the estimates which accompanied their letter of the 31st of May.
I have proposed to them that this specimen coin may be an eagle or
half eagle, as in their opinion may be best calculated to show the
practical importance of Dr. Barclay's discoveries.
Very respectfully,
H O W E L L COBB,
Secretary ofi Treasury.
Dr. JAMES F . HEISKELL,

No. 413 J and 415 Ai^ch street, Philadelphia.

No. 45.
SIR: The undersigned, appointed as commissioners to examine into
the methods proposed by Dr. James T. Barclay, for preventing the
abrasion,'counterfieiting, and deterioration of the coins of the United
States, beg leave to make the following report.
We received the notification of our appointment to conduct the
investigations in the summer of 1857, and so soon thereafter as our
own professional engagements permitted and the arrangements of
Dr. Barclay were made for the purpose, we entered upon the duties,
and have continued to devote our attention to the subject down to the
present time.
Frequent and occasionally prolonged interruptions have occurred
in the course of the investigation, but these have been unavoidable,
and have arisen in a great degree from the necessity forced upon Dr.
Barclay to often spend much time in the effort to devise cheap



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

459

expedients to accomplish ends for which the appropriation of Congress would have been altogether inadequate had regular minting
machinery been constructed.
An apartment in the mint at Philadelphia was placed at our
service by the director as a workshop for Dr. Barclay in the execution
of some of the mechanical details of the experiments, and as a
convenient office for our frequent interviews, and was so made use of
until May, 1858. The small amount of bullion in the shape of gold
and silver planchets which was required from time to time in the
experiments, was supplied likewise by the director ofthe mint. The
chemical experiments have in the main been conducted in the laboratory of the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania.
From the nature of the suggestions and devices submitted by Dr.
Barclay for our examination and criticism, our inquiries have necessarily taken a somewhat wide range, and been various in their
character.
They have been conducted partly by direct research through
mechanical and chemical experiments, partly by tentative processes
O successive steps of trial, and partly by an appeal to the experience
T
and knowledge of practical artists and workmen; and have frequently
involved the investigation of collateral matters, as preliminary to the
solution of the main question.
It is proper, however, in this connexion to state, that although we
have pushed our examination of the subject as far as the resources
at our command have permitted, and believe a point has been reached
from which we are prepared to communicate to the department a
definite expression of our convictions, we yet feel that owing to a
want of sufficient funds at our disposal, to defray the cost of the
construction of machinery and to compensate those who alone were
competent to carry out in practical detail most of the proposed devices
of Dr. Barclay, a promising beginning only has been made towards the
development of a system which when attained cannot fail to confer
the most important benefits upon society.
As indicating the character of the inquiries which have engaged
our attention, and in explanation of the form we have thought it desirable to give to this communication, ^we herewith transcribe the
memorial of Doctor Barclay, presented in 1857, and which gave rise
to the action of Congress on the subject, and the joint resolution of
Congress authorizing the investigation with