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https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Collection: Paul A. Volcker Papers Call Number: MC279  Box 9  Preferred Citation: White House Correspondence, No. 1-28, 1980 January-March; Paul A. Volcker Papers, Box 9; Public Policy Papers, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library Find it online: http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/MC279/c288 and https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/archival/5297 The digitizadon ofthis collection was made possible by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. From the collections of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton, NJ These documents can only be used for educational and research purposes ("fair use") as per United States copyright law. By accessing this file, all users agree that their use falls within fair use as defined by the copyright law of the United States. They further agree to request permission of the Princeton University Library (and pay any fees, if applicable) if they plan to publish, broadcast, or otherwise disseminate this material. This includes all forms of electronic distribution. Copyright The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or other reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or other reproduction for purposes not permitted as fair use under the copyright law of the United States, that user may be liable for copyright infringement. Policy on Digitized Collections Digitized collections are made accessible for research purposes. Princeton University has indicated what it knows about the copyrights and rights of privacy, publicity or trademark in its finding aids. However, due to the nature of archival collections, it is not always possible to identify this information. Princeton University is eager to hear from any rights owners, so that it may provide accurate information. When a rights issue needs to be addressed, upon request Princeton University will remove the material from public view while it reviews the claim. Inquiries about this material can be directed to: Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library 65 Olden Street Princeton, NJ 08540 609-258-6345 609-258-3385 (fax) mudd@princeton.edu   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  BOARD OF ItERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  , ( PTo: ' From: Edward T. Mul ren in   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  IP  Date:  (  AA  c  01F- A/RA/  4  EXOJTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIONT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  ,  I  •  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AN D AGENCIES It t iy/421 FROM:  James T. McIntyre, J Director Office of Management and Budget Alan K. Campbell Director Office of Personne  SUBJECT:  //f/' gement  Plain English in Government Communications  From the beginning of his Administration, President Carter has stressed the importance of writing Federal government communications in plain English. He wants regulations to be in simple, clear language, as called for by Executive Order 12044,"Improving Government Regulations". Some agencies have made considerable progress but all of us need to redouble our efforts. The value of clear writing cannot be overstated. We expect you to stress the importance of writing in plain English within your agency. All those who participate in the rulemaking process must cooperate program staff, agency attorneys, and policy officials. There are several things that you can do to further your agency's progress. You can encourage members of your staff to take the writing courses and training opportunities offered by the Office of Personnel Management and the Office of the Federal Register. You can provide incentive awards to staff members who do an outstanding job. And you can include the use of plain English as a performance standard to be evaluated during the annual appraisal process. emli•  The Office of Management and Budget, the Office of Personnel Management and the Office of the Federal Register will co-sponsor a one-day clinic on writing regulations in plain English on April 2, 1980. Following that session, OPM and Federal Register staff will be available to help your agency identify areas that need strengthening. Should you find it useful, OPM will also conduct on-site writing workshops for your staff. We urge you to lend your full support to this effort.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • -  _Al SPEAKERS  MINI-CLINICS (Patticipants wite attend each minic2,Lnic.)  WAYNE G. GRANQUIST Associate Director for Management and Regulatory Policy, Office of Management and Budget  Managing Regutation Wiciting The panelists will discuss with participants what agencies are doing and can do ito revise their procedures for the management of regulation writing. Practical suggestions will include the project manager approach to managing writing, the criteria for clear writing, and the role of the reviewer.  The Need 60k. Regutatoky Re6okm  CARL FELSENFELD Vice President, Citibank of New York Undefustandabte Language in the Titivate Sectoit  I; iThe Rote o6 the Dtaktet ALFRED KAHN Advisor to the President on Inflation and Chairman of the Council on Wage and Price Stability, White House How Wtiting tike a Pek4on can Convent a Buiteaunnt into a Pemon   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  40-  WHO SHOULD ATTEND? From each agency, a maximum of five participants who are involved in different aspects of the regulation writing process: program, ,policy, technical, legal, writing, and management. Participants will Z' be accepted on a first come - first served basis. REGISTRATION FEE  panel of experienced legal drafters will demonstrate how they might go about analyzing a regulation and rewriting it. The audience will share in the analysis and rewriting process. The mini-clinic 'will also include a discussion of available resources and useful techniques that improve legal drafting. •  1. is mini-clinic explores the traditional legal language of regulations and he current trend toward clear English. hy do lawyers and regulators cling to words and structures that impede clear communication? Have the Plain English people identified the real source of the anguage problem?  Fottowing Thkough  -To ensure that "plain English," as mandated in Executive Order 12044, ._-,f. becomes the language of Government regulations.  A  an.uase 06 Law--New Techniques To o've o's 'to• ern6  JULE M. SUGARMAN - '47 Deputy Director, Office of Personnel Management  WHY THE WRITING CLINIC?  :135.00 (includes the cost of lunch „and materials). The Writing Clinic ils being conducted under the authority of the Government Employees ,;:,-jraining Act. SF-182's or purchase t;orders can be submitted for payment. Payment must be received by :-March 26, 1980. t MAIL TO: JULIE BENNETT OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT SUPERVISORY AND COMMUNICATIONS TRAINING CENTER - WED P 0 BOX 7230 WASHINGTON D C 20044 • ..-, OR ... DELIVER TO: Supervisory & Communications Tng Center Thomas Circle Training Center 1121 Vermont Avenue NW, Room 308 -‘• Washington, DC • '  ,s  WRITING CLINIC PRE-REGISTRATION FORM  Please indicate approximate date SF-182 or purchase order will be mailed or delivered.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Office of Personnel Management Office of Management and Budget Office of the Federal Register  • fklo Cr 111\   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  United States of America  •  Office of Personnel Management  icrn::7 7  7 r.. t : r.:15  tiM 14 19E0 •  To:  Heads of Departments and Independent Establishments  From:  Alan K. Campbell Director  Subject:  /  /  The Hatch Act  In this election year of 1980 I am requesting each of you to remind your employees of the restrictions the Hatch Act (5 U.S.C. §§ 7324-7327) places upon their ability to participate actively in partisan political management and partisan political campaigns. I have attached to this memorandum lists of what employees may do and what they may not do. This list is taken from the new edition of FED FACTS 2, which will be published by OPM by late March. I urge you to order a sufficient number of copies of this helpful publication to make it available to all employees. Ordering instructions are in the March "OPM Writer Bullebin," which your agency should receive In the meantime, however, you may want to shortly. reproduce the attached list of "dos" and "don'ts" for distribution. There also has been some confusion about whether the Hatch Act applies to Schedule C employees and to certain types of appointees in the Senior Executive Service (SES). These employees are covered by the Act. The only employees excepted from the prohibitions against active political management and political campaigning are specified in 5 U.S.C. § 7324(d), and include: (1) an employee paid from the appropriation for the Office of the President; (2) the head or assistant head of an Executive Department or military department; (3) an employee appointed by the President subject to Senate confirmation, "who determines policies to be pursued by the United States in its relation with foreign powers or in the nationwide administration of Federal laws". The Act's prohibitions are in effect whether the employee is on duty or off duty. Employees are subject to the restrictions while on leave.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .  -4714711111.11L  -2  Most municipalities and political subdivisions in the Washington, D.C. vicinity have been exempted from certain of the Hatch Act's restrictions. These are listed in 733.1 CPR 5 5 24. Employees who reside in these localities may take an active part in political management or in political campaigns in connection with partisan elections for local offices, so long as the participation is as, on behalf of, or in opposition to an independent candidate. In these localities candidacy for or service in public office may not result in interference with the performance of the employee's duties, nor create a conflict or apparent conflict of interest. Should your employees have questions concerning their obligations under the Hatch Act, they should direct them to the Office of Special Counsel, 1717 H Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20419. The telephone number of the Special Counsel's Office is 653-7140. Attachment  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  POLITICAL ACTIVITIES WHICH ARE PROHIBITED BY THE HATCH ACT  The general prohibitions on Federal employees are that they may not use their official authority or influence to interfere with or affect the result of an election, and that they may not take an active part in partisan political management or in partisan political campaigns. These are some of the prohibited activities: . You may not be a candidate for nomination or election to a national or state office. . You may not become a partisan candidate for nomination or election to public office. . You may not campaign for or against a political party or candidate in a partisan election for public office or political party office. . You may not serve as an officer of a political party, a member of a national, state or local committee of a political party, an officer or member of a committee of a partisan political club, or be a candidate for any of these positions. . You may not participate in the organizing or reorganizing of a political party, organization or club. . You may not solicit, receive, collect, handle, disburse, or account for assessments, contributions, or other funds for a partisan political purpose or in connection with a partisan election. . Federal criminal statutes impose restrictions concerning contributions in connection with elections for Federal Office. Specifically, you may not solicit political contributions from other Federal employees and no person may solicit or receive political contributions in buildings where Federal employees work. Also, one of these criminal statutes restricts your ability to make political contributions to other Federal employees. You should contact the Office of Special Counsel at 1717 H Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20419, (202) 653-7140), for advice if you have any questions concerning the requirements of these laws.  Mk   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  . You may not sell tickets for or otherwise actively promote such activities as political dinners. . You may not take an active part in managing the political campaign of a candidate, i•n a partisan election for public office or political party office. . You may not work at the polls on behalf of a partisan candidate or political party by acting as a checker, challenger, or watcher, or in a similar partisan position. . You may not distribute campaign material. . You may not serve as a delegate, alternate, or proxy to a political party convention. . You may not address a convention, rally, caucus, or similar gathering of a political party in support of or in opposition to a candidate for public office or political party office, or on a partisan political question. . You may not endorse or oppose a candidate in a partisan election through a political advertisement, broadcast, campaign literature, or similar material. . You may not use your automobile to drive voters to the polls on behalf of a political party or candidate in a partisan election.  •  •  •  PERMISSIBLE POLITICAL ACTIVITIES UNDER THE HATCH ACT  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  These are some permissible activities: . You have the right to register and vote as you choose in any election. Political activity restrictions do not relieve Federal employees of their obligation as citizens to inform themselves of the issues and to register and vote. Employees are urged to vote by being granted leave under certain circumstances to register or vote. . You have the right to express your opinions as an individual, privately and publicly, on all political subjects and candidates as long as you don't take an active part in partisan political management or partisan political campaigns. . You may wear a political badge or button or display a political sticker on your private automobile, subject to work-related limitations. . You may make a voluntary campaign contribution to a political party or organization. . You may accept appointment to public office, provided service in the office will not conflict or interfere with the efficient discharge of your Federal duties. . You may participate in a non-partisan election either as a candidate or in support of (or in opposition to) a candidate, and you may, if elected, serve in the office if such service will not conflict or interfere with your Federal duties. . You may serve as an election clerk or judge, or in a similar position, to perform non-partisan duties as prescribed by state or local law. . You may be politically active in connection with an issue not specifically identified with a political party, such as a constitutional amendment, referendum, approval of a municipal ordinance, or similar issue. . You may participate in the non-partisan activities of a civic, community, social, labor, professional, or similar organization.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • . You may be a member of a political party or other political organization and attend meetings and vote on issues, but you may not take an active part in managing the organization. . You may attend a political convention, rally, fund-raising function, or other political gathering, but you may not take an active part in conducting or managing such gatherings. . You may sign petitions, including nominating petitions, but may not initiate them or canvass for nignatuces, iE they are nominating petitions for candidates in partisan elections. . You may petition Congress or any Member of Congress, such as by writing to your Representatives and Senators to say how you think they should vote on a particular issue.  •  •  •  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506  MAR I 2I980  Honorable Paul A. Volcker Chairman Board of Governers of the Federal Reserve System 20th & Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20551  1611Malift.  Dear Mr. Volcker: At its meeting on March 11, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission approved the enclosed draft of proposed interim guidelines on sexual harassment and the implementing management directive. A preliminary draft was circulated to all heads of Federal agencies last week, during the informal interagency coordination period (copy enclosed). During the next 15 days of formal interagency coordination, we would appreciate receiving your comments concerning the proposed amendment to the guidelines on sex discrimination. The interim guidelines will not he published in the Federal Register until the 15 days of coordination have passed and we have evaluated your comments. Sincerely,  \ Frederick D. Dorsey, Arector Office of Policy Implementation  .t  Enclosure   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  immer  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  •  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506  March 8, 1980 MEMORANDUM TO:  All Heads of Federal Agencies  FROM:  Frederick D. Dorsey, Director Office of Policy Implementation  SUBJ:  Proposed Amendment to EEOC Guidelines on Sex Discrimination -Sexual Harassment  F117:.r1  Attached is a preliminary draft of proposed interim guidelines amending the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's Guidelines on Sex Discrimination under Title VII and an implementing management directive. These guidelines are drafted as interim in recognition of the Commission's long standing policy that sexual harassment constitutes a violation of Title VII. The directive will require agencies to take steps to include sexual harassment in their affirmative action plans and to report these inclusions as a supplement to their Phase II Affirmative Action Planning Process. Through this memorandum we are requesting your informal comments as soon as possible. The guidelines and directive will be considered by the Commission on March 11, 1980. Formal interagency coordination will continue for an additional 15 days thereafter and will occur prior to publication of the guidelines for comment. It has come to our attention that many agencies have established policies to address the problem of sexual harassment. Some of the policies were issued in .response to the Office of Personnel Management's directive on this subject while others were -adopted on the agency's own initiative. As a result, there may be inconsistencies between policies now in effect and the Commission's proposed interim policy. We are attempting to fulfill our responsibility under Executive Order 12067, which requires EEOC to eliminate conflict and duplication in equal employment policy, by requesting that you bring to our attention any formal policy your agency has regarding sexual hartssme!lt :n Lb e .!nv 4,r:)nrr.ent. Inv CLiii[d he Ldencified so that sil;nii'icant differences ,:an he Cofli. resolved. Our goal is to provide a consistent approach to this issue so that agencies can meet the established Title VII and Federal personnel requirements. Those sexual harassment policies which EEOC has reviewed understandably tend to approach the issue from the perspective of establishing standards for employee conduct without always recognizing the range of liability and protection created by Title VII.  • Your review of the following provisions of the proposed interim guidelines in light of Title VII liability and protection is especially important. Both physical and verbal conduct are within the scope of the guidelines. The harassment need not be directly related to specific job opportunity or benefit but also includes the psychological atmosphere created. The strict liability standard applies to supervisors and agents (i.e., no specific knowledge is required). Harassment between peers is covered as well as harassment between supervisor and supervisee. All activity in the employment relationship is covered whether on or off the work site. All comments received during the interagency coordination and the public comment period will be analyzed and changes made as appropriate prior to publication in final form. We are attempting to provide as much time as possible for agencies to include sexual harassment in the Phase II affirmative action planning and to meet the deadline of May 1, 1980 for submission of a supplementary report on this issue. If you have questions or wish to submit comments, please address them to Merle Morrow, Supervisory Attorney, Office of Policy Implementation, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2401 E Street, N.W., Washington D.C. 20506.  Enclosure   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • TITLE 29 - LABOR  CHAPTER XIV - EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION  PART 1604 - GUIDELINES ON DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX UNDER TITLE VII  OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED  ADOPTION OF INTERIM INTERPRETIVE GUIDELINES  AGENCY:  Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  ACTION:  Interim Amendment to Guidelines on Discrimination Because  of Sex  SUMMARY:  The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is amending its  Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Sex on an interim basis, in order to clarify its position on the issue of sexual harassment and to invite the public to comment on the issue.  This amendment will  re-affirm that sexual harassment is an unlawful employment practice. These Interim Guidelines are in full effect from the date of their publication; however, EEOC will receive comments for 60 days subsequent to the date of publication.  After the comment period EEOC will  evaluate the comments, make whatever changes to the Interim Guidelines may seem appropriate in light of the comments, and publish the final Guidelines.  DATES: .Comments must be received on or before  , 190.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • (2)  FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  Frederick D. Dorsey, Director Office of Policy Implementation, Room 4002 2401 E Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 634-7060  SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:  Sexual harassment like harassment on the  basis of color, race, religion, or national origin, has long been recognized by EEOC as a violation of Section 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.  However, despite the position  taken by the Commission, sexual harassment continues to be especially widespread.  Because of the continued prevalence of this unlawful  practice, the Commission has determined that there is a need for guidelines in this area of Title VII law.  Therefore, EEOC proposes to  amend its Guidelines on Discrimination because of Sex (37 FR 6836, April 5, 1972, as amended) to add Section 1604.11, Sexual harassment.  Proposed Subsection 1604.11 (a) provides that harassment on the basis of sex is a violation of Title VII and states that such unwelcomed behavior may be either physical or verbal in nature.  The proposed  section also sets out three criteria for determining whether an action constitutes unlawful behavior.  These criteria are (1) submission to  the conduct is citir!r An explicit  r  !..:2rm or contifLion or'  employment; (2) submission to or resection of the conduct is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting the person who did the   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • (3)  submitting or rejecting; or (3) the conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.  It  is the Commission's position that sexual harassment, like racial harassment, generates a harmful atmosphere.  Under Title VII, employees  should be afforded a working environment free of discriminatory intimidation whether based on sex, race, religion, or national origin. Therefore, the employer has an affirmative duty to maintain a workplace free of sexual harassment and intimidation.  Proposed Subsection 1604.11 (b) recognizes that the question of whether a particular action or incident establishes a purely personal, social relationship without a discriminatory employment effect requires a factual determination.  In making such a determination, the Commission  will look at the record as a whole and at the totality of the circumstances, emphasizing the nature of the sexual advances and the context in which the alleged incidents occurred.  The determination of  the legality of a particular action will he made from the facts, on a case by case basis.  Proposed Subsection 1604.11 (c) applies general Title VII principles to the issue of sexual harassment and states that an employer is responsible for the acts of its supervisory employees or agents, regardless of whether the acts were authorized or forbidden by the employer and regardless of whether the employer knew or  have   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (4) known of the acts.  This subsection further states that the Commission  will determine whether an individual acts in either an agency or a supervisory capacity on a case by case basis, examining the circumstances of the particular employment relatonship and the job functions performed by the individual, rather than accepting an individual's title as being controlling.  Proposed Subsection 1604.11 (d) distinguishes the employer's responsibility for the acts of its agents or supervisors from the responsibility it has for the acts of other persons.  This subsection  states that liability for the acts of those persons not mentioned in subsection (c) exists only when the employer, or its agents or supervisory employees, knows or should have known of the conduct.  The  subsection further provides that the employer may rebut this apparent liability for the conduct by showing that it took immediate and appropriate corrective action.  Consistent with the policy of voluntary compliance under Title VII, subsection 1604.11 (e) recognizes that the best way to achieve an environment free of sexual harassment is to prevent the occurrence of sexual harassment by utilizing appropriate methods to alert the employees to the problem and to stress that sexual harassment, in any form, will not be tolerated.  This subsection requires an employer to  take all steps necessary for the prevention of sexual harassment and gives the following as ,2xamples of sto.ps necessary:  h icti  mighL 'De deemed  affirmatively raising the subject, expressing strong   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (5) disapproval, developing appropriate sanctions, informing employees of their right to raise the issue of sexual harassment under Title VII, and developing methods to sensitize all concerned.  This amendment to the Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Sex is a signigicant regulation under Executive Order 12044, "Improving Government Regulations" (43 FR 12661, March 24, 1978).  There are no  regulatory burdens or recordkeeping requirements necessary for compliance with the amendment.  The Commisison has determined that  these proposed guidelines will not have major impact on the economy and that a regulatory analysis is not necessary.  In compliance with Executive Order 12067 (43 FR 28967, July 5, 1978), the Commission has consulted with representatives of the Office of Personnel Management, Department of Justice, Department of Labor, and Department of Health, Education and Welfare.  At the end of the 60 day  comment period, the Commission will again consult with these agencies on the issues raised thrcugl: the public comment process.  Signed at Washington, D.C. this  day of  ,1980.  Equal Employment Opportunity Commission   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  (6)  Accordingly, 29 CFR Chapter XIV, Part 1604 is amended by adding Section 1604.11 to read as follows:  PART 1604 - GUIDELINES ON DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX  Section 1604.11 Sexual harassment.  a)  Harassment on the basis of sex is a violation of Sec. 703 of Title VII. */  Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual  favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment, (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting such individual, or '(3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment.  b)  In  determining whether alleged conduct constitutes sexual  harassment, the Commission will look at the record as a whole and at the totality of the circumstances, such as the nature of the sexual advances and the context in which the alleged incidents occurred.  The determination of the legality of a  particular action will be made from the facts, on a case by 0_a!;e  *  The principles involved here continue to apply to race, color,  religion or national origin.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (7) c)  Applying general Title VII principles, an employer, employment agency, joint apprenticeship committee or labor organization (hereinafter collectively referred to as 'employer") is responsible for its acts and those of its agents and supervisory employees with respect to sexual harassment regardless of whether the specific acts complained of were authorized or even forbidden by the employer and regardless of whether the employer knew or should have known of their occurrence.  The Commission will examine the  circumstances of the particular employment relationship and the job functions performed by the individual in determining whether an individual acts in either a supervisory or agency capacity.  d)  With respect to persons other than those mentioned in subsection (c) above, an employer is responsible for acts of sexual harassment in the workplace where the employer, or its agents or supervisory employees, knows or should have krovn of the conduct.  An employer may rebut apparent liability for  such acts by showing that it took immediate and appropriate corrective action.  e)  Prevention is the best tool for the elimination of sexual harassment. prevelt  An employer should take all steps necessary to r  1S  r  .  1  affirmatively raising the subject, expressing strong  •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  disapproval, developing appropriate sanctions, informing employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Title VII, and developing methods to sensitize all concerned.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .•  • (9) a   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EEOC MANAGEMENT DIRECTIVE ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT  Harassment on the basis of sex is a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended. OPM has issued a policy statement that sexual harassment is also a prohibited personnel practice. Agencies are instructed to include as supplement to their Phase II Affirmative Action Planning Process a plan indicating the steps the agency will take to prevent sexual harassment. Such supplements are to be submitted by May 1, 1980. Agency plans will be evaluated on the extent to which they utilize training and/or other methods to prevent sexual harassment. This evaluition will be part of the EEOC analysis of agency affirmative action plan submission. EEOC has published Interim Guidelines on Sexual Harassment. (See Agencies should refer to these Guidelines for further information and for guidance in developing or modifying their affirmative action plans. EEOC invites comments on the Interim Guidelines during the comment period. As interim guidelines these are effective upon publication. However, comments submitted will be evaluated, changes will be made as appropriate and formal interagency consultation will be conducted prior to publication as final Guidelines.  ( hew,.P—IP   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r .•  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506  March 8, 1980 METI0RANDU1 TO:  All Heads of Federal Agencies  FROM:  Frederick D. Dorsey, Director Office of Policy Implementation  SUBJ:  Proposed Amendment to EEOC Guidelines on Sex Discrimination -Sexual Harassment  FW,,r1  Attached is a preliminary draft of proposed interim guidelines amending the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's Guidelines on Sex Discrimination under Title VII and an implementing management directive. These guidelines are drafted as interim in recognition of the Commission's long standing policy that sexual harassment constitutes a violation of Title VII. The directive will require agencies to take steps to include sexual harassment in their affirmative action plans and to report these inclusions as a supplement to their Phase It Affirmative Action Planning Process. Through this memorandum we are requesting your informal comments as soon as possible. The guidelines and directive will be considered by the Commission on March 11, 1980. Formal interagency coordination will continue for an additional 15 days thereafter and will occur prior to publication of the guidelines for comment. It has come to our attention that many agencies have established policies to address the problem of sexual harassment. Some of the policies were issued in response to the Office of Personnel Management's directive on this subject while others were adopted on the agency's own initiative. As a result, there may be inconsistencies between policies now in effect and the Commission's proposed interim policy. We are attempting to fulfill our responsibility under Executive Order 12067, which requires EEOC to eliminate conflict and duplication in equal employment policy, by requesting that you bring to our attention any formal policy your agency has regarding sexual barass-nent in the work environment. Specifically, any areas of conflict should he identified so that significant differences can be resolved. Our goal is to provide a consistent approach to this issue so that agencies can meet the established Title VII and Federal personnel requirements. Those sexual harassment policies which EEOC has reviewed understandably tend to approach the issue from the perspective of establishing standards for employee conduct without always recognizing the range of liability and protection created by Title VII.  16  Your review of the following provisions of the proposed interim guidelines in light of Title VII liability and protection is especially important. Both physical and verbal conduct are within the scope of the guidelines. The harassment need not be directly related to specific job opportunity or benefit hut also includes the psychological atmosphere created. The strict liability standard applies to supervisors and agents (i.e., no specific knowledge is required). Harassment between peers is covered as well as harassment between supervisor and supervisee. All activity in the employment relationship is covered whether on or off the work site. All comments received during the interagency coordination and the public comment period will be analyzed and changes made as appropriate prior to publication in final form. We are attempting to provide as much time as possible for agencies to include sexual harassment in the Phase II affirmative action planning and to meet the deadline of May 1, 1980 for submission of a supplementary report on this issue. If you have questions or wish to submit comments, please address them to Merle Morrow, Supervisory Attorney, Office of Policy Implementation, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2401 E Street, N.W., Washington D.C. 20506.  Enclosure   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  TITLE 29 -. LABOR  CHAPTER XIV - EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION  _PART 1604 - GUIDELINES ON DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX UNDER TITLE VII  OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED  ADOPTION OF INTERIM INTERPRETIVE GUIDELINES  AGENCY:  Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  ACTION:  Interim Amendment to Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Sex  SUMMARY:  The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is amending its  Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Sex on an interim basis, in order to clarify its position on the issue of sexual harassment and to invite the public to comment on the issue.  This amendment will  re-affirm that sexual harassment is an unlawful employment practice. These Interim Guidelines are in full effect from the date of their publication; however, EEOC will receive comments for 60 days subsequent to the date of publication.  After the comment period EEOC will  evaluate the comments, make whatever changes to the Interim Guidelines may seem appropriate in light of the comments, and publish the final Gui(1, 211ne, ..  OATES:  ':om-lent; -11.1.1t ht  c,!ct!ii()LI on or ',efor2  , 19R0.  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  Frederick D. Dorsey, Director Office of Policy Implementation, Room 4002 2401 E Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 634-7060  SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:  Sexual harassment has long been recognized  by EEOC as a violation of Section 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.  However, despite the position taken by the  Commission, sexual harassment continues to prevail.  Because of the  c - ontinued prevalence of this unlawful practice, the Commission has determined that there is a need for guidelines in this area of Title VII law.  Therefore, EEOC proposes to amend its Guidelines on  Discrimination because of Sex (37 FR 6836, April 5, 1972, as amended) to 'add Section 1604.11, Sexual harassment.  Proposed Subsection 1604.11 (a) provides that harassment on the basis . of sex is a violation of Title VII and states that such unwelcomed behavior may be either physical or verbal in nature.  The proposed  section also sets out three criteria for determining whether an action constitutes unlawful behavior.  These criteria are (1) submission to  the conduct is either an explicit or implicit term or condition of ,”nployment; (2) 'Iubmislion t-o or reThction of the conduct is used as the ka.;is for  mp1ovment leciions affectins-, the perwa who did the  submitting or rejf!cting; or (1) the conduct has the purpose or effect   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (3) performance or of substantially interfering with an individual's work creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.  It  like racial is the Commission's position that sexual harassment, harassment, generates a harmful atmosphere.  Under Title VII, employees  ry should be afforded a working environment free of discriminato . intimidation whether based on sex, race, religion, or national origin ace Therefore, the employer has an affirmative duty to maintain a workpl free of sexual harassment and intimidation. whether Proposed Subsection 1604.11 (b) recognizes that the question of social a particular action or incident establishes a purely personal, a relationship without a discriminatory employment effect requires factual determination.  In making such a determination, the Commission  will look at the record as a whole and at the totality of the and the circumstances, emphasizing the nature of the sexual advances context in which the alleged incidents occurred.  The determination of  on a the legality of a particular action will be made from the facts, case by case basis. ples to Proposed .Subsection 1604.11 (c) applies general Title VII princi the issue of sexual harassment and states that an employer is , responsible for the acts of its supervisory employees or agents regardless of whether the acts were authorized or forbidden by the :ic  r j)C Iher_hi.2r  tr1ploy.2r .:new or shwa(' have   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • (4)  known of the acts.  This subsection further states that the Commission  will determine whether an individual acts in either an agency or a supervisory capacity on a case by case basis, examining the circumstances of the particular employment relatonship and the job functions performed by the individual, rather than accepting an individual's title as being controlling.  Proposed Subsection 1604.11 (d) distinguishes the employer's responsibty for the acts of its agents or supervisors from the responsibility it has for the acts of other persons.  This subsection  states that liabty for the acts of those persons not mentioned in suS section (c) exists only when the employer, or its agents or supervisory employees, knows or should have known of the conduct.  The  suS section further provides that the employer may rebut this apparent liability for the conduct by showing that it took immediate and appropriate corrective action.  Consistent with the policy of voluntary compliance under Title VII, subsectiS n 1604.11 (e) recognizes that the best way to achieve an envirS nment free of sexual harassment is to prevent the occurrence of sexual harassment by utzing appropriate methods to alert the employees to the problem and to stress that sexual harassment, in any form, will not be tolerated.  This subsection requires an employer to  tike Ail  ; or tens lece!;';ary .  “v.ls  followin; as oxnmpL!s  necessary:  pr.2-ention of 4i-!xuaI )arasment And qtt,')s which ni.4ht  deemed  affirmatively raising the subject, expressing strong   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (5) disapproval, developing appropriate sanctions, informing employees of their right to raise the issue of sexual harassment under Title VII, and developing methods to sensitize all concerned.  This amendment to the Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Sex is a signigicant regulation under Executive Order 12044, "Improving Government Regulations" (43 FR 12661, March 24, 1978).  There are no  regulatory burdens or recordkeeping requirements necessary for compliance with the amendment.  The Commisison has determined that  these proposed guidelines will not have major impact on the economy and that a regulatory analysis is not necessary.  In compliance with Executive Order 12067 (43 FR 28967, July 5, 1978), the Commission has consulted with representatives of the Office of Personnel Management, Department of Justice, Department of Labor, and Department of Health, Education and Welfare.  At the end of the 60 day  comment period, the Commission will again consult with these agencies on the issues raised through the public comment process.  Signed at Washington, D.C. this  day of  ,1980.  Chlir Equal Employment opportunity Commission   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • Accordingly, 29 CFR Chapter XIV, Part 1604 is amended by adding Section 1604.11 to read as follows:  PART 1604 - GUIDELINES ON DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX  Section 1604.11 Sexual harassment.  a)  Harassment on the basis of sex is a violation of Sec. 703 of Title VII.  Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual  favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment, (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting such individual, or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's work performance or creatillg an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment.  b)  In  determining whether alleged conduct constitutes sexual  harassment, the Commission will look at the record as a whole and at the totality of the circumstances, such as the nature of the sexual advances and the context in which the alleged incidents occurred. pnrtic!ilar cas  The determination of the legality of a he  froTi th^ facts, on a caso by   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S c)  Applying general Title VII principles, an employer, employment agency, joint apprenticeship committee or labor organization (hereinafter collectively referred to as "employer") is responsible for its acts and those of its agents and supervisory employees with respect to sexual harassment regardless of whether the specific acts complained of were authorized or even forbidden by the employer and regardless of whether the employer knew or should have known of their occurrence.  The Commission will examine the  circumstances of the particular employment relationship and the job functions performed by the individual in determining whether an individual acts in either a supervisory or agency capacity.  d)  With respect to persons other than those mentioned in subsection (c) above, an employer is responsible for acts of sexual harassment in the workplace where the employer, or its agents or supervisory employees, knows or should have known of the conduct.  An employer may rebut apparent liability for  Such acts by showing that it took immediate and appropriate corrective action.  e)  Prevention is the best tool for the elimination of sexual 11:tratic9r_. pro.vent  shouli!  111 3ters nece!;sary t)  .larileat from ocirrinv„ .mch is  affirmatively raising the subject, expressing strong  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  disapproval, developing appropriate sanctions, informing employees of their right to raise the issue of harassment under Title VII, and developing methods to sensitize all concerned.  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EEOC MANAGEMENT DIRECTIVE ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT  Harassment on the basis of sex is a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended. OPM has issued a policy statement that sexual harassment is also a prohibited personnel practice. Agencies are instructed to include as supplement to their Phase II Affirmative Action Planning Process a plan indicating the steps the agency will take to prevent sexual harassment. Such supplements are to be submitted by May 1, 1980. Agency plans will be evaluated on the extent to which they utilize training and/or other methods to prevent sexual harassment. This evaluation will be part of the EEOC analysis of agency affirmative action plan submission. EEOC has published Interim Guidelines on Sexual Harassment. (See .) Agencies should refer to these Guidelines for further information and for guidance in developing or modifying their affirmative action plans. EEOC invites comments on the Interim Guidelines during the comment period. As interim guidelines these are effective upon publication. However, comments submitted will be evaluated, changes will be made as appropriate and formal interagency consultation will be conducted prior to publication as final Guidelines.  N  •  The Administrator (A) GSA Furniture Management Reform Plan Heads of Executive Departments and Establishments  Congressional and Executive Branch findings have revealed the need for significant improvement in the procurement and utilization of furniture. As a result, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has initiated a freeze on the procurement of office and household furniture by Executive Branch departments and agencies (Enclosure 1). The freeze will remain in effect until the GSA Furniture Management Reform Plan (Enclosure 2) has been initiated and each agency's furniture expense plan for FY 1981 is approved by OMB. Five principal improvements comprise the GSA Furniture Management Reform Plan: (i)  Fix responsibility at a high level in GSA and in each agency, i.e., Property ManacTement Officer (PM), for the management of furniture and other high value, high demand personal property,  (2)  Institute an intensive manauement program over high value, high demand, reparable furniture item - "Operation Validate;"  (3)  Institute procedures to assure full use of furniture reported as excess and of furniture not in use by individoAl agencies - "Operation Clean Sweep;"  (4)  Systematically determine furniture requirements of each agency and develop an expense plan for approval by OMB and review by GSA; and,  (5)  Improve furniture quality control procedures while insisting on simple but reAlistic specifications.  Eurrary descriptions of Operation Validate, Operation Clean Sweep, and Requirements and Expense Plan are provided (Enclosures 3, 4, 5).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S  •  2 The OMB Bulletin speciL.cally "freezes" agency procurement or ordering of furniture from GSA or any other source, but provides that exceptions may be granted by GSA. Currently authorized exceptions include the Legislative and Judicial Branches, or other Government activities not subject to ale direction such as the Postal Service, and the following: a.  Requisitions for the 1980 Census Project;  b.  Reauisitions for items suppliPd by the National Industries for the Blind and Severely Handicapped;  c.  Iters ordered directly by agencies from Federal Prison Industries;  d.  Requisitions in support of national fire suppression program;  e.  Definite quantity buys in support of properly validated requisitions received prior to February 27, 1980;  f.  Bureau of Indian Affairs Alaska - annual requisitions;  g.  Those item in Federal Supply Class 7110 that are neither office nor household furniture (safes, school and library furniture);  h.  State Department export orders; and,  i.  Export orders for other activities with Issue Priority Code (Y1 through  Requisitions received in GSA with a Julian date of Y058* or latPr will be rejected to the slIbmitter and any designated recipients of status, bearing supply status c-Dde "OQ." Bonafide exceptions for emergency requirements should be snitted using normal exception data procedures in rE0STPIP/MILSTPIP publications, and ray be forwarded by letter if regular foLn6 do not provide adequate space for narrative justification. An important as of the plan is the appointment of an agency Property Management Officer(s). The PM3 must have the knowledge, stature, authority and accountability required to effectively control the acquisition, utilization and disposal of designatPd personal property items. A more definitive explanation of the PD is to evolve as the GSA Furniture Manaaement Reform Plan is implemented. It is recommended that PMD's be a full-tire position on the staff of the Assistant Secretary for Administration. For smaller agencies, the assignment can be the part-tine responsibility of a suitable official. Property Management Officers should be responsible for: requirements determination, standardization and simplification of specifications; Property accountability; oversight of inventory and inventory levels; utilization of property and dec arations of excess; rehabilitation and maintenance; and, participation in the contracting function in terms of specifications, tPstina and feedback on performance including life cycle testina. *February 27, 1980   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  • 3 Initial agency appointmants of PMO's made prior to OMB approval of the GSA Furniture Management Plan are listed in Enclosure 6. We would appreciate your review of the qualifications of the appointees for conformance to the role of the PM0 as outlined above. If an appointment has not yet been made by your agency, please do so in accordance with the above guidelines. Where more than one nate is provided, perhaps for each major agency buroau, we would also appreciate your designating one name as the agency PMO. The name of your Property Management Officer(s), and inguiries and requests for assistance, should be addressed to Mt. Herbert W. McCarthy, Deputy Commissioner for Raauirements and Supply, Federal Supply Service (GSA), telephone (703) 557-8644. The various initiatives are underway. With your cooperation we will be able to achieve mcaningful reform in Executive Branch furniture procurement and management.  Enclosures   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  FEB 2 7 1980 Honorable Rowland G. Freeman, III Administrator of General Services Geagz-al SezYices _Admiaistration r- Washington, D.C. Dear Mr. Freeman: We believe the five-point government-wide furniture management plan described in your letters of February 6 and 11 will contribute significantly to the reforms in agency furniture procurement that Senator Chiles, you, and I consider essential. I understand your staff and mine had a very positive session with the subcommittee staff, at which the general outline of the plan was discussed. I would like to endorse the major elements of the plan and have so indicated in a letter to Senator Chiles, a copy of which is enclosed. The enclosed OMB Bulletin notifies the departments and agencies of my endorsement and further strengthens the Deform initiatives we are instituting by freezing furniture procurement until agency furniture expense plans are approved by OMB. Commissioner Morris of the Federal Supply Service -has worked closely with us in perfecting the details of this order. I believe we have provided a sound basis for GSA and OMB to achieve meaningful reform in Executive Branch furniture procurement and management. We should be able to report significant progress to Senator Chiles at the hearing he has scheduled in March. Sincerely,  cc James T. McIntyre, Jr. Director b.  Enclosures cc:  Thomas D. Morris Commissioner of Federal Supply  Enclosure 1 Page 1 of 5 4.,14.11..-••••••• ••••••••  ;  •  EXECOVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDE. 0E- F1cE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  •  WASHINGTON. D.0  20503  'TP3 2 7 1930 Bulletin No. 80-  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS rcrcitre me-n-t—ef—Rew-4:444-4-c urniture This Bulletin pro‘,ides for a freeze on the Purpose. 1. by furniture household and office new of procurement This amilitlimen Executive Branch departments and agencies. supersedes the moratorium ordered by the Administrator of General Services on October 9, 1979. This action results from CongresScope and background. 2. that revealing findings Branch Executive and sional and significant improvement is needed in the procurement u tilization of furniture. lead in The Administrator of General Services will take the ent and the effort to asspre effectiveness in the procurem He ch. u tilization of furniture throughout the Executive Bran ," approved has developed a "Furniture Management Reform Plan as well by OMB, that covers actions already started for 1980 The freeze will, apply to all as those anticipated for 1981. all other requisitions and orders submitted to GSA and and shall be sources on and after the date of this Bulletin Furniture the with accordance in GSA by administered Management Reform Plan. plans for the Aencies will be required to submit to GSA The plans will be reviewed p:ocurement of furniture in 1981. The Administrator in GSA and forwarded to OMB for approval. rm plan shortly w ill announce the furniture management refo and submission of and issue instructions for the preparation Exceptions to the freeze may agency furniture expense plans. s. be granted by GSA in unusual circumstance ent of all This Bulletin prohibits the procurem Coverage. 3. e in Federal Supply Classes new office and household furnitur all sources, by Executive 7105, 7110, 7125, and 7195, from Branch,departments and agencies.  Page 2 of 5   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 The freeze is effective immediately and will reTimino. 4. e main in effect until (1) the GSA Executive Branch furnitur management plan has been initiated, and (2) each agency's furniture expense plan for 1981 is approved by OMB. Inquiries and requests for assistance should Inquiries. 5. oner, be addressed to Mr. Herbert McCarthy, Deputy Commissi Federal Supply Service, telephone 557-8644.  James T. McIntyre, Jr. Director  Page 3 of 5   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXEOTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDE* OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTOPsi: D.C. 20503  FE.B 2 7 1980 Honorable Lawton Chiles Chairman, Subcommittee on Federal Spending Practices and Open Government a rb .on Governmental cOridmittSe United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Dear Mr. Chairman: In my letter to you of January 30, I indicated some of the actions I had taken up to that point to involve the Office of Management and Budget more aggressively in improving office furniture management by government agencies. I had concluded, as you had in your letter to me of January 16, that "the inventory and procurement functions of Federal agencies, at least with regard to furniture, are mismanaged and poorly coordinated and this situation needs to be resolved." Since my last letter to you I have taken additional steps in support of Administrator Freeman of the General Services Administration and his proposal for a government-wide furniture management reform plan. I understand my staff and GSA officials had a very positive session with Ron Chiodo, e the subcommittee staff director, at which the general outlin of the plan was discussed. We look forward to the opportunity you have offered us to discuss the details of this reform initiative at a March 18 hearing of the subcommittee. I have endcrse3 the principal elements of Administrator Freeman's proposal which: -  fixes responsibility for management of furniture and other high-value property on a high-level named official in each agency with whom GSA can deal;  -  launches "Operation Validate," expanding a screening of agency furniture requisitions for real need and use of repaired and rehabilitated furniture; this operation was first applied to over 30,000 requisitions caught in a moratorium imposed by Administrator Freeman last October;  -  institutes "Operation Clean Sweep," sending joint agency-GSA teams to physically inspect all items of  Page 4 of 5  2 furniture not in use by agencies and returning them to GSA if there is no demonstrated need for them; and implements an 01.93 requirement for development of agency furniture requirements and expense plans for fiscal year 1981. an addiElon to notitylng agency heads of my enddYnnent of the GSA proposal, I am taking the additional action of freezing the procurement of furniture by agencies. This freeze order, which takes effect immediately, will be lifted as soon as agency furniture expense plans are approved by OMB. The General Services Administration will be issuing detailed implementation guidance to the agencies. We believe that the estimated 90-120 day duration of the freeze order will result in savings in furniture expenditures during the current fiscal year in addition to those already experienced during Administrator Freeman's moratorium. I hope you will agree with me that these actions will accomplish the reforms in furniture management that you had proposed through use of rescission legislation. Sincerely,  "n7  James T. McInyre, Jr. Director cc:  Honorable Rowland G. Freeman, III Administrator of General Services Thomas D. Morris Commissioner of Federal Supply'  Page 5 of 5   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  G Ices al!'Jn Wash.noton. DC 20405 nistr AOrnI ,  1S6D Jr. The Honorable James T. McIntyre, Director Office of i1anagement and Budget Washington, IN: 20503 Dear 1.1r. McIntyre Administration, Since October 1, 1979., the General Services of ma.ior initiatives with your support, has launched a series of furniture by Federal to bring the purchase and utilization agencies under effective control. ings -- developed These actions were precipitated by many find ch -- which e both by the Congress and the Executiv Bran to this area by revealed a widespread lack of attention imposed a moratomanagement officials. As a consequence, I iture in order to rium on all purchases and issues of furn nt. develop permanent plans for future manageme launch these We are now at h point where we are beginning to progress report revised control procedures. The attached We urge that you outlines our finings and action plans. cy heads. We endorse these Tlans and to so indicate to agen with the objectives believe that these plans are compatible es dated January 30, expressed in your letter to Senator Chil sing our methods 1980, in which you stated the goal of revi a meaningful reduction of acquiring furniture so as to achieve in overall expenditures. work on these revised Our respective qtnifs are already at able to report procedures, and 1 am confident we will be the Congress during significant progress to the President ad this fiscal year. Sincerely,  R. G. FFIEEMA. III Administrator  -iclosu..-r.e 2 Page 1 of 13  • Feb:ary 6, 1960  0  •  ON GENFRAL SFRVICFS ADMINISTRATI rf Furniture Plans to Strengthen Manarcmrnt by GSA and Federal Users  :one of Problem S. average annual outlays by :he During the past several years the howschold furniture (Federal Federal Government for office and have av;.raced in excess of $250 Classes 7105, 7110. 7125, 7195) chases cf 256.9 million were million. In Ty 1979. total pur broken down by type as follows: Amount (Millions)  Type of Purchases 1.  Purchases for GSA depot stocks  Purchases by GSA for direct delivery from supplier to using agency 3  Purchases from Federal Supply Schedules  S 103.4  53.4  102.1  6  Comment Items stocked by GSA in 17 depots and issued in response to individual acency requisitions Ordered by GSA for individual agencies but shipped direct from supplier Ordered by individual acencies from suppliers under open-ended contracts known as Federal Supply Schedules  $ 256.9 ses is: what type of items were Another way to view these purcha pal recipients? purchased; and who were the princi Type of Furniture Purchased in FY 1979 Household (Class 7105)  Cost in Millions  All agencies. DoD  Office (Class 7110, Cabinets, lockers. shelves, auditoriur. • Library equipment, ele. (Classes 7.125, 729)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  54.5  S25R.9  Enclosure 2 Page 2 of 13  Principnl Users Predominantly DoD. Labor only other large user About half  Many acencies in small amounts. Predominantly DoD  t the major area needing G:,...ernmenIIt Is clear from the ahoye tha ure where FY 1979 purchases, by wide attention is office furrit type, were as follows: e FY 1979 Office Furniture Purchased Lv Typ (Vallions) 78.9 9.1  For stock For Direct Delivery From Federal Supply Schedules  44.1 S132.1  TOTAL A  disposing of old furniture with Eact'year the agencies have been about S40 million. Some of it an origine.1 acquisition cost of eral use -- but often requires is suitable for some further Fed d by the Federal Government, rehatilitation. :f not reutilize donation or sale as provided by the items were disposed of by law. The Issues Senate hearings and our own investiDuring the past fifteen months ing: gations have revealed the follow ns limiting agencies to the Despite longstanding regulatio when determined "absolutely purchase of nev-- furniture only y requisitions do not receive essential,- it appears that man t, as required by the Code of rigorous scrutiny by managemen dy now being conducted by the Federal Regulations.." A stu e further information on the Inspectors General may provid it is clear that more discipline extent of this problem, but ts. of .purchases can reduce cos 41•11P •••  111••••  OEM MID  2/  in the extent to which property Agency practice varies widely ntained on these items. accounting records are mai strong interest in utilizing items Agencies have not shown a repaired and returned to use in which can be overhauled and lieu of -new procurement. popular to replace entire office n bee has it rs yea ent In rec known as "Office Excellence- and m gra pro a er und gs hin furnis tems Furniture." The cost effecSys of ion lat tal ins the by is not always clear. tiveness cf thise techniques  41 C.7-1-:  1C1-26.101, 101-4.3  Enclosure 2 Page 3 of 13  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  sa.  Arm ra..1.1prer.rp  It mAny arencies have th: nt re ra ar e m o c ture Finally, :tbe ure 'rcilsg held against fu it rn fu of ' s d a l, in special "set ks :Ire individually smal oc st e es th of ny ma needs. While ignificant nuantities t en es pr re y ma ey :h e. . the aggregat through GSA management ed iz il ut er tt be be which could tor problems. the Administra of y ra ar is th th wt s ip l To come to gr 1979. ordered a halt to al 9, r be to Oc on , e! ic rv issues of General Se A depot stocks and all GS r fo e ur it rn fu w ne ted purchases of es -- Avith certain limi ci en ag er om st cu to time out of depots moratorium was to allou is th of e os rp pu e Th ess, exceptions. requisitions then in proc r fo ed ne e th cess y if st (1) to reju ures for the use of ex ed oc pr nt me ge na ma (2) to develop better new techniques of detere uc od tr in to ) (3 and unused stocks. and ts based on needs. en em ir qu re re tu fu ng mini work e the results of GSA's i2 ar mm su hs ap gr ra pa save The following ogram which is expected to pr on ti ac an f in tl very to date and ou dollars annually. While of ns io ll mi ny ma s forts in tbe taxpayer y accrued from these ef ad re al ve ha ts fi ne definite be cur in FY 1981, and oc to ed ct pe ex e ar s FY 1980, the major gain achieve five principal to ed gn si de e ar s on therefore these acti below. improvements outlined  ••••••••  Action Number 1 a level in GSA and in each gh hi a at y it il it ns phFix resm-, furniture and other ha of nt me ze na ma e th agency for personal property value. h:0-demand one GSA office has been no at th en be s ha g Our first findin iture expenditure rn fu al nu an n io ll mi iture, accountable for this 5250 -wide inventory of furn nt me rn ve go e th ng gi an for mana is unknown. the total size of which 1, r Freeman, on October to ra st ni mi Ad A GS m fully To correct this prctle itur Center which when rn Tu 1979, establirlhed hRVC total oversight of la w] T, l ri Ap y e of operational (b ) distribution,(4) reus (3 ' e, ag or st ) in (2 g. (2) contractin ning -- for all items an pl ts en em ir qu re s excess, and (5) future and 7195. (1,086 item 25 71 , 10 71 , 05 71 s se Federal Supply Clas for direct delivery or k, oc st r fo ed ur oc pr in number) whether St•hedules. 2/ from Federal FurTl,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  uipment and supply eq .n hr Ic k: d an d ol eh hous initially . certain incompatible with ind fcA en be ve ha se he .T item::: were included. mission. the Furniture Center  Enclosure 2 Page 4 of 13  formerly 1,_,catr,d in l ne on rs pe cr th ge to as This center w:11 bring quarterF, and place the. ad ho A GS at ns io :; vi di ndred four different rnanagemcnt team. One hu al on si es of pr me ti ll tion m-embers of a fu erly staff this organiza op pr to red qui r.? be th personnel will meeting that objective, wi to y wa e th 9n ll we w Lnd we are no February 4, 19SO. 69 positions filled as of official in most agencies le ng si no is e er th at of We find, also, th onsibilities in all five sp re le ab ar mp co th wi an of Government ned above. Without such io nt me s ea ar nt me ee na not be the property ma policy officials, it will cy en ag to ss ce ac th ment Individual wi ntion tc property manage te at te ua eq ad in ta ob possible to ng other high-value gi na ma to t bu nt me ge na ma not only to furniture tention. Hence, our at ch su y if st ju h ic wh personal property it-ems t in the tain permanent improvemen ob to on ti da en mm co re property first other high-value personal d an e ur it rn fu of nt me manage items is as follows: ment appoint a "Pror,erty Manace ld ou sh ad ne cy en ag ch Ea and dge. stature. authority Officer- w: te knowle realistic planning of re su as to d re lui c re accountability pervision over the acnuisisu e iv ct fe ef d an ts recuiremen iture and other high-value rn fu of n io at iz il ut tion and ts. personal property asse Cabinet for this• assignment in the en os ch e os th at th staff It is felt should be a member of the es ci en ag er rg la d an come departments r Administration,/ and be fo y ar et cr Se t an st si hope of the As cupational category which we oc l na io ss fe ro .p a of members nagement. e Office of Personnel Ma th by d he is bl ta is es will be ted individuals now in th va ti mo d an d te ca di de overThere are many ition and authority is long gn co re d se ea cr in nt field for whom gnized that this assignme co re is it es ci en ag . due. In smaller ty of a suitable official li bi si on sp re e im -T rt will be the pa d d to endorse this plan an ke as en be s ha ; OME of The Director will take. responsiSA .G s. ad he cy en ag by on ti direct its implementa ch officials, and for su of t en pm lo ve de d an ng most bility for the traini procedures which will be e th on cy en ag ch ea th working wi agency. suitable within that  ••••••  cial. Secretary or policy offi t an st si As e at ri op Or another appr cy's structure. depending on the agen  Enclosure 2 __Page 5 of 13  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Acti:w Nu7,ber ^ f,nslvt, r:InacemenI nrc...ram 'tute27-Tedi;ttelv an tnt ure -'. nJ repairable furnit hc ovt Vz.1d;1te am Desi:natt- this Prc.gr . t ..••  gement bility of thf. Property Vana si on sp re t an rt po im st The mo buys only that GSA and each acency re su as to be ll wa rs Office to high with parIic.. 11ar attention -ed ed ne y rl ea cl d is what ng the moratorium initiate ri Du . fe li ng lo th wi unfilled ucit-value items of 120 such items from p ou gr 2 ed ct le se A GS to last October, ted by the agencies prior it bm su en be had h ic wh agencies requisitions isitions were returned to qu re ed ct le se e es Th October 9. cancel those which and ed ne e th e in am ex re was with a request that they A very high response rate d. fic sti 11: ll fu be t could no ned. of the agencies concer ottcined -- over S were checked and 2.189 ns io it is qu re 03 ,6 30 Through this procet--.6 for 7300 units of furnirs de or ed at in im el is were cancelled. Tt, 5700,000 -- a reduction of er ov of st co se ha rc pu ture wilt, a new (the first ever attempted) on ti da li va re is th , 7. While modest potential of a continuing e th and r fo ed ne e illustrates th A and agency managers. program of oversight by GS rising a)yzed the 108R itvms comp an ve hn we ce ('n .i ! pc nt Based on this ex unching a permanent manageme la e ar d an s se as cl ty the furniture ation with the agency Proper or ab ll co in d tq ra gu plan to be inau ginning immediately: V.anagement Officers, be life that 729 items have a useful 1: has been determined ir; d are susceptible to repa in excess cf one year an fied as e. These will be classl rehabilitation and reus will erty Management Officers s "control i - e7ns." Prop 's usago of control item cy en ag r ei th r to ni mo eparing constantly s for these items in pr ed ne re tu fu e yz al an ll and wi scal penditure plan for each f: ex ed os op pr 's cy en ag their year. been found that 249 (3Y; s ha it p ou gr l ro nt Out of the co dollars spent -- since e th of ( 897 r fo t un cp of items) ac are purchased in quantity d an st co it un gh hi ). they have es, filing cabinets, etc. bl ta , rs ai ch , l:s des (i.e., property emand group separate -d gh hi , ue al -v gh hi hase F,_,r this maintained, and each purc be st mu ds !-r rec ng ti accoun fore the high level validation be l ia ec Fp a t ir qu re will Excesses of these . er li pp su e th or GSA crcier as st'nt tc; om now on. Annual fr ny ti ru sc l ia ec sp re items '.l rqui by line item in these ed iz em it be ll wi s an pl expenditure caft.es.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •••  Enclosure 2 Page 6 of 13  MEP MID  -"n cortrll !tc,7r,- an )!II7-cd.e spries cf studies : al fy For acency ifficials tc idnnti will be t-.,. egun 1,y GSA and e Th e:onnmici.1 procurement. opportunities or more ered far each item will sw an be to s on ti es qu specific followinc: include th T‘ to have?- If ice -r. st ju or y ar ss ce Is the ite:T. ne e item nou purchased in larg necessary. vill another For example, among the quantity dp the same job? e are 69 rotary chairs. 24 249 high-vllue items ther cabinets, and 17 tables flat top desks, 26 filing Sizeable savings can k. oc st r fo y da to ed r2r being ord necessary varietiPs nnd un g in at in im el t!y ed ev be achi types. scription be used in lieu of de rn ite a: ci er mm co a Can n? a Federal specificatio I  ,  l being purchased from Federa e ar s em it r la mi si If these be eliminated and all Supply Schedules, can ock? on the items bought for st purchases concentrated fective ways of checking ef ve ha s er us e rg la Do the stocks of excess or unused cy en ag r he ot and n ow their on before purchasing? furniture f(o- substituti ties: ent way to buy future quanti ci fi ef st mo e th ls t Wha year ed only once or twice each ac pl be rs de or ld ou sn the of delivery so as to obtain with speciflted points ive bids? For stock it et mp co om fr es ic pr e most favorabl ctive locations for fe ef st co st mo e th e ar items what lier's own storage facili pp su e th ld ou Sh e? ag GSA stor lly as possible? ties be utilized as fu "OPeration Validate ately will be implemented immedi e ov ab ed in tl ou ts en agency The improvem Supply in concert with the l ra de Fe cf er on si is mm edures by tbe Co Officers. Under these proc nt me ge na Ma ty er op Pr T-'ersonal superseded. Requisibe ll wi r be to Oc st la d th tbe moratorium applie for processing along wi ed as le re be ll wi d te da se. tions already vali have been held in suspen h ic wh ns io it is qu re tbe non-furniture high-demand group will be , ue al -v gh hi 9 24 e th eviously A'l items in on by agencies, unless pr ti da li va ll fu r fo returned validated.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Enclosure 2 Page 7 of 13  items uisitions for the 729 control req 1ng o.7 inc In tne d under cy of certification as :c nee qua ade f:r ned ami be l wil ty developed uith Perso-nal Proper Gampling procedures to be certilied, requisitions will bc ly ate equ , :Ad ". If .. l!LnEgerb returned. where validaticn predure for items al eci a !:p , L)n iti add :n iture) is r (primarily housf7.hold furn use p:1 Lci pri the is DoD being developed. of need, the Commissioner of As a final check on validity s for uously sample all 'requisition Federal Supply will contin t ncies and orders placed agains furniture received from age a group for direct investiect sel and les edu Sch ply Federal Sup visits to verify intended use te -si on ing lud inc d, nee gation of will apply to all control ng pli sam h Suc es. cas ed in celect basis for future additions to the be l wil and ms ite e ur furnit control list. and deletions from the Action Number ure full use of ...ir-crous !Procedures to ass ess and ci furniture not an exc as ec :rt rcc ure nit fur s es. Designate these procedure nci age l dua ivi inC by use "Overation Cif,an Sweep -. have opportunities for savings we ant ort imp t mos the of One tee and studies by the Senate Commit of ult res a as ed ter oun enc from utilizing furniture wnich cur own staffs will result litate ds of an agency, and to rehabi becomes excess to the nee so.4! In addition, we have do to ic nom eco n whe such property e stocks against future erv res ng ini nta mai es fcund some agenci some in new condition. contingencies ps with this opportunity for gri to e com we t tha ial It is essent This will call for a range of . way ve ati gin ima an in savings designating "Operation Clean are we ch whi -es tiv tia new ini Sweet - -- as follows:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  perty M;fnagement Officers First, prompt review by Pro all excess furniture listings In GSA and the agencies of and selection of those• -d ate cul cir , are y the as as soon or lize. Items which are new uti can es nci age t tha items in will be selected for inclusion d ate lit abi reh be can st source of sup.1,1y against fir the as es ori ent inv GSA airability specifies rep ic nom eco of n tio ini def Tne nurrent on, repair and packing ti ta or sp an tr of t cos al that the tot modify of neu item cost. We will r 75e the eed exc not should basis exceptions Cr n cuse by case ow all to rd nda sta this conservation when an rgy ene ci ts efi ben ed vlew cf the add 1TCM 1S rellti:17cd.  Enclosure 2 Page 8 of 13  h To r..131:() vertain that suc ns. !er new fr ns io it is . requ we will makt. use both of our selections are worthwhile ..mtractors to make litation c, own GSA personnel and rehabi ine usal,ility n.nd to deIerm an on -site inspection of of packang, transpc;rt cos e Th y. it il ab ir pa economic re ially chargeJ against the it in be l wil air rep and tation recover those costs at l wil ch whi d Fun ly pp Su General ued to an agency user. iss y ll na fi is m ite e th me :he ti zation for the fund if li ta pi ca r te ea gr k see l wil We it. these costs pose a strain on s will set up central location Second, where possible, we litated or remanufactured in majcr cities for rehabi ection by prospective users furniture to f:Icilitate insp e items most suitable to the and :he selection of thos needs of an agency. ections of items being held sp in le mp sa ent rec our d. Thir s property reveal that quanti lu rp su for es ci en ag e at st by r and made available for furthe ties which can be repaired ). Cat best a few hundred pieces Federal use are not large on certain that such items now Nonetheless, we will make pearing on the high-value, hand at state agencies and ap is rned to GSA stocks where it high -demand list are retu the other stocks will be economical to do so. All on and sale. released for normal donati we need to. survey agency-held s, on ti ac ve abo the to in addition age sites in major cities -or st nt d ate loc es rv se re e furnitur houses, buildings, sections of ware l ra de Fe of s nt me se ba g in includ m v:ere etc. Examples of this proble s, er nt ce ty er op pr al on pers ittee on staff of the Senate Comm the by DC , on Rt in sh Wa in found ment last December. rn ve Go n Ope and s ce ti ac Pr Federal Spending • of a number of storage h ug ro th k wal y ar in im el pr a We nave made ed 113.000 p1eces5/ held by fi ti en id and ion reg ch ea in cy, locations d for rettntion by the agen te da li va be to d nee ch whi es agenci quantity ation- . About half of this iz il ut for GSA to s. ed as le or re located in most region is me so but ea ar DC , on gt is in the Washin l more than that which was dea at gre a is e er th at roughs. We suspect th these informal walk th in d te un co and ed fi ti initially iden launch Operation Clean Sweep' will y. it un rt po op is th 7o pursue follous . a special effort n!l ,ncies in each region wil acr l ra de Fe the of CSA an'i eacn which ect all items of furniture sp in to rns lea n torn. able or repairable conditio us in are and use s as are not in high-value, high -demand item 9 24 of t lis th( g usin ••••  ••••  :)on  h(.1d rirlu(ling 51  Not  Enclosure 2 ----Page 9 of 13  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  by  nr,nries  er:n ear. ca'". n documented det the Trimnr cn ..se for whi inc the pur , mination wi:1 he rade includ ywhethcr thril pur,:oe seems f .. 111 stock :s being L(.1ei and G7-..frnmert-wiqe requirements cf ht lig e . t! :n td us .5 Lyamp2es of valid next for tnese items during the stckc fcr peak requirements uses are the a:cumulation of during ;he tax season. by by Internal heyenue Service census pr.riods, and by GSA the Bureau of Census during for an inaugural. be fully justified against to not nd fou are as cks Such sto to GSA. If items are new ed urn ret be l wil d nee ar a cle credit return policy. the er und ed urn ret , bt l wil they litamake arrangements for rehabi l wil GSA ms ite er oth For to stock. tion and return cf inventory to condition and those restored ' net in PMS :.1 ed urn Ret l be mile the firFt nnd fully usably condition wil . hpainst agency requisitions ply sup of rce sou red prefer iuction %kill he made for reha.ral An appropriate price red st 25). To this end the tated iternE (usual2y at lea :Items and rehabilitated furniture ability to match excess ed ns by computer will be stress against agency requisitio nt. as an urgent future improveme these new and strengthened of on pti ado e iat ped imr With the release the freeze that has to e atl be l wil ue. s ure proced r on excess stocks of furniture been in effect since Octobe ion trate our management attent and related classes and concen nd, group of 249 items. on the high -value, high-dema Action Number 4 h niture requirements of eac Systematically determine fur e plan for the approval ‘.2 agencv and develo7. an expens . OMB and enforcement by GSA ure efficient acquisi- • ass to l tro con m ter g lon ant of Tbe most .import ult from systematic analysis res l wil ure nit fur of use tion and itures as part of the regular end exp of on ati fic sti -ju needs and in budget ure requirements are buried it rn fu ay Md s. ces pro budget ibly displayed for scrutiny and vis not are I an: 31 ss cla object evaluation. Program 1980. C,MB Director McIntyre wrote. his 7, y uar Jan On s. Associate Directnr!-- as lollow  Enclosure 2 Page 10 of 13  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1 hNvo dt.c;d(.d ru; .vc nv ..f f.1 slo cor 'Aftvr producAIG: the grvatt.st !,romise of that the apprc:IM v..ith mit a each of the agencies to sub solid results ls tf-, as have GSA review e . OYF to n pla ze enfurniture exp existing anncy holdings and each agency plan arainst how the agency proposes to ing lud inc s tor fac lnt other relcv. icexceFs and rehabilitated ion rat Ide ns: c'o l ta en n give prefer needs.... When the agency c,la its g lin fil ful in it furniture program associate director, ant niz cog the by ed rov is app ity. furniture acquisition author 's ncy age the as ve ser will orce the plan." I would look to GSA to enf and GSA Property Management Officers ncy ace t tha ed pos pro It is sting eloping techniques of foreca dev on ly ate edi imm h wor as the begin high-value, hich-demand items requirements using the 249 ectancy will consider: (1) life exp planning base. Forecasts and condian analysis of the current age estimates by item; of furniture in use; (3) forecasts of cks sto ncy age of n tio anization changes and other org ed pat ici ant ) (4 : nds agency staffing tre erate new requirements for an gen r the f!, l wil ch whi factors return to GSA stocks. for ble ila ava ure nit fur or make ting of pilot the development and tes to e lik ld wou we' lly tia Ini including DoD -- followed es, nci age ed ect sel in s such technique ficers of for the Property Management Of m cru pro ng ini tra posed a by both FY 19S0 and 1961 are pro lor nts eme uir Req all agencies. for coverage. 9 high-value, hicn-demand 24 the e miz ite l wil st While the foreca or ordered for agencies ots dep GSA in d cke sto l items which are items purchased from Federa er oth all for nts eme ense by GSA, requir must be included in the exp s rce sou er oth or les Supply Schedu items plan to replace schedule le. plan. In the future we contracts, wherever possiU bid ve iti pet com , ty ti h definite quan acencies in accordance wit to ect dir e mad nts pme ty and have shi that there is an opportuni s ear app It ds nee d lion predetermine s area where tver 100 mil thi in s ing sav nt ica for signif that the nt. It is also believed spe now is ly ual ann dollars nt. For standardization are significa m ite for s tie uni opport edule for cafeteria seating Sch ply Sup l era Fed example, today the ble the full range of such ila ava es mak and cts lists 50 contra -- which might run into rer ctu ufa man h eac ty ble for items offered ds of combinations availa dre hun h Wit .. els mod ation dozens of rdization and item simplific nda sta cf. l coa the purchase, achieve. , becomes very c'.f.ficult to   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Enclosure 2 Page 11 of 13  fcros of developinr requirement:. ces pro TE in p ste al :ne fin cn;:ni: l he :he devr,opment cf a rep wil ns y,a ;e cnt exp and ts • cas e plan for each azency ens exp ed rov app he ch plan against whi t this report cnn be designed tha ed hop is 7: . red can be monito -ce achieverentF 1.,y the agency to identify other p.,rforman released to GSA for reutilizaure nit fur of unt amo the including by each ngency in lieu of new ed tut sti sub unt amo the :ion and procurement. Action Number 5 improve furnture quality Continue vizcrons efforts to istinc on simple but control procedures while ins realistic spc:fications. ealed cern which past studies have rev con of a are or maj th fif The ed by defects in furniture items accept t duc pro of ent ext the is 's e surveillance of manufacturer the Government, and inadequat specifications. performance against Federal cial be to expand the use of commer l wil ive ect obj st fir 117 C.. ) m and to utilize commercial ite products wherever possible eral specifications. descriptions in lieu of Fed 1, 1980, to free the time y uar Jan ng rti sta en tak Action has been more attention to source for nel son per n tiQ pec of technical ins to tract administration duties inspection by transferring con our regional offices. in rs ice off ng cti tra con administrative e ention to problem cases. Mor This is generating more att ots, as well as the condidep in ks oc st of n tio pec rer vigorous ins is also planned. Manufactu use ual act in ure nit fur tion of in-use m source, in-storage, and fro d nte ume doc a dat ce man perfor future important consideration in inspections will become an contract awards. nce prpgram was completed ura ass y lit qua s A' GS of A major study in September 1979. This has ncy Age s ic st gi Lo e ens by the Def ure improvements, including fut of p dma roa le uab val provided a quality assurance, (2) a for nt eme uir req ct tra con (1) a program for quality assurance n tio ica tif cer a and ng ok, traini the quality assurance handbo of ing rit rew ) (n s, st li ia spec m under which we rely gra pro the of on isi erv sup and (4) stronger QAMP). inspection system (known as own r's cto tra con the on  fnclosure  2 Page Ji. of 13   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ,.1Prn TO SL"!'.'1,P.Y OF FIVE ArTIONS F.' E 7E1. !!ANAGENT OF IUR!;ITUR Li GSA AND FL12....P.AL dir(.c;ed a moratorium cn GSA of r ato str ini Adm the r Last &ctobe :Jre unlit a valety•of Studi€,s. nit fur of ec.i isFu and es tas prc The elopment cf improved controls. dev to g djn :ea ' tea duc con 'ere by been dramatically demonstrated had s ion acl se the for ity nocess mittee on Government Spending findings of the _Scnate Subcom and by GSA's own findings. Practices and Open Government lows: five-part action program as fol We are now implementing a ty at a high level in Action No. 1 - Fix responsibili 1. agement of furniture GSA ant in each agency fcr the man d porsonal property. and other high-value. high-deman ly trained managers to Develop .a corps of professional ties. exercise these responsibili   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2.  3.  4  5.  ediately an intensive manageAction No. 2 - Institute imm value. hich-demand furniture ment r.:ogri..m over all highgram -Operation Validate'. items. DeFignate this pro special procedures to assure Action No. 3 - Institute orted as excess, "and . of full use of furniture rep is held by individual agencies furniture not in use which eration Clean Sweep' . s Designate IhTse procedure "Op determine the furniture Action No. 4 - Systematically , and develop expense plans requirements of each agency orcement by GSA. for approval by OMB and enf ous efforts to improve Action No. 5 - Continue virzor ures while insisting or furniture quality control proced tions for furniture. simple hut realistic specifica  once and have a• mounting impact These actions uill begin at during FY 1950 and 1981.  Enclosure 2 Page 13 of 13  OPERATION VALIDATE ••••••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Operation Validate is a four part operation under the GSA Furniture Management Reform Plan which provides for: 1.  Release of all requisitions held in GSA and having a julian date of 0058 (February 29, 1980) or earlier; PROVIDED, (a) the order has been re-validated by the ordering activity or certified by one of the following officials: a.  Commanders of military installations.  b.  Medical Directors of VA hospitals.  c.  The local senior official of civil agency regional, district, or similar headquarters; or another official designated by the senior official for that purpose.  d.  For Congressional or Judicial offices, by the senior dofficial of the office involved;  or (b) the order is for a National Stock Number (NSN) which has not been selected for further control. 2.  A process in which all uncertified or unvalidated orders will be referred to designated agency official(s) i.e. Property Management Officer(s), at the Headquarters level for decision to process or cancel.  3.  Agency personal property management practices will be surveyed and a coordinated minimum accounting standard will be established through coordinated regulations, to be mandatorily met by all activities in the Executive Branch. This will provide a data base for future forecasting of needs, and will be limited to a selected group of designated items which are both repairable and represent significant Federal expenditures.  4.  Agency internal certification of need or validation procedures will be established again in accordance with coordinated regulatory minimum standards which will be established throughout the Executive Branch.  Enclosure Page 1 of 2  11   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S 2 Steps 1 and 2 are being carried out in GSA's National Furniture Center. Major actions included in these steps are: a.  Releasing all orders for uncontrolled items.  b.  Releasing all re-validated or properly certified orders for controlled items dated 0058 or earlier.  c.  Requiring that all unvalidated controlled item orders in GSA possession be sorted in Agency (document number) sequence and forwarded to the Furniture Center; where they will be separated and provided to designated personnel in Aaency headquarters for validation or cancellation decisions. Listings will be forwarded to Agencies on or about March 7, with a request that they be returned with disposition instructions in 30 days. Requisitions will then be processed or cancelled in accordance with Agency wishes.  A Federal Supply Service task force is in the initial operating stages for carrying out steps 3 and 4. This will be accomplished in full coordination with the Property Management Officers discussed in the letter. The resulting procedures will be formalized in both Federal Property Management Regulations and counter-part DOD Directives. Target is to have the system fully in place and functioning before the end of FY 80. Following activation of the four part operation outlined above and OMB approval of Agency expense plans order processing will return to normal, subject to audit and monitoring to assure that the system remains in place and functions properly.  Enclosure 3 Page 2 of 2 a.  S OPERATION CLEAN SWEEP  "Operation Clean Sweep" consists of the various agency and GSA initiatives intended to assure full, use of Government-owned furniture, including furniture already reported as excess to GSA as well as furniture not currently in use by individual agencies but not vet made available for reutilization elsewhere. There are important opportunities for savings through utilization of excess as the first source of supply and rehabilitation of furniture when economic to do so, as alternatives to new procurement. Action is already under way to return selected economically reparable excess furniture items to GSA for restoration to like-new condition and subsequent re-issue. In addition, the use of GSA furniture rehabilitation contracts will be encouraged through displays in major cities and other promotional activities. The major opportunity for savings, however, is in the identification and return to GSA by agencies of furniture not currently in use and not required for use in the immediate future. Surveys conducted by congressional staffs, agency auditors and GSA personnel have revealed that there are substantial reserves of agency-held furniture located at storage sites in major cities. Much of this furniture could be used to fill requirements of other agencies, thereby precluding new procurement. To pursue this opportunity "Operation Clean Sweep" will launch an intensive effort to locate, identify and return to GSA for re-issue selected items which are no longer required by the holding agency. GSA and each Federal agency will form joint teams at major locaticns to inspect all items of furniture which are not required for immediate use to determine which. items are suitable for return. A list of 249 high-value, high-demand items has been developed for the selection process. The agency and GSA representative will jointly determine and document the purpose for which stock is being held and if it can be released to GSA. Items will be reported as excess in accordance with existing procedures. Those items on hand but not needed in the next 12 months will be returned under the following special credit return schedule which will apply to Operation Clean Sweep only. The GSA representative will assist in preparing the necessary documentation and arranging transportation, if requested.  Enclosure 4 Page 1 of 2   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  (a)  For new items in original containers - 100 percent;  (b)  For new items not in original containers or used, repaired, or reconditioned items which are serviceable and issuable to all acencies without limitation or restriction (condition code A) - 80 percent;  (c)  For items which involve limited expenses or effort to restore to serviceable condition, specifically, a deficiency in packing or packaging which restricts the issue or requires repacking or repackaging (condition code E) - 60 percent;  (d)  For items determined economically repairable or susceptible to reconditioning for return to issuable condition (condition code F) - 30 percent;  (e)  For items which require additional parts or components to make up complete end items prior to issue (condition code G) - 30 percent.  The holding agency will pay transportation costs for furniture returned for credit under this Policy. Items requiring repair or refinishing will be restored to like-new condition by a GSA contractor and returned to stock for re-issue. These items will be preferred issue items for fillinc agency requisitions. The selling price will normally be 75 percent of the new item price. "Operation Clean Sweep" is being tested on a pilot basis with limited agency participation and restricted geographical coverage until about mid -March. From late March until the end of this fiscal year, "Operation Clean Sweep" will involve all Federal agencies at all locations in the continental United States.  Enclosure 4 Page 2 of 2   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  NSE PLANS REQUIREMENTS AND EXPE of rniture requirements fu e in rm te de ly al ic OMB and Objective: Systemat plan for approval by e ns pe ex an p lo ve each agency and de Supply Service). al er ed (F A GS by ng monitori will ents survey format em ir qu re A : es am repreMajor Steps and Timefr designated agency th wi n io ct un nj co format be designed by GSA in cers (PMO's). The fi Of nt me ge na Ma ty er usesentatives, i.e. Prop ts for office and ho en em ir au re cy en ag will he used to report of requirements will st ca re fo e Th . 81 19 480 hold furniture for FY gh demand items; hi or st co it un gh hi ar cover 249 individual in excess of one ye fe li ul ef us a ve h ha additional items whic and re-use; and for on ti ta li bi ha re , pair for and are subject to re cast must be made re fo A s. em it le umab 359 high demand, cons will be grouped to s em it g in in ma re s; the each of the 249 item simplify this task. e GSA (Office) th to in d ye ke be ll cast wi identification of The reauirements fore cy en ag fy li mp si 1976 to lified Furniture Catalog of e forecast. A simp th by d re ve co s loped by GSA for ve de the furniture itep g in be is me he d coding sc for furniture ts en em classification an ir qu re cy en existing ag les and use in estimating iple award schedu lt mu d an le ng si items acquired from et procurements. rk ma en op h ug ro th p the techniques lo ve de y tl in jo ll wi e (FSS) staff will consider th s st ca The PMO's and GSA re Fo . ts en eir requirem and condition of e ag e th for forecasting th s, em it e ous furnitur agency requireg in ct useful life of vari pa im s or ct e, and other fa changes. Agency al on ti za existing furnitur ni ga or d by fing trends an ng the techniques ments such as staf pi lo ve de of s es the proc furniture and ng ti ia ec PMO's will begin pr de r w esent methods fo FSS staff is no reviewing their pr S. FS to e bl la ai endrmation av e sector. The at iv making that info pr e th om fr arable data llowed by the fo be to e collecting comp ur ed work will be a proc product of this requirements. ng ti ma ti es in agencies aaency expense an st ca re fo ts d. th the requiremen will be develope st ca In conjunction wi re fo e th by s covered ure item, or it rn fu ch ea t plan for the item ns for expenditures aaai e expense plan th r Anticipated agency fo s si ba e th will be quired by 0M3. re as , 81 19 grouping of items, FY old furniture for office and househ  Enclosure Page 1 of 2  2  Pilot Test in GSA  March 14, 1980  Formats and, Procedures Developed by GSA, OMB and Agencies wcrking together  April 15, 1980  Survey Packages Distributed to Agencies  May 1, 1980  Requirements Data Received by GSA for Review and Comment prior to submission to OMB As Received All due by July 1, 1980 Expense Plan Reviewed and Approved by OMB... As Received All due by Sept. 1, 1980  The OMB freeze in each aaency will be lifted when its expense plan is approved by OMB providing Operation Validate and OperaticIn Clean Sweep have also been initiated as outlined in Enclosures 3 and 4.  Enclosure 5 Page 2 of 2   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  PEU 2 8 1380  OPERTY MANAGEMENT OFFIC.  C  LIST .11•••••••  ALTERNATE  PRIMARY  DEPARTMENT •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Agriculture  Mr. Walter Fox Personal Property Branch Phone: 447-5564  CIA  Mr. William S. Regan Chief, Procurement Div. Phone: 281-8191  Commerce  Mr. William Burns Chief, Property & Bldgs. Mgmt. Div. Phone: 337-4017  Phone:  Mr. Robert Rozycki OASD (MRA6L) Phone 697-4186  Mr. John Jivatode OASD (MRA&L) Phone: 697-0346  Defense  Mr. Henry Cooper Property 6 Bldgs Mgmt. 377-4131  Mr. Donald B. Mueller Industrial Property Specialist Phone: 245-8986 4  V  Mr. Frank Roche Directorate of Procurement Contract M3nagement Phone: 252-8254 Mr. Frank Proden Chief, Logistics Policy Br. Phone: 245-8791 HUD  Interior  Mr. James Wyatt Chief, Division of Property Management Phone: 343-3185  Justice  nr. Anthony C. Muscato Dir., Property Mgmt. 6 Procurement Staff Phone: 633-4405  Enclosure 6  raryl  of -  Mr. Benjamin Burell Acting Asst. Director Real Property & Materi Management Group Phone: 633-3176  •  • 2  ALTERNATE  PRIMARY  SO  DEPARTMENTS  State  Transportation  Mr. Harry Kinney Chief, Supply Mgmt. Div. Phone: 426-4194  Treasury  Mr. Robert T. Harper Assistant Director of (Property Management) Phone: 376-0404  Mr. George E. Meredith Office of Administrati% Programs Phone: 376-0920  •  •  Enclosure P.:10 2 nf  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  c .....••••••••••••••••••  PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OFFICER LIST  AGENCIES & COMMISSIONS  PRIMARY  ACTION  Civil Aeronautics Board  Consumer Product Safety Commission  Environmental Protection Agency  Mr. Donald Kraft Chief, General Serv. Branch Phone: 755-2814  Equal Employment Opportunity Comm.  Federal Communications Commission Fed. Maritime Comm. Federal Trade Comm.  General Services Administration  Mr. Wayman Crow Dir., Admin. Operations Div. Phone: 566-1835  Inter'l Communications Agency  Interstate Commerce Ccmmission  Enclosure rage 3 of 5  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  P  Mr. Ray Houser Chief, Property Mgmt. Phone: 275-7480  ALTERNATE  S  O AGENCIES & COMMISSIONS Nat'l Aeronautics & Space Administration  PRIMARY  ALTERNATE  Mr. Charles Wagner Dir. of Supply & Equip. Mgmt. Div. Phone: 755-8460  Nat'l Labor Relations Board  Nuclear Regulatory Commission  Mr. George Fetrow Actg. Dir., Div. of Facilities & °pers. Phone: 492-8290  Ofc. Personnel Mgmt.  Ms. Ann Brassier Dir., Ofc. of Mgmt. Phone: 632-6161  Postal Service  Securities & Exchange Comm.  Selective Service System  Small Business Adm.  Mr. Tom Leyden Dir., Ofc. Mgmt. Serv. Phone: 653-6805  Smithsonian  Mr. Harry Barton Dir. of Supply Serv. Phone: 381-5924  Tennessee Valley Authority  Mr. Kenneth Gray Washington Rep. Phone: 245-0101  Veterans Administration  Mr. Bruce Brinkman Chief Property Mgmt. Phone: 389-3645  Enclosure 6 PnRe 4 of 5   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  VALIDATE Doris McCaine Phone: 389-3713  •  • •  AGENCIES & CCMMISSIONS Veterans Admin. (Cont'd)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  PRIMARY  ALTERNATE CLEAN SWEEP Tom Hamilton Phone: 389-3610 REQUIREMENTS Joe Kine Phone: 389-3201  Enclosure 6 Page 5 of' 5   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  April 1, 1980  Dear Mrs. Peterson Thank you for inviting the 3oard to participate in the Constituent Resource Exposition to be held on May 22. We believe this should be a worthwhile program and we will he pleased to participate. Our staff has teen in contact with Mr. Coldblatt's office to work cut the administrative details. I sucmest that any future contacts regarding our participation in this program be directed to Miss Kathryn Casey at 452-3963. Sincerely,  The Honorable Esther Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs The White House Washington, D. C. 20500  cc:  Don Winn Glenn Loney Kathryn Casey Robin Fenner Naomi Salus Sandra Wolfe (2) Mr. Coyne  tICK:slw WH-23  • THE  :uii:r.iuii USE  WASHINGTON  March 7, 1980 The [lonorable Paul A. Volcker ChaLrman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Wa-shington, D.C. 20551  1-c  Dear Mr. Volcker: On May 22, 1980, the U.S. Office of Consumer Affairs is sponsoring the Constituent Resource Exposition which will be held in tile Cannon Caucus Room. The purpose of the Expo Ls to bring together those representatives of federal agencies with whom Congressional caseworkers deal on a daily basis as they work to solve constituents' problems. In our study of complaint handling we have found that misdirected referrals is one of the greatest delays in getting consumers' problems resSlved. Referrals that are sent to the wrong federal agency can delay action being taken in behalf of a constituent as much as three to four weeks. Federal agency officials agree that better communication and better understanding of federal programs are needed. For this Expo we are asking those federal agencies that we have identified as receiving numerous Congressional complaint referrals to set up an exhibition booth. Each booth should have available for distribution information on its major programs and should be staffed with agency personnel that can discuss these programs and are very familiar with the way in which the agency handles Congressional complaint letters and requests for information. We feel your agency would make a major contribution to the Expo and we would very much like your participation. We also plan to have representation from selected trade associations. I look forward to receiving your early response to our request that your agency participate in the Constituent Resource Exposition. If you have any questions regarding the Expo, please do not hesitate to call me or Roger Goldblatt oE my staff at 755-8820.  Sin2e4ly,  ,s r eterson Special A sistant to the President for Consumer Affairs cc: Ann Marie Bray   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  , 4MINI  A  ("MTH) STAITS (WIWI OF CONSLNIIT AITAIRS \V‘isliin,!zton. D.C. 20201  •••0" •  •  March 10, 1980  Dear Executive Order Designee: Attached is a self-explanatory copy of a letter we have sent to your agency head. We are sending this to you in the hopes that we may continue to have a single point of contact within your agency on significant consumer matters. Would you please coordinate this effort with your . agency's congressional relations staff and the consumer complaint official. As soon as a decision is reached regarding your agency's desireI participation, would you please initiate action on the matter by calling me at 755-8821. It is important that we have an answer no later than March 21, 1980.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Sincerely,  ger ,oldblatt Irector Federal Complaint Coordinating Center  • THE WHITE HOUSE  IID  WASHINC ,TON  March 7, 1980 Tne Honorable Paul A. Volcker Thairman Boarl of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Washington, D.C. 20551 Dear Mr. Volcker:  trier  On May 22, 1980,Office of Consumer Affairs is sponsoring the Constituent Resource Exposition which will I- held in the Cannon Caucus Room. The purpose of the Expo is to bring to• gether those representatives of federal •aencies g with whom Congressional caseworkers deal on a daily basis as tnev work to solve constituents' problems. In our study of complaint handling we have found that misdirected referrals is one of the greatest delays in getting consumers' problems resI lved. Referrals that are sent to the wrong federal agency can delay action being taken in behalf of a constituent as much as three to four weeks. Federal agency officials agree that better communication and better understanding of federal programs are needed. For this Expo we are asking those federal a gencies that we have identified as receiving numerous Con• gressional complaint referrals to set up an exhibition booth. Each booth should have available for distribution information on its major programs and should be staffed with agency personnel that can discuss these programs and are very familiar with the way in which the agency handles Congressional complaint letters and requests for information. We feel your agency would make a major contribution to the Expo and we would very much like Your participation. We also plan to have representation from selectel trade associations. I look forward to receiving your early response to our requost that your agency participate in the Constituent Resource Exposition. If you have any questions regarding the Expo, please do not hesitate to call me or Roger Goldblatt of my staff at 755-8820. Sincerely, / A  , 4  Esther Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs cc: Ann Marie Bray   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  , 54 L. 7;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  C  February 20, 1980  Dear Chairman Voelker: The first meeting of the Consumer Affairs Council will be held on February 27, 1980. I have invited your agency representative Ann Marie Bray to attend. As you know, the Consumer Affairs Council was created when the President signed the Consumer's Executive Order (E.O. 12160) on September 26, 1979. The Order sets standards for and strengthens consumer programs in each agency. The Council will serve as an important mechanism for coordinating Federal consumer programs. I appreciate your cooperation and assistance in implementing the Consumer's Executive Order. I look forward to working with you and your agency's representative in the months ahead as we make the promise of th xecutive Order a reality. Si  erely,  Esther Pe er o Chairperson, Consumer Affairs Council  The Honorable Paul Voelker Chairman Federal Reserve Board Martin Building 20th and C Streets, N.W. Room M4364 Washington, D. C. 20551   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  Enclosed are a number of booklets briefly describing the President's accomplishments in the indicated areas. These may be of help to you in your talks or correspondence, or those of your staff: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  Agriculture Arts & Humanities Business Consumers Economy Education Employment Energy Environment  10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.  Health Housing Human and Social Services Low Income Older Americans Regulatory Reform Science and Technology State and Local Governments Teachers Youth Employment  If you have any comments or questions, please let me or Jack Dover (456-2923) know. Additional copies of these documents can be obtained by calling Sharon Schroer at 456-7700.  David Rubenstein   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Alt  • United States of America  Office of Personnel Management  •  Washington, D.C. 20415  1,1 Pal:AO:fele- To   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Your Reference  •  February 7, 1980 TO:  Assistant Secretaries for Administration  FROM:  Jule M. Sugarman, Deputy Director/2A(  SUBJECT:  Letter from National Urban Fellows Program  Recently you received a letter from the National Urban Fellows relative to their program to develop and implement career enhancement action plans for Federal employees (GS 11-13) through a program called the Career Planning Institute. I want to clarify the background on this matter. NUF's interest in this program developed because of my personal interest in preparing women and minorities to compete for higher level positicns. I understand that NUF is now exploring agency interest in enrolling employees in a development program. OPM is not taking any position on the merits of the NUF proposal. Rather agencies must compare the programs that are available to them and agencies should make their judgments based on an assessment of the merits of each program.  CON 114-24-3 ary 1979  ..awromra  United States of America  Office of Personnel Management  110 kl.:&Thington, D.C. 20415  ' :tb February 8, 1980  It Reply Re'cr To   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Your Reference  •  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM:  Alan K. Campbell Director  SUBJECT:  Hiring of Retired Fed ral Employees (Reemployed Annuitan ts)  A unique combination of economic conditions/factors will serve to encourage many top-level Federal employees to retire befo re March 1, 1980. On that date, many will have completed three year s at a new "high 3" and will find it financially beneficial to retire and then seek immediate reemployment with the Government. By retiring now, and then reentering Federal service, thes e employees may receive a larger annuity in the future than they would receive if they remain in the service. This is due to the bi-an nual cost of living increases for retirees currently exceeding the annual comparability pay increases for regular employees. Agencies are permitted, by law, to reemploy retired Federal employees. Clearly this statutory authority, if used appropri ately, is beneficial such as in the case of annuitants who possess criti cal skills and knowledge that are essential to the continuation of vital programs or for national security reasons. Although reem ployment in these unique situations may be in the public interest, it is incumbent that you closely monitor this authority and use it only when clearly essential. It is requested that you review all such reemploy ment requests for appropriateness and, prior to appointment of annuitants, submit the following information to OPM: 1.  The annuitant's full name,  2.  Date of birth,  3.  Retirement claim number,  4.  Date and location of reemployment appointment, and  5.  Explanation of the rationale for reemployment of the annuitant.  CON 114-24-3 1, Rev 1Q70  *   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Il —  No cc '.  gespoe)56 arvd•"""  4 ----A-- ' /44'4-'--  1116c .,  ktF/7 •ill/?/17 e ; c 94.,„  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE  WASHINGTON February 1, 1980  MENTS AND AGENCIES MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPART SUBJECT:  Federal Facility Ridesharing Program  on February 1, 1980, Executive Order 12191 , which I signed loyee ridesharing directs each of you to set federal emp your jurisdiction and goals for each federal facility under grams for achieving to institute enabling actions and pro those goals. 18 issued by the Office This Order complements Circular A-1 ute parking fees at federal of Management and Budget to instit It also fulfills a commitfacilities in metropolitan areas. sue an Executive Order ment I made in October, 1979, to "is eral agencies and installamandating aggressive efforts by fed ling, and use of mass tions to increase carpooling, vanpoo is and other steps being transit by federal employees." (Th e ridesharing are taken by the Administration to promot pamphlet.) described in the attached White House ements of this Order, I In addition to the specific requir le actions under current expect Agencies to take all feasib s. Potential incentives law to provide ridesharing incentive include: o  o  o  o  o  o  o  g hours to facilitate providing for flexibility in workin this will result employee ridesharing arrangements, if in net energy savings; tly located parking spaces reserving the majority of convenien for carpools and vanpools; unions to establish encouraging federal employees' credit arrangements; favorable commuter vanpool financing to form vanpools through ees loy emp for s tie uni ort opp ing vid pro third -party leasing arrangements; not interfere with scheduling meetings at times that will employees' ridesharing arrangements; unities for employees providing convenient places and opport to meet potential ridesharers; transportation informafacilitating the installation of public on government property; tion kiosks and passenger shelters  10,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  o  y transit passes; facilitating the distribution of monthl  o  to promote ridesharing encouraging major federal contractors at their facilities; and  o  employees who are recognizing through agency awards those ridesharing programs instrumental in establishing effective as. or who contribute valuable ridesharing ide  ng is enormous. Since The energy savings potential of rideshari e and predictable the home-to-work commute is the most routin ptable to regular ridecomponent of all driving, it is the most ada t must provide leadership sharing arrangements. The Federal governmen -- and to demonstrate by encouraging its own employees to rideshare congestion, improve air that ridesharing can save energy, reduce economical personal quality, and expand options for safe and travel. Administration in The Administrator of the General Services ation will consultation with the Department of Transport ss of the goals report to me annually on the reasonablene iveness of steps established by the Agencies and the effect ort will compare being taken to achieve those goals. This rep ing ridesharing the efforts of federal agencies in promot e sector and under this Order with actions of the privat ative actions recommend any further legislative or administr riers or to provide that might be appropriate to eliminate bar ng. additional incentives to encourage rideshari  FOR IMMEDIAAIORELEASE  FIVARY 4, 1980  Office of the White House Press Secretary  THE WHITE HOUSE  EXECUTIVE ORDER  FEDERAL FACILITY RIDESHARING PROGRAM  By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and statutes of the United States of America, and in order to increase ridesharing as a means to conserve petroleum, reduce congestion, improve air quality, and provide an economical way for Federal employees to commute to work, it is hereby ordered as follows: 1-1.  Responsibilities of Executive Agencies  Executive agencies shall promote the use of ride1-101. sharing (carpools, vanpools, privately leased buses, public transportation, and other multi-occupancy modes of travel) by personnel working at Federal facilities. Agency actions pursuant to this Order shall be consistent with Circular A118 issued by the Office of Management and Budget. 1-102. Agencies shall establish an annual ridesharing goal tailored to each facility, and expressed as a percentage of fulltime personnel working at that facility who use ridesharing in the commute between home and work. Agencies that share facilities or that are within easy walking distance of one another should coordinate their efforts to develop and implement ridesharing opportunities. Agencies shall designate, in accordance with OMB 1-103. Circular A-118, an employee transportation coordinator. Agencies that share facilities may designate a single transportation coordinator. The coordinator shall assist employees in formthg carpools or vanpools (employee-owned or leased) and facilitate employee participation in ridesharing matching programs. The coordinator shall publicize within the facility the availability of public transportation. The coordinator shall also communicate employee needs for new or improved transportation service to the appropriate local public transit authorities or other organizations furnishing multipassenger modes of travel. 1-104. Agencies shall report to the Administrator of General Services, hereinafter referred to as the Administrator, the goals established, the means developed to achieve those goals, and the progress achieved. These reports shall be in such form and frequency as the Administrator may require. 1-2.  Responsibilities of the Administrator of General Services  1   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1-201. The Administrator shall issue such regulations as are necessary to implement this Order.  more (OVER)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 The Administrator may exempt small, remotely 1-202. located Federal facilities from the requirements of Sections 1-102, 1-103, and 1-104 on his own initiative or upon request of the agency. An exemption shall be granted in whole or in part when, in the judgment of the Administrator, the requirements of those Sections would not yield significant ridesharing benefits. The Administrator shall, in consultation with the 1-203. Secretary of Transportation, periodically provide agencies guidelines, instructions, and other practical aids for establishing, implementing, and improving their ridesharing programs.  Ii.  1-204. The Administrator shall assist in coordinating the ridesharing activities of the agencies with the efforts of Department of Energy, under the Federal Energy Management Program and in the development of an emergency energy conservation plan for the Federal government. I'; The Administrator shall take into consideration 1-205. the advice of the Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Air Act, as aii mended, in performing his responsibilities under this Order. 1-206. The Administrator shall, in consultation with the Secretary of Transportation, report annually to the President on the performance of the agencies in implementing the policies and actions contained in this Order. The report shall include (a) an assessment of each agency's performance, including the reasonableness of its goals and the adequacy of its effort, (b) a comparison of private sector and State and local government ridesharing efforts with those of the Federal government, and (c) recommendations for addonal actions necessary to remove barriers or to provide additional incentives to encourage more ridesharing by personnel at Federal facilities.  JIMMY CARTER  THE WHITE HOUSE, February 1, 1980.  • The White House Announces   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • Initiatives in Energy Conservation through Ridesharing  October 25, 1979  • r •• r..1 •• • ilk • ni •• • • Ak ail  ni   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  INITIATIVES IN ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH RIDESHARING  President Carter today announced a series of new initiatives to conserve energy through ridesharing, including the expanded use of carpools, vanpools, and commuter buses and trains. The energy 50 million If each of senger, we  savings potential of ridesharing is enormous. Over Americans drive alone to and from work each day. these drivers would carry just one additional pascould save 22.5 million gallons of gasoline per day.  Besides its great potential for conserving energy, ridesharing offers other important benefits. It relieves traffic and parking congestion, reduces air pollution, cuts down on personal transportation expenses, and increases personal mobility. Variable work hours can facilitate ridesharing and reduce tardiness. It offers a chance to relax in comfort and converse with friends and commuting employees. In the Los Angeles area, carpools and vanpools last year saved 2.3 million gallons of gasoline, reduced air pollutant emissions by 3 million pounds, saved poolers million, and cut vehicle miles traveled by 37 million. $4 Vanpooling is a form of ridesharing which is just beginning to reach its potential. The first employer-sponsored vanpool program was begun by the 3M Company in 1973. Since that time, 3M estimates that it has saved $2.5 million from the reduced need for employee parking spaces and 1.6 million gallons of gasoline. Following this pioneering effort by the 3M Company, over 250 companies across the country now sponsor vanpooling programs. Many state and local governments are also making vanpooling a commuting option for their workforces. In many vanpooling programs, vans are purchased by the company and operated by company employees. Other types of vanpools are becoming prevalent, including individual and third-party owned and operated systems. RIDES for Bay Area Commuters is an example of a rapidly growing third-party operation. Formed as a nonprofit organization less than two years ago, RIDES now has 140 vanpools on the road with an average occupancy of 13.5 riders. A similar program in the Baltimore, Md. area called VANGO has put 160 vanpools on the road in less than two years. Building upon these important efforts, President Carter is joining forces with the private sector and state and local governments to achieve the full potential of ridesharing and to capture the significant conservation and other benefits of this form of transportation. New steps being taken by the President to promote expanded ridesharing include:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  of Setting a national goal of saving 400,000 barrels oil per day by 1990 through ridesharing.  o  o  o  o  o  inistrative Support for new tax incentives and adm clarifications, including: O  ment tax credit extension of the 10 percent invest t of a trade to cover all vanpools operated as par or business;  O  eage (limited recognition of driver incentive mil ) as a legitimate personal use of a van by its driver ermining eligivanpooling use for the purpose of det bility for the 10 percent tax credit;  O  to clarify issuance of guidelines annually by IRS ements, and and simplify tax record-keeping requir all legitimate provide guidance on how to allocate cost-sharing (fixed as well as operating) costs in arrangements.  aggressive efforts Issuance of an Executive Order mandating ions to increase carby federal agencies and installat nsit by federal pooling, vanpooling, and use of mass tra employees. of a proposed rule Issuance by the Department of Energy ne to maintain to assure bulk users sufficient gasoli shortage, tooperation of vanpools during periods of Energy to gether with efforts by the Department of consideration to encourage the states to give priority other high occuthe fuel requirements of vanpools and de programs. pancy vehicles through the state set-asi lion Targeted use of a portion of the ten-year $2.5 bil ed Auto Use ManageDepartment of Transportation propos and projects, ment Program for ridesharing programs including: for commuter O construction of dedicated highway lanes and public transit vehicles; O  gram for establishment of an interest-free loan pro the purchase of vans; and  O  normal 75 perincrease of the federal match from the cent to 90 percent.  S  3  •  o  Overcoming major institutional impediments by sponsorship of special efforts to develop a model state ridesharing law (to help overcome state regulatory barriers to ridesharing in the 30 or more states which have not de-regulated vanpooling) and new insurance classifications for vanpools (to facilitate increased availability and affordability of insurance).  o  Mobilization of special efforts by the USDA Extension Service, the Economic Development Administration (Commerce) and the Community Services Administration to assist isolated, low-income residents in rural areas to organize and operate commuter ridesharing programs.  o  Making ridesharing an area of increased emphasis within the Department of Transportation, with continuing and/or new efforts to:  o   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  O  administer and expand the Cities Ridesharing Demonstration Program;  O  provide training and technical assistance to both public and private sector program operators;  O  Institute a national ridesharing information clearinghouse (with a toll-free telephone number) in cooperation with the National Association of Vanpooling Operators and others;  O  organize in cooperation with the National Task Force on Ridesharing regional conferences to promote ridesharing and explain/implement the initiatives announced herein; and  O  seek passage of the Auto Use Management Program.  Showcasing several special efforts which exhibit new and/or on-going innovative efforts, including: O  a coordinated program in rural Coastal Georgia involving the Coastal Area Planning and Development Commission, the State DOT, two major defense installations (Fort Stewart and the Kings Bay Trident submarine facility), and several local employers to serve, over the next several years, more than 35,000 military personnel, their dependents, public employees, and approximately 15,000 employees of private enterprises; savings in excess of $1,000 a year per employee are expected;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 4  0  O  o  a coordinated employer-based program in the Los Angeles area, (the Come Together Program) involving local governments, CALTRANS, federal agencies, transportation service operators from the private sector, and the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce which utilizes Commuter Computer, Inc. to match potential ridesharers through direct personal contact at the worksite; this effort constitutes a major part of both a regional air quality plan and multi-modal transportation plan. an area-wide program (King County Commuter Pool) involving local governments, employers, retail businesses, and the Washington State Department of Transportation in the Seattle area which promotes carpooli ng, vanpooling, and buspooling through computer matching services, efforts to promote flexible work ing hours, parking management, and preferential access lanes for carpools, vanpools and buses.  Foimation of a National Task Force on Ridesharing to work with Secretary of Transportation Neil Goldschmidt to: O  encourage business and government leaders across the country to initiate and expand rideshar ing programs;  O  assist in overcoming regulatory, financia l, insurance, and other institutional barriers to carpooling and vanpooling;  O  advise on problems that need to be addr essed through government action; and  O  provide a continuing dialogue between gove rnment and the private sector.  •  • 5  Members of National Task Force on Ridesharing  Tom Bradley, Chairman Mayor of Los Angeles Los Angeles, California David J. Sherwood, President Prudential Insurance Company of America Newark, New Jersey T. F. Bradshaw, President Atlantic Richfield Company Los Angeles, California Thomas W. Bradshaw, Jr. Secretary of North Carolina Department of Transportation Raleigh, North Carolina Roy M. Coughlin Staff Specialist for Environmental Affairs Southern New England Telephone Co. Hartford, Connecticut  Robert D. Kilpatrick President and Chief Executive Officer Connecticut General Life Insurance Company Bloomfield, Connecticut Jim Lowe, Manager of Employee Services IBM Armonk, New York Dale W. Luehring General Manager, Golden Gate Bridge and Transit District San Rafael, California John A. Mahony, Manager Office Services SmithKline Corporation Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Louis R. Nickinello House of Representatives Boston, Massachusetts  Jack Derby Statewide Ridesharing Coordinator California Department of Transportation Clarence Shallbetter Sacramento, California Project Director Public Service Options, Inc. Richard H. Erickson, Manager of Minneapolis, Minnesota Safety, Health and Security Hallmark Cards, Inc. Richard Somerville Kansas City, Missouri Transportation Program Manager Ella T. Grasso Texas Medical Center Governor of Connecticut Houston, Texas Hartford, Connecticut Stan Stokey, Supervisor of Ray Herzog, Chairman of the Board Commuter Pooling Section 3M Company Tennessee Valley Authority St. Paul, Minnesota Knoxville, Tennessee   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Jeannette Williams Councilman Seattle City Council Seattle, Washington  GPO 962 215   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  pen sC  oe c  /10 cc. 1-6 i/oaatt-t-L-  gel  • THE WHITE HOUSE  e3  WASHINGTON  February 1, 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Required Reduction in Usage of Federal Motor Vehicles  1 bit' 11.  In my State of the Union address, I emphasized that we now have a clear, comprehensive energy policy for the United States. Essential to implementing this policy is an aggressive energy conservation strategy that will reduce our dependence on foreign oil now. 1980 will be a year of energy conservation for America. In consultation with the Governors, we will set gasoline conservation goals for each of the fifty states. They are being asked to sacrifice. Cities are being asked to sacrifice. Federal agnecies must do no less. In an April 10, 1979, memorandum, I directed all Departments and agencies to reduce the use of automotive fuels by 10 percent for the twelve month period beginning April 1, 1979, as compared with the previous twelve months. During the first six months of this program, most Departments and agencies fell short of that goal. Because progress „has been disappointing overall, I must ask all Departments and agencies to make extraordinary efforts to meet or exceed the 10 percent goal during the last quarter of this reporting year (January-March, 1980). In addition, I am taking action to ensure that all Departments and agencies curtail gasoline consumption adequately during the remaining two months of this quarter. I direct that all Federal departments and agencies, except the United States Postal Service, reduce the mileage travelled by government-owned and leased vehicles by 10 percent during the months of February and March, 1980, as compared to mileage travelled during the same period in 1979. This order applies to all commercially-designed motor vehicles which consume gasoline. Agencies shall ensure that public transportation is used to the maximum extent possible and that other substitute methods of transportation are not used to circumvent the purpose of this directive. Agencies determining that this directive severely jeopardizes essential missions and agencies that need assistance in establishing their baseline mileage figures should contact the Administrator of the General Services Administration.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  2  •  Along with your regular report to the Department of Energy at the end of the current quarter, you should include a special report on mileage travelled during the months of February and March, 1980, compared to the same period last year.  4=  7i  z  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  cs.• \ r2) t.(1  January 30, 1980  Dear Mr. Chairman: I am very pleased to invite your agency's participation in the White House Workshop on the Consumer's Executive Order to be held on Wednesday, February 6 at HEW North Auditorium from 1:00 p.m. to 500 p.m. As you know, on December 10, 1979, in response to Executive Order 12160, 31 Federal departments and agencies published their draft consumer programs in the Federal Register. These consumer proposals explain how each agency will work with consumers in handling complaints, providing information and getting the consumers' point of view on agency activities. The White House Workshop will provide an opportunity for the public to meet with your agency's consumer official to discuss your proposed consumer program. This one-on-one exchange will be one attempt in a continuing effort to provide opportunities for early and meaningful participation by consumers in the development and review of Federal consumer programs. The Workshop is a vehicle for the public to comment on the Federal consumer programs and is designed to complement your agency's outreach efforts encouraging public comments about your program. We expect more than 300 consumers from across the nation to attend the Workshop. We have been working with your agency's consumer official in planning this public forum. This will be the first interagency activity coordinated through the Consumer Affairs Council. Your agency's full participation is essential to our effort. Should you have any questions about the Workshop, please call me or Belle O'Brien of my staff at 456-6226. Thank you for your age  y's cooper  Esther Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs The Honorable Paul A. Volcker Chairman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Washington, D.C. 20551   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  February 6, 1980  Ms. Filen Pedler Presidential Personnel Office Old Executive Office Building Room 149 Washinc, ,ton, D.C. 20500 Dear Ms. redler: Thank you for your recent memorandum rega rding summer employment opportunities with the Federal Reserve Syst em. The Board of Governors in Washington does employ a limited number of summer interns each year to work on spec ial projects with our economists, primarily in the Division of Research and Statistics. This program is designed to provide actual work experience for students actively considering a career in economics.  •seta.-  As you can imagine, competition for thes e positions is quite keen, and our selections are generally based on academic records and references. Any interested individuals should cont act Ms. Juanita L. Johnson at (202) 452-3850. Sincerely yours,  William R. Stovall Manager, Staffing and Placement Division of Personnel cc:  Mr. Mulrenin  1,TH-15  r spa   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  -  . ..1"; •  -ro  ..r.t.c • . 114.,  •  +.•  P . " 1211' • • ,  -  -4  ,-  ••  Iral."44!".‘  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  January 30, 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR ALL HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM:  JACK WATS° ARNIE MI  SUBJECT:  SUMMER J  Each year we receive numerous requests for assistance in placing students in summer jobs. We would like to enlist your help in this process. Please send information regarding your agency's hiring procedures and the name of an agency contact to: Ellen Redler Presidential Personnel Office Old Executive Office Building Room 149 Washington, D.C. 20500 Phone: 456-7860 This information is needed as soon as possible.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  )1  BOARD   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  F GOVERNORS  OF TH  ER  L RESE  E SYSTEM  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 201:03  OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  POLICY LETTER 80-1  JAN 2.4 1980  t ( 1•/ d-1-  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT: P.L. 95-507, Section 211, Subcontracting: Agency Coordination with the Small Business Administration Resident Procurement Center Representatives Section 211 of P.L. 95-507 amends section 8(d)(10) of the Small Business Act, 15 USC 637, to authorize the Small Business Administration (SBA) to review any solicitation for any contract over the stated thresholds. The purpose of the review is to determine whether maximum practicable opportunity has been afforded small business concerns and small business concerns owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals to participate as subcontractors in such awards. Furthermore, SBA is responsible for evaluating compliance with agreed upon subcontracting plans. In order to facilitate the implementation of these provisions by the Small Business Administration, departments and agencies shall observe the following policies regarding section 8(d)(10), and shall incorporate them in their procurement regulations: r4  1.  The Small Business Administration's resident Procurement Center Representatives shall be provided an opportunity to review any solicitation that meets the threshold prior to release to the public. The Procurement Center Representative shall be provided a period reasonable under the circumstances to review the solicitation.  2.  Prior to the execution of any negotiated contractual document requiring a subcontracting plan, the total procurement package including the proposed subcontracting plan shall be made available to the resident Procurement Center Representative, with a reasonable time for review. The Procurement Center Representative may submit recommendations, which shall be The advisory in nature, to the contracting officer. Procurement Center Representative shall also be provided a copy of the subcontracting plan finally negotiated by the contracting officer. -  ii  La,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A copy of any subcontracting plan submitted pursuant to a formally advertised procurement also shall be provided the resident Procurement Center Representative upon execution of the contractual document. 3.  The small and disadvantaged business specialist of the Business Small the notify contracting activity shall or amendments, contracts, of Administration of the award The modifications that contain subcontracting plans. notification shall contain the contractor's name and address, place of performance, dollar amount, performance period, description of contract item or items, and name and address of contracting officer. A copy of the award document (e.g., DD 350) is sufficient for these purposes. The notification shall be sent to the Assistant Regional Administrator for Regional Programs in the SBA region where contract performance is to take place.  The Director of the Office of Management and Budget concurs in the issuance of this policy directive to be effective February 25, 1980.  James D. Currie Acting Administrator  4111  -/3 s  fgo +1)  Or; •  nec Su e Cor4 de.r•  r pro rrwtt; 0)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • THE WHITE HOUSE WAS  January 23, 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  I have just signed a Presidential Proclamation designating the Month of March as Red Cross Month. This act carries with it a certain urgent significance this year. Our American Red Cross is in dire financial need because of vast sums expended for disaster relief during a threemonth period last summer. We depend upon the Red Cross not only to help us in time of disaster but also to collect and distribute blood, to assist members of our armed forces as well as veterans and their families, to instruct us and our families in first aid and water safety, and to provide a vast array of community health services. We in the federal employ can be of great assistance to the Red Cross by providing it with financial support, by volunteering our free time as volunteers, and by donating blood for the ill and injured. Although the Red Cross is part of the Combined Federal Campaign within the Federal Government, approximately half of its 3,000 chapters raise all their funds in March. Additionally, all chapters use this period to inform the public of available Red Cross services and to recruit new volunteers and blood donors. As President of the United States and Honorary Chairman of the American Red Cross, I urge all members of the Federal establishment and members of the Armed Forces to support this vital voluntary organization.  rile  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  kesi, leYe c Per  1noir1'r7.0  . p  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  January 23, 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR:  THE HONORABLE PAULA. VOLCKER  FROM:  HUGH A. CARTER  SUBJECT:  The President's Executive Exchange Program illammumwm.  I am writing as a Commissioner of the President's Executive Exchange Commission to communicate some background on the Program. The President's Executive Exchange Program, which was established by President Johnson, is one in which selected mid-career executives from the private sector are brought into federal agencies, and comparable persons from federal agencies are employed by private industry for one-year tours. Approximately 50 executives are involved in this year's Program. The overall objective of the Program is to enhance understanding and channels of communication between business and the Federal Government, in a manner which only direct experience can provide. I hope that you will consider the possibility of sponsoring one of your executives who is a possible future member of the Senior Executive Service, or hosting one of the outstanding private sector executives; or both. If we can provide any more information on the Program, please call the Executive Director, Lee Cassidy, at 632-6834, or myself.  Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1.  • r •r  •  -•  .s•  IF  .  .  ye  4k!P t. • eVii;; '3 . 0:Y  4ffi-1;4',"   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  z Do J  1,tfYo  r•Mporl.c.,  kespot)  e  •  beC.  United States of America  Pcf:  Office of Personnel Management  ii JAN 1980  In Rep... Refer   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Washington, D.0 20415  Your Reference  ALL AGENCY OFFICIALS CONCERNED WITH EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SES  Vice President Mondale, OMB Director McIntyre, OPM Director Campbell and OPM Associate Director Greenberg met with agency Executive Resources Board (ERB) Chairpersons on September 13, 1979 to discuss executive development for the Senior Executive Service. An advance copy of the printed transcript of their remarks, Executive Development and the Senior Executive Service, is attached for your information and reference. The publication also contains the President's memorandum of September 19 to heads of Departments and agencies on Selection and Development for the Senior Executive Service.  imum i474,* ammema.  Many persons contribute to effective executive development systems: agency heads, ERB members, SES members, line managers, personnel office rs, budget officers, executive resources staffs, executive development staffs , and training officers. They need a common understanding of executive develo pment and its importance to the Senior Executive Service and to improve d Federal management. As you proceed with the establishment of executive development systems, we hope you will share this transcript with others . It should contribute to creating that common perspective.  '.•••  '  If you are an Executive Resources Board chairperson, additional copies are enclosed for your ERB members. Other addressess may purchase additi onal copies of the publication by requesting your agency's printin procur g ement office to ride OPM's printing requisition 1180-236 prior to April 18, 1980. OPM's February monthly rider information bulletin, which is mailed to all agencies early in the month, will provide exact ordering inform ation. If you have questions or comments, please call Martha Niewenhous at (202) 632-4661.  p-; * &s, Sincerely yours, 100%,  James F. Dullea, Chief Programs & Guidance Branch Executive Personnel and Management Development  ° 6 a1C  Sow  Omar  Attachments  CON 114-24.3 January 19'r Immoftwift. • • ••  1.  .w  "•••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  L:rited 3tar.?s  Office of Personnel ManaQernent  : r„  1  ;•!e7,..nce  2 1 JAN 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES )/ SUBJECT:  FEDERAL WORKFORCE PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT  Implementation of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 links performance of organizations with productivity improvements. Therefore, the development of appropriate, useful measures of productivity has become a critical concern of the Office of Personnel Manacement. Toward this end, OPM has been working closely with the Bureau of Labor Statistics and representatives of agencies to develop and improve federal sector productivity measures. In the coming year, we will continue efforts in this direction, and we will rely on each of you for your continued support in improving productivity within your agency. One aspect of the ederal Productivity Improvement Program is the annual rePort to the President and Congress on federal productivity. We need data from your organization to prepare the fiscal year 1979 report. Each department and agency should provide operatina data to the Bureau of Labor Sta tics in accordance with the attached instructions and time schedule. In turn, 3LS will generate productivity indites, and OPM will provide an analysis of these data to you. On the basis of these data, our staff will be available to assist you in developing an integrated productivity improvement program, specific to your individual agency needs. Throughout fiscal year 1980, OPM and BLS will be reviewing the federal productivity measurement system, in terms of quality of the data supplied, validity We.will be I f output measures and utility to line managers and supervisors. soliciting your views and support to improve the measurement system and to I- velop a program wnich will enhance Feder/71 gover ment productivity. 4 nrectoy Attachments   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Federal Productivity Measurement Project Fiscal Year 1979 Agency Instruction Package  Contents  I.  Page  Introduction Reporting Procedures A. 3. C. D.  III.  Data Reporting Instructions A. 3.  IV. V.  Key Dates Project Mailing Address Contact for Technical Assistance Summary of Major Changes in Data Call  Project Definitions Criteria for Choosing Output Indicators  Required Data Exhibits Appendices Appendix A (3LS Agency Analysts) Appendix 3 (OPM Agency Analysts) Appendix C (Detailed Criteria for Selecting Outnut Indicators)  This report has been cleared in accordance with FR 101-11.11 and assigned interagency report control numher 0169-CSC-4.N.  3  I.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  INTRODUCTION This data call represents a continuation of the oermanent system to collect and analyze oroductivitv data for the Federal sector. %ast year, 347 organizational units participated in the Federal productivity project by submitting output and input data to the lureau of Labor Statistics (3L3). The data they Provided Covered 65 nercent (1.1 million employee—years) of the civilian Executive branch. Analysis of FN 71 data can be found in the Annual Productivity Report. For the purpose of this system, productivity is defined as the efficiency with which an organization's resources are utilized to nro— duce final outputs. OPM defines productivity in the Federal sector much more broadly, however. OPM believes that productivity in the Federal government must be defined as the combination of the efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness with which the Rovern— ment carries out its functions. This system attempts to measure only the component of efficiency. OPM will be engaged in efforts, jointly with BLS, OMB and the agencies, to develop measures of effectiveness and responsiveness. In the meantime, the continua— tion and improvement of the system to measure efficiency is essential to the development of a more credible and useful measurement system. Specifically, productivity in this system is expressed as the ratio between the volume of goods or services oroduCed (output) and the quantities of labor resources consumed in its production (employee—year inputs). This ratio is translated into an index with the first year's data referenced at lnO. Subse— quent yearly changes in the ratio are readily analyzed by Comparing the current index with the base year, reference index. For an organization Producing a single uniform nroduCt or performing a single uniform service, the productivity index simply measures the change over time of the ratio of units produced to total direct and indirect employee—years expended to produce this output. tiowever, for organizations producing several types of products, 3 composite outnut index must be contructed through the use of base—year unit emnlovee— year weights. The quantity of each product Produced each Year is weighted (i.e. multiplied) by the employee—years renuired to nroduce one unit of output in the base year. Thus, those products which re— quired more unit labor time to produce in the hase—year are given more importance or greater weight in the composite output measure. These base—year weights are constructed by BLS from the detailed data orovided by each organization participating in this project. Then detailed data are unavailable, outputs are combined with estimated weights using other information supplied by each organization. Data for this submission can be extracted from existing management information systems already in place within your agency or denartnent. Organizations are encouraged to use Zero—lase Budget data .4hen annro— priate to supplement submissions. An agency that has been renorting productivity data at the agency level may also want nroductivitY indexes for one of its more detailed decision units, for examnle, a field ofcice, program or activity that would be useful to line managers. These Pro— ductivity measures can be provided by BLS in addition to the measures  • already generated in the system. If questions arise concerning data submission, 3LS analysts are available to assist each agency with technical details.  II.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  REPORTING PROCZDURES Productivity data are to be reported on six separate documents (Exhibits A through F). Following is 3 brief summary of exhibit contents and due dates for submissions. More detailed information on each exhibit can be found on pages 6 through 14. Each organizational unit should submit its data package to the agency principal who will forward it to 3LS before the key dates indicated below. A.  3.  Key Dates  Jan. 31  Exhibit A - Name of agency principal and listing of agency elements, employee-year inputs and number of outnuts submitting data to the system.  Feb. 15  Exhibit 1 - Revision, expansion, or modification of last year's submission of Exhibit 3 which describes in narrative form all organizational elements within the agency.  Feb. 15  Exhibit C - Listing of output, input and personnel compensation data for each activity.  Feb. 15  Exhibit D - Response to questions on data submitted in Exhibit C concerning time required to produce a unit of output, responsiveness, quality of outputs, extent of contracting, and extreme changes in outputs and inputs.  June 2  Closing date for data revisions  June 2  Exhibit E - Narrative on factors contributing to changes in Productivity.  June 2  Exhibit F - Verification of data returned to agency by 1LS.  Project Mailing Address James Urisko lffice of Productivity and Technoloav 1ureau of Labor Statistics Room S-432n 20n Constitution Avenue. (or 3t00 4 gashington, D.C. 20212  i;')  -3-  C.  Contact for Technical Assistance Questions concerning this instruction nackage or technical assistance regarding productivity measurement should be directed to James Urisko, 3LS, project manager or individual agency analysts (listed in Appendix A). 1 rogram or Questions concerning the Federal ProduCtivity " technical assistance relative to the development of perfornanCe and productivity measurement systems will be provided by Allan S. Udler, OPM, or individual agency analysts (listed in Appendix R).  D.  Summary of Major, Changes in Data Call Exhibit E format has been modified and new auestions concerning initiatives in Productivity enhancement as a result of the Civil Service Reform Act have been added.  III.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  DATA REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS A.  Project Definitions  1. Agency principal: The primary contact between an agency (and units) and the BLS project team. This individual organizational its will be responsible for collecting each exhibit from all organizations of the agency and submitting these exhibits by the target dates indicated on page 2. 2. Agency: Departments and establishments of the Executive branch (e.g., Department of Labor or the Veteran's Administration). 3. Organizational Unit: An organization within an agency which may be as small as a division or decision unit or as large as an entire agency (e.g., 3ureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Aviation Administration, or the personnel division within a department). 4. Outputs: The products and services produced by an organizational unit. Final outputs are produced by the reporting organization and con:sumed by outside organizations or individuals. Intermediate outPuts are produced and consumed by the reporting organization. 5. Measurable Activities: The activities of an organizational unit for which final outputs and their corresponding employee-year inputs can be quantified.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -4-  6. Non-measurable Activities: The activities of an organization for which final outputs cannot be adequately quantified. 7. Emoloyee-vears: The measure of labor resources devoted to producing the outputs of an organizational unit. An employee-vear includes regularly scheduled time, overtime, and leave time of all full-time, part-time, and intermittent employees. One employee-Year equals 2080 paid hours (i.e., the equivalent of one individual paid for 40 hours a week for 52 weeks). (A)  Employee-years associated with final measured outputs: The total employee-years required to produce the final outputs which the organization has been able to quantify. Each employee-Year figure should include not only the direct employee years required to produce the output, but also the indirect efforts without which the output could not have been produced, e.g., clerical, typing, supervisory, secretarial, and administrative efforts. In the event that indirect time cannot be allocated to specific final outputs, they should be reported in the category of "employee-years associated with administration and support."  (3)  :.mployee-years associated with final non-measured outputs: The direct and indirect employee-years required to produce final outwits which cannot be quantified.  (C)  Employee-years associated with administration and support: The indirect employee-years required to provide executive direction and other general services (such as typing) which Cannot be allocated to the final outputs of the organizational unit.  3. Compensation: Wages (personnel service costs) and fringe dollar benefits (personnel benefits costs, e.g., life and health insurance), including separation costs (i.e., severance pay and terminal Leave). The data should match those provided under Oml Circular A-Li (object classes 11 and 12).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -5-  3.  Criteria for Choosing Outout indicators  1.  Each output measure should consist of units which are relatively homogeneous with respect to their labor reauirements. Outputs generally should be renete. 'Ion-renetitive final outputs can be included in the data base but renuire snecial treatment, i.e., estimates of base-year weights.  3.  Outputs indicators should directly reflects the workloads of the organizational unit.  4.  Output measures should reflect changes in output quality.  5.  Output measures should indicate the amount of work done during each fiscal year.  6.  Output measures should reflect the final Products and services Sf an organization.  For more detailed instructions on methods of choosing output indicators see Appendix C. Should any questions arise concerning these criteria, contact K.S for assistance.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • -h-  Q_.  REOUIRED DATA 7 .XHIBITS  1._1flNIi bit A:  Due Date:  Jan. 31  This exhibit provides an overview .11I4 each agency and identifies all agency organizational units (i.e., those which have measurable activities and those which lo not).  Exhibit A: Listing of agency organizations for FY 79 Date submitted: Name of agency: Agency PrinciPal: Phone: Mailing Address 1/: Agency Alternate: ?hone:  Name of Organization  Total FY 1979 Employee-Years 2/  Number of Outputs to be Submitted  1. 2.  total agency  1/ Include stop number 2/ Employee-years for this exhibit should 'le '3ased on the definition used in CSC Bulletin 298-2, formerly 04B Circular A-ql.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -7-  7.  Exhibit 3:  Date Due:  Feb. 15  Exh_bit 3 provides a narrative description of each measured and non-measured organizational unit within an agency. BLS is returning to you FY 78 Exhibit B data that you can revise, expand or otherwise modify.  Each organizational unit should submit one of the following: Exhibit 1-1:  Description of organizational units with measurable activities '<for units already in the data base). Please use the computer printout provided for your submission.  Exhibit 3-2:  Description of new organizational units with measurable activities (for units not in the data base). ...1.1.11•11•1•  Exhibit 1-3:  Description of organizations with no measurable activities.  If there are no changes to the 3LS computer orintout returned to you please state so.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Exhibit 3-2:  Due Date:  Feb. 15  Exhibit 3-2: Description of new oranizational unit with measurable activities (for units not in the data base).  Date submitted: Name of Agency: Name of organizational unit: Mission of organizational unit:  Measurable Activity  Description of Activity  Non—measurable Activity  Description of Activity  lutnut Indicator  I. 2. 3.  1. 3.  Reason My lutnuts Cannot le '!easured   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -9-  Exhibit 1-3:  Due Date:  Exhibit 3-3:  Feb. 15  Description of organizational unit with no measurable activities  Date submitted: Name of agency: Name of organizational unit: lission of organizational unit:  Non-measurable Activity  1. 2. 3.  Description of Activity  Reason Why )utouts Cannot le 'leasured   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • -10-  3.  Exhibit C: Due Date:  Feb. 15  Exhibit C: This exhibit Provides FY 1979 luantitative data on the OUtDUtS, employee-years and personnel compensation for each organizational unit having at least one output that can be measured. Each organizational unit should submit one of the following: Exhibit C-1:  Organizational units that submitted data last year should use the attached Exhibit C form. Corrections to FY 1977-197R data and/or inclusion of new outputs should be submitted separately. Indicate whether any data are estimated and submit the final numbers as soon as they are available. Any change in the method of measuring an output should be reported on both the old and the new basis. If a reorganization has taken place, all data for FY 1977 forward should be presented on a consistent basis. Please use the forms nrovided for Your data submission.  Exhibit 0-2:  Organizational units reporting data for the first time should use the following format:  Date submitted: Name of agency: 'Tame of organizational unit:  Output Quantities Data for Measured Activities 1. (Output indicator) 2. (Output indicator)  N.  (Output indicator) Subtotal  Data associated with final non-measured activities Data associated with administration and/or support activities Grand totals  X X  X  EmployeeYears Expended  X X  personnel Comnensation  X X   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S 4.  Exhibit D:  Due Date:  Feb. 15  Exhibit D: This exhibit requires resnonses to a number of auestions concerning the data provided in Exhibit C. These responses will be used by the 3LS project team in evaluating the input and output data and interpreting results of overall functional trends.  Exhibit D:  Responses to support questions  Date submitted: Name of agency: Name of organizational unit:  For each organizational unit with measurable activities (i.e., organizational unit submitting an Exhibit C), responses to the following support questions are required: 1. Show the typical low, high and average total labor time required in FY 1979 to Produce one unit of each measured outnut. If actual data are not available, an educated estimate is accentahle. 2. Indicate the average total time which elanses from the time one unit of each measured Output commences production to the time it is considered completed. This includes nroduction time and any intervening slack time. If actual time is not available, an educated estimate is accentable. 3. Has the quality of any of the outputs changed during the time period? If yes, describe, by output, the nature of the change and when it occurred. 4. Has a contractor contributed to the nroduction of any renorted output? If yes, explain the nature and extent of the contractor's efforts. 5. save there been extreme movements in the outnut or innut indica— tors during FY 1979? If yes, explain the nature and causes of such movements.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5.  Exhibit E:  Due Date:  June 2  Exhibit E provides documentation on the individual factors directly or indirectly contributing to changes in productivity indices which have been computed by 1LS with the data submitted on Fxhihit C. Each organizational unit is requested to provide information on the causes of changes in these productivity indexes according to the following format:  Exhibit Date submitted: Name of agency: Name of organizational unit:  1.  Factors Causing a Change in Productivity  2.  Productivity Outlook  3.  Implementation of Productivity Improvement Programs as a re— sult of the Civil Service Reform kct.  Organization representatives should consult with other individuals within the organization, including representatives from line management, personnel, budget and labor unions. Agencies with unions having exclusive bargaining rights must consult then on responses to this exhibit prior to submission.  1.  Factors Causing a Change in Productivity The causes for productivity increases and descreases for the entire period (FY 1967-79) should be discussed for each organizational unit in order to explain the reasons for the long—term productivity trend. Causes for productivity change during FY 1979 should be identified separately. The causes of Productivity change such as motivation, skill, technology, work environment, procedural changes and others should be described. In some cases, measurement Problems may affect the productivity index (e.g. product mix). Describe any neasurement problems that are reflected in the oroductivitv trends. It is most im— portant that the causes of change be identified as specifically as possible.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -13-  It mav be appropriate an organizational unit to identifY obstacles to productivity improvement even though it exPerienced a productivity increase. For example, an organization that increased Productivity 7 percent because of a change in work procedures might have had a In percent increase if a new computer system had heen installed on schedule. factors should be discussed. In that case, both I  2.  3.  Productivity Outlook a.  Describe the productivity changes exPected in FY 1980.  b.  Describe the productivity trends expected in the next several years.  -.  Describe future actions planned hy the organizational element which are expected to improve productivity.  Implementation of Productivity Improvement Programs as a result of the Civil Service Reform Act a.  What activities are agencies engaged in to improve productivitv that were triggered by the CSRA?  b.  Has productivity improved over the last Year?  c.  What productivity measures have been established due to the emphasis triggered by the reform act?  d.  How many staff-years are now devoted to improving the nrodlIctivitv program within your agency?  e.  How many staff-years are devoted to responding to this data call?   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1111011.‘11..111.1.1,..rigealMOM , . "  -  • 6. Exhibit F:  Due 'Date:  Exhibit F:  June 2  Verification of FY 1979 data returned to you by 3LS  Date submitted: Name of agency: Name of organizational unit:  1.  Are the basic data on output, emo1ovee—years, and compensation correct as shown on the comouter printcut? ) Data are correct as shown. ) The following changes should be -lade:  2.  Do the employee—year productivity indexes appear to be representative of productivity trends within the organizational element? ) indexes are representative ) Other comments  .  .7.7:1161111111111r   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • -13-  Appendix A: Bureau Df Labor Statistics Agency \nalvsts  'Ir. Edwin Adelman  521-9117  Army Corns of Engineers Civil Aeronautics Board Environmental Protection Agencv Export - Import Bank Farm Credit Administration Department of Interior International Communications ARencv Agency for International Development Department of Justice Library of Congress National Transnortation Safety Board Postal Service Railroad Retirement Board Department of State Department of Transportation U.S. Soldiers Airmen's qome Irs. Darlene Forte  521-9115  Community Services Administration Department of Energy Denartment of Education Federal Deposit Insurance Cornoration Federal Iediation and Conciliation service Federal Trade Commission General Service Administration Denartment of 4ealth, Education an Yel;are Department of Housing and Ilrban Develonment National Aeronautics and Snace Administration National Credit Union Administration National Labor Relations Board Nuclear Regulatory Commission Securities and Exchange Commission Tennessee Valley.Authority   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  'tr. Arthur Younr, _  571—°351,  American Battle monuments Commission Arms Control and Disarmament Agency Department of Commerce Commodity Futures Trading Corporation Department of Defense Federal Communications Commission Federal Maritime Commission General Accounting Office Government Printing Office International Trade Commission !lerit Systems Protection Board Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission Panama Canal Company Office of Personnel Management Veterans Administration  Mr. Gary Burdette  523—Q116  Action Department of Agriculture Commission on Civil Rights Consumer Product Safety Commission Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Federal Election Commission Federal Home Loan Bank Board Foundation on the Arts Foundation on the Humanities interstate Commerce Commission 'iational Science Foundation Small Business Administration Department of the Treasury   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -17-  •  ‘noendix 3 : Office of Personnel 'Ianagement Agency' Analysts  lartinRerman  32-555R  Department of Commerce Consumer Product Safety Commission Environmental Protection Agency Farm Credit Administration Department of Housing and Urban r)evelonment Department of Labor Office of Personnel Management Panama Canal Company Railroad Retirement Board 'lartin Flaherty  Al2-555R  Department of Defense Federal Communications Commission Federal Rome Loan Rank Board Federal laritime Commission Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service Federal Trade Commission International Communications Agency International Trade Commission Interstate Commerce Commission Postal Service Renegotiation loard Jeanne M. O'Leary Department of Agriculture Department of Energy Export - Import Bank Department of Health, Education and '4elfare National Science Foundation National Transnortation Safety Board Securities and Exchange Commission Small Business Administration Department of Transportation  Cr.-55SR   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -13-  Hoefer  532-559R  American 3attle lonuments Commission Civil Aeronautics 3oard General Accounting Office Government Printing Office Library of Congress National Aeronautics and Space Administration National Foundation on the Arts National Foundation on the Humanities Nuclear Regulatory Commission Department of the Treasury  Kay  nte-4,,Thite  Community Services Administration General Services Administration Department of the Interior Department of Justice National Credit Union Administration National Labor Relations 3oard United States Courts Veterans Administration  532-5558   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  —19—  Appendix C:  Criteria for Selecting Output Indicators  1. Each output measure should consist of units which are relatively homogeneous with respect to their labor reauirements. If the output units represented by one output indicator are not homogeneous and if over a period of time the proportion changes between those units that are more labor intensive and those that are less labor intensive (i.e., product mix), the resulting output measure may be seriously distorted. Special efforts should be made to separate outputs which are known to have widely varying labor requirements into two or more output line items.  Example:  Output  Type A Type 3 Total  An organizational unit produces two tynes of reports:  3ase—Year Output Weight  10 1  Actual Number of eports FY 2 FY 1  Weighted Number of eports FY 1 FY 2 Ro 1/  120  12  12 6  20  18  147  126   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -10-  If only the total number of reports Produced.is submitted, the output measure would show a decline of 10 Percent. 4.owever, if each type of renort is quantified and appropriately weighted into a composite, then the output measure would show an increase of 37 percent.  2. Outputs generally should be repetitive. Outouts which are produced on a regular basis are generally most amenable to meaningful quantification. Such outputs might he: (l) those which are produced on a regular schedule (e.g., periodic audits or periodic publications), (2) those which are Produced in response to frequent requests (e.g., investigations concernine health and safety laws), or (3) those which are produced on a regular, although not a scheduled basis (e.g., a series of bulletins on methods of farming or a series of bulletin on wage patterns for different areas). Non-repetitive final outputs can be included in the data base but require special treatment, i.e., estimates of base-year weights. The ILS should be contacted in these situations.  3. Output indicators should directly reflect the workloads of the organizational unit. Then workload data are unavailable, proxy output indicators may be useful. gowever, such proxy measures should not be used as output indicators unless the workload of the Federal employee depends on and remains Proportional to the workloads represented by the Proxy.  Example: An organizational unit develops job training programs for veterans, awards contracts to priv:Lte organizations to run the programs, and monitors the work performed tinder these contracts. Outputs such as the number of monitoring visits, number of technical inquires answered and number of contracts administered by type of program might be appropriate as indicators of the work performed by the Federal organization. qowever, the number of veterans trained or the number of emplovee-vears of training delivered would probably he less desirable as indicators of Federal workloads. Since the efforts expended hv the Federal workers may not change appreciably whether inn or 5nn people are being trained in a given program.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • -71-  Example: A personnel office nrovides a variety of services to employees and notential employees, e.g., promotions processed, classification actions, and inquiries answered. Because these services are utilized in varying degrees. by employees and the relative proportion of these services is likely to change over time a proxy indicator such as the number of employees served would not appropriately measure the actual services provided.  4. Output measures should reflect changes in output quality. For purposes of productivity measurement, changes in output quality refer to changes in the basic characteristics of the output which reflect an altered production process with different base-period Labor reauirements for Producing the output, e.g., adding a step in processing a grant. Changes in output characteristics which affect the value of the output to the user but which do not reflect an altered production process or different base-period Labor requirements do not reauire snecial treatment. For example, the substitution of synthetic fibers for rubber in the manufacture of tires would not be considered 3 quality change even though the life of the tire may be extended, assuming that the labor requirements did not change. ghile such changes are certainly an important consideration for the nrogram manager, the" do not fall within the definition of output quality when measuring labor productivity. If productivity indexes are derived from output measures which have not been adjusted for changes in output aualitv, they will reflect both 'real- changes in efficiency and "apnarent' changes resulting simply from alterations in the hasia characteristics of the output. Thus, when quantifying outputs, it is necessary to identify changes in output quality and to ad lust for these changes in order to obtain a meaningful indication of productivity. Such adjustments may take two forms:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • (A) Identify when the change in output lualitv occurred, create i ew output category, and estimate the time it would have taken to produce this output in the base vear.1/  Example: In FY 3 an organizational unit increased the quality of type 3 reports by including several new sections and tables. This change could be reported as follows:  Output  Type A Type 3 (old) Type 3 (new)  3ase-Year Output Weight  `lumber of Reports Produced FY 1 FY / FY 3  2 (calculated) 1 (calculated) 1.5 (estimated)  , / R -  5 , / -  3 -  (3) Identify the specific areas of changes in a given output, quantify these areas separately, and estimate the incremental time it would have taken to produce these changes in the base year.  Example: Using the data from the previous example, an alternate method of reporting could be:  Output  Type A Type 3 (old) Type 3 (new)  lase-Year Output Weight  2 (calculated) I (calculated) 0.5 (estiMated)  'lumber of Reports Produced Ty 2 FY 1 FY 3 5 7  7  1/ Various techniaues are available for estimatina base-vPar weights. The BLS project team should be contacted for issistance.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • -23-  Example: An organizational unit has been conducting incretasingly thorough inspections of food Processing Plants. Initially, it had only sampled the products of the nlants. In FY 2, it also began inspecting equipment at some of these plants. This change could be rectorted as:  lase—Year Output ' , /eight  Output  Plants Inspected .004 Equipment Inspected .001  Number of Inspections lade FY 1 FY 2 FY 3  (calculated) 500  (estimated)  510  52n  200  400  5. Output measures should indicate the amount of work done during each fiscal year. If outputs with a cycle time extending beyond one year are qauntified only in the Year Completed, the resulting output index is likely to be erratic and meaningless. For example, if 5 years are required to build a ship, it would be improper to report the production of one ship in the Fifth Year and zero production (i.e., no work performed) in the first through fourth years. There are two ways to handle these situations: (A)  Establish the total base—Year labor require— ments for one unit of output and quantify the Percentage of an output that has been completed in each year. (Note: This solu— tion applies not only to comnleted outputs but also to outputs which were initiated during a recent period and which will he completed in some future Period. In the case of unfinished outputs, estimate the portion completed during the current time period. These estimates should be revised as additional information becomes available).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Example: /f a report took two years to complete and if work was begun at the start of FY 1 and was completed at the end of FY 2, then 1/2 unit of out— put would be credited to FY 1 and 1/2 !mit to FY 2-assuming that the effort expended in each year was approximately equal. If in this example the work began in mid—FY 1, then FY I would be credited with 1/4 report completed, FY 2 with 1/2 report, and FY 3 with 1/4 reoort.  (3) Identify the major steps reauired to complete the output and count the number of steps completed each year rather than the final output.  Example: An organization studies the nation's industries and produces three major documents, each of which takes from two to three years to complete. The first document reports on technology in each industry, the second renorts on sales and profit trends in each industrY, and the third reports on the wages and occupational requirements in each industry. This organization may decide to use as its output indicator the number of industry chapters comnleted (by tvne of publication) rather than the number of doCuments com— pleted. Its output submission thus might be:  Output  Number of Chapters Completed FY 1 FY 2 FY 3  Chapters on Industry Technology  — 27  31  78  Chapters on Industry Sales and Profits  45  41  42  Chapters on Industry wages and Occupational equirements  17  23  31)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -25-  ‘). OutPut measures should reflect the final nroducts and services of an organization. Ideallv, a productivity index should relate final outputs Co their associated direct and indirect input(s). Therefore, the output data submitted by each organizational unit should he final from the perspective of the organization providing the information (i.e., the outputs that are consumed outside of the reporting organization). lmplovee—years associated with intermediate outputs (i.e., outputs produced and then consumed by the reporting organization) should be allocated to the final outputs that are oroduced, or when not possible, should be included with other administration and sunnort employee—years.  Example: A library purchases books and oeriodicals, catalogs these materials and lends them to individuals and other institutions. The outputs associated with lending activities (i.e., number of books and periodi— cals lent) are final to the library and should be quantified. However, the outputs associated with acquisition and cataloging activities are intermediate and should not be quantified; the emplovee—vears asso— ciated with these activities should he considered support employee—years.  Example: Men an output is produced from the ioint efforts of regional and headquarters personnel, it should be counted only once. For example, if the regional offices collect data which are used by head— quarters to construct statistical series, the number of each type of statistical series produced should be the output measure, and theweights for combining the different types of statistical series should re— flect employee—years expended in the base "ear by the regional offices as well as headquarters.  /31,1  /(C3 fon  re I-  .5 c  ft,  C  of nt  We  I  r  ri in  Washington. D C 2041S  Reoe•  Y'.Uf  Reference  C  limemee-  t  MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  Strengthening and improving the management of the Federal Government continues to be a major commitment of this Administration. One important means of accomplishing this objective has been agency participation in the Faculty Fellows Programs conducted by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) and the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA) with cooperation from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).  '  1••••••,••6_ reZp. imemeer.  These Faculty Fellows Programs are designed to bring into government highly motivated professionals who have expressed interest in a meaningful work assignment in a Federal agency. Each Faculty Fellow has been either recommended or nominated by his or her university and has been selected by a committee of either AACSB or NASPAA.  IFe  :741e. r6:44 riamsw.  The benefitsthe programs are numerouhese outstanding faculty agencies a varif managerial competencies. members brin While agencienefit from the expertisthese individuals, the participatinculty members are afforde opportunity to receive of the government. Othnefits are improved relationa firsthand and the Federmmunities, and the improvement ships betweee a the governmental experience of public mament curricula as a resu gained by thfaculty members.  Ler..  You will find attached some information on these Faculty Fellows. I have included additional copies of this material and would urge you to share it with other key management officials within your agency. For each finalist you will find a summary of his or her current academic position, primary Federal work interest, and academic specialization. Agencies interested in hiring either an AACSB or NASPAA Faculty Fellow should contact the finalists in whom they are interested. The biographical data of each Fellow gives you both a mailing address and appropriate phone number.  in4q, LNOCISI 61111MM,  !PitY4‘ • .•  .. •  Both AACSB and NASPAA have copies of each Fellow's application. If you want to review the applications, please contact Ms. Terri Rosenblatt, AACSB, 483-0400 or Mr. Joe Robertson, NASPAA, at 785-3260.  I#•  •  In placing a Faculty Fellow, agencies are urged to use the mobility provisions of the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA). Under the IPA, agencies can bring in a Faculty Fellow on detail or can give the individual a temporary, excepted appointment. In either instance, the Faculty Fellow is entitled to the appropriate rate of pay which the duties and responsibities of the position would warrant under the applicable Federal pay provisions. Generally, these positions range from GS-12 through GS-15. We emphasize that the responsibility for making final grade level determinations rests with your agency   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  *. WO"  11.11EMIN.  CON 1 1 4-24-3 Janufry 1979  ,.  ••••er  *  •• •  s.1-•Na."..e...- 2.'•.•~40- • ZI`c ' • •  -  •  e."".  4°,1,•' '  *1-0•  • r7z  '  • yeL  r-  In order to help with the selection process, you shou ld he aware that agencies are authorized to pay for preemployment intervie ws under Federal Personnel Manual chapter 571, subchapter 1-1. To defray administrative costs of the programs, AACSB and NASPAA assess a fee of $750 per Fellow. This fee covers costs associated with the selection, placement and continuing professional development of the Fellow. Agencies are auth orized to pay such costs under Federal Personnel Manual chapter 332, subchapter 1-10. The college or university from which a Fellow comes also remits a participation fee of $250 for each Fellow selected from the institution and placed with a Federal agency. Information about the IPA mobility program and the broad range of Faculty Fellows opportunities can be obtained from Ardrey Harris, Chief, Faculty Fellows and Personnel Mobility Division in OPM's Office of Intergovernmental Personnel Programs (202) 632-5373. I urge you to look within your agency for placement opportunities for this excellent group of Faculty Fellows finalists. Please initiate direct contacts with candidates in whom you have an interest. Thank you for your personal support and assistan in utilizin his program.  . C mpbel rector Attachments   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business  Federal Faculty Fellows Program Program Purpose  Selection and Placement  Orientation and Educational  The Federal Faculty Fellows program is administered by AA(SB in cooperation with the U S Office of Personnel Management under the authority lit the Intergovernmental Personnel Ad of 1970  A maximum of two nominees will be considered from each AACSB member school. and applications must be received by November I  Orientation Seminar. An integral component of the program is a one-week serlIIMIlf administered by the Brookings Institution and designed to engage the fellows in dialogue with key officials in the federal government The Serflerhilf will be held in late lime or early July Participation in the entire week is required Fellows should plan their beginning work schedule to enable them to parlor spate  No discrimination will be made sin the basis sit cokir, religion, sex, political altiliation. or national origin in the selection and placement of eligible faculty members. Schools are encouraged to nominate women, minorities, and the handicapped race.  The program has a dual purpose: 1) to contribute to the leaching and research functions of collegiate schools of business by providing selected faculty members with the opportunity to obtain first-hand knowledge of the public policy process and management and administration in the federal government.  Applications will he reviewed by an AA(SB committee composed sit academic, business, and governmental representatives. This ccimmittee will select finalists based on established criteria by December 1.  2) to contribute to the administrative and managerial capabilities of agencies And departments of the federal government through the expertise of selected faculty members from collegiate schools of business.  Programs  Iduc•ttional Programs. Additional meetings on maiiir policy issues within the federal government are organized by AA(SB throughout the year  Finalists will be interviewed by federal agencies. One trip to D.C. will he scheduled between late Ianuary and early March.  •:e faculty  Full-lime faculty members who demonstrate high promise and are nominated by deans of AACSB member schools of business are eligible to apply. Nominees must he committed to return to their respective schools upon completion of their assignment and should have limited or no work experience with federal agencies.  In most case's, agencies are authorized to pay for pre-employment interviews, fringe benefits, and most travel and relocation costs for the fellows and their dependents. Program administration costs will he partially covered by charging the nominating academic institution a $ISO lee for edict' candidate who is selected and placed. and each federal agency to which a fellow is assigned, a lee of 57-41  Interested faculty members may obtain further information and applications from the dean of AA( SB member schools or by writitig to.  Assignments are designed to provide a mutually beneficial experience for the fellow and the federal agency. Meaningful protects which relate realistically to the program's one-year time fr•rne are discussed and agreed upon by the fellow, the federal agency and the AACSB stall Assignments will begin in the summer.  Feder•I I .441.U111 Fellows Prograni American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business 1755 Massachusetts Avenue, N.Suite 129 Washington, D( 20014 federal employees wishing further information on the program should write to the above address or telephone (292) 4814400.  Fellows must he able to devote full time to their agency assignmer is.  . •5  Compensation for each fellow will be determined by the participating federal age's( And will reflect the fellow's background, univeruly salary level and supplementary income An advisory rating is provided by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.  An application fee of $20, payable to AACSB, must accompany each set of nomination papers.  Placement of fellows will be completed by May 1. Eligibility of  Financial Arrangements  f • 1;  114'  list, • •• .• • •••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  los ,r  /6.  .1( • "  11  Z?.  •  1980-81 AACSB FEDERAL FACULTY FELLOWS PROGRAM Sponsored By The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business In Cooperation With The U.S. Office of Personnel Management  ;e.  Final Participants Available for Placement in Federal Government Agencies  NAME  CURRENT ACADEMIC POSITION  Butterfield, D. Anthony  Professor of Management School of Business Admin. University of Massachusetts at Amherst Amherst, MA 01033 (413) 549-4930 Ext.275 (413) 549-6865  Edelman, Richard B.  PRIMARY FEDERAL WORK INTERESTS  PhD - University of Michigan (Organizational Psychology)  Projects Involving Performae Appraisal Management Training Interviewing & Questionnaire An Men and Women in Management  Organizational Behavior Organizational Development Human Relations Leadership & Power  (B) (R)  Associatc Professor of Finance College of Business University of Hawaii at Manoa Honolulu, HI 96822 (808) 948-7678 (808) 737-2434  )  ACADEMIC SPECIALIZATION  DBA - University of Maryland (Finance, Statistics, Operation Research, Accounting)  Analysis of Financing & Invest-7 mentPatterns by Public Utilities Examinin7, Optimal Capital Structure, Obiective Bond Rating Techniques and the Impact of Changing Industry Risk on Capital Markets Regulatory Behavior with ilon respect to Rate-Base Valua and Rate of Return  Capital Markets Public Utility Economics  (B) (R)  .;'  Harvey, Barron   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Assistant Professor School of Business Admin. Georgetown University Washington, D.C. 20057 (202) 625-4721 (703) 435-0326  PhD - University of Nebraska (Organizational Behavior) Accounting Management Principles Organizational Behavior Organizational Development  (B) (R)  v"i sIP f  Program Policy Development & Evaluation/Research Small Business & Minority Enterprise Civil Service Reform Management System Evaluation  7  • • •.  I  24,914? 1104  I W:  -2-  Klotz, Benjamin  Associate Professor of PhD - University of Minnesota Economics (Economics Statistics) School of Business Administration Temple University Philadelphia, PA 19122 Macroeconomic Theory Business Cycles & Forecasting (215) 787-8452 (B) The Theory of Finance (202) 833-9829 (R) Production Function, Econometrics Portfolio Selection  Policy or Project Analysis of: Inadequate Capital Formation and Lagging Productivity Growth in the U.S. Wage Costs & Labor Economics Volunteer Military Portfolio Selection by Conglomerate Firms High Youth Unemployment Issues of Inflation  McCrohan, Kevin  Associate Professor School of Business Administration University of New Haven West Haven, Conn. 06516  Impact of Export Promotion East-West Trade, Countertrade Foreign Investment in the U.S. Impact of Antitrust Legislation on U.S. Export Performance Consumer Attitudes & Behavior  (203) 934-6321 (B) (516) 333-1910 (R)  Majumdar, Badiul  Assistant Professor Albers School of Business Seattle University Seattle, WA 98122 (206) 626-5368 (206) 832-4614  PhD - City University of N.Y. (Marketing, Public Policy) Economics, International Business Public Policy & Marketing Foreign Trade & Investment  PhD - Case Western Reserve (Economics) International Economics Economics of Technological Change  (B) (R)  International Trade Implications of Technological Innovations and Technology Migration across National Boundaries Tariff Negotiations, Dumping Investigations Domestic Science & TechnologyRelated Issues  • Maronick, Thomas   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Associate Professor of Marketing University of Baltimore School of Business Baltimore, MD 21201  JD - School of Law, University of Baltimore DBA - University of Kentucky (Marketing)  Design & Implementation of Marketing Research Programs Problem Definition for Consumer Research Evaluation of Rules & Regulations Having Impact on Trade  (301) 727-6350 ext 442 (B) (301) 821-1154 (R)  I:  / .9 1 1. !,I ?a...  ,  ,  •,  Wha I  I  4  TP.4  I .3 6i; ret  PA I  -34•11.•  Miller, Robert  Professor School of Management & Admin. University of Texas at Dallas P.O. Box 688 Richardson, TX 75080 (214) 690-2025 (214) 783-0395  Moo maw, Ronald L.  Associate Professor of Economics College of Business Admin. Oklahoma State University Stillwater, OK 74074 (405) 624-5106 (405) 377-8946  Murphy, Patrick E.  Nolan, John  Shipper, Frank   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  PhD - Princeton (Economics) Economics, Microeconomics Urban Economics & Applied Econometrics  Policy Development Economic Development at Neighborhood, City, & Regional Levels  •  PhD - University of Houston (Marketing, Social & Environmental Aspects of Business)  Evaluation of Programs or Regulations Utilizing Marketing Research & Consumer Behavior Concepts  Marketing Research Consumer Behavior  (B) (R)  Assistant Professor of Management School of Business Western Carolina University Cullowhee, N.C. 28723 (704) 227-7401 (704) 293-3441  International Finance International Trade Academic Administration and Governance International Investment  Policy Analysis Related to: Foreign Direct Investment, Trade Regulation and Technology Transfer Project Analysis Related to: International Agriculture, International finance & trade  (B) (R)  Assistant Professor of Marketing College of Business Admin. Marquette University Milwaukeet, WI 53233 (414) 224-7181 (414) 774-0925  A  (B) (R)  PhD - Stanford University (Business Economics, International Economics)  (B) (R)  Assistant Professor of Management College of Business Admin. Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281 (602) 965-3431 (B) (602) 839-8319 (R) . f.• 11;:l. ;;Ii i: 7 117;,. 7, S; . ::',...(''. : .4 ,. ..- , ,. f'i ••••)i.f 4 ' ti  PhD - Ohio University (Organizational Communications, Personnel Management) Human Resources Admin. Performance Appraisal Programs Employee Recruiting Programs  PhD - University of Utah (Business Administration, Organizational Behavior) Individual Motivation and Group Leadership Job Redesign, Management by Objectives, Strategic Planning & Leadership Training  Performance Appraisal Systems Personnel Selection, Employee Development and Training, Compliance Reviews Discriminatory Employment Frac tices Program Evaluation  Organizational Development Program Aimed at Improved Supervisory Practices, Reduction of Stress & Increased Productivity Conducting Seminars on Individual Motivation and Group Leadership  •  a  -4Stover, Carl P.  Professor College of Business & Public Administration Governors State University Park Forest South, IL 60466 (312) 534-5000 ext. 2248 (312) 748-8963  Strier, Franklin Delano  (B) (R)  Associate Professor School of Management California State University at Dominguez Hills Carson, CA 90747 (213) 515-3584 (B) (213) 931-9884 (R)  Thompson, A. Frank  1:' r  1:  Assistant Professor Department of Industrial Administration School of Business Administration Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 (515) 294-5244 (515) 292-7233  r • •  PhD - University of Minnesota (Public Law & Public Policy, Public Affairs & Economics)  Policy Analysis & Research Program Planning & Evaluation Intergovernmental Relations Management Analysis  Criminal Justice Public Law Policy Analysis Methodology  J.D - Rutgers University (Law)  Government Regulation, Study of State Government & Regulatory Reform with emphasis on CostBenefit Analysis and Applicability at the Federal Level Federal Tax Reform Income Tax Indexing, Charitable Deductions for Non-itemizing Taxpayers  •  Government Regulations of Business Taxation & Tax Policy Program Administration  PhD - University of Nebraska (Economics, Actuarial Science)  Econometric Studies to Develop Estimates of Costs & Benefits of Pension Programs Development of Alternative Funding Methods for Social Security Benefits  Actuarial Science, Econometrics Monetary Theory Risk Theory  (B) (R)  Developing Economic Methods of Sampling to be Used in Surveying the Population.  '.•.'  •  • .4,  r t  Witt, Robert .11r  Professor School of Business University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 (512) 471-4368 (512) 442-1028  T. •  r.1   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •4,1 •  •  (B) (R)  PhD - University of Pennsylvania (Insurance & Economics) Tnsurance & Actuarial Science  Financial, Economic & Regulatory Aspects of Insurance Insurance Pricing Related to Proper Classification for Risks in Property, Liability, & Life Insurance Pension Plans, Social Security  'cur  ACT SHEET° 1980-81 NASPAA FACULTY FELLOWS PROGRAM WHAT IS IT? •The 1980-81 NASPAA Faculty Fellows Program, sponsored jointly by the Office of Personnel Management(OPM)and the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), provides practical experience in the federal govemment for college and university professors teaching public affairs/administration in NASPAA member programs.  wore:,  •Fellows provide staff support in federal administrative agencies. Assignments involve such areas as administrative systems and process, budgeting, program and personnel management, policy development, and program planning and evaluation. Pay is determined according to experience and educational background and generally ranges from GS-12 to GS-15 ($23,000-$38,000). Appointments are for one year, beginning in mid-summer. WHO CAN PARTICIPATE? •College and university faculty members teaching in public administration and related public policy fields who are interested in spending approximately 12 months on a temporary assignment in a federal agency are selected from a list of applicants. and •Federal agencies able to benefit from the perspective and insight of talented professionals from the field of public administration and public affairs and to place them in challenging assignments commensurate with their ability.  WHEN DOES IT TAKE PLACE? •Potential candidates may obtain an application by writing: NASPAA Faculty Fellows Program Attention: Joe Robertson 1225 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 306 Washington, DC 20036 •Federal agencies interested in securing a NASPAA Faculty Fellow should contact Joe Robertson, Executive Director of NASPAA, early in the year (1980) to review background material on the finalists, including their applications. Final placement negotiations will take place directly between agencies, Fellows, and their academic institutions. Precise assignments, dates and duties are negotiable. In this process, agencies and Fellows should consult with the Office of Faculty Fellows and Personnel Mobility, Bureau of Intergovernmental Personnel Program, U.S. Office of Personnel Mobility, Bureau of Intergovernmental Personnel Program, U.S. Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20415 (202) 632-5373.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1,:$405  1,01°71116•1•101W-  c -  •.  .  442,v.  •  •  • WHAT DOES IT COST? •To defray administrative costs of the Faculty Fellows Program, NASPAA assesses a fee of $750 per Fellow on the employing agency. This fee covers costs associated with the selection, placement and continuing professional development of the Fellows. The program from which a Fellow comes also pays NASPAA a participation fee of $250 for each Fellow selected and placed with a federal agency.  i'awA  •In addition, there is an application fee of $15 to cover the costs of processing the application prior to consideration by the NASPAA Faculty Fellows Program Committee at the time of application submission. •Agencies are encouraged to use the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) mobility authority to hire Fellows. Under the IPA, an agency may give an excepted temporary appointment to a Fellow. Or, under the "detail" procedure of the IPA, Fellows remain on the payroll of their employing university, and the agency reimburses the university for salary costs. Under this act, agencies are authorized to pay most travel and relocation costs.  MOO owls,  ,1 1 irdilbanom.  •Agencies are authorized to pay for pre-employment interviews. Such interviews are authorized in Federal Personnel Manual Chapter 571 to allow agenices to determine the qualifications of an applicant for a position in excepted service.  HOW AND WHEN ARE SELECTIONS MADE? •All applications will be carefully considered by the NASPAA Faculty Fellows Program Committee, with final selections announced early in January, 1980.  lanolow.  FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  NASPAA Faculty Fellows Program 1225 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 306 Washington, DC 20036 (202) 785-3260 Or  Office of Faculty Fellows and Personnel Mobility Bureau of Intergovernmental Personnel Programs U.S. Office of Personnel Management 1900 E Street, NW Washington, DC 20415 (202) 632-5373  LIIIIM1101M  ,  •  •I  ._  %  •  1980/81 NASPAA FACULTY FELLOWS Sponsored by The National Association of Schools of Public AlIai rs and Administration and The U.S. Office of Personnel Management FINAL PARTICIPANTS AVAILABLE FOR PLACEM ENT IN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES SUMMARY LISTING It  :  •i • • 4  RANK 3: INSTITUTION  f51JT1TON  AREAS—C1: E\PERTISE-6 -IN-TEREST Financial Management, budget, analysis, program evaluation, management analvsk  ABRAN1S. Jay (II) (703) 830-3490 (0) (703) 323-2272  Asst. Prof. of Public Adm. George Mason University  DP A-SU N Y,Albany-1975 MPA-SUNY,Albany-1971 BA-Maxwell School-1970  AUFRECHT, Steven E. (II) (907) 272-8179 (0) (907) 263-1762  Asst. Prof. of Public Adm. School of Business 6: Pub. Adm. University of Alaska  Ph.u.-USC-1978 M P A-USC-197 2 AB-UCLA-1967  Organizational analysis, mgt. analysis. system. development information systems, accountability  BROWN. Michael N. (II) (703) 951-3609 (0) (703) 961-6633 or 961-6571  Asst. Prof. Dept. of Political Science Virginia Polytechnic. Institute & State University •  Ph.D.-UCLA-1976 MPA-UCLA-I969 BA-Univ. of Oregon-1965  Policy evaluation, quantative analysis. organization behavior, program management  CAT RON. Bayard L. (H) (301) 530-0276 (0) (202) 676-3960  Assoc. Prof., Dept. of Public Administration George Washington University  Ph.D.-Univ. of CA, Berkeley-1975 MCP-Univ. of CA, Berkeley-1972 MA-Univ. of Chicago-1965 BA-Grinnell College-1963 Ph.D.-Univ. of PA-1974 MA-PA State Univ.-1966 BA-Colgate-1964  - -- -Policy analysis; program planning, management and evaluation, organizational tn-ory, social service uesign and delivery  a.  C LA RK K. Staaley E. (11) (805) 831-9027 (0) (805) 833-2363  • Assoc. Prof., School of Business and Public Administration California State College, Bakersfield  Community organization, public law, policy evaluation, race relations, law enforcement policy, immigration policy  •  DeMARCO, John J. (II) (404) 549-5334 (0) (404) 542-2057  Asst. Prof., Dept. of Political Science University of Georgia  Ph.D.-Syracuse-1979 MPA-Wayne State-I976 BA-Wayne State-1974  Personnel management, program evaluation, organization and management processes  DIAMOND, Irene (II) (317) 743-4230 (0) (317) 494-4795  Asst. Prof., Dept. of Political Science Purdue University  Ph.D.-Princeton-1968 BA-Douglass College-1975  Polies/ analysis, women and the family, program evaluatir.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r et 6  l" A  Ig j r s •  •  NAME  rt' .4,. ' 1 1:4  .1 ,  RANK & INSTITUTION  DUNN, William N. (H) (412) 784-0629 (n) (412) 624-3629  EDUCATION  Professor, Graduate School of Public International Affairs University of Pittsburgh  Ph.D.-Claremont:1969 A-Claremont-1966 BA-Univ. of CA-1964  EDNER, Sheldon M. (II) (503) 235-1827 (0) (503) 229-3921  Asst. Prof.. Masters Program in Public Administratioa Portland State University  ERIE, Steven P. (H) (518) 869-1131 (0) (518) 457-4786  Asst. Prof., Graduate School of Public Affairs State University of New York, Albany  GRAFTON, Carl T. (II) (205) 277-2036 , 1 0) (205) 279-9110  Assoc. Prof., MPA Program Auburn University at Montgomery  HAMILTON. David K. (11) (312) 392-1134 (0) (312) 341-3744  Asst. Prof., MPA Program Roosevelt University  JONES, Garth N. (II) (907) 349-4062 (0) (907) 263-1786  Prof. (Dean) School of Business & Public Adm. University of Alaska  JONES, Juanita B. (II) (513) 221-2044 (0) (513) 475-3211  Asst. Prof.. Dept. of Political Science University of Cincinnati  LAEMMLE, Philip G. (II) (502) 897-0328 (0) (502) 588-6831  Asst. Prof., Dept. of Political Science University of Louisville   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  rz I  ..  141,yk A  5 cirl,  •4 •  AREAS OF EXPERTISE S INTERN sT Policy making nrocesses, resear ch design. criminal justice. props-am eva luation. loeal government innovation  Ph.D.-Univ. of CA, Riverside-1973 MA-Univ. of CA, Riverside-1971 AB-Humboldt State Univ.-1969  Environmental policies and pro grams, intergovernmental relations, grants in aid, policy analysis. development', implement ation. and evaluation  Ph.D.-Univ. of CA, Berkeley-1975 MA-Univ of CA, Berkeley-1969 AB-UCLA-1967  -- --Program and poliey analysis. for mulation. and evaluation. social and Libor policy. and ethnic politic  Ph.D.-Purdue-1970 MA-Purdue-1966 iiS-Univ. of Toledo-1963  Executive legislative relations, bud geting, policy formulation, technology ass essment  Ph.D.-Univ. of Pittsburgh1978 MA -Brigham Young-1968 BA -Brigham Young-1966  Local government, personnel adm inistrati intergovernmental relations. gra nts-n -n id  Ph.D.-Univ. of Utah-1954 MS-Univ. of Utah-1948 BA -Utah State Univ.-1947  International development, rural development, public finance, program evaluati or.  Ph.D.-Southern Illinois-1977 MA-Southern Illinois-1972 BA -Western Illinois-1969  Public law, criminal justice, program evaluation, policy planning, status of woraen  Ph.D.-Indiana Univ.-1976 MA-Univ. of Texas, Austin-1968 BA-Univ. of Texas, Austin-1966  Quantitative analysis, energy policy and analyses, program evaluation  ( -I  If.0 ,  -I  I  I  A  NAME : .•  •  RANK &  EDUCATION  ARE.\S -OF EXPERTISIT& INTEREST  LON DO W, David Z. (H) (904) 642-1724 (0) (904) 646-2540  Asst. Prof., Dept. of Political Science University of North Florida  Ph.D.-Univ. of Chicago1978 AM-Univ. of Chicago1968 I3A-St. John's College1966  Program evaluation, personnel mlnagement, leg,islative relations, regulatorv policv and administration  MEIER, Kenneth J. (ID (405) 321-6546 (0) (405) 325-6621  Asst. Prof. S: Asst. Dftector Bureau of Government Research University of Oklahoma  Ph.D.-Syracuse-1975 MA-Syractise-1974 AB-Univ. of South Dakota-1972  General managemcnt, personnel manager'ent. policy analyis, policy and program evalu;.tion  PFIFFNER, James P. (1-1) (714) 548-5735 (0) (714) 773-3414  Asst. Prof., MPA Program California State University, Fullerton  Ph.D.-Univ. of WisconsinMadison-1975 MA-Univ. of Wisconsin-1972 BA-Univ. of Wisconsin-1968  General management. budget and fnianct. personnel management  REGENS, James L. (H) (404) 543-1807 (0) (404) 542-2057  Asst. Prof. of Public Adm. Dept. of Political Science University of Georgia  Ph.D.-Univ. of Oklahoma1975 MA-Univ. of Arizona-1973 BS-Univ. of Arizona-1969  Policy analysis /Ina planning, program management, management analysis, program evaluation  Asst. Prof., Dept. of Political Science Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University  Ph.D.-Indiana Univ.-1976 NIA-Indiana State-1971 BA-Stephen F. Austin State Univ.-1969  Neighborhood organization, urban prot)lern:,. policy analysis, policy program evaluation  Assoc. Prof. & Director of Public Adm. Program Dept. of Political Science Barat College  Ph.D.-Univ. of Illinois-1973 MA-Univ. of Illinois-1968 BA-Chatham College-1966  Policy planning, prog,ram analysis, minority affairs especially Hispanic questions  SHATTUCK, Petra (202) 265-5189 (0) (212) 489-5027 489-5025 (II)•  Assoc. Prof., Dept. of Government & Public Adm. John Jay College of Criminal Justice  Ph.D.-Columbia Univ.-1972 NIA-Columbia Lniv.-1966 BA-Pomona College-1964  Policy analysis, program evaluation, nianace ment problems, particularly in criminal justice area  STOCK, Robert L. 01) (714) 452-0362 (0) (714) 265-6224  Assoc. Prof., School of Public Adm. & Urban Studies San Diego State University  Ph.D.-Univ. of Pittsburgh1975 NIP1A-Lnis.,. of Pittsburgh1972 BA-Univ. of Pittsburgh-1968  Policy and program analysis and international development administration. arts administration. state government  •  Pe# •  RICH, •  C. (H) (703) 951-7707 (0) (703) 961-5491 or 961-657i Richard• ROTHENBF.RG, Irene F. (II) (312) 475-3260 (0) (312) 234-3000   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r"• I  ,t:: ,  4.;  •  N M1  RANK—FIN-Si  SWAIM, Charles R. (H) (301) 669-0854 (0) (301) 727-6370  u ITUNr—  EDIJCATTON  AREAS-0T EXPERTISE -3:-TNTEREST - --  Asst. Prof., Masters of Public Administration Program University of Baltimore  Ph.D.-Univ. f Colorado1977 MA-Villanova Univ.-1973 BA-Rutgers Univ.-1972  Policy and program evaluation, research methodology, substantive fields, arts aging, and humanities  UHLMAN, Thomas M. (11) (314) 725-4312 (0) (314) 453-5521  Asst. Prof., MPPA Program University of Missouri-St. Louis  Ph.D.-Univ. of NC. Chapel 11i11-1975 MA-Univ. of NC, Chapel Hill-1971 AB-Univ. of Rochester1968  Program management and evaluation. administrative law, criminal justice and administrative law  1.1IEELER., Gloria E. (H) (801) 375-4604 (0) (801) 374-1211  .Asst. Prof., Institute of Public Management Brigham Young University  Ph.D.-Univ. of MichiganAnn Arbor-1(i72 MS-Univ. of Michigan-1968 AM-Univ. of Michigan-1966 BS-Montana State Univ., Bozeman-1965  Organizational d. velopment, decision theory, research methodology, policy analysis, program evaluation, statistics, quantitative methods  •  1.;  4 '  , •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  F.-• 41  PA  ;  •  •  I K1 • hi.  r ; pl  TiN  -  I.  ;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  January 21, 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Energy Conservation in Federal Government Programs and Operations  Executive Order 12185, which I signed on December 17, 1979, directs each of you to inventory your agency's financial assistance programs, identify those with significant potential for energy conservation, and make administrative changes which will encourage conservation of scarce petroleum and natural gas supplies by the recipients of Federal financial assistance. The Office of Management and Budget and the Department of Energy will take leading roles in implementing the provisions of this Executive Order through the Interagency Coordinating Council, chaired by Jack Watson. To accomplish the necessary program reviews and revisions in a consistent and coherent fashion within the time limits set by the Executive Order, I have asked Jack to act as overall coordinator of the effort. On a separate but related issue, I have asked OMB Director Jim McIntyre and Jack Watson to expedite the implementation of Executive Order 12003 concerning conservation in the operations of the Federal establishment. This order was issued on July 20, 1977, and the annual goals were set in a memorandum from me on April 10, 1979. Jim McIntyre and Jack Watson will work with the Department of Energy and the General Services Administration to develop the specific steps each of you must take to achieve energy savings in the day-to-day operations of your agency -buildings, vehicle fleet, and other equipment. Conservation is the cheapest and quickest way to attack our nation's energy shortage. I cannot ask our citizens and private businesses to conserve energy if the Federal government lags behind. Not only do we have substantial leverage over the energyrelated actions and choices of others through our financial assistance programs, we also set an example for others in the conduct of our own operations. In both of these areas -covered respectively by Executive Order 12185 (1979) and Executive Order 12003 (1977) -- we must move forward _more _ vigorously.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  77  116 A-t-bif  7)71A-  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .r •  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  JAN 1 4 1980  AGENCIES MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND FROM:  Wayne G. Granquist Associate Director for Management and Regulatory Policy  SUBJECT:  Study of Decentralization of Federal Governmental Functions  Management and On January 8, the Director of the Office of the Congress Budget submitted a report to the Presirlent and Governmental on the Study of Decentralization of Federal e CiviI-Sevice Refu Functions required by Sectior. 901 (.f Act of 1978. Ciecentralizatjes The report does not recommend major physicol j%Tortance of at this time, However, it recognizes the We will be providing updated guidance on the issue utive Branch initiating follow-up actions to revise Exec directives on decentralization as needed. youL. information. I have attached a copy of the report for  Attachment  COMPTROLLER GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES1 • WASHINGTON, D.C. 20548  B-197146  HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  The enclosed report discusses our recent reports relating to debt collection in the Federal Government, our ongoing efforts, and our views on the issues that are impeding collection efforts. As you are responsible for establishing and maintaining internal control over accounts receivable as well as taking prompt and aggressive action to collect amounts due the Governuse. ment, we are sending this report for your information and We are not making new recommendations. Rather, we are highboth lighting and summarizing the unresolved issues to provide the legislative and executive branches with a document that can be used in further efforts to improve debt collection.  !p.4,74 tiksk 11=14/11"-  omptroller General of the United States Enclosure   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  '  "•.•  •  —0 • r);?.re:.0%..1  ,  January 3U, 1930 N f\( j  t!r. Jack Jetson T)se =ouAt, WatOliniton, D. C.  i050J  isear nr. Vatenc: In rauponne to Preeident Carter's January 13, 19E0, werorandum rc;ardlo6 the procnrenent programa for minority businesses and labor sur— plus arPaa, we have deve1ops4 prorram to achieve our roAls in oupportine President Carter'a UrI3tin Policy. SpecificAlly, the noArPs procurement officials hzvv been inetructed to place A hl?,h priority on inc reasioe th.s vartic17.ation of minority businesaes in Roard purchases. To insure tbat proper e!lphasis im placed on this pro gran, gaiter W. Kreilsaon, Associate !Director, Division of Support Ber vices in cherge of procur ement was ap— pointed to head our Cffice of 3-.ell and Disadvantaged Business Uti lization. As a rteult of this effort, we have set our 19f1U goals to double ainority businese participation in nut prime contracts. The reouire— mente for entablish!:tent of a slbcontra cting plan to utilize small lyusinece and snail disadvanta ct ,ed business concerns has been includ ed in all lost," contracts over °300,000. Through this subcontracting plan, we anticipate an oven 7,reeter partic ipation of cloority busiresses in our contract . although specific goals in the LSA areas have not been achieved due to tha type of noods and servic es that we purchase, a continuin g effort la haing :rale to improve our coltrecti ng in this area. :lowever, we wil l cooperate with t;SA in entablial'in R tA goals, And when ponsible purcha se goo:la an! serviceo titrovph the use of SA labor surplus area contra cts. :le will continue to rnnitor and place personal emphasis on these procurents to achieve oor Very truly yours,  Donald r. Anderson, Director Oiviefon of support Services Cel  Yr.  C;tLF...n   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  rr. An1Preon,  <reimann, Mr. Lopez  f   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE • WASHINGTON  r.  n  January 13, 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  When I announced my Urban Policy in March 1978, I set certain goals for the federal procurement system. Specifically, I pledged to triple the amount of business the Federal Government does with minority businesses, increasing those contracts from the $1.1 billion level of 1977 to $3.3 billion by the end of FY 1979. I also signed an Executive Order to increase substantially the amount of federal procurement in areas of high unemployment (labor surplus areas). In both instances, although the government's performance improved significantly over previous years, the goals I set were not achieved. We are in the process of establishing higher goals in minority and LSA procurement for 1980, which I am confident we can achieve. I would like each of you to take the following specific actions to ensure that your agency is doing its best to meet those goals: o Familiarize yourself with your agency goals and ensure that adequate plans have been developed to reach these goals. o Instruct each of your procurement officials that these goals are a high priority with me and that I expect each of them to take every necessary and appropriate step to reach these goals. o P.L. 95-507 requires that each agency establish an Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) with a full-time director who reports to the agency head or deputy. It also requires subcontracting plans for utilization of small and minority firms for most federal contracts over $500,000. Please take the following actions regarding P.L. 95-507: (1) review your OSDBU to see that it has the necessary resources and full-time staff to carry out the responsibilities mandated by this law; and (2) review the performance of your agency with regard to the subcontracting provision of the law, and take every action required to ensure that, henceforth, no contract covered by the provisions of this law is let by your agency which does not have a subcontracting plan.  gem   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • o You should already have established with the Department of Commerce your annual minority contracting goals and with SBA your subcontracting goals under P.L. 95-507; if not, do so immediately. o Cooperate fully with GSA in establishing LSA goa14. o Personally review the 1979 performance of your agency in the minority and LSA procurement areas, and if you did not meet your goals, develop a plan by January 30 to meet 1980 goals. o Both the Senior Executive Service System and the Merit Pay System require goals and objectives for evaluating employee performance. Where it is feasible and appropriate I want the achievement of procurement goals in these two areas to be included as a performance objective. This objective should be a critical element in the evaluation of procurement officials and related program personnel.  I have asked Jack Watson to work closely with Deputy Secretary of Commerce Luther Hodges, Administrator Vernon Weaver of SBA, and with OMB in monitoring our performance in these two areas. Please report to me through Jack by January 30 on specific steps you have taken, and are taking, in accordance with this memorandum, including the specific goals set for your department or agency in these areas. I would like each of you to devote sufficient, continuing, and personal attention to these procurement matters to ensure achievement of our goals.  • •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  liiE CHIEF OF PROTOCOL  c Lv  DEPARTMENT OF STATE WASHINGTON, D.0 20520  January 8, 1980 MEMORANDUM TO:  f l* Heads of All Employing Agencies as Defined in Section 515 of Public Law 95-105  FROM:  Abelardo L. Valdez  SUBJECT:  Submission to Department of State of Listing of Foreign Gifts Reported to Employing Agencies in Calendar Year 1979.  Federal agencies are reminded of the requirement of Section 515 of Public Law 95-105, 91 Stat. 862, the amended statute governing the receipt and disposition of gifts and decorations tendered by foreign governments to Federal employees, their spouses, or dependents, that each employing agency or its delegate must, not later than January 31 of each year, transmit to the Secretary of State a compilation listing all statements filed during the preceding year by employees of that agency concerning gifts valued at over $100 which they have received from foreign governments. These compilations are to include, in addition to tangible gifts of prescribed value, all foreign government gifts of travel or travel expenses for travel taking place entirely outside the United States and valued at more than $100, the acceptance of which has not been authorized in accordance with specific instructions of the recipients' employing agency. The purpose of requiring these submissions is to enable the Secretary of State to discharge his responsibility under the law for the annual publication of a comprehensive listing of all such statements in the Federal Register. Gifts of "minimal value", defined by the statute as having a retail value in the United States at the time of acceptance of $100 or less, and decorations received from foreign governments are excluded from this reporting requirement.  •  Woo..  2  Each agency should prepare its compilation for 1979 in conformity with the enclosed format sheet and address its transmittal to the Secretary of State, Attention: Office of Protocol. Agencies whose responses have not been received by January 31, 1980, will be presumed to have had no statements filed with them during 1979 concerning foreign gifts to their employees which were subject to the statutory reporting requirement. Inquiries regarding this memorandum should be directed to the Office of Protocol, Telephone Number: 632-0907.  Enclosure:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Reporting format.  FORMAT FOR REPORTING TANGIBLE GIFTS AGENCY: Name and Title of Recipient  Gift, Date of Acceptance Est. Value and Current Disposition or Location  Identity of Foreign Donor and Government  (List recipients alphabetically)  Circumstances Justifying Acceptance  •  FORMAT FOR REPORTING TRAVEL OR EXPENSES OF TRAVEL  •  AGENCY: Name and Title of Recipient (List recipients alphabetically)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Brief Description of Travel or Travel Expenses Occuring Entirely Outside United States  Identity of Foreign Donor and Government  Circumstances Justifying Acceptance   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MEMORANDUM• THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  January 9, 1980  FOR  :  CABINET MEMBERS AND AGENCY HEADS  FROM  •  AL MCDONALgq JACK WATSON  #3  Attached is a series of summary documents covering the President's decisions in response to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. These are intended to provide the essential background and talking points for response to questions that you or your associates may be receiving. Information 'hotline' telephone numbers are available for the Departments of Agriculture and Commerce as follows:  Department of Commerce  377-2076  Department of Agriculture  800-424-9082 (toll free) 472-1450 (local calls)  RESPONSE TO  lik  SOVIET INVASION OF AFGASTAN  Summary of Points Covered by President Carter at a Briefing for Members of Congress, January 8, 1980  1)  The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan is perhalos the most serious threat to peace since World War II.  2)  The Soviet Union must be made to realize that they  ,  cannot take such action with impunity.  The United States has a responsiblitv  ^u-r-s=ivP.s and  to those who look to us for leadership in the world to take strong action to impress upon the Soviet Union the cost of their behavior and the determination and will of the American people.  3)  The President had three choices in responding to the Soviet invasion:  political action, economic action,  - and direct military action.  4)  The President chose to maintain the peace and exercise the first two options.  5)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Politically, we and 50 other nations have brought the matter before the Security Council.  Now that the Soviet  Union has vetoed the Security Council Resblution condemning their aggression,.we may decide to bring the matter before the General Assembly.  Most nations around the world  have joined with the United States in making public statements of condemnation.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6)  Economical., we will severel'y restret trade and exchanges of all kinds in a way that will be costly to the economic plans of the Soviet Union:  a)  General commerce.  b)  High technology items which are very important to Soviet plans for expanding production.  c)  Agricultural products. (Soviet production of meat will decline by 20% in 1980.  We are assured that  other cram n exporting countries will not replace this quantity of grain.)  7)  d)  Scientific exchanges.  e)  No more fishing rights in American waters.  These necessary actions involve a cost to the United States. The President is determined that this cost will be borne fairly by the whole country and will not fall just upon American farmers or any other group. The United States government will buy all the grain that would have gone to the Soviet Union.  That grain will be  used to increase our reserves, to produce gasohol and to feed starving people around the world. used to depress farm prices.  It will not be  I&  Summary of Actions Taken to Effects on U.S. AgriculdWe Soviet Grain. SuspensionW  Offlik  We have taken four major actions to offset the price depressing effects of the suspended grain-shipments: 1)  Assume Contractual Obligations to Export The Commodity Credit Corporation has offered to assume the contractual obligations for wheat, corn, and soybeans previously committed for shipment to the Soviet Union. We assume that this will result in CCC assumption of contracts covering about 10 million tons of corn. We have offered to assume these contracts at the contract price minus any costs that have not already been paid. Grain so purchased will not be resold into the market until it can be done without adversely affecting market Srices.  2  Formation of Emergency Wheat Reserve The Commodity Credit Corporation has offered to purchase wheat contracted for exPort to the Soviet Union for the purpose of forming an emergency wheat reserve. In this case too, we would offer to purchase at the contract price. We anticipate that about 3.7 million tons will be so purchased. Legislative authority will be required for rules governing the release of this grain.  3)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Increase in Loan Rates The loan rates for wheat and feed grains will be increased as follows: wheat - from $2.35 to $2.50 corn - from $2.00 to $2.10 (Loan rates for other feed grains will be increased comparatively) These higher loan rates will aid in making participation in the farmer-held grain reserve more attractive. They will also provide additional subsidized credit to participating .farmers. Reserve Program Modifications To encourage farmers to place additional grain in the farmer-held grain reserve, we are taking several actions, including the following:  An  S increase  in the release  111 price:  wheat - from $3.29 to $3.75 corn - from $2.50 to $2.63 o  An increase in the call price: wheat - from $4.11 to $4.63 corn - from $2.80 to $3.05 (Comparable increases on both release and call . levels will be made for other feed grains.)-  o  Waive'first year interest costs for the next 13 million tons of corn entering the reserve. 2 cents. / Increase reserve storage payments from 25 to 261  Note:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A decision on a paid diversion Program for 1980 crop grains will be made at a later date.  •  lk •••••1 •-•-•-4...• • ••-•'  LT. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE USDA ANNOUNCES PROGRAM CHANGES TO OFFSET SUSPENSION ACTION WAaIINGTON, Jan. 8--Acting Secretary of Agriculture Jim Williams today announced a series of actions designed to fully offset the potential decline in farm prices and income. These actions, approved by President Carter, were taken to fulfill the President's directive to insure that the burden of t 111.sension on agricultural deliveries to the Soviet Union will not fall unfairly on farmers. Effective immediately, the U.S. Department of Agriculture will: • increase the wheat loan price from $2.35 to $2.50 a bushel; • increase the corn loan price from $2.00 to $2.10 a bushel, with comparable increases in loan price thg. othPr feed grains; o  increase the reserve release price from $3.29 to $3.75 a bushel for wheat --representing 150 percent of new loan price;  • increase the reserve call price from $4.11 to $4.63 a bushel for wheat --representing 185 percent of the new loan price; • increase the reserve release price from $2.50 to $2.63 a bushel for corn --representing 125 percent of the new loan'price; • increase the reserve call price from $2.80 to $3.05 a bushel for corn --representing 145 percent of the new loan)  6 increase the reserve release and call prices for the other feed grains comparable to corn;• • waive first year interest costs for the next 13 million tons (512 million bushels) of corn entering the reserve; o  increase reserve storage payments fr.om 2; to 26 1/2 cents a bushel for all reserve commodities except oats, which is increased from 19 to 20 cents- a bushel.  As the Vice President announced yesterday, the Department will also: • purchase 4 million tons (150 million bushels) of wheat, including the assumption of the contractual obligation on up to 3.7 Million tons (135 million bushels) that will not be shipped to the Soviet Union; • • offer to assume the contractual obligation on up to 10.0 million tons (395 million bushels) of corn; A decision on a paid diversion program for 1980 crop grains will be made at a later date. "We are convinced these actions will protect producers, but if legislation to complement them is necessary, we will propose it," Williams said. Williams said the increase in budget outlays for the entire package for fiscal years 1980 and 1981 is_estimated at $2.5 to $3.0 billion.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ........ • Of 6°Ve • •. ?4, • *cc> ..— 0. • C., s;,1 . :4F/../" 2 -• -:, 1•;/iii"';' '•': -{ .kt. • .•"\\....,.. •.t<6 --,' _ ••  BOARD OF GOVERNORS  0F1mE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  .•  k•  •  WASHINGTON, D.E. 20551  4.:.;)g.' .• : . -4 . LI • ..,' ...:7,..4 ,. k: ,• .  :4 L ftE-5.••  March 7, 1980  To:  From:  Subject:  Mr. Stanley E. Morris, Deputy Associate Director Regulatory Policy and Reports Management Stanley J. Sigel, Reports Coordinator Assistant to the BoardS"56 Comments on "Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public"  This is in response to Mr. Granquist's memo of January 4, 1980 requesting comments on proposed regulations to implement Executive Order 12174. In light of the fact that the Federal Reserve Board would be totally exempt from Subpart A of the proposed regulations, we are submitting no comments on that subpart. Similarly, since only a small number of Federal Reserve reports are covered by Subpart B, we have only limited comments on that subpart of the proposed regulations. Specific comments on Subpart B Section 1320.22(a). The provision stating that agency regulations that "involve information collections may not be issued as final or otherwise implemented" until OMB approval is received is extremely broad and may exceed the authority conferred on OMB by section 3509 of the Federal Reports Act. That section provides that an agency may not conduct or sponsor the collection of information unless OMB approval is obtained in advance of adoption or revision of any "plans" or "forms" to be used in the information collection. The proposed requirement is extremely broad and raises questions concerning possible unwarranted and unnecessary interference in agency rulemaking proceedings. Although OMB does have a "check-off" power with respect to the forms to be used in specific covered information collections, it is doubtful that section 3909 provides OMB with the authority to require its prior approval of agency regulations that may involve the collection of information. The general purpose of the Federal Reports Act--to provide control of clearance and approval procedures for the actual collection of data, is adequately served by OMB review at the reports clearance stage. In view of the fact that Board regulations that require reports are   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  ---2=14aaiwaiiiiiiimwammummamm  111111M=111111MMIIIIMIL  -*  •  • Mr. Morris  page 2  based on an underlying statutory authority and that information collection requirements contained in Board regulations are gener al (the specifics are normally handled in the actual report form itself), it is difficult to see how the involvement of OMB in the rulemaking process would further facilitate accomplishing the purposes of the Federal Reports Act.  ••••••••  r  Section 1320.22(b). This paragraph seems to assume that any agency subject to Subpart B is also subject to Subpart A. The Board, however, would not have a "burden allowance as provided by section 1320.7(a) of Subpart A," since the Board is exempt from that subpart. I suggest adding the phrase "or as otherwise provided for agencies not subject to Subpart A" to handle this problem. A similar problem affects the wording of one item in the proposed revision of form SF 83. We would always answer "NO" to the question "Is proposed information listed in approved information collected budget?" since that budget is a requirement of Subpart A from which we are exempt. I would suggest adding a "not applicable" optio n to cover this situation. Section 1320.23(b)(1)(v). This paragraph is confusing. I assume that the intention is to elicit a statement of why information that takes more than one-half hour of the respondent's time is needed from respondents with fewer than 300 employees. If this is the intent, the paragraph should be reworded; the present wording asks a quite different and less useful question. Section 1320.23(b)(4)(iv). It is not clear what is operationally intended or required by this paragraph. There will be situa tions in which, for a number of possible reasons, the optimal design will involve departures from the statistical techniques or statistical standards sponsored or urged by OFSPS. The wording of the paragraph should be changed to recognize explicitly this possibility. The phrase begin ning "provide..." might be replaced by "describe coordination consultations with OFSPS and indicate the results of these consultations". A related problem arises in connection with section 1320.28(b). The provision that OMB will not approve an information collection if OFSPS formally recom mends disapproval because of deficiencies in statistical methods or stand ards" is too broad. In some situations, there may be strong statutory, regulatory , or policy reasons for having procedures that OFSPS might conceivably disapprove. While presumably OFSPS would take these reasons into consideration in its decision, there is nothing requiring them to give weight to these reasons. It is suggested that the provision'be reworded as follo ws: "OMB will not act on an information collection if OFSPS forma lly recommends disapproval because it judges there to be specifically cited deficiencies   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  p.  •  r  .  anle.111.1.4i  Mr. Morris  - • AO41.11111MOOMMOIEW  page 3  in statistical methods and standards until the requesting agency submits a statement of justification for departures from the specific standards or recommendations cited by OFSPS". Section 1320.23(b)(7). Modification is needed of the types of costs explicitly called for in subparagraphs (ii) and (iii). While there may be self-contained projects for which the inclusion of all the listed costs would be appropriate, there are many information collection activities for which this is not the case. Where the information is collected primarily for regulatory, supervisory or policy purposes, it is inappropriate to include the costs of "analysis", "publication", and "designing". Similarly in such cases, even the costs of tabulating relate more to analytical and policy activities than to the information collection activity itself. If the data to be used were available from other sources, none of these costs would be attributable to the information collection activity; it is anomalous and misleading to so attribute them v,Fien the information is collected ad hoc. Where there is continuing and varying use of data once they exist, the costs of tabulation, analysis, and publication are unknowable at the time of submission for approval and it is inappropriate to include such costs even on a roughly estimated basis. For many regulatory-related reports, the report "design" is an integral part of the regulation "design" that must be done in any case and allocating the costs of design would not be appropriate. In all these situations, particularly when the whole process of report design and processing is not a separate, distinct activity, but is imbedded in the analytic, supervisory, and policy framework, there is no workable or meaningful concept of "share of overhead cost".  U  •••  lah.-  Section 1320.26. The definitions of the various categories of "Purpose of Information Collection" do not fit most of the reports we submit to OMB. For example, almost all statistical information we collect is primarily for our internal use for specific policy-based purposes, although it may have "public and general government uses" as well. As such it seems to fall in neither category (c) or (e). I would suggest that (c) be changed to read "General purpose statistics are those for which there are public and general government uses even though their collection is with primary reference to the collecting agency's needs and uses." Section 1320.27(0. The categorical prohibition on requiring respondents to submit more than the original and two copies is unduly restrictive. There will be cases in which submission of more than two copies is appropriate. I would suggest rewording along the following lines: "An agency shall not normally seek approval. . .any document. If there is a need for the submission of more copies, the request for approval shall include a specific justification."   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  b..  41W  Mr. Morris  page 4  Section 1320.28(c)(4)(i). The limitation of all new repor ts to a two-year approval is too restrictive. There will be new reports for which an approval of more than two years can be shown to be appropriate. Moreover, our experience is that, given the length of time required to go through all the steps of a rigorous clearance and decis ion process, a two-year limit is unduly costly and inefficient and in the end will result in less careful clearance procedures. I note that the latest version of the Redtape Reduction Bill (H.R. 6410) has adopted a three -year limit for reports. Section 1320.28(d). The wording of this paragraph provi des no deadline for OMB action on an agency request for approval and a request could be "bottled -up" indefinitely. The various versi ons of the Redtape Reduction Bill provide a 60 to 90 day deadline for OMB action and an implied approval if that deadline is not met. Section 1320.28(e). This provision is too broad and sweeping and its exercise could result in disruption of the regulatory process. It is urged that the provision be qualified to read: "OMB, after appropriate consultation with the collecting agency, may annou nce its intention to modify the terms of approval of a request in any particular or to withdraw approval entirely, to take effect no sooner than six months from the date of announcement." Specific comments on Subpart C Section 1320.41(j). The definition of "identical" items to include not only items that are the same in every respect, but also those with -hinor differences in definition and those that are recognizably related but differing in specific elements will occasion seman tic confusion and foster ill-founded decisions. Even the inclusion of "minor" differences is fraught with difficulties since what is minor from one perspective, say statistical, may be crucial from another, say regulatory. The inclusion of "recognizably related" as "identical" is clearly outside the range of reasonable procedure. If the intent is to deal with similar and related items, as well as with identical items, it should be done directly and not under the guise of defining away the problems involved.  I hope that these comments are of some use to you. If you have any questions about them or about our reactions to other parts of the proposed regulations, I would be glad to discuss them with you or your staff. •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  a/  ce, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503  JAP  4 iseD  MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF EXECUTIVE BRANCH DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM:  Wayne G. Granguist, Associate Director for Management and Regulatory Policy  SUBJECT:  Controlling paperwork burdens on the public  As you know, a major objective of the President has been to reduce the amount of paperwork and red tape that the Federal government imposes on the public. Since he took office, this burden has been cut by 15 percent. However, to continue the successes in eliminating Federal paperwork, we must take steps to expand our efforts. On November 30, the President signed Executive Order 12174, "Paperwork." This Order is designed to strengthen control over information oollection in the executive branch. I am enclosing copies of the Order and the President's message for your information. I am also enclosing, for your review and comment, proposed regulations to implement the Order. These regulations would also replace OMB Circular A-40 and related guidance to agencies for implementing the Federal Reports Act. The Executive Order makes fundamental changes in the way the Federal government controls paperwork. The Order and the proposed regulations will clarify and strengthen agency responsibilities and give greatly increased emphasis in CMB to planning, budgeting, and auditing information oollection. You and your legal and administrative staffs should examine the proposed regulations carefully to understand how they will affect your agency's operation and to make any recommendations you believe would result in more effective execution of the President's directive. The proposed regulations will be published in the Federal Register for public comment. Your conunents should be sent by Ma ch 3. 19RfL to Stanley E. Morris, Deputy Associate Director Regulatory Policy and Reports Management, Room 10202, New Executive Office Building. Enclosures   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  Attachment A Proposed Content of Standard Form 83 Request for Approval Old SF 83 # (if any) 2  Data Element Department/Agency and Bureau/Office originating request 4-digit OMB Agency/Bureau number (part of 13-digit account number)  3  Name(s) and telephone number(s) of person(s) who can best answer questions regarding request  4  Title of information collection  MOM  ••••  3-digit functional code (part of 13-digit account number) Abstract -- needs and uses (50 words or less)  7  Current (or former) OMB approval number and expiration date  8  Requested expiration date  rIMIO  Is proposed information collection listed in approved information collection budget? .yes .no Will this proposed information collection cause the Department/Agency to exceed its burden allowance? .yes (attach amendment request from Department/Agency head) .no  ••••  5  Number of report forms submitted for clearance Agency report form number(s)  11  Related report form(s) (give OMB number(s), IRCN(s), internal agency report form number(s) or symbol(s))  12  Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Number   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 Old SF 83 # (if any) 9  41MMID   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Data Element Type of request (check one): .preliminary plan .new (not previously approved or expired more than 6 months ago) .revision .extension (adjustment to burden only) .extension (no change) .reinstatement (expired within 6 months) Classification of change in burden (explain in supporting statement) Number of Number of Reporting Hours Responses (item 15f) (item 15d) In Inventory Explanation of Difference (In Inventory - As Proposed) (complete as many as apply) No change in burden or preliminary plan Adjustments Correction-Error Correction-Reestimate Change in Use Real Changes Increase Decrease As Proposed  -T  S 3 Old SF 83 # (if any)  Data Element  15B  Approximate size of universe (if sample) (do not complete Size of sample (for application (or recordkeeping)  15A 15C 15D 15E 15F  Anticipated number of respondents or recordkeepers per year Reports annually by each respondent (item 10) Total annual responses (item 15A x 15C) Estimated average number of hours per response Estimated total hours of burden (item 15D x 15E)  14A  Type of respondents (check as many as apply): .individuals or households .state or local governments .farms .businesses (except farms)  ••••  Type of activity -- indicate 3-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code(s) (up to 10) -- if over 10, check: multiple or all Are any respondents employers of fewer than 300 employees? .yes .no  14B  6  10   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Brief description of respondents (i.e., "households in 50 largest SMSA's," "retail grocery stores") Purpose of information collection (check one): .application for benefits .program evaluation .general purpose statistics .regulatory or compliance .program planning, operation, or policy .research Frequency of use .nonrecurring .recurring (check as many as apply): -- on occasion weekly -- monthly quarterly -- semiannually -- annually -- biennially other  4 Old SF 83 # (if any)  Data Element  13A  Collection method (check as many as apply): .mail self-administered .other self-administered .telephone interview .personal interview .recordkeeping requirement .other -- describe  13B  Collection agent (check one): .requesting Department/Agency .other Federal Department/Agency .private contractor .recordkeeping requirement .other -- describe  OM=  Prescribing authority -- indicate statute, regulation, judicial decree, etc.  16A  Compulsory status (check as many as apply): .voluntary .required to obtain benefit .mandatory -- cite statute, not CFR (attach copy of statutory authority) -- check if all data elements are specifically required by statute  16B  Do you promise confidentiality? .yes (explain basis for pledge in supporting statement) .no  diMIP  Will the proposed information collection create a system of records under the Privacy Act? .yes (attach Federal Register notice) .no  GIMP  Cost to Federal government of information collection  unnumbered  Certification by 2 authorized Department/Agency officials   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .m'   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  DEC 2 8 1973 OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET (5 CFR Part 1320) CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  AGENCY: Office of Management and Budget, Executive Office of the President. ACTION:  Notice of proposed rulemaking.  CLASSIFICATION:  Major regulation.  SUMMARY: The Office of Management and Budget is seeking comments and suggestions on a proposal to improve the Federal government's abty to control the reporting and recordkeeping requirements it imposes on the public. On November 30, 1979, President Carter issued Executive Order 12174, "Paperwork." This regulation is intended to carry out this Order. In addition, it is intended to increase the effectiveness of the government's paperwork control effort and implementation of the Federal Reports Act of 1942. When issued as a final rule, it will supersede OMB Circular No. A-40 (Management of Federal Reporting Requirements), instructions for completion of and guidelines for the Standard Form 83 (S.F. President's Paperwork Reduction Program. This reduces 55 pages of guidance to 31 pages. DATE: Comments must be received on or before (insert a date 60 days after publication). ADDRESS: Please address written comments to the Deputy Associate Director for Regulatory Policy and Reports Management, Office of Management and Budget, 726 Jackson Place, N.W., Room 10202, New Executive Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: C. Louis Kincannon, Chief, Reports Management Branch, Regulatory Policy and Reports Management Division, Office of Management and Budget, 726 Jackson Place, N.W., Room 10201, New Executive Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20503, Telephone (202) 395-3772.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  11  SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We are asking the public, as well as Federal departments and agencies, for comments and suggestions on these proposed regulations. Under the Federal Report Act of 1942 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3511), Federal agencies that propose to collect information from 10 or more persons must submit those proposals to the Office of Management and Budget, which may disapprove them. Executive Order 12174 imposes new obligations on Federal agencies to reduce the burden of paperwork on the public. At present there are three major weaknesses in government-wide oversight of paperwork management. First, reports review authority is limited to a small proportion of the government's paperwork. Second, too often review efforts have been spent in ineffective action on tasks of unequal importance. Third, procedures for overall control have not been adequately developed and utilized. In the last few years, in response to public complaint and Presidential and Congressional leadership, additional controls have been imposed on agencies subject to the Federal Reports Act. Although agencies have responded differently to these requirements, the attitude is developing that the public's time and patience for complying with Federal reporting requirements is not limitless. Although progress has been inconsistent, some agencies have made genuine efforts to upgrade the quality of their paperwork control procedures and have devoted competent staff to the effort. The Office of Management and Budget has, in the past, focused primarily on individual agency requests for approval. This sharply limits control over workload and priorities and reduces the chance for coordinated, in-depth review of related reporting requirements. By the time a proposed report reaches OMB for review, considerable time and effort have been invested by the agency. Commitments to contractors, data users, and others have already been made. As a consequence, needed improvements that would have been easy to make in the planning or development stages may be impossible or are resisted vigorously. Also, because attention has focused on the review of each of the thousands of requirements submitted to OMB each   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  year, too often insufficient followup is done after a review to see that agency claims about uses of the information are demonstrated by actual experience. This detailed, case-by-case examination of individual reporting and recordkeeping requirements repeats what agencies are or should be doing. Furthermore, it tends to undermine agency responsibility for reports management. There is little incentive for agencies to take a hard look at the proposals of program managers when that task can be passed off to the Office of Management and Budget. An intent of these regulations is to give greater emphasis to the Office of Management and Budget's role in policy setting, planning, and audit of paperwork control. As a consequence, review and control of individual agency reporting requirements will be strengthened. In addition, the Administration is supporting legislation that will eliminate fragmentation of oversight responsibility under the Federal Reports Act. This legislation would eliminate exemptions from the Federal Reports Act. The Office of Management and Budget would be responsible for implementation and oversight of the new provisions under this legislation. Executive Order 12174 and these regulations are designed to rectify the problems cited above, and have been developed after thorough consideration of the over 600 recommendations of the Commission on Federal Paperwork as well as recent recommendations from the General Accounting Office and various Congressional committees. Implementation of the Executive Order through these regulations should result in: -- clearer agency accountability for the collection and effective use of information; -- planning and budgeting techniques designed to ensure that the government carefully considers time and cost to the public as limited resources;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • iv careful consideration by agencies of information collection consequences and costs in proposed legislation and regulations; careful attention to the compliance problems of individuals or small organizations -- businesses, institutions, units of government -- that may have unique compliance problems; .MMI ••••  increased public participation in the development of information collections; a sunset date for all information collections and a mandatory zero based review before continuing any information collection;  111111. OEM  MOD 11•1111,  a Federal Information Locator System to identify information being collected in order to increase the utility of that information and to identify and eliminate unnecessary duplication; improved agency and OMB processes for evaluating the need, burden, and practical utility of each information collection plan and form.  In addition to general comments or suggestions, we are asking the views of the public on the following specific questions: 1.  What added steps would be most helpful to ensure public involvement in the development of information collection plans and forms?  2.  Are there particular paperwork problems that are not addressed by these proposed regulations?  3.  Would it be helpful to require that information collection plans and forms be developed simultaneously with regulations and have public comments sought on both at the same time?  4.  What information collections are the most burdensome, and are there steps the government could take to reduce those burdens while not jeopardizing the quality of the information collected?   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5.  What information is most helpful and least helpful in describing upcoming information collections?  6.  Is the proposal to limit burdens on small organizations (those employing fewer than 300 persons) reasonable, practical and useful?  7.  Is the proposed method for defining "significant" information collections reasonable, practical, and useful?  8.  What methods other than the Federal Register should the government use to obtain meaningful and timely public comment on proposed information collections?  9.  Is the definition of regulatory or compliance information collection (sec. 1320.26(d)) clear and adequate?  In addition, we are proposing revisions to Standard Form 83 (Attachment A). To aid in the consideration of these questions, the following documents are available upon request to the Regulatory Policy and Reports Management Division at the above address: 1.  Existing OMB Circular A-40  2.  Existing Standard Form 83  3.  Existing Standard Form 83A  Availability of a Regulatory Analysis This proposal is classified as a major regulation under OMB's procedures for implementing Executive Order 12044, Improving Government Regulations. These procedures were published in the Federal Register on February 28, 1979 (44 F.R. 11356). OMB's procedures require the preparation of a regulatory analysis for all directives having an annual effect on the economy of $50 million or otherwise selected by the Director. Estimating net economic effects of a procedural regulation such as this one is largely a subjective undertaking. These effects   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  vi are very difficult to quantify. However, OMB believes that the proposal, when fully implemented by Executive agencies, may reduce costs to the public by $50 million or more annually and should increase significantly the net benefits of Federal information collections that affect the public. Since this proposal may be of interest to and affect a large number of Americans, the Director has determined at his discretion that this proposal is a major regulation that is subject to the regulatory analysis requirements of E. 0. 12044. A preliminary version of this analysis is attached. It explains the reasons for the approach taken in the proposal and discusses other alternatives that were considered. A final regulatory analysis will be prepared and made available to the public upon issuance of final rules. The final analysis will include a plan for periodic evaluation of this proposal, prior to modification or termination of subpart A in September 1983. Comments from both Federal agencies and the public are solicited on the draft analysis. In accordance with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act, an environmental assessment of this proposal has been made. The assessment includes a finding of no significant impact on the human environment, and is available to the public. This is a proposal to amend title 5 of the Code of Federal Regulations by adding a new part 1320 as set forth below.  Part 1320  CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC  Subpart A  IMPLEMENTATION OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 12174  Sec. Sec. Sec. Sec. Sec.  Purpose Coverage Agency Head Responsibility Information Collection Budget Procedures Required Before Information Collection Sunset Reviews Responsibilities of the Office of Management and Budget General Provisions  1320.1 1320.2 1320.3 1320.4 1320.5  Sec. 1320.6 Sec. 1320.7 Sec. 1320.8   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S vii IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL REPORTS ACT OF 1942  Subpart B  Sec. Sec. Sec. Sec. Sec.  1320.20 1320.21 1320.22 1320.23 1320.24  Sec. 1320.25 Sec. 1320.26 Sec. 1320.27  Purpose Coverage General Requirements Submission of Agency Requests for Approval Submission of Requests for Approval: Extension without Revision Submission of Requests for Approval: Revision Submission of Requests for Approval: Purpose of Information Collection Submission of Requests for Approval: Other Requirements  Sec. 1320.29 Sec. 1320.30  Office of Management and Budget Action on Agency Requests for Approval Modified Office of Management and Budget Review Requirements for Approved Information Collections  Subpart C  Definitions and General Provisions  Sec. 1320.40 Sec. 1320.41 Sec. 1320.42  Purpose and Coverage Definitions General Provisions  Sec. 1320.28  Issued in Washington, D. C., January  1980  James T. McIntyre, Jr. Director  Authority:  (Federal Reports Act, 44 U.S.C. 3510; Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1970, 5 U.S.C. App. II; 3 U.S.C. 301; E.O. 11541 of July 1, 1970, 35 F.R. 10737; E.O. 12174 of November 30, 1979; 44 F.R. 69609.)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  Subpart A IMPLEMENTATION OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 12174  1320.1 Purpose. This subpart establishes policies and procedures to implement Executive Order 12174, "Paperwork," issued on November 30, 1979. It is designed to improve the control of information collection from the public sponsored by Federal agencies. 1320.2 Coverage. This subpart applies to all Federal executive departments and agencies, except the following: Civil Aeronautics Board, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Federal Communications Commission, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Federal Election Commission, Federal Home Loan Bank Board, Federal Maritime Commission, Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission, Federal Reserve Board, Federal Trade Commission, Interstate Commerce Commission, National Labor Relations Board, Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, Postal Rate Commission, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Securities and Exchange Commission. 1320.3 Agency Head Responsibility. (a) The head of each agency is responsible for overseeing the agency's collection of information from the public. To achieve effective oversight, and to achieve the goal of minimizing information collection burdens imposed on the public, agency heads shall: (1) designate a single unit in the agency with responsibility for management of information collection activities. This   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 unit shall be located outside any area of program responsibility and with effective access to the agency head or deputy agency head. This unit shall have the authority to approve, deny or modify any information collection sponsored by any component of the agency. (2) establish written procedures and descriptions of organizational functions for carrying out the responsibilities of this subpart; (3) include in these procedures the agency's operational definition of a "signcant" information collection. Agencies shall, at a minimum, consider the following criteria in developing the definition: substantial program or policy importance, cost to the government, and burden on the public (e.g., requires 250,000 or more persons to report or maintain specc records, has an annual estimated burden of more than 100,000 hours, has an estimated burden of more than two hours per respondent per year). (4) establish a systematic and rigorous procedure for reviewing existing and proposed regulations and legislation for the paperwork burdens they will impose on the public. (b) The head of each agency shall publish in the Federal Register a description of the organizations and procedures through which he or she intends to carry out this responsibility. Prior to publication, and within 90 days of the effective date of this regulation, these procedures shall be submitted to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget for approval. (c) The head of the agency shall, at least every three years, independently audit the effectiveness of the organizations and procedures established above. Results of such audits shall be submitted to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget. (d) The head of the agency shall approve the agency's information collection budget (section 1320.4(a)); requests for an amendment to the agency's burden allowance (section 1320.7(a)(3), and requests for a waiver (section 1320.42(a)(2)). 1320.4 Information Collection Budget. (a) Each agency shall develop twice a year a comprehensive Information Collection Budget for all information to be collected from the public in the succeeding 12 months. A preliminary Budget shall be submitted to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget on April 30, 1980, and a formal Budget shall be submitted on each succeeding August 1 and February 1. Revons to the Budget shall be submitted whenever they are developed. The agency head shall approve the   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3  Budget and any revisions before submission to the Office of Management and Budget. (b) An Information Collection Budget is to be the result of a careful analysis and synthesis of total agency information requirements that arise from decision processes involved in: (1) policy formulation and program management; (2) eligibility determinations for applicants for Federal benefits, assistance, and services, including grants-in-aid; (3) compliance determinations with Federal laws, regulations, policies, standards, and guidelines; (4) evaluations and audits; (5) general purpose statistical and research programs; and (6) other critical activities not otherwise covered. (c) An Information Collection Budget shall include: (1) titles of all information collections proposed to he introduced, those that will be reviewed under section 1320.6, and others in place; OMB approval number (if any) and agency form number(s) (if any); and an indication whether they are "significant." (2) a brief (50 word) statement of the need for each information collection and the uses to be made of information collected; (3) an identification of the purpose of the information collection using categories defined in section 1320.26; (4)  a description of the types and numbers of respondents;  (5) an estimate of average burden per response and total burden; (6)  the frequency of response;  (7) the anticipated starting and expiration dates of the information collection;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  (8) whether the collection is voluntary, mandatory, or required to obtain a benefit; (9) cost to the Federal government (see section 1320.23(b)(8)); and (10) the name, address, and telephone number of the agency official from whom additional information may be obtained; (d) Agencies subject to the provisions of subpart B shall, as part of their Information Collection Budget: (1) Submit to the Office of Management and Budget a complete listing of all grant programs utilizing the Standard A-102 grant application and an estimate of the number of applicants for each program. (2) Submit a complete listing of all grant programs utilizing the Standard A-102 or A-110 financial reporting forms, and the frequency with which they are used. (e) Agency information requirements should normally be satisfied from sources in the following priority order: (1) information already available in existing agency files, records, reports, and other established information files and holdings; (2)  information available from another agency;  (3) the production or creation of the needed information internally; (4)  new information collection from the public;  Occasionally considerations of cost, urgency, uniqueness of the source of the information sought, or some other critical factor will alter the above sequence. 1320.5 Procedures Required Before Information Collection. (a) Before the collection of information from the public, agencies shall:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (1) ensure that existing information held by the agency, other Federal agencies, or any other available source cannot satisfy the agency's needs; (2) consider less burdensome alternatives to the proposed information collection such as sampling, reduced frequency of reporting, differing compliance standards, and exemptions; (3) take every reasonable step to ensure that the information collection imposes a minimum burden on individuals and small organizations (whether businesses, institutions, or units of government). This includes ensuring that a given organization employing fewer than 300 persons is not included in more than one of the agency's information collections at any given time, except as may be required by law; (4) ensure that the information to be collected is essential, does not unnecessarily duplicate or overlap with other information collected by the Federal government, and is not unnecessarily detailed. Agencies should employ standard information collection definitions and classifications, where applicable. In addition, agencies should actively seek to integrate their information collections with related activities sponsored by other agencies in order to maximize usefulness of information collected; (5) ensure the practical utility of the information sought; (6) ensure that information sought will be sufficient to comply with Constitutional and legal requirements, and will meet minimum standards for statistical validity and reliability; (7) ensure, when applicable, the protection of privacy and the proprietary interests of those from whom information is collected; (8) seek public comment and views in the formulation of information collections. For each new significant information collection agencies shall provide public notice of the proposed information request in the Federal Register. For these and all other information collections agencies should consider conducting a public hearing, issuing a   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 6 public notice, issuing a direct notice to affected individuals or organizations, or obtaining public views in some other manner. Federal Register notices shall provide: (i) sufficient information for the public to understand what will be collected; (ii) a statement of the purpose of and need for the information to be collected; (iii) a description of the numbers and types of respondents; (iv)  an estimate of the average and total burden;  (v) the frequency of response and anticipated starting and expiration dates; and whether response to the request is voluntary, mandatory, or to obtain benefits; (vi) an opportunity for the public to obtain a copy of all documents relating to the information collection; (vii)  at least 60 days for public comment for significant information collections (to precede requests subject to subpart B);  (viii) cost to the government. (b) An agency may temporarily exempt any request for information from section 1320.5(a)(8) if the agency head determines that it is in the public interest to do so or it is otherwise required by law. All such exemptions shall be published in the Federal Register and reported to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget. The Federal Register notice shall include a plan for ensuring compliance with section 1320.5(a)(8) within 90 days if the information collection is recurring.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  C 7  1320.6 Sunset Reviews. (a) Each collection of information from the public shall be reviewed by the agency for practical utility and continuing need within two years of its initial use and at least once every five years thereafter. (1) These reviews shall include an examination of all uses of the information collected, and shall determine whether it is still needed. (2) Before any subsequent information collection the agency shall determine whether any burden reduction techniques (see section 1320.5(a)(2)) should be used, and shall obtain public comment. (b) Results of sunset reviews shall be submitted by the agency to the Director, Office of Management and Budget, on February 1 and August 1 of each year. Agencies covered by subpart B shall also submit the results of sunset reviews with requests for Office of Management and Budget approval. (c) Units designated in accordance with section 1320.3(a)(1) shall certify the accuracy and depth of these reviews.  1320.7 Responsibilities of the Office of Management and Budget. (a) Allowances. (1) Based on the Information Collection Budgets (section 1320.4), the Office of Management and Budget shall set an allowance on the total information collection burden that each agency may impose on the public in the next 12 month period. This allowance shall: (i) Include all information collections, both recurring and nonrecurring;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  (ii) Reflect consideration of the need to collect information to comply with Federal law; (2) The Office of Management and Budget shall periodically review the allowance for revision as may be necessary; (3) No increase in an agency's allowance may be made without written request from the agency head to the Director, and the Director's approval. (b) Publication of Calendar. In order to inform the public of the most important upcoming information collections, the Office of Management and Budget shall publish in the Federal Register on April 1 and October 1 of each year, a calendar of all information collections that are significant and anticipated during the next 12 months. The calendar shall contain all the information contained in the Information Collection Budget described in section 1320.4(c).  (c) Federal Information Locator System. The Office of Management and Budget shall design and implement systems and procedures for use by the agencies to assist in eliminating unnecessary duplication and overlap in information collection. (1) The principal system shall be a Federal Information Locator System that will contain profiles of all Federal agency information collections. (2) After the locator system is established, no agency shall collect information (or request approval in accordance with subpart B) without first searching the system to determine if the same or similar information has already been or is planned to be collected by another agency. (3) The system shall include only descriptions of the information collection, including questions asked, but shall not include the actual information provided agencies by respondents. (4) Periodically, the locator system will be examined to determine whether a lead agency assignment should be made to eliminate duplicative and overlapping information requirements.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  9 (d) Coordination of Information Collections. In order to ensure consistent practice and eliminate unnecessary duplication, the Office of Management and Budget shall designate lead agencies for the purpose of coordinating information collection as may be appropriate and shall institute procedures for securing effective coordination. (e) Office of Management and Budget Oversight. The Office of Management and Budget shall examine agency information management processes and procedures periodically to appraise their effectiveness in complying with provisions of this subpart. (1) These examinations may be accomplished by requests for information, on-site audits, or a combination of these methods. (2) These examinations may be comprehensive in nature or may focus on particular aspects of the process or on particular procedures. (3) The Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall report the findings of these examinations to the head of the agency together with recommendations for changes in processes or procedures as may be appropriate. The head of an agency shall respond to any recommendation within 90 days of receiving it. (4) The Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall audit agency compliance with provisions of this subpart and shall report his or her findings to the President in January, 1981, and annually thereafter. (f) The Office of Management and Budget shall maintain a continuing program of oversight over the implementation of the recommendations of the Commission on Federal Paperwork. Sec. 1320.8 General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this subpart limits the authority of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget under other orders, or other delegated or statutory authorities.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10 (b) Nothing in this subpart shall be interpreted to conflict with any statute, nor shall the provisions of this subpart be interpreted in any manner to preclude compliance with any statutory authority. (c) The Director of the Office of Management and Budget may exempt from the provisions of this subpart any agency he or she determines to sponsor too few information collections to warrant the provisions of this subpart. Such a determination shall be made only after public notice and opportunity to comment. (d) Unless continued or modified, the provisions of the subpart terminate on September 30, 1983.  SUBPART B IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL REPORTS ACT OF 1942 Sec. 1320.20 Purpose. This subpart establishes policies and procedures to implement the Federal Reports Act of 1942, as amended (44 U.S.C. 3501-3511). It is designed to assure effective control of information collection in the Executive branch through the review of individual information collections. Sec. 1320.21 Coverage. (a) This subpart applies to all Federal executive departments and agencies except the following: Civil Aeronautics Board, Commodity Futures Trading Commission Consumer Product Safety Commission, Federal Communications Commission, Federal Election Commission, Federal Maritime Commission, Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission, Federal Trade Commission, Interstate Commerce Commission, National Labor Relations Board, Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, Office of Surface Mining - Department of Interior,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 11  Postal Rate Commission, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Securities and Exchange Commission; and These organizations within the Department of the Treasury: Bureau of Government Financial Operations, Bureau of the Public Debt, Comptroller of the Currency, Internal Revenue Service. (b) This subpart does not apply to the tax collection information requests of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms -- Department of the Treasury. (c) This subpart does not apply to bank supervisory information collection sponsored by the: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Federal Home Loan Bank Board, and Federal Reserve Board. (d) This subpart does not apply to certain information collections relating to health manpower as described in section 708(g) of P.L. 94-484. (e) This subpart does not apply to the collection of information whenever the respondents are primarily educational agencies or institutions and the purpose of the collection is to request information needed for the management or formulation of policy related to Federal education programs or research or evaluation studies related to the implementation of Federal education programs. These information collection activities are subject to review by the Secretary of Education, under the provisions of the Control of Paperwork Amendments of 1978 (P.L. 95-561) and should be referred to the Federal Education Data Acquisition Council. 1320.22 General Requirements. (a) A Federal agency subject to the provisions of this subpart shall not collect information or sponsor the collection of information from ten or more persons unless, in advance, the   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  12 agency has submitted to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and the Director has approved, the proposed collection of information. Information collection plans or forms (including Standard Forms) used by more than one agency require a separate approval for each agency. Note that provisions of regulations that involve information collections may not be issued as final or otherwise implemented until they comply with the provisions of this paragraph. (b) An agency shall not request approval of an information collection if its use would result in the agency exceeding its burden allowance as provided by section 1320.7(a) of subpart A to these regulations. (c) When a Federal agency sponsors the use of an information collection that agency shall: (1) ensure the collector of information is aware of and complies with the requirements of this subpart; and (2) ensure that the submittal of a request for approval is made in accordance with provisions of this subpart; and (3) ensure that the information collection is not undertaken without prior approval by the Office of Management and Budget. 1320.23 Submission of Agency Requests for Approval. (a) Requests for approval may only be made by the agency head, deputy agency head, or the unit established under section 1320.3(a)(1) of subpart A. (b) In order for the Office of Management and Budget to have sufficient information to review requests for approval, agencies shall include three copies of: Standard Form 83 (Appendix A), information collection plans or forms or recordkeeping requirements proposed, and supplementary documents such as instructions, covering or transmittal letters or introductory statements. Requests for approval shall also include an original and two copies of a Supporting Statement containing information on each of the following items (1) through (7). The items shall be identified by the number used in this subsection. When an item is not applicable, a brief explanation shall be given. If the Supporting Statement  t   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  13 exceeds 10 pages, a summary not exceeding one page shall be provided. (1) Justification. Requests for approval shall Explain the circumstances that make the information (i) collection necessary. Include identification of any legal or administrative requirements that necessitate the information collection; (ii) Indicate how, by whom, and for what purpose the information would be used; (iii) Show specifically why any similar information already available cannot be used or modified for use for these purposes. (iv)  Describe efforts to identify duplication;  (v) If the average number of reporting hours required per response is greater than one-half hour and if respondents are individuals or organizations employing fewer than 300 persons, show specifically why the needed information cannot be obtained in less than one-half hour of the respondent's time. (2) Description of the Information Collection. Requests for approval shall Describe (including the total numbers) the potential ( i) respondent universe and any sampling or other respondent selection method to be used; (ii) Describe the design and procedures for the information collection; (iii) Describe any tests of procedures or methods to be undertaken. Testing is encouraged as an effective means of refining information collections to minimize burden. Tests must be approved if they call for identical information from ten or more respondents. A proposed test or set of tests may be submitted for approval separately or in combination with the main information collection.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  14 Indicate expected response rates. Describe methods (iv) to maximize response rates and deal with issues of nonresponse. The accuracy and reliability of information collected must be shown to be adequate for intended uses. Include the name of individuals consulted on (v) statistical aspects of the design and the name of the agency unit, contractor, grantee, or other person who will actually collect the information; Describe all arrangements regarding the handling, (vi) storage, and disposition of information containing personal organizational identifiers. Also certify that the information collection complies with the Freedom of Information Act, the Privacy Act of 1974 and OMB Circular A-108, "Responsibilities for the Maintenance of Records about Individuals by Federal Agencies."  II  (vii) Describe an y re muneration to respondents 27(d (see section 1320.)).  (viii) Describe plans for tabulation and publication. (3) Time Schedule for information collection and publication. Requests for approval shall indicate the planned time schedule for the entire project, including beginning and ending information collection dates, completion of report or publication dates, and other actions;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 15 (4) Consultations outside the agency. Requests for approval shall Give the names of persons outside of the sponsoring (i) agency with whom material submitted was discussed, and indicate agencies, companies or other organizations that they represent. Summarize any major problems on which agreement could not be reached; (ii) Describe other public contacts and opportunities for public comment; (iii) When an information collection involves obtaining information from State or local governments, provide evidence of consultation with officials or representative of such governments as required by OMB Circular A-90 on information systems and A-95 on Federal assistance programs. (iv) When an information collection involves statistical techniques or standards (occupational or industrial classification, for example), provide evidence of coordination as needed with the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, Department of Commerce. (5) Estimate of respondent burden. Requests for approval shall (i) Provide number of respondents, frequency of response, burden on respondents, and how burden has been estimated. Unless directed to do so, agencies need not make special surveys to obtain information on which to base estimates of reporting burden. Informal consultation with a few respondents may be desirable. Estimates may also be based on experience with a test;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 16  (ii) Where the reporting burden is expected to vary considerably because of differences in respondent size or complexity, show the range of such estimated burden, explain the reasons for the variation, and estimate the average time per response. (6) Sensitive questions. In the request for approval additional justification shall be provided for information collections that include questions of a sensitive nature, such as sexual behavior and attitudes, religious beliefs, and other matters that are commonly considered private. This should include the reasons why the agency considers the questions necessary and the specific uses to be made of the information obtained. The explanation to be given respondents and any steps to be taken to secure their consent should be stated. (7) Estimate of cost to Federal Government. Requests for approval shall (i) Identify the total cost of the information collection if it is a separate activity, and total project cost if the information collection is a component of a larger activity. (ii) Include in the total: the costs of tests, printing forms, mailing list compilation and maintenance, mailing or enumeration, and editing, coding, tabulating, analysis and publication of results. The estimated share of overhead cost should be included. If funds are transferred from another agency for this project, identify the agency and state amount; (iii) Include in cost estimates for applications, recordkeeping, or other administrative plans or forms: the costs associated with designing, mailing, collecting, processing, and analyzing information collected; (c)(1) Related forms may be submitted for approval under one Standard Form 83. Related forms include variations that differ somewhat from the basic form, such as a "long form" for large firms and a "short form" for small ones, or forms that vary slightly by industry, by State, or other related group of respondents. (2) When related forms are combined in a single submission, all forms should be listed in the Supporting Statement, showing for each its title (or short description), the number of responses and the burden.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 17  (d) Requests for Approval of Preliminary Plans to Collect Information. Agencies may wish to determine whether the Office of Management and Budget would support the concept of certain information collections well before making a formal request for approval. In such cases, a preliminary or concept approval should be accompanied by an abbreviated Supporting Statement. 1320.24 Submission of Requests for Approval: Without Revision.  Extension  (a) Requests for extension of approval are subject to the requirements of section 1320.23. (b) These requests and those submitted under section 1320.25 sITPfhall be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget at i4114.. due to expire. least 45 days before the existing approval (c) Requests for extension shall be accompanied by information required by section 1320.6. 1320.25 Submission of Requests for Approval:  Revision.  (a) Requests for approval of revised information collections are subject to the requirements of section 1320.23. (b) Before a material revision or change is made in an approved information collection, approval shall be obtained from the Office of Management and Budget. Changes in an information collection necessitating approval include: (1) any modification in the kind or amount of information sought; (2) any change in the type of respondents or the survey coverage; (3) any change in the timing or  frequency of reporting;  (4) any change in the sample design or collection method; or   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  18 (5) a change in the purpose for which the information is collected or required to be maintained. (c) Requests for approval shall clearly identify each change and present reasons for them. 1320.26 Submission of Requests for Approval: Purpose of Information Collection. (a) Application for Benefits. Applications for benefits include all information collections used in connection with requests to participate in or receive a benefit from a Federal agency or program. (1) Applications submitted for approval shall not contain any information beyond the minimum necessary to determine: Whether the applicant is eligible to receive the (i) benefit applied for; (ii) The amount of benefit to which an eligible applicant is entitled; or (iii) The race, ethnicity, age, and sex of the applicant (if applicable) but only in such manner as prescribed by the Notice of Interim Guidelines published in the Federal Register, December 10, 1979. (iv)  What is otherwise expressly mandated by statute.  (2) When narrative statements are required as part of an application, reporting instructions are to be explicit as to what is needed. (3) Grant applications completed by State or local governments are to conform to the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-102, except as required by statute. (4) An agency shall not collect as part of an application any information that is already available to the agency from other sources, except the minimum necessary to identify and locate an applicant.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  19 (b) Program Evaluation. (1) A program evaluation is the systematic examination of specific Federally sponsored activities to provide information on the program's effects. It is designed to determine whether anticipated objectives are being achieved or whether the most effective procedures are being used. (2) Requests for approval of information collections as part of a program e.valuation shall contain evidence that information to be collected will directly contribute to the assessment of the effect of the program, its processes or management. Collection of large amounts of descriptive information not directly relevant to these purposes will be disapproved. (c) General Purpose Statistics. General purpose statistics are collected chiefly for public and general government uses and without primary reference to specific agency policy or program operations. Federal agencies shall not engage in any general purpose statistical information collection not financed wholly by Federal funds except an information collection that is undertaken as a consequence of cooperative efforts with State and or local governments or that the agency head personally determines is in the public interest. (d) Regulatory or compliance. category includes:  Information collection in this  (1) applications or petitions for licenses, allocations, and other privileges; (2) applications or petitions for exemption or waiver of standards; (3) monitoring of conduct or attainment of standards; This category of information collection includes, for example, compliance with civil rights, heii alth, safety, environmental, energy, and econo iJ imic standards. (e) Program Planning, Operation, or Policy. Information collection in this category includes that needed for agency management, such as financial or supply management, quality control, studies to collect information relating directly to program policies or the implementation of these policies, or other administrative information collections used in program operations.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  20:  (1) Financial information collections from grantees shall conform with the provisions of OMB Circulars A-102 or A-110 unless additional information is specifically required by law. For such exceptions, approval shall be obtained from the Office of Management and Budget. An agency shall collect such information only from the grant recipient. An agency shall not collect information from subgrantees, or any other organization or individual unless specifically required by statute to do so. (2) Information needs in this category should rely on multi-use and general purpose statistical programs whenever feasible in order to assure consistent information and avoid duplication among related missions. (f) Research. This includes information collection that does not fit in any category above and is undertaken without primary reference to program evaluation, operation, management, or policy. (1) Requests for approval of information collection in this category shall demonstrate that the activity (i) tests a stated hypothesis or (ii) is part of an investigation designed to discover new facts or principles in a specified area of knowledge. (2) The anticipated benefits expected from the information collection and the consequences of not engaging in the proposed collection shall be specified. 1320.27 Submission of Requests for Approval: Other Requirements. (a) Standard and Optional Forms. A standard form is a form prescribed by a Federal agency, for mandatory use. An optional form is one developed for use in two or more agencies, for non-mandatory use. Primary responsibility for approval of standard and optional forms was transferred in June 1967 from the Bureau of the Budget to the National Archives and Records Service of the General Services Administration.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 21 Standard and optional forms that collect information from the public or are the basis for statistical compilations of general public interest require approval under the Federal Reports Act and shall be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget in accordance with this subpart. The Office of Management and Budget shall forward such requests for approval to the National Archives and Records Service of the General Services Administration. (b) Interagency Reporting. .Interagency reporting involves the transmission of information to a Federal agency from one or more Federal agencies covered by the Federal Records Act. Administration and oversight of Federal interagency reporting shall be the responsibility of the General Services Administration. The General Services Administration shall issue regulations and directives necessary to effectively administer this program. This program shall be designed to insure that interagency reporting or other information requirements are minimum and that sufficient preclearance of such held to a reporting is performed to reduce unnecessary duplication. The Administrator of the General Services Administration shall report annually to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget on the effectiveness of this program. Interagency report forms that require approval under 44 U.S.C. 3509 shall be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget with an original and two copies of both Standard Form 360, "Request for Clearance of an Interagency Reporting Requirement" and Standard Form 83. The Office of Management and Budget shall forward such requests for approval to the National Archives and Records Service of the General Services Administration. (c) Number of Copies tb be Submitted by Respondents. An agency shall not seek approval of any information collection that requires the submission of more than an original and two copies of any document. (d) Remuneration of Respondents. Remuneration of respondents for participating in information collections will be approved only if it can be demonstrated through tests or other means that such remuneration materially enhances respondent   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  22 participation, improves the quality of information collected or reduces the cost of the information collection to the Federal government. Remuneration of persons or contractors supplying information does not constitute a basis for exemption from these regulations. 1320.28 Office of Management and Budget Action on Agency Requests for Approval. (a) Agency requests for approval to collect information will be reviewed initially for completeness. Incomplete requests under the requirements of this regulation will be returned to the agency. (ii)  Complete requests will be accepted for formal review.  (iii) A notice will be published on Mondays and Thursdays in the Federal Register summarizing requests accepted for review by the Office of Management and Budget. (b) A copy of all requests will be sent to the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, Department of Commerce. The Office of Management and Budget will not approve an information collection if the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards formally recommends disapproval because of deficiencies in statistical methods or standards. (c) In accordance with applicable law, the Office of Management and Budget will review agency requests for burden and unnecessary duplication, need, and cost to the Federal government. (1) The Office of Management and Budget shall advise the requesting agency promptly of the need for additional explanation, or changes in the proposal. If the nature of these requirements is such that prompt response by the agency will not be possible, or if response is not prompt for any reason, the request will not be approved but will be returned to the agency for modification. (2) The Office of Management and Budget shall notify the agency of action on the request for approval by returning a Notice of Action. (3) For each action taken, agencies shall be provided with an identification of the type(s) of burden change associated with the action, in terms of the following categories:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  23 (i) Change in use -- Change in burden resulting from factors outside the Federal government, such as increasing number of applications, declining number of firms in an industry, or changes in population. (ii) Correction-reestimate -- Change in burden resulting from a reestimate based on actual agency experience. Correction-error -- Change in burden from that formerly recorded because of error. (iv) Increase -- Change in burden resulting from a new information collection or an existing information collection changed by action or directive of any branch of the Federal government to increase sample size, amount of information, or frequency of reporting. (v) Decrease -- Change in burden resulting from expiration or discontinuance of an information collection, or change in burden of an existing information collection resulting from action, or directive of any branch of the Federal government, such as use of sampling (or smaller samples), reduction in the amount of information requested (fewer questions), or reduction in frequency of reporting. (4) An approved request shall show an OMB docket number and an expiration date for the approval on the Notice of Action. New requests shall not be approved for a period longer (i) than two years. (ii) Other requests shall not be approved for a period longer than five years. (iii) When the approval applies to a request modified by the Office of Management and Budget in the course of the review, those modifications will be described on the Notice of Action. (5) A request for approval that is denied will explain reasons for the disapproval.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  24 (d) In general, the Office of Management and Budget will not approve any information collection sooner than 10 working days after notice of receipt is published in the Federal Register. An agency requesting more prompt action shall submit with the request an explanation of how more rapid approval better serves the public interest. The explanation should discuss steps already taken by the agency to secure public involvement in the development of the information collection. The Office of Management and Budget anticipates that it will ordinarily act on requests for approval no later than 45 calendar days after receipt. If there is substantial public concern about the plan or form, final action may be delayed. (e) The Office of Management and Budget may modify the terms of approval of a request in any particular, for example, content, frequency, or expiration date, or may withdraw approval entirely at any time upon notice to the agency. (f) Collection of information subject to this subpart without valid, current Office of Management and Budget approval or without waiver is contrary to law (44 U.S.C. 3506, 3509). (g) The Office of Management and Budget shall publish on the second Thursday of each month a summary listing in the Federal Register advising the public of agency requests for which Office of Management and Budget approval has been granted, denied, modified, or withdrawn. The Office of Management and Budget may also include in the lists all known violations of the provisions of this subpart. (h) Whenever an information collection is discontinued prior to expiration of Office of Management and Budget approval, the agency shall request a change in the Office of Management and Budget inventory within 30 days. (i) Each Federal agency shall provide the Office of Management and Budget with an explanation of the status and use of its information collection plans and forms as requested. (j) To aid agencies in the planning and management of information collections, the Office of Management and Budget shall provide each agency with an inventory of information collections approved by the Office of Management and Budget, summary reports of the changes made in this inventory, notice of expired information collections, and advance notice of   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 25 information collections whose approval will expire in the next 60, 90, and 180 days. 1320.29 Modified Office of Management and Budget Review. (a) The Director of the Office of Management and Budget and the head of an agency may enter into an agreement to substitute a modified Office of Management and Budget review of agency requests for approval to collect information. No such agreement will be implemented without allowing opportunity for public comment. (b) When such an agreement is in place, the primary Office of Management and Budget review for burden, duplication, need, and cost to the government, will be of the Information Collection Budget submitted by the agency in accordance with section 1320.4. The allowance determined and set by the Office of Management and Budget under section 1320.7(a) will identify: (1) Any information collection warranting additional review by (i) the Office of Management and Budget because of overall reporting burden, outstanding interagency coordination questions, substantial public concern, or significant policy issues; or (ii) the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U. S. Department of Commerce, because of major Federal statistical policy issues; and (2) Any information collection for which the Office of Management and Budget directs that specific actions be taken in the course of the agency's own review. (c) Information collections identified under paragraph (b)(1) shall undergo standard review by the Office of Management and Budget and shall be subject to provisions of section 1320.23. All other information collections identified in the agency's information collection budget shall be submitted for approval to the Office of Management and Budget accompanied by two copies of Standard Form 83 and a copy of documentation of the agency's review of the proposal. These requests will be reviewed and acted on by the Office of Management and Budget within two business days of receipt. (d) The Director will enter into such an agreement only when the head of the agency demonstrates that there is in operation an effective information planning and control process. An effective information planning and control process shall include at least the following characteristics:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  26 (1) The number, level, and skills of the staff charged with this responsibility shall be sufficient to assure reasonably that an independent assessment of each information request can be performed; (2) The information management process shall have explicit links to agency processes for oversight of legislation and regulation, and may, depending upon the mission and organization of the agency, need links with data processing, records management, and statistical centers in the agency. (e) A copy of each agreement entered into between the Director of the Office of Management and Budget and agency heads will be on file with the Office of Management and Budget, and will be published in the Federal Register. (f) The Director reserves the right to rescind such agreements at any time and reserves the right to disapprove any individual information collection, or any part of such a collection sponsored by an agency at any time. (g) Agencies performing modified reviews are subject to audit by the Office of Management and Budget as described in section 1320.7 of subpart A. 1320.30 Requirements for Approved Information Collections. (a) All information collections approved under this subpart shall comply with the following provisions: (1) Each agency shall print the Office of Management and Budget docket number in the upper right hand corner of each questionnaire or other document used, (2) Respondents shall be informed of any consequences of noncompliance and whether the information collected is: mandated by an express provision of a statute (cite (i) statute);   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  27 required as a result of discretionary authority (cite Lilt authority); or (iii) voluntary. This information shall be printed on any form, regulation, or instructions for an information collection. SUBPART C DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL PROVISIONS 1320.40 Purpose and Coverage. (a) This subpart is designed to clarify terms used in subparts A and B and to further describe the scope of these regulations. 1320.41 Definitions. (a)(1) "Information" means any fact or opinion (whether in numerical or narrative form) collected or maintained by the use of any information collection or recordkeeping sponsored by a Federal agency, upon identical items, from ten or more persons, whether response is mandatory or voluntary. (2) "Information" shall be deemed not to include simple identification for the purpose of an affidavit, oath, change of address, or acknowledgement, labels or samples of products or of any other physical object, nor to include a fact or opinion collected (i) by subpoena; (ii) as part of a criminal investiby observation; (iv) in the form of technical gation; drawings or specifications submitted as part of the government procurement process,the course of specc, ind dually focused proceedings arising out of judicial or adjudicative administrative actions; (vi) from patients receg or about to receive treatment for a clinical disorder (or in followup of these patients), if such information is to be used exclusively for purposes of research on or direct treatment of that disorder, or exclusively for the interpretation of biological analyses of body fluids, tissues, or other specimens, S r for identification or classcation of such specimens; or (vii) that has been specifically exempted by the Office of Management and Budget because it does not call for information S f substantial volume or importance.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  O 28  (b) "Information collection" includes any specific provision or guide for collecting any information, or for recordkeeping. An information collection embodied in a report form, a contract, agreement, rule (as defined by 5 U.S.C. 551(4)), statement of policy, or any other activity sponsored by a Federal agency, shall be included in the scope of this definition. Information collection includes the use of any application, schedule, questionnaire, interview guide, telegraphic or telephonic request, or any other means used to collect any information. (c) To "collect" information means to obtain, solicit, request, or otherwise seek information by any means, or to require that information be kept or maintained. (d) "Recordkeeping" means the establishment or maintenance of information for compliance or any other purpose. (e) "Nonrecurring" use means a collection of information not more frequently than twice in a consecutive 12 month period and not for continued use. (f) "Recurring" use means a collection of information more frequently than twice in a consecutive 12 month period, or for continued use regardless of frequency. (g)(1) "Person" means an individual, partnership, corporation, association, or any other public or private organization other than a Federal agency located in the United States or its possessions or a citizen of the United States, wherever located. A current employee of the Federal government is included within this definition for the collection of information not related to his employment, but retired and other former Federal employees are included entirely within the definition. (2) "10 or more persons" means the number of persons directly responding to a Federal agency. In addition to a person responding directly, persons supplying any fact or opinion to the direct respondent shall be included when determining whether 10 or more are involved. This does not include persons who compile information already in the possession of the direct respondent. (h) "Significant information collection" means any information collection that the collecting or sponsoring agency or the   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  29  Office of Management and Budget determines to be of substantial public, budgetary, or policy importance. (i) "Burden" means time required to respond to an information collection including: (1) the time it takes to read or hear the instructions; (2) the time it takes to assemble any source materials necessary for developing the information to be reported; (3) the time it takes to process the materials and to put them into the format used; and (4) time required to report the information. (j) "Identical items" include: (1) individual items that are the same in every respect; (2) individual items that are the same except for minor differences in definition; and (3) items about the same subject that are specific enough to be recognizably related but different as regards specific elements. (k) "Practical utility" means both the actual use of information collected for reasonable purposes as well as the ability of an agency to use information it receives in a timely and meaningful fashion.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  30  (1) "Federal agency" means an executive department, commission, independent establishment, corporation owned or controlled by the United States, board, bureau, division, service, advisory committee, office, authority, or administration in the executive branch of the Federal government. (m) A Federal agency is considered to "Sponsor" the collection of information if the agency itself collects the information, or under the following circumstances: (1) Collection by a Contractor. An information collection by a contractor acting for a Federal agency is considered sponsored by the agency that awards the contract except when the collection of information is neither required by nor implied by the terms of the contract and no representation of Federal sponsorship or association is made to the respondents. (2) Collection by Recipient of a Grant or a Cooperative Agreement. An information collecttion undertaken by a recipient of a Federal grant or cooperative agreement is considered sponsored by an agency only The recipient of a grant represents to respondents (i) that the information is being collected for or in associtation with a Federal agency; or (ii) the recipient of a grant is collecting information that the agency has requested for the planning, operation, or evaluation of its program; or (iii)the terms and conditions of the grant or agreement provide for approval by the agency of the study design, information collection plan or form, or collection procedures; or o of the grant provide for (iv) the terms and cndons sio of information to the agency for either sub misn or the preparation and submission of individual respondets n specific tablulations requested by the agency.  oI  (v) a recipient is collecting information under an exemption granted by an agency from law or regulations requiring the participation in an already approved information collection.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 31  (3) Other types of Sponsorship. When specific information collected is to be made available to a Federal agency, the information collection is sponsored by the agency even though a contract or grant is not involved. In case of doubt as to whether an information collection is sponsored, inquiry shall be made to the Office of Management and Budget. When specific records are to be kept because of a requirement imposed by a Federal agency rulemaking or statute, such recordkeeping is considered sponsored by the agency issuing the requirement. 1320.42 General Provisions. (a) Exercise of Authority. (1) Determination of Scope. The determination of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget or his designee whether any information collection, recordkeeping requirement, or other matter is within the scope of the Federal Reports Act, Executive Order 12174, or these regulations shall be controlling. (2) Waivers. Any provision of these regulations may be waived in writing by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget except for requirements under paragraph (a) of section 1320.22, and those requirements applicable to the collection of personal information specified in the Privacy Act of 1974. A request for waiver can be made only by the head of an agency. (3) All waivers previously granted in relation to approval of information collection plans or forms under the Federal Reports Act of 1942 (subpart B of these regulations) are rescinded. Agencies desiring to secure continuation of such waivers shall submit them in accordance with section 1320.42(a)(2).  (b) Relation to Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act of 1974. These regulations do not limit the responsibilities of agencies under the Freedom of Information Act or the Privacy Act of 1974.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE AT 10:45 AY EST  NOVEnBER 30, 1979  Office of the White House Press Secretary  THE WHITE HOUSE  TO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES: In the past two and one half years, my Administration has achieved real progress in cutting the paperwork burden government imposes on the public. Today I am announcing steps to expand and accelerate that effort. I have today signed an Executive Order on paperwork reduction. I am also calling on the Congress to enact two bills which will help eliminate needless forms, cut duplication, streamline those forms which are necessary and strengthen central oversight of Federal paperwork. Government efficiency is a central theme of my Administration. If we are to restore confidence in government, we must eliminate needless burdens on the public. We have pursued this goal through regulatory reform, civil service reform, reorganization, and other initiatives. Paperwork reduction is an important part of this program. Some Federal paperwork is needed. The government must collect information to enforce the civil rights laws, compile economic statistics, design sound regulations, and for many other purposes. In recent years, however, government forms, surveys and interviews have mushroomed. Much of this paperwork is unnecessary or duplicates information being collected elsewhere. My Administration has stopped the paperwork surge and started cutting this burden down to size. We have reduced the amount of time Americans spend filling out Federal forms by almost 15% -- 127 million hours. That is the equivalent of 75,000 people working full-time for a year. We have evaluated the 520 recommendations of the Paperwork Commission and have already implemented more than half of them. The Internal Revenue Service made it possible, for ex171;:le, for five million taxpayers to switch from the long tax form to the short one. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration exempted 40,000 small businesses from reporting requirements The Interstate Commerce Commission sliced a 70-page report required from 13,000 carriers down to 8 pages. The Labor and Treasury Departments slashed the paperwork burden that was crushing the small pension plans. I am today announcing that we are consolidating three reports required from the States on welfare and food stamp programs; this will eventually save 500,000 hours and $10 million per year. The progress in cutting Federal paperwork has been substantial, but we must do more. Congress is enacting new requirements in energy, environmental protection, and other programs that will add to the paperwork burden. To continue our success in eliminating Federal paperwork, we need the broad management program I am announcing today. more   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 The Executive Order I have signed establishes strong management for the Executive agencies. First of all, it creates a "paperwork budget." Each agency will submit an annual estimate of the numbers of hours required to fill out all its forms. The Office of Management and Budget will then hold agencies to that total or order it cut. The process will be similar to the spending budget; it will give agencies incentives to set priorities and to eliminate or streamline burdensome forms. II The Order creates a Federal Information Locator System, which will list all the types of information collected by Federal agencies. Before an agency collects information, it will check in this System to see if another agency already has the data. The Order also requires agencies to consider the special paperwork problems of small organizations and small businesses. Data gathering that may be easy for a corporation with computerized records may be very costly for a small business person who keeps records by hand. Some reports must necessarily be versal and uniform, but in many cases agencies can meet their infS rmation needs while providing exemptions or less burdensome reports for small businesses. Some agencies already have started doing so. The Executive Order requires all agencies to review each form to identify those cases where small organizations can be exempted or given simpler forms. Senator John Culver deserves credit for leading the development of this concept of special consideration for small organizations. Finally, the Order mandates a "sunset" process. This process will be similar to the legislation I am supporting to mandate sunset reviews for regulations, spending programs, and tax expenditures. The Paperwork Order requires that each form terminate every five years unless a new decision is made to continue it. We also need legislation to build a complete paperwork control program and extend tS all agencies. Representatives Jack Brooks, Frank Horton, and Tom Steed and Senator Lawton Chiles have taken the lead in developing a Paperwork Reduction Act which will strengthen and unify existing paperwork oversight. The Federal Reports Act is insufficient in this regard. It gives OMB power to disapprove many agencies' forms, but the independent regulatory commissions are reviewed by the General Accounting Office and tax, education, and health manpower programs have no central review atThese loopholes represent El% of the total paperwork burden, of which tax forms are 73%. This legislation will close these loopholes, providing central oversight for all forms. It also strengthens the paperwork clearance process by allowing members of the public tS refuse to fill out forms that have not been properly cleared. The legislation will provide additional tools to cut S uplication in paperwork requirements. When several agencies want to collect overlapping data, the bill will empower the TA.2 to assign one agency to IS the job. The bill will also deal with the special problems of statistical systems. One cause Sf duplication is that agencies collect statistical data under pledges of confidentiality, and these pledges hamper sharing the data. The bill will authorize such sharing while strengthening safeguards to ensure the data is used only for statistical purposes and never to abuse personal privacy. These provisions will also strengthen our Federal statistical systems, which are crucial to economic and other policymaking. more   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 While controlling the paperwork imposed on the public, we must also hold down paperwork within the Government itself. I am therefore submitting to the Congress the Reports Elimination Act of 1979. This bill, together with administrative action we are taking now, will eliminate or simplify 278 annual agency reports, saving at least $5.5 million per year. This overall paperwork reduction program has been developed in a cooperative effort with the leaders of the Senate Governmental Affairs and House Government Operations Committees. Working together, we will continue the progress on cutting away red tape. I urge the Congress to act promptly on the two bills I have discussed.  JIMMY CARTER  THE WHITE HOUSE, November 30, 1979.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • E. 0. 12174  11/30/79  EXECUTIVE ORDER  By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and statutes of the United States of America, and in order to establish procedures that eliminate all paperwork burdens on the public above the minimum necessary to determine and implement public policy and ensure compliance with Federal laws, it is hereby ordered as follows: 1-101.  Agencies shall minimize the paperwork burden  the time and costs entailed in complying with requests for information and recordkeeping requirements -- imposed on persons outside the Federal government.  Forms should be  used only to the extent necessary to gather the basic information required to fulfill an agency's mission.  When forms  must be used, they should be as short as possible and should elicit information in a simple, straightforward fashion. 1-102.  Each agency shall designate an existing official  to be responsible for minimizing both the agency's use of forms and the paperwork burden resulting from proposed legislation and regulations. 1-103.  Agencies shall pay particular attention to the  special burdens faced by individuals and small organizations in responding to requests for information.  To minimize these  burdens agencies should, whenever possible, forego uniform or universal reporting requirements and rely instead on sampling, reduced frequency of reporting, differing compliance standards, or exemptions. 1-104.  Each agency shall prepare an annual paperwork  budget, i.e., an estimate of the total number of hours required to comply with requests for information.  The budget  should itemize each form used, describe its purpose and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 identify those affected by it.  The Director of the Office  of Management and Budget shall review and may modify each agency's proposed budget.  After the Director has approved  an agency's paperwork budget, it may be increased only by the Director upon request of the head of the agency. 1-105.  Forms or similar requests for information shall  be reviewed within two years after their initial issuance and then at least once every five years.  Following review,  they should be revised or abandoned to the extent they are not required to meet an agency's basic information needs. These reviews will be conducted by the agencies, and reports of the reviews will be submitted to the Director. 1-106.  The Director shall audit compliance with this  Order and may issue rules and regulations necessary to implement it.  The Director may issue exemptions for agencies  whose use of forms is limited. (a)  The Directcr also shall:  Seek to eliminate duplication in requests for  information by establishing a Federal information locator system, which will list all the types of information collected by Federal agencies and will be available for use by all agencies.  This or similar systems will not  contain any information obtained from the public.  The  Director shall take any other steps needed to prevent duplication, including the assignment to a particular agency of lead responsibility for the collection of certain types of information. (b)  Seek to inform the public and broaden public and  agency comment by preparing and publishing in the Federal Register an annual paperwork calendar of significant requests for information.  This calendar  will be based on the information contained in the agencies' paperwork budgets. (c)  Report annually to the President on implementation  of this Order and control of the paperwork burden generally.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 1-107.  The authority vested in the Director under this  Order shall not affect any authority vested in him by any other Order.  This Order shall be implemented in a manner  consistent with all applicable Federal statutes . 1-108.  For purposes of this Order, agency means those  agencies covered by Executive Order 12044. 1-109.  This Order will expire on September 30, 1983.  f  THE WHITE HOUSE,  •  BOARD  OF  GOVERNORS  /r/   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  OF THE  FEDERAL  -40  RESERVE SYSTEM  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  z  January 4, 1980  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Presidential Recognition Program  I am pleased to announce that ten individuals and one group have been selected to receive 1978 Presidential Management Improvement Awards. The names of the recipients are listed on the enclosure. Collectively, their achievements have saved the Government more than $50.5 million and have contributed significantly to advancements in science and technology, improving our national security, and providing better services to the public. The winners were selected from a field of some 2,900 outstanding candidates. Since this program began two years ago, more than 4,200 employees and military members have been recognized for contributions which have saved the Government more than $479 million. These gratifying results demonstrate my belief that Federal personnel are willing and able to contribute significantly to improving Government operations and services. Those serving in management positions can help provide the necessary motivation and incentive by listening to employee ideas and giving prompt recognition to exceptional performance. I urge each of you to use our various awards programs to bring out the best in those who serve with you. So that I can continue to add my personal congratulations and thanks, I ask that you continue to provide me with the names of persons within your organization who contribute significantly to increasing productivity, improving services, conserving energy and other vital resources, eliminating paperwork, and developing and applying new and existing technology.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  /  N..-,11•111."  6 •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  e  •  1978 Presidential Management Improvement Award Winners  Harmon H. Adams Veterans Administration  Jeffrey L. VerBurg United States Navy  Marion E. Meadows, Jr. Department of Agriculture  Arthur E. Martin Veterans Administration  Spencer T. Hayes Department of the Air Force  Barnett W. McConnell Veterans Administration  James Campbell Department of the Army  Helen A. Lewis Department of the Army  Patricia A. Martens Department of the Army  Houston Employee Plans Group Department of the Treasury  John W. Kiker National Aeronautics and Space Administration
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