View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

!Ir  . v\i k 4e Ho(Ace ("1 1 - I(-1 A LA 9 LA er.,.1- - NoQei9*-(:)Qe. i9-79   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Collection: Paul A. Volcker Papers Call Number: MC279  Box 9  Preferred Citation: White House Correspondence, No. 71-117, 1979 August-November; Paul A. Volcker Papers, Box 9; Public Policy Papers, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library Find it online: http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/MC279/c285 and https://fraser.sdouisfed.org/archival/5297 The digitization ofthis collection was made possthle by the Federal ReserVe Bank of St. Louis. From the collections of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton, NJ These documents can only be used for educational and research purposes ("fair use") as per United States copyright law. By accessing this file, all lisers agree that their use falls within fair use as defined by the copyright law of the United States. They further agree to request permission of the Princeton University Library (and pay any fees, if applicable) if they plan to publish, broadcast, or otherwise disseminate this matefial. This includes all forms of electronic distribution. Copyright The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of Ihese specified conditions is that the photocopy or other reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or other reproduction for purposes not permitted as fair use under the copyright law of the United States, that user may be liable for copyright infringement. l'olicy on Digitized Collections Digitized collections are made accessible for research purposes. Princeton University has indicated what it knows about the copyrights and rights of privacy, publicity or trademark in its finding aids. However, due to the nature of archival collections, it is not always possible to identify this information. Princeton University is eager to hear from any rights owners, so that it may provide lb iii ui accurate information. When a rights issue needs to be addressed, upon request Princeton University will remove the material from public view while it reviews the claim. Inquiries about this material can be directed to: Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library 65 Olden Street Princeton, NJ 08540 609-258-6345 609-258-3385 (fax) mudd@princeton.edu   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON, DC. 20503 •r OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  November 28, 1979  POLICY LETTER NO. 79-4 TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT: Contracting for Motion Picture Productions and Videotape Productions  1. Purpose. This Policy Letter directs the establishment of a uniform Government-wide system for contracting for motion picture and videotape productions. It replaces Policy Letter 78-5 issued by the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) on August 28, 1978. Background. Beginning in the early 1970's, various management 2. studies were made of the Government's audiovisual contracting programs. These studies indicated widespread dissatisfaction with the policies and procedures followed by Federal agencies and departments in contracting for the production of audiovisuals, particularly motion pictures. OFPP Policy Letter 78-5 corrected many of the motion picture contracting problems noted in the studies and established a Government-wide system for contracting for motion pictures. Since the issuance of Policy Letter 78-5, members of the audiovisual industry, Congress, and individual Federal agencies have urged OFPP to develop a similar system for videotape productions. This policy letter responds to those suggestions and establishes a Government-wide system for both motion picture and videotape productions. 3. Policy. Executive agencies and departments shall use the uniform Government-wide system described in paragraph 7 below in contracting for motion picture and videotape productions. The uniform system is intended to: a. Reduce waste and inefficiency inherent in departmental and agency contracting procedures;  many existing  b. Ensure that the Government obtains quality motion picture and videotape productions at fair, competitive prices; Provide a central point within the Government where producers c. can obtain information on motion picture and videotape contracting procedures and opportunities; and d.  Increase competition for Government contracts.  4 .   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 4. Implementation. The General Services Administration and the Department of Defense shall make such changes to the Federal Procurement Regulations and the Defense Acquisition Regulation as are necessary to make the uniform contracting system operational on March 31, 1980. The motion picture contracting system required by this policy letter was initially implemented on March 30, 1979, by Policy Letter 78-5. That system shall continue in effect until March 31, 1980, when solicitations and awards for both motion pictures and videotape productions shall be in accordance with the herein prescribed system. The Executive Agent shall take immediate steps to assure that the prescribed system is fully functional on March 31, 1980. 5. 8(a) Contracts. Contracts made pursuant to Section 8(a) of the Small Business Act will be handled in accordance with existing regulations and use of the uniform system is not required. 6.  Definitions. As used in this Policy Letter: a.  "Motion picture production" refers to those productions in which the majority of the photographic and editorial work was accomplished in 8-mm, 16-mm, 35-mm, or 70-mm sound-on-film. It does not include videotape, sound slide, multi-media productions, or separate media services. b. "Videotape production" refers to those productions in which the majority of the recording and editorial work was accomplished in magnetic videotape, videocassette, or videodisc. It does not include motion picture film, sound slide, or multimedia productions or separate media services. c. "Federal Audiovisual Committee" refers to an interagency committee chaired by OFPP. The Committee is made up of representatives from more than 20 Federal agencies. Its purpose is to advise and assist in the formulation of Government-wide audiovisual policy. d. "Executive Agent" refers to the Directorate for Audiovisual Management Policy of the Department of Defense. The Executive Agent is designated by OFPP and is responsible for administering and maintaining the motion picture and videotape contracting system. The Executive Agent also serves as the central information source about the system. e. "Interagency Audiovisual Review Board" refers to a sub-group of the Federal Audiovisual Committee. It is chaired by the Executive Agent and is used to evaluate motion picture and videotape productions submitted by producers interested in obtaining Government contracts for motion picture and videotape work. 7.  Uniform System.  a. Open Invitation. All persons and firms interested in producing Government motion picture or videotape productions are required to submit samples of their work to the Executive Agent. The Executive Agent will place notices. at least semi-annually, in the Commerce Business   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3  Daily inviting the submission of such work samples. Similar notices will be placed in the trade press where feasible. b.  Submission of Work Samples.  (1) Producers interested in motion picture work must submit a 16-mm sound sample film that they have produced within the previous three years. (2) Producers interested in videotape work must submit a sample program on 3/4 inch, U-format videocassette that they have produced during the previous three years. (3) Each sample film and videotape must be accompanied by a statement explaining its purpose, the sponsor, production medium, the contract price, and/or production cost. Review of Work Samples. Work samples submitted to the c. Executive Agent will be reviewed and evaluated by the Interagency Audiovisual Review Board (IARB). A minimum of five IARB members must participate in the evaluation of each work sample. The public may attend meetings of the IARB during which sample motion picture and videotape productions are viewed. The public may not, however, be present nor participate in the formal evaluation of the productions. d. Criteria for Evaluating Work Samples. Films and videotapes reviewed by the IARB will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria: (I)  Achievement of Purpose(s): Did the production accomplish its stated purpose? Was it appropriate for the intended audience? 0-20 Points  (2)  Creativity: Did the production provide a fresh or innovative way of conveying the message? Was the manner of presentation appropriate? 0-20 Points  (3)  Continuity: Did the subject develop in a logical or understandable manner? 0-10 Points  in   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  (4)  Technical Quality: Did the following elements, if included in the production, exhibit technical competence? Direction Writing Photography/Camera Work Editing Artv,,ork/Animation Narration/Dialogue Music and Sound Special Effects 0-50 Points  e.  Obtaining Contracts and Placement on Qualified Producers  Lists. (I) Contracting with the Executive Agent. The Executive Agent will offer contracts to all producers v,'hose films and/or videotapes receive an average composite score of 70 or more from the IARB. The contracts will contain standard provisions covering Government motion picture or videotape work. Orders for production and other work will be awarded under these contracts. The authority for the contracts is this Policy Letter and 41 (2) Placement on the Qualified Lists. Producers who sign contracts with the Executive Agent will be placed on a Qualified Film Producers List (QFPL) or a Qualified Videotape Producers List (QVPL). Producers, who qualify on the basis of motion picture and videotape work samples, may be placed on both lists. The QFPL and QVPL will (3) Continuous Qualification. remain open and producers may submit work samples to the Executive al films and/or videotapes IS not Agent at any time. Producers whose receive a score of 70 or more may continue to submit samples until they All samples will be reviewed on a first-in, first-out basis. qualify. Producers who initially qualified for the QFPL under the "grandfather arrangement" in Policy Letter 78-5 must still submit a. work sample to the Executive Agent within one year of the date of their original contracts. (4) Removal from the QFPL or QVPL. A producer will remain on the QFPL or QVPL until an agency complains of unsatisfactory work on a specific production or until the producer requests removal. If an agency complains of unsatisfactory work, the IARB will review the production and the complaint. When warranted, the IARB may recommend that the Executive Agent terminate the producer's contract and remove the producer from the QFPL or QVPL. Also, producers not responding to five consecutive solicitations will be asked if they wish S.- removed from the list(s).  `7"--  4ie   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5  (5) Structure and Distribution of the QFPL and QVPL. Firms placed on the QFPL or QVPL will not be classified by subject matter or geographic area unless they so request. Copies of the qualified lists will be distributed by the Executive Agent to all using agencies and to persons requesting them. f.  Agencies' Use of QFPL and QVPL.  (1) Contacting the Executive Agent. When an agency is prepared to contract for the production of a motion picture or videotape, the contracting officer will contact the Executive Agent and request the names of a specific number of producers from the QFPL or QVPL. The Executive Agent will furnish names in increments of five. The names furnished will be selected from the QFPL or QVPL on a random number, For every increment of five names requested, the rotational basis. procuring agency may select a maximum of two additional names from the appropriate list. The names provided by the Executive Agent will be placed at the bottom of the list for future use. (2) Use of Names. The agency will solicit proposals from all firms referred by the Executive Agent and from those appropriately selected by the agency itself. Proposals must be solicited from at least five producers for each requirement (unless a noncompetitive acquisition is justified in accordance with agency regulations). Agencies will determine in light of the specific film or videotape to be produced whether more than five proposals should be solicited. As a general guide. however, agencies should not request more than two increments of producers from the Executive Agent for productions estimated to cost less than $100,000. g.  Soliciting Proposals.  Agencies shall use the (1) Use of Solicitation, Formats. solicitation formats developed by the Federal Audiovisual Committee in soliciting proposals for specific productions. The contracts between the producers on the qualified lists and the Executive Agent contain standard terms and conditions and those terms and conditions will not be repeated in each solicitation or award. The solicitation formats developed by the Federal Audiovisual Committee may be obtained from the Executive Agent. (2) Two Approaches. When using the solicitation formats obtained from the Executive Agent, agencies must first determine whether scripting will be separated from production. This is a matter of judgment involving two approaches to production. The first approach holds that a clear separation can be made in some instances between scripting and production and that any producer can produce a satisfactory motion picture or videotape production from a completed script. The second approach   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6  holds that production of some films and videotapes (from initial research through treatment, scripting, and production) is a continuous process which requires the continuous involvement of one creative individual from start to finish. Solicitation formats have been developed for each of these approaches and the proper format must be used depending on the approach selected. h.  Scripting Separated from Production.  (1) Obtaining scripting for a particular production, the agency will may be obtained directly procedures.  When an agency determines that Scripts. film or videotape should be separated from obtain and approve a script. Generally, scripts from writers under existing small purchase  (2) Obtaining Production Proposals. Once the script has been acquired it will be included in the production specifications and used by the agency in soliciting competitive proposals from the firms on the QFPL or QVPL. Proposals will be solicited in the appropriate format, in accordance with paragraph g.(1) above. (3)  Evaluation Criteria.  Motion picture and videotape production proposals, (a) submitted by producers when scripting has been separated from production, will be evaluated on the basis of: Qualifications and relevant experience of proposed production team members. Creativity as demonstrated in sample production. Technical quality of sample production. (4) Production Awards. The production award will be made to the responsible producer submitting the best proposal, price and other factors considered. i.  Scripting Included with Production.  (1) Obtaining Treatments. Where scripting is to be included proposals as part of the production effort, agencies will solicit treatment format from firms on the QFPL or QVPL. The appropriate solicitation must be used in accordance with paragraph g.(1) above. (2) Evaluation Criteria. Proposals for treatments will be evaluated by the agency on the basis of:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7  Qualifications and relevant experience of proposed production team members. Creativity as demonstrated in sample production and sample treatment.  Technical quality of sample production. Offeror's understanding of the production's purpose and subject matter. (3) Awards for Treatments. Awards for the development of treatments should generally be made to at least two producers submitting These awards will be made at a preestablished fixed price determined by the agency and included in the solicitatiori. Subsequent awards for the development of multiple scripts (not treatments) should be made only in unusual cases.  I  (4) Production Awards. The treatments will be evaluated together with technical and price proposals for the production, and the award for the scriptwriting and production work will be made to the responsible producer whose proposal is most advantageous to the Government, price and other factors considered. j. The evaluation criteria Responsibility Determinations. contained in paragraphs h. and i. will be used by agencies in evaluating producer proposals. Agency contracting officers, however, will determine a particular offeror's responsibility prior to making an award. For this purpose, financial and other data may be requested. Effective Date. 8. 1980.  This Policy Letter shall be effective January I,  Concurrence. The Director of the Office of Management and 9. Budget concurs in the issuance of this policy directive.  /() James D. Currie' Acting Administrator  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C.  20506  November 29, 1979  Honorable Paul A. Volcker Chairman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System 20th & Constitution Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20551  H  Dear Chairman Volcker: On June 29, 1979 Eleanor Holmes Norton, Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, (EEOC), sent a Survey of Agency EEO Activities with an attached memorandum to you. The purpose of that survey is to ascertain the scope of your agency's equal employment opportunity (EEO) programs and authority that affect non-Federal employees. Ms. Norton requested that your agency respond within 45 calendar days of receipt. EEOC's Office of Interagency Coordination is currently reviewing the survey submissions of responding agencies. Our records indicate gla.A.A ciag-a.A.zubmission from your agency. If a that we h comple ed survey was sent by 77777771177"Tr"TrnrrrTFIrrinform me immediately so that my staff can locate it. However, if a completed survey has not been submitted, I am urging you to submit a completed survey within the next two weeks. I have taken the liberty of enclosing a copy of the survey form in case the original was misplaced. Should your staff have any questions regarding information solicited by this survey, please don't hesitate to have them contact Arthur Jefferson on my staff. He will be available to answer any questions. Mr. Jefferson can be reached at 653-5490. Your detailed answers to these questions will be of immeasurable assistance to the EEOC as we seek to fulfill the coordination mandate of Executive Order 12057. Very sincerely yours,  ancesta E. armer Director Office of Interagency Coordination Enclosure   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  .  •  .`"•,•••- -  a -  ,  •  ••  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20506 June 29, 1979  FFICE OF THE CHAIR  MEMORANDUM  TO:  All Agency Heads Directors of Civil Rights Policy and/or Enforcement Offices General Counsels  FROM:  Eleanor Holmes Norton, Chair  RE:  Survey of Agency Programs and Activities Under Executive Order 12067  Enclosed is a survey to ascertainlithe scope of your agency's equal employment opportunity programs and authority. The survey is being conducted by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") pursuant to its coordination authority under Executive Order 12067, and is being sent to all Federal departments, agencies and Commissions. A copy of the Executive Order is attached to this letter for your convenience. Executive Order 12067 requires the EEOC to provide leadership and coordination to Federal EEO activities, in order to "maximize effort, promote efficiency, and eliminate conflict, competition, duplication and inconsistencies among the operations, functions and jurisdictions of the Federal departments" with EEO responsibilities. Further, 1-301 of the Order requires the EEOC to develop consistent and effective standards and procedures in the following areas:  0— •••••  So. •••••%• ,  •  regulations, guidelines and orders  • • 1.  •  training  •  investigations and compliance reviews  •  enforcement actions  •  record—keeping and reporting  r •  r,  •  sharing of compliance or investigative findings  •  publications  •  other cooperative programs to achieve the goals of E.O. 12067.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  feri  er•:  ...1111111••••-  016  1  —2—  You will note that the survey seeks information on all of these areas. The results of this government—wide survey will be used to target areas of maxi— mum overlap and duplicAion, and to provide vital information that will be used to develop a comprehensive coordination program. The EEOC is only con— cerned about data and information on agency EEO authority and programs as they relate to non—Federal employers, grantees or institutions. Therefore, please exclude any data on internal EEO programs, regulations, directives, guidelines, policies or orders. Where the data are aggregated in your agency's records, please report only data relating to these non—Federal entities. We seek your cooperation in compiling the necessary data: •  Answer all questions completely and in detail. Where an item is not applicable, please so indicate. In any case, you must answer questions 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10 and 13.  •  Attach all requested documents, and indicate the question, by number, to whict, documents relate. Documents that are unusually lengthy may be sent under separate cover, so long as the question to which they relate is clearly indicated.  •  Paw—  Use separate sheets as necessary, but indicate clearly the question to which they relate. teve,-Ir  • Complete the survey within 45 calendar days of receipt.  1;;141,.  •  Designate a contact person for the survey. may be designated in a letter or by phone.  This person  lemmeme.—  The Office of Interagency Coordination will answer any questions or provide any technical assistance in order to assist you in completing the survey. You may call Francesta E. Farmer, Director of EEOC's Office of Interagency Coordi— nation, at 653-5490 if assistance is needed. The detailed answers to these questions will be of immeasurable assistance to the EEOC in conducting an effective coordination program. Coordination of Federal EEO activities is one of the highest priorities of the Administration and the Commission. While your agency may have supplied portions of these data to other Federal agencies or task forces, we believe that a complete, and descriptive, information base on Federal EEO activities is critical if we are to achieve the worthwhile goals of Executive Order 12067.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  ,4 . f.••  •  .•.r  •  • • L.  ••'•  .• 414.$ .  • SURVEY OF hGENCY LEO ACTIV1ilL6 1.0  PROGRAM OVERVIEW  4 your agency enforces the following statutes or F.ecutive Orclorc (itc.T. 1.0) c,71ntai7 4 ng eT1.l emr sources federal to According c=rc.ctL- no, opportunity (EEO) provisions. To the extent that this list is inlccurate, plase make the a.1-;nro. 1:in.: z.h : 0. *Ttcmo 1.1 r.n( :changes in ir-em deletions. Also please indicate the effective dates of en, 10. 4 proEEO programs and the regulations and guidelines under which they operate. Pre nott. C.71t I.' 7.1C t - `.'•7_ pr.rt involving private employers, state and local governments, and other organizcions agency programs are not covered by the survey. Please use the apace provided at the bottcm of :  ra 1  0  •••• • ••  clarifying information.  1.1  1.2  Statutory Authority and/or Executive Orders (Make imy necessary corrections, additions, or deletions)  Program Title and Brief state-nr,nt of Purpose. Key to language of 1.1. (Match items to those in Col. 1.1)  1.3  Ct  ar-rsn • •-• 04.11  ••  1..4  •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  COM11ENTS:  Tit1  r.  r':- of r'culati Po7.cy  •••,•  ,s of tlIcco ttrch con!_c. 4 -to •  ow.  •  2.0  POLICY DEVELOPMENT Please use this format to describe all EEO issuan ces, i.e., regulations, (except those involvin program guidelines, poli g the agency's internal EEO pr cy directives z%nd/or or og ra m) cu ders rr en tl or published in the Federa y under development by l register as final docume yo ur ag en cy (e .g ., not yet promulga nt). Use additional sh ted eets if needed. 2.1 Title of Issuance 2.2 Statutory 2.3 Progra ms 2.4 Purpose 2.5 Lead Develop- 2. Under Development Authority 6 Ccntr.ct Affected 7 ment Office Person and ••--(37-- • late codes, . Tele. • r7 1 .; . •  (  - - Y12  •  /-7P 77c  • /1„ C.  /-/cA /-7FP /-70  //FR A  /T7? /-7C 1 7 :1 / /712  /-7CA / /FP Z17°  /-7CA /-7C  /-7FP  / /:R  / /c / /a COMMENTS:  /-To  / /-2R  Code: P-Preliminary developm ent stage; c-submitted to other agencies for co in thd Federal Register mment; R-Suhmitted to EEOC for public comment (cit rvirsw; e date); CA-Comment period cl publication; 0-Other (Spe os ed co , mments being analyze:.; -7P-F.c...-.dy fo cify). r f1n31 4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  3.0  PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION  Please specify the type of EEO programs implemented by your agency, the types of investigation (if any), and the procedural order of activities. (Note that information regarding your agency's internal EEO program activity should be excluded). If ridditional space is needed to clarify your agency's responses, use item 3.4. 3.1. Type of EEO program activities (check one or more categories as appropriate) . 3.11  Complaint Processing  3.12  Affirmative Action  /-7 Technical  L=7 Defer to State or local agencies a /-7 Fact Finding /7 Investigation 17 Conciliation L=7 Litigation  3.13  Assist-  ance /17 Require AAP's /7 Review of AAP's L7 Sanctions for Noncompliance  Adjudicatory  /7 Hearings L17 .7 Cease and Desist a Power to obtain Court Orders  R(727.1cia1  /7 In1iv.c1a1  /-7  Remdir's  7 Bacay, reinstatement etc.)  //  Sanctions for noncompliance (e.g. fund termination, etc).  OF  •  3.2  3.14  Type of EEO Investigation (check one or more as appropriate).  /7  Individual Complaints  /7 Class  Complaints  /7 Self  Initiated Cornpliance Reviews  / / Pattern & Practice Reviews  L=7 Other Systemic Reviews  3.3  Please attach all documents that describe the major procedural.steps followed by your agency in conducting its EEO compliance and enforcement program. Where more than one program is conducted by your agency, please provide separate documents for each program citing the statutory authority for each. Where appropriate documents are fragmented or excessively lengthy, please supply a summary of agency procedures, and attach a flow chart outlining the major procedural steps.  3.4  COMMENTS:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4.0  For each activity listed, please cite authority and provide data for the fiscal years indicated. -r your (.1e-!:- not conduct one or more of the listed activities, please enter "Not Applicable" in the space designated as Statut(ry (Exclude information on the agency's internal EEO compliance activities). 1 ,  4.1 Individual Complaints  Statutory Authority and Status of Actions • Sta.tutory Authority  Number of Actions 4.2 Class 4.3 AgencyComplaints initiated Compliance Reviews -  On Hand Beginning: FY 78 FY 79 Received or Initiated: FY 7U 1st half FY 79 Completed Investigation:  4.4 Systemic or 1 Pattern of ! Practive Reviews  1  .  ! /  i 1 ,  , i  _ , 1  Findings Made: FY 78 1st half FY 79  !  Cases Closed:  _  FY 78 1st half FY 79 Cases Pending: End of FY 7R On 3/31 FY 79  _ 4.'.3 Oti= _ ,• • ,  .  .  FY 78 1st half FY 79   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  a  COMPLIANCE STATISTICS  , i i  ::.6 Ot. .-1( ,de cc. '- _  5.0  F:VESN- GTIrN  ,r  :-)1:;.,.  :.:nf7 invc,stiticn..-i :nt dir:cciinr. ... .. „j2ncy. Additionll infQrtion neded to clari ' l our a..3.ancy'J 1:- i;.):-.;,:li to Lhe informltion recited may be enterer] at •.__ aijr.sc,cy EEO acLivity. :H(711 of IL(..;:a 5.0)  (if 5.2  •-• ••  4  •  /7 vos /17 :10  r(A_t_tv.--mt sec Lions t:.;!..c.in which provid ,...! for.. of employr:.clit: discriination (whether sc:lf-initiated or bnn.ed upon complaints  s1.11-,m1ttod to yc.;,c  Ch.-2c?, the dc_cripticns that best describe the types of investiyations by yo!Ir ancy.  5.3  Type of Investigations ,1-7  5.4  5.5  5.6   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  //  Desk Audits (based on reports, EEO profile data, etc.)  //  Investigation by Written Interrogatory  /7  Fact Finding Conferences (attended by employer and employee)  /-7  Other (describe)  Basis for Investigations  /7 /7  Agency-Initiated Complaints  /1  Agency-Initiated Compliance Reviews  //  Other (describe)  Receipt of Complaints  Relationship to Other Agencies  /-7  Referred from Other Federal Agencies  L=7  Deferral of Authority to Other Federal Agencies  //  aeferred from State or Local FEP Agencies  //  Deferral to State or Local FEP Agencies  CCXYLENTS:  rumher of Investigation  MIMS.4440  • a...kite/WIMP.••••..  •••11.  ;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6.0  .1, vITT.-  flt.Lt! a 11%t r & rly ;11:encies; iticil to (_ ,,rcl,:tins i(em 6.5 Slate ::;(1 local, T.:1th whf(h rgrec,mr_mts arc uh,..1t..r dr_velt. Also  TH  copios or •-• ! 1 T. or 01..1 TITI,n or -r . ,!,fcccalL L It;  ••  4  I  •  C  r::.•rcc i-r:n ts  r-17 LA (I into 1,y  1. •  .1 •• •  Lc.)  ••  •  r  7.17 ycs  /-7 nc  •  •• •1•-  r  „  (IE  (  •••• •  C•  a •  17 yes 7-7 no l.rs) Lath 6.1 Lr1:1 (.2,  of this  ;:ir-) 3.  ne number of cf,n.1- 1aints derc.:rr In fY 79 (Thru 2/21/79) 6.30 6.31 6.4  . 6.5  Other Federal State and loc!al ajcies  Do you notify State and local agencies when you 6.40 6.41 6.42  Li ycz  Investiatc indivial complaints? Investigate class ccmplaints? Undertake compliance reviews?  /-7 yes  7 yes  L=7 no L=7 no L=7 no  Does your agency share findings based upon investigations or s compliance reviews with State and local governments? aye  L-7  Complaints Deferred to Federal, State, or Local Agencies Date of Agreement No. of Ccm=laints f. and Amend- CFR Type FY 19, FY 1978 I .or FR ment, if of 1 (thru 3/31 Aaencyli ,any Name of Aaencv -. Crtation  _ 6.6  ,  . -  I/  6.7  F.- Federal; S - State; L - Local.  cOMYENTS:  ,  7.0  Ai. I TIY,AT  PROGRA:IS (AAP's)  L11(..! followinj revarding Affirm,-Itive -cc(r3 rquir1 hy your aciency. Exclude intern- 1.. rr-p- ncy ,....(!ring the rillf:r3LIG.1-4, ,111 (locuinents rcc.ursted on the form.  •  i.re I to C1C: VC: 1. OP t1.,0 ri- f:t of ;'.1.5!-; :loction)  (rE  LI7  7• C;  I  71  -rzd?  .?d 's?  1.; no /7 Annually /  7 -1  yes  73iennially  1 7(.-)!:.71 7.3 7.4  7.5  ycu require that AAP's he suL:aitted to your- arjency?  C7  yes  L:7  r  1711 bases, inclu.ling .citation of regulations and guide-7 for "1.1%2s" answers in 7.1, 7.2, and 7.3, resp.Jctively.  Does your agency review All AAP's? // ves /7 no /7 yes f7 no If "yes", please describe sarlpling method  A sa. .Tle?  7.6  Number of AAP's Reviewed in FY 1978 Reviewed in FY 1979 as of 3/31/79 Total estimated to be reviewed in FY 1979  7.7  Does your agency use written criteria to select AAP's for reviews? L7 yes L27 no If yes, submit a copy of the criteria.  7.8  Does your agency use AAP's as a basis for initiating investigations? yes Z=7 no  L7  7.9  Does your agency provide technical assistance or policy guidance /-7 yes /-7 no in the development of AAP's? If yes, state under what authorities, A-nd attach copies of all such technical assistance and policy documents.  7.10  Do you require AAP's to contain a utilization analysis or goals and Li yes timetables? no  /7  If yes, please cite the relevant authorities.  7.11   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Does your operating authority provide for sanctions for / yes / / no Failure to develop AAP's? Failure to comply with provisions of AAP's? c7 yes /7 no If yes to either or both, please cite relevant sanction authority.  (continued)  e•••;,-,•+••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7. U  P1 •  cf tho  icit,::  1.1f;r2  of 5anct1o15  • •-- •  • '•••Iof '  F n ••',-  n  •••-• :• _ • F  Te.  t. ion  Cease. and Desist  7.13  your  .TS: CC:•"2.1  „. ,  1.97;3  r.•  • -  •  ••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  8.0  ACTIYTTTES  :::lude internal 1:,C1 legal activitie3)  e'N  C •  14-  r•-•  (check all le(jal activitic2s in wilich your 71grmcy ir; (7,ngrIgcd) a,-. :cncy in c(-urt whi:n (7.(ii:ncy surs. Litir:atic,n L:ar!jets.  •  1:3  clut activity (auvicory or policy de::elopmr-nt only) conciliation.  c  (specify)  8.2  Is your ia-ency a party to any court decrees or court orders that affect conuct of yot:r i:rogram or EEO policy /77 yes /- 7 no  8.3  If yes, list each case from which decrees or orders are derived and attach a copy of each order or decree.  8.4  Narrative (atach additional sheets if necessary)  '  9.0 LEO TRAINING (Exclude agency internal EEO activities)  In addition to answering the following questions, please attach copies of all EEO training materials, e,%clusive of internal EEO programs. Where EEO training is a part of a more comprehensive training coure, attach only thoc. , notons of training materials dealing with the conduct of EEO program activities. If there are no training materials, brief17 drcri1J2 in item 9.9 the EEO program training components or other methods used to train EEO perscnnel. Please add any additional comments your agency may deem helpful to clarifying your responses to the information requr?ste d. 9.1 . Does your agency train its employees who conduct EEO programs?  yes  9.2  If "yes", does your agency.need to make changes in existing EEO training programs?  yes  9.20 9.21  Are such chancjes needed because of changes in EEO program authority? Are such changes needed because of inadequate employee performance  no  /7  /7  no  /7  yes /7 yes /7  no no  /-7  9.3  If yes to item 9.2, briefly indicate (narrative) the changes to be made and schele for implementing changes.  1.4  Is your agency in the process of developing new programs or changes in existing training programs?  1.5  Indicate the number of training courses:  1.6  Does your agency train persons other than employees of your agency in EEO programs?  ).7  If yes to item 9.6, indicate the source of such trainees (e.g., agency and/or program)  .8  Does your agency conduct joint training with other agencies?  .9  COMmENTS:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  Held in FY 78  vc :. ; i  -.,  Planned for FY 79  yes L=7  no /  yes /7  no  /7  If yes, identify the agencies  2  10.0  EEO REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING  (Exclude agency internal EEO program)  *10.1  Does your agency require employers and/or other organizations to submit reports containing statistics of c:mpl -)ymenL, apprenticeship, union membership, etc.? yes no  L=7  L.2 If "yes", please attach a copy of each form and applicable instructions, ord2rs, and other issuances relJlted to it. If "no", skip the rest of this section. INFORMATION ABOUT REPORTS  II  10.2  Title of Report  10.3  Identification Number of Report  10.4  Expiration Date, OMB or GAO  10.5  Frequency of Filing (e.g. annual, biennial)  10.6  Period for which data must be retained by respondent (if none, so indicate)  10.7  Describe type of respondents  10.8  Sampling used, yes or no (If yes, attach explanation)  10.9  Frequency of agency analysis of the data  : I  10.10 In what agency programs are the data utilized?   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (continued)  . ....01.1•1.1.01111••• •••  -..mompepappipsimpwwwwwwillinlinIMEMOMIMP111111101MIMMINIUMIPPIF  II 10.11  Does the report require statistics on applicants? (Indicate yes or no)  10.12  Give approximate number of respondents  10.13  Are data shared with other agencies? or no) .  10.14, If 10.15 . 10.16  "yes", specify  (Indicate yes  agencies  Are OMB ethnic categories used?  (Indicate yes or no)  Cite authority for requiring each report, and specify basis, e.g., law, executive order, court order, MP requirement, etc.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7'1  4  4-  11.0  (Zo .i.:1L2rnal EEO activitis) infor:1;Ition on  slillitt.ad or curri.::ntly hcincj developed for sIlL:ni5sion to the 96th cf ,-111 ')3(.11 to ("SS  of Existing -, t: 4 c, r1 ff c . rf7  -4  11.2  - -jress Proposals in Process to be Submitted to 06th Co:.  11.3  If officials of your agency have testified before the 95th Congress on EEO issues, please attach copies of the testimony. If copies are not available, cite the appropriate committee report. Official Testifying  F.,,,r,ort Title  44.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ,  11.4  CC:.'2•'..ENTS:  Date  IMI   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  #  12.0  OT!!7R  1PPOP.t :.CYT7TTUS JL.  Gn t.1  • ... •• • ••••  12.3  1. ) ,0 l_tiuns for Liz! (Tncral vncy's FEO prc-27.:11 or policies? /-7 •  no  please 2.c..1 cf. such publicaticns. If EEO issues discussed in pilhlitions on °nor mlttcrs, p1eo ur-ply ;:itics, and s..-:nd r(.21,...:wInt EEO component.  your ago.ncy cuntracE with independent consultants, public iterest groups, or othek vc2n'f!ors, for the study of EEO issues? 7 yes / / no If yes, please give the m-Ime of the contractors, the topics of the contracts let or under current consideration in FY '78 and '79. 4  1*.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  13.0  PrancPP.'.1 P,TYDIET  . ',he following information regar,ling your agency's 7 (it) r.ot include information related to your If your : ; •;:cy'5 1-7 1 7? 1.)••• : ,Activitie3). from total monies allocati by C:'.3 If new staLutory of 1:.)t1 thc.! re'.4uest and the allocation. La your agr-.7ny's 0 2,rojra:n by copy of your agency's budget suhmission reflecting the r.--17 au 1.:11oc i Ly.  •;1  a  7  FY 1978  sjory  FY 17?  :Y 19%10  1/  I  2/ 12rogram Obligation Program Obligation  13.2  Investigation Co7,pliance Enforccmcnt, Litigation Training Publications D7Ita Program -- Collection, Processing, Analysis All other  13.20 13.21 13.22 13.23 13.24 13.25 13.26 13.3  1/  Total Personnel Compensation 1/  Personnel Utilization (positions) 13.4  Full-Time Professional & Administrative Clerical  13.40 13.41  •••••  13.5  Other Than Full-Time 13.50 13.51  13.6  Professional & Administrative Clerical  Program Activities 13.60 13.61 13.62 13.63 13.64 13.65 13.66  Investigation Compliance Enforcement Litigation Training Publications Data Collection Other Services  1/  Round to nearest $1,000.  2/  Enter totals in item 13.1 only if EEO program is a part of larger In that event, enter program name or title and a brief program. description of the larger program in item 13.7.  3/  Include personnel costs.  4/  Include benefits as a part of total personnel costs.  13.7  CO:AENTS:  BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  Y COMMISSION D506  To: rd T klulrenin From/EctZe   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1979  1  Date: Ob 0/77  eral Agencies Directors orton  C-  r`l? P  t7/  Opportunity  dr./ tif  ts to the Procedures f Handicap Discrimination ector rid 12067, the Equal bmits the attached gencies for comment and hed regulations should  :e Division Opportuntiy Commission .W. 20506  wfii  December 14, 1979. Attachment  10,J,979,,in order to are published in the comments are received, ue puolisneu in their present form on  • w  -- I)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  -t37-LLA, -1-44  ••  •  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION  V" .1-13$.. 1 .)e  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20506  o 3  1   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Nfrv  4/5  November 27, 1979  ' et Co  MEMORANDUM TO:  Heads of All Federal Agencies All Federal EEO Directors  FROM:  Eleanor Holmes Norton Chair Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  SUBJ:  Interim Amendments to the Procedures for Complaints of Handicap Discrimination in the Federal Sector  Pursuant to Executive Orders 12106 and 12067, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission submits the attached interim regulations to all Federal agencies for comment and coordination. Comments on the attached regulations should be addressed to: John Rayburn Director Technical Guidance Division Equal Employment Opportuntiy Commission 2401 E Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 634-6855 Comments must be received by December 10, 1979, in order to be considered before the regulations are published in the Federal Register. If no substantive comments are received, these regulations will be published in their present form on December 14, 1979. Attachment  .16  .  ,  ,  TITLE 29 - LABOR CHAPTER XIV - EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PART 1613 - EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT COMPLAINTS OF HANDICAP DISCRIMINATION AGENCY:  Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.  ACTION:  Interim regulations with comments invited for  consideration in final rulemaking. SUMMARY:  The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  is amending its regulations concerning complaints of handicap discrimination in order to authorize awards of back pay to applicants for Federal employment.  The  regulations are also being amended to make clear that a complainant has the right to file suit in Federal court if dissatisfied with final agency action, or failure to act, on a complaint of handicap discrimination.  These changes are necessary in order to  conform to the 1978 amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. DATES:  Effective Date:  These interim regulations  will be effective upon publication in the Federal Register and will remain in effect until final regulations are issued. Comment date:  Written comments will be considered  if received within 60 days from the date of publication   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  L   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  of this notice in the Federal Register. ADDRESS:  Comments should be addressed to Marie Wilson,  Executive Secretariat, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2401 E Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20506. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  John Rayburn,  Director, Technical Guidance Division, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2401 E Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.  20506, telephone number (202)  634-6855. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:  As part of Reorganization  Plan #1 of 1978, the responsibility for enforcing equal employment opportunity in the Federal Government for handicapped individuals was transferred from the Civil Service Commission to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).  To provide continuity  during the transfer of functions, EEOC adopted the procedures for complaints of handicap discrimination which had previously been issued by the Civil Service Commission.  See 43 F.R. 60900 (December 29, 1978).  (These procedures originally appeared at 43 F.R. 12293 (March 24, 1978) and are now codified at 29 C.F.R. §§1613.701 through 1613.710.)  Changes in these proce-  dures are now necessary in order to comply with the 1978 amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The 1978 amendments added a new section (§505) to  \  3  .  the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.  See Public Law 95-602,  §120, 92 Stat. 2982 (November 6, 1978).  Section 505  of handicap makes available to individuals complaining s and rights discrimination the same remedies, procedure le VII of the as are provided under Section 717 of Tit Civil Rights Act of 1964.  The legislative history of  intended it this amendment demonstrates that Congress as the judicial to apply at the administrative as well level.  s., See Senate Report #95-890, 95th Cong., 2d Ses  mber 20, 1978). 18-19 (1978); 124 Cong. Rec. S15591 (Septe In order to implement this statutory amend3.710 ment, it is necessary to delete Section 161 of the Commission's regulations.  This section  apcurrently prohibits awards of back pay to ap displicants for employment aggrieved by handic crimination.  At the time the Civil Service  only Commission adopted this regulation, the pay in statutory authority for awards of back Back Pay handicap discrimination cases was the Act, 5 U.S.C. §5596. (March 24, 1978).  See 43 F.R. 12293, 12294  Since the Back Pay Act applies  Commission to employees only, the Civil Service licants for prohibited awards of back pay to app employment.  This restriction is no longer either  necessary or permissible.  Section 505 of the  complainants in Rehabilitation Act now extends to  \  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  • 4  handicap discrimination cases the same right to administrative awards of back pay as is provided by Section 717(b) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  As a result, back pay is now available to both  applicants for Federal employment and Federal employees. Section 505 of the Rehabilitation Act also entitles persons complaining of handicap discrimination to file suit in Federal court once they have met the prerequisites set forth in section 717(c) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This new right is reflected in the amendment to Section 1613.708 of the Commission's regulations. As amended, this section makes the Commission's regulations concerning the right to file a civil action (§§1613.281 - 1613.283) applicable to complaints of handicap discrimination. These interim changes to the handicap discrimination complaint procedures are being made effective immediately as they are essential in order to bring the Commission's regulations into compliance with the 1978 amendments to the Rehabilitation Act.  Comments on these regulations  are encouraged and will be considered before the regulations are adopted in final form. For the reasons stated above, the Commission finds, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. §553(d)(3), that good  ii   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5  cause exists for making these regulations effective in less than 30 days.  In addition, 5  U.S.C. §553(d)(1) permits the Commission to make the amendments effective in less than 30 days as these amendments relieve a restriction upon the rights of complainants. The Commission has determined that these regulations do not require a regulatory analysis under Section  3 of Executuve Order 12044. By virtue of the authority vested in the Commission under Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of  1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C. §§791 and 794a, Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1978 (43 F.R. 19807), and Executive Order 12106 (44 F.R. 1053), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission hereby publishes the following amendments to its regulations on Equal Employment Opportunity in the Federal Government. Signed this  day of  1979.  For the Commission  • ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON Chair   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6  ,  Accordingly, 29 C.F.R. Part 1613 is amended by revising Sections 708 and 710, as explained below: 1.  29 C.F.R. §1613.708 is revised to read as follows: §1613.708  General  An agency shall provide regulations governing the acceptance and processing of complaints of discrimination based on a physical or mental handicap which comply with the principles and requirements in §§1613.213 through 1613.283 and §§1613.601 through 1613.643.  Nothing  in the foregoing shall be construed to postpone the effective date of this rule. 2.  29 C.F.R. §1613.710 is deleted.  MIL   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  United States of America  Office of Personnel Management  lk.ashInaton, DC: 20415  RoefT,  \  Rwevenct  November 21, 1979  MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISH:a:NTS  p e/n SUBJECT:  Agency Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program Reports  This memorandum transmits the format for agencies to report the progress of their Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Programs. As indicated in paragraph 4 of our issuance on the Governmentwide Program (Frn Letter 720-2) dated September 19, 1979, OPM intended to use information on agency program plans provided by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in lieu of requesting a formal agency report for this initial program year. However, the date for submission of agency plans to EEOC has been postponed, leaving an insufficient amount of time for opn to prepare its required report to Congress on program results by January 31, 1980. Consequently, OPM must use its authority under 5 CFR 720.207 to require agencies to report on the status of their programs. Agency reports must be submitted to the Assistant Director of the Office of Personnel Management for Affirmative Employment Programs, Room 7530, 1900 E Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20415, by December 15, 1979, in the format provided in the attachment. In addition, OPM will schedule a limited number of technical assistance visits to agency headquarters during the month of December to assess the problems encountered in implementing FEORP plans.  ///4 14 n4 K. Campb Director Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1979 FEORP REPORT  AGENCY: LOCATION:  1.  5 CFR 720.205(a) states that each agency must have an up-to-date Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program plan. When did your agency plan become operational?  2.  Attach a list of agency components, ind icating geographical location, designated responsible FEORP officials, and the dates component plans became operational.  3.  Were any instructions sent to component s regarding FEORP? attach copies.  4.  Identify the principal designated off icial responsible for FEORP, including position title and grade level.  5.  Indicate the total resources allocated to FEORP for FY 80 (both dollars and staff years). What portion is reserved for external recruitment activities? What portion is reserved for internal recruitment activities?  If so,  Note: Inquiries may be addressed to the ginority Programs, Outreach and Upward Mobility Programs Office at 202-632-6256. This report has been cleared in accordanc e with FPMR 101-11.11 and assigned interagency report control num ber 0233-OPM-OT.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D C. 20.503 OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  NOV 21 1979  MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMEN TS SUBJECT: Implementation of Public Law 95-507  Public Law 95-507, amendments to the Small Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, was enacted October 24, 1978. Section 211 of the Act establishes a program for small and small socially and economically disadvantaged subcontractors under Federal prime contracts of $500,000 or more ($1,000,000 for construction). Office of Federal Procurement Policy regulations implementi ng section 211 were published on April 20, 1979, and agency imple menting regulations were published in the Federal Procurement Regulation s (FPR) and the Defense Acquisition Regulation (DAR) on July 2, 1979, and July 27, 1979, respectively. By letter dated October 19, 1979, in response to a Congressional inquiry, the Comptroller General stated his opinion that contracts of the requis ite size awarded after the issuance of the FPIZ and DAR imple menting regulations should have contained the section 211 subcontracting program provisions. He also stated his opinion that those contracts requir ed to contain the subcontracting provisions, but awarded without those provisions, were "legally deficient." We believe that, although the implementing regulations technically were effective on July 2 and July 27, a reasonable time is required for their distribution and implementa tion through the system. However, it seems that in some cases the time for implementation has exceeded reasonable bounds. We understand that at the present time there are a substantial number of contracts and contr act solicitations that should, but do not, contain required subcontrac ting provisions. We recognize that Public Law 95-507 is a complex and difficult law to implement, and for that reason it merits special attention in each agenc y to assist contracting officers to comply with implementing regulations. Accordingly, I request each agency to review its contracts and contract   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  U.S. DEPARTMENT Of: LABOR EMPLOYNIE-:NT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION Office of Workers' Compensation Programs Office of the Director  -  U'ashinyton, 1).C. 20210  411  \A AS ••%6_  tt 74.  NOV 1 41979 4t4r;  MEMORANDUM FOR:  ALL FEDERAL AGENCIES  FROM:  RALPH M. HARTMAN Director, Office of Workers' Compensation Programs  SUBJECT:  Right of Agencies to Have Employees Examined  The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs has received several agency inquiries as to the appropriateness of agency arranged disability examinations for employees. This memorandum is to explain the difference between "fitness of duty" examinations and examinations which agencies arrange under their administrative responsibility to maintain optimal use of personnel resources. We have been informed by the Office of Personnel Management that when the Office refers to a "fitness of duty examination" it means .sa type of examination which is conducted when an agency has reason to believe that an employee may no • (because of physical or mental disability) longer be capable of performing usual employment. In order to arrange for such an examination, agencies must,of course, follow the procedures set forth by OPM. The aforementioned type of examination is not usually used by agencies in the case of a claimant under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA). In such a case, an agency may arrange for an examination (in connection with possible short term disability) to determine if the injury is still causing total disability or if there is any type of work which can be performed in spite of the disability. Such an examination is not performed for retirement purposes. The OPM has advised that they encourage agencies to arrange for such examinations because agencies have an administrative obligation to maintain an optimum work force.  Include your addres.r, ZIP code, and file number on all correlondence  -  ••••••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  solicitations issued since the FPR and DAR implementing regulations were published, and: (1)  amend all outstanding solicitations that should, but do not contain the subcontracting provisions, to include those provisions; and  (2)  where feasible, modify all contracts awarded that should, but do not, contain the subcontracting provisions, where modification to include the subcontracting provisions would lead to a greater utilization of small and small disadvantaged subcontractors.  So that we may evaluate the extent of non-compliance with the implementing regulations, and seek ways to avoid such problems in the future, I also request that each agency provide this Office by January 15, 1980, a report of (1) the number and dollar amount of contracts and solicitations requiring the subcontracting provisions that were issued without the provisions; and (2) the number and dollar amount of those subsequently modified to include the provisions. Should you have any questions about this matter, contact Thomas F. Williamson, Associate Administrator for Acquisition Law, on 395-3455.  , -' James D. Currie Acting Administrator   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  yv  - 11 0e-y7   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  /vt  a  t  p to•Ptoy 1.7ft'..  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20506  '...  • i (0,.. •ify  el' ^0 ' . Ow  November 15, 1979  -  OFFICE OF THE CHAIR   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  //°  MEMORANDUM TO:  Heads of All Federal Agencies All Federal EEO Directors  FROM:  Eleanor Holmes Norton Chair Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  SUBJ:  Proposed Amendments to the Regulations on Equal Employment Opportunity in the Federal Government  Pursuant to Executive Orders 12106 and 12067, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission submits the attached proposed regulations to all Federal agencies for comment and coordination. These regulations amend the Federal eaual employment oPPortunity complaint procedures in order to make clear that back pay and other appropriate relief is available as part of an informal adjustment of a comPlaint of discrimination. The Commission wishes to call to your attention the recent decision by the U.S. District Court for the istrict of Columbia in Shaw v. Library of Congress, F. Supp. , 20 FE? Cases 1483 (No. 79-0325, SePte:nber 14, 1979). This case holds that Federal agencies have authority to award back pay and a retroactive promotion to an individual complaining of employment discrimination, without formally deciding the merits of the claim. Thus, agencies need not await the final adoption of the attached reaulations in order to enter into informal settlements which include back pay. The Commission strongly urges agencies to make use of this authority and to attempt to resolve as many complaints as possible through voluntary settlement. Comments on the attached regulations should be addressed to: John Rayburn Director Technical Guidance Division Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 2401 E Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 634-6855   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  r to Comments must be received by November 28, 1979 in orde in the be considered before the regulations are published ive Federal Register for notice and comment. If no substant ished comments are received, these regulations will be publ in their present form on Tuesday, December 4. Attachment  •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  nvv:.-vrn  CHAPTER XIV - EJAL OPPORTUNITY • .4-  Dm  1" -ln  J.JJ...) OPPORTUNITY IN THE F7DERAL GOVERNMENT -1 r INfORI4A  -^r"7  AGENCY.  Equal Employment Cpportunity Commission.  ACTI3N:  Proposed ralema.c. •i .nz• „/„..  Equal  Jr.,cortuna.L.,J  is amending its /-,nc-ulations to make clear that back •  pay and othe  rclic.  an informal  as emtL-y-ent ••  emplo7e=  h-  5-17=CCr7P,e _ —  y  VI pp  "•^1  co:'::  1  ,  11:.• 01  ...1...(-411•2.  brouht  vv. ". 7  policant for  may be 2'.'"""nd by an  4.=.1,1!:;1 me.  t..• ... . ^. ..C,Vbe• -  =r1n107.'", v• ••• v  i •  ?ritten comments will  received with 4 n  days from the  o_ this  4- 4t-bm  ADDRESS:  Comments  4 n  r. 1^.1.=  of tuoll"on •  sl-a"=s -.=r4  nx=cu„ii - Secretariat Commission, 2401  date  "-•  Val  qua 7 Employment Oppor  2 J-  Street, N. W • , Washington 5 D.C.  FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  „-  John Rayburn, Director  Technical Guidance. Division, Equal Employment Cipt.or• s nasnin,e.„on,  tunity Commission, 2L01  D.C. 20506, ‘r=i 1 .=p'"one .• number (202) 634-6855. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:  part of Reorganization  Plan #1 of 1978, the responsibility  P  enforcing  equal employment —nortum_t%r in the Federal Government  was transferrc.d  r•-•.=  CZAn-I, 17rim  -•  „  the Ecual Employment Opcortu  ('0") LL  Le  •  To provide Continuity,. EEOC adopted, on nn int,erim• basis  the equal employment opport—nity e'omplaint pro-  Cedures issued by the  Service Commission.  43 7.R. 60900 (Dc.=:Lber  7,0  • 4_ complain,  / 141  197 , •  procedures have teen trnns'=rrPd  t  See  ••• . )  ,  r•-•  •  "••••) a. CI....  •  )  •_▪ •- R•  now studying  possible revisions in these complaint oro^=dures .in order to reduce processing delays and rrov_ae _or n effctvP mPnns  V V  „,= " •• I V.•1 • v  Cr  -  es+"  c• 4-  crimination. -- t ure  •  pl^es-=nt  i  which the Commission  s..•  •• V6  4.4. 4. V  , v.,  v•  h • throuzn in.ormal  current reiz . u-  Under  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  lations, the Parties to-n.compl= 4 nt n -e consider a voluntarv settlement of  -4 -$.-1  e•-,  matter boL„n  during precomplaint couns;.-ling and at the clos,n, of th= investigation, prior to the issuance of a p-onosarl .L  disposi,,ion by 1613.217.  agency.  See  nv-A  Li • -  One factor which has inhib 'ted informal  -settlements is the. uncertainty, on the part of many. agencies, as to their authority to award back pay prior to a formal finding of discriminPtio, •  EEOC has  •  studied this question and concluded that such awards  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  may be mPd- unde” !muthority'..  .2  2 v..,  , 1- •  howev-,1,• to 1-P ,..,')7ve  •  11, -..,-•'—w.-".2 t0"--r  1  .  this question,•EEOC is amendi-  on  e  regulations to  " ....  expressly authori-P awards of tck pay and other approcrintn relinf  p  ... 1 e me nt  or.mal  of a comol=lnt. 7-7T:=-71-1  rrqn  Pu..xclei4 tv  411..  7 ^ "  tions is found in ,Pction 0,  e'N  4.  WILY  ••••  _ lorL  Ri7hts Act  16.  42. d  . 14 • ••  — dis  ••••  •7  •  _• n .7.reaeral  •••  "..,  , 1 1Cn..17.,  1  ,•  J41s)2 -[101  -4AY  ...•• • 2 4-  4 f-Nr ,  -•••  • .--  • '1 In  .anDY1r101 .1-1.  ••••1 .4  •1  .dr  ,••-•  . .  .  tack pay, and  such rules, regulations or crders as  •  conqider.Pd necessar7 • t'N -1 •  the.statu  1 4.  -V  ,L  auL,horlity to ,-.1 1- P--4 1ne •.•  4 so r 4.1r.• 1  a  i•  rr P' ' s—• -1  •'%  •••r2  under what  stances back pay and other relief could oe awn'de' ' - in FePdP-al  4.  A •  This ,-)rr'd  cases.  •  authoritT „ has now b=n-  --  '  :-eorgani. t 1, 1.-•  By authorizing awards of •  settlements, EEOC will be carrying out thP both Title 'TIT  Civ;1  • ‘ 4 •  r• 1 •-•  and Idne  4:"  •  .L  es r  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Mla7 = 4. a LI .aa  conc. ' , 1-!P :to_  -,-,--1 ....-",„.  n1-1:z.rnnnt-1 z....,....- -..-..... a ,r•L  means  ....t.„0 equal .‘'-' •I 1  a' V 4:4  3  ..., _ .....:. 4 „ -..... v settlement. h.-1v...-  by  -. -"t "r1 r•-. 7( I' -, ...- ........-,.. ...i.  . , ..zc.'nr,-, -.16--...)0  vment opportunit.y.  G r n e r -1;s n.1-4:'r .  .1 -„H -,-  -  •n •  •  th  4 2-ht  See, Alexan er v.  (1974).  iri the private  a  „  •""  L ••••.' ' • 1  47 CI  ••••  ,  a ..,  -  •  r1 4  •  •  ler. in  •-• , .r..% n  1-1  •••,  ••  •, •  ••• -  ••  : a a  it  •  •• • •••• .•  1 I... v.  •  make  •-•  (•••  ••••  6 •  19  /-1  -5.--,'-. •••• • • a  . A. 7 ,1  -•7 2 1  aa  O's ba..)  •,•. 14^ ••••_ .4 .7• • a a• .••••• a ' a ...  -7.  alAa.14 S  •  hare  " •  •••"1  4  — • •-• • .....  •  .70  the matter soori aftr  ,...  the  4-4.1  •  ,  ,-.=  v'tle).^:n.=A"t". 1= -• a a  a..sa  •.•  •  •  1• 77  1 ....  - 411 -1 .. r4.  1,, , 1 1 ". • ^ a • aft r  -a  oacy: pay awards  a a  -• a  •••  v a a S  4-77 --  —  r  ;  informal  '  supported by the recent dcision of the •Th •  •  -  A- •  ld  S  ..  _• 4. 3•  • • "y.) Cs. -" / 1 4..  (NO.  o-n;21--;  2 .J.  nie  States  of Co 7 umbia in Shaw v.  i 4.  7 3  2.0  -77-1 -  1 S  e• a‘I'let A-  1!. -A-  •  a  'la  held that =-1 Federal ai7ency does have authority to award back pay to an individU=1 complainin  of employ-  •  merit disc-Irrir=inr  'P'V^Tlly  •ieoidin  S.. •  •  I 4  ., '.. 1  (I', .(-; 1,  I  I il.) .1 .t,-.; D.) :• • 4) -4 -I '.-1 ''. -' .... -1 ., (1) ..- 1 r4 , 1--- I (IS r) Cl ,  : *.. / .) I  .r I 4;) (1) S: 1/)  51  (..) C. i  •( I C1 (iN  k1 1  fl i I -I ... ;  "  , 1'  EA  I( \  14)  •  ." .1 ) 0 `'.1. ,  :.a (li (.1 1  ()  1)  1) .t:  "  •-i;  1  if)  :1 .4.) fn  .1 I  .. 1' r; t -; i 1 , ro  (Ti ' .1  QS  I  I (I) -4 I  i .) S:  t,  re I  'Ci  ft)  Oa  rn -.1 I • 0  c(  tli A1  c. 1  (J) (1)  rr.1  F. ;  ro .4.4  L  s..4, q)  C)  t1  f.). 0  4-1  't.::  i)  54  LI•i  )  r:)  C),  r i  0 •r- I ‘i) .(.  A:,  f)  !:.; (1) ::•1 I 1)f)  • 1  (1). ,;:)  (1)  : (I)  r• 1 01  Ell)  :1  (I)  I  . c.:1 •.4.1  " -- 1 C.)  -.1  ii1  4 .\  n  0  0'  •c-I c.: ,..1 I  'CI  ;4 (1)  -- ()  (1)  r---I • al  (...)  'r1 (i.i (1)  S), (_)  ..4 () 4...  SI et I  1 -4,  4 -N  ;'")  C.).  (.)  i•i  -I "  .(:  tf;  1  4)  .1. I C .-4  f4-4 :  (1)  r4) -I C.--1.  rf) I  .r  ci  -I  C(1  4-"  r  ())  F-4  11)  0 C. .  .0  --',  1)  a)  .;-•  *, (45 0.  1r-,, .C' (II cli -,C)  .4)  *I- 1  4-)  rO (5)  CO  71 .1.\  4  n  -FA  .1. l 4-1 10  •:.'  /()  -0 vi  to  (1)  4'1  el) ,--4 .1.1  1-i  I).  rf) 4)  :-  J.)  .' . ?-7,  (I)  ' ..s.':  41  41)  ip>  (1)  - 0  , 4)  (13  4P F1 (p. ,C.: .1 ,  54  ;.1 (n  0  0 .C1  .-.41 . .--1  .c::  r, 1  0  (I)  -ii  F.:  ai  :1  41:1 h  (I)  •4-4 ..  4-1  . c::'  .....1  .  :.)  '.. e  :.i  ( 4 1  C .-4  0  W  r.:  --4 . a)  t „I 1  421  .t-)  C.)  .1- (  ro -,- I E.: .ri cti  0  (li  . 0) .  .....tr' ) 1 oi gi (I)  • ....: ()  : 1 0  H  g.1 C)  IT.)  '', (", ,  ti  •, -I  *1 1  -1-.1  :::-•,)  hi) A t  1-"71  s•N-1  .r -I  cl, ( 7 )  \1-..1  ' c4) -I  ;, 0) 0, Qi  't.I (1) 1 :) 1..). .0  •4'i.-'. 1-.; (.) e) •r i:1 -  r-i  -41 51 (P  T.I •  ,(:  r--1 -; I  ,r-',  .41 . r- I  a)  () (/)  . 4/3  ,•.1  ,1Z 1  , 4:. I ... (1)  • •.-1  . ( r) -- 1 :--1  70  0.  4')  C. I  5-  ,, iFtI,i  ET:  4)  -...  1-.i 1. I (1  ',I( -. 4). 111 1 i,: :  (..)  U 0  r44  ,D • ::' .4-I 4` ,71  a  0  (Ai  I" \J  rr (  ' 4 .--1 0 (.: 4 .•.,  tli  •f- 1  11 F' -1: i1 I I 1 :3'1 :-. 1 1 i ri i r.1 11 1 Ir: 11 :  I 1.  4 .'r i 1 1. C' t) 11 ..:.-e. 4 si : i 1'l I Iii  1  I" .r -I  i ti 4_) , . I  4  1.... t  '; 1 i I 111 LI  •i i  IT/  T I)1  51  .,_1 ,  '(ki  S1 0  0  :1 .0  Col .,()  ri)  c. , 4  .71  (II lf)  41  n  C: ., -I -1." ..--I r.) :r_-.11 • 1:  (I) ,....... , 4 ..)  to  Ill (.-..) I- -1  E.: 4 [.. 4  ill (7)  -1-1  ' :  .  1 ., 1  c: -. I  141  (Ai  .., . ...  F; ..  "  :44) ;  ..,..  (.4.  .; I  (-)  F,0 ,1 :  I ;  .7....  1.15  0  0  - ;--7.  '1'1  . 4• 4  ut  I1)  , I 41 4)  (14  . tl)  :  " I;  11 c)  I ,- .  , .. ,4 41i ()  :: ; (.1i v..  to rib .( 4  ..• .  ('I  .-.  F;  H  (1?  in  (i)  .4 I  ,..- i  . (/)  (I,  (1i  1)  4) -,- I  - .4  S..:  0  C.-1  r-1  (_) -,4..) 41  ... ..,  41)  ..• I :' c;  1)  oi  445  (11  I- I  r-I  ,( ••• •  0  ,r  tH  -,- 1 40  (kV  (i)  C) ) 1 (1.  -g I (). ••  I :I :z ..- -I ..  •• I  1)0 ) (11 54  Ei  0 cl 4 •)-I r. 01 ( 41  C)  . 1 1  5-1  0 1 4  4,1'1  :1 ' 4 1 .)  4/)  C)  '' I ',---.)  I  W.  .  5'1  .4.  :z ..;ii S. (II ::: V. :.1  5$ ( I  't 1  J. ),  .( : .4 )  (i) 4  . ( 41. , 1  '(1  '1 1  ,i)  (ki . • I (I)  : •I r; t  ): .4 *I I  41)  :1  in •.. i . F..; i.4 i  ti,  *4 .  ;  1.C,  :::  .  •• • 1'  . ':.  ', ••• •  4  •-.:  4  Ali • .1_1 •,--.1 1: -g• I r  1:) .., ": 10  't1  (, 4  F-4 .0  I -  .--, rsi  ., I  t )  (-)  I.!)  4 4 (/)  44)  .4 ')  : 4:) -, I  f- I  -I  ri  . rf )  :1  0  'AI:  (f) q1 F; (k/ ..--: tki  ....)  I. )  ri  •t)  tit  I1\ 4.4; 7.."C.,1  (1)  . r -4  ;I;  'r:'•  •  'I.  -4 I • I,I  ' I I .7  1)  1  4) !: i t 4  ....$)  T(I) 1 T'.  0 .,  :  ., 1 I •'• 1: (4)  I  I)  r) 4) r • .... I II 71 .1 ) ( .14 , ' I 41)  i  !.. (I)  111  , a () , . .t.1 1  (i) 4  ; ". -r: I 711)  :•--., .1 1 4.1)  4.  •-• 1  :1 , I c4 rt ;  1 -'  ,... -I l  .l. ;  : 1 4- 1  c)  tJ  !•-: 411 Ii.  :->  I -C.  " II  C)  '.". -J (V. I41  rti  %. k ()N .. I '4.4  i)  cl  -I  .C.:  Ili  4 1. 1  (; 11  g' , .• 1:  .1-1  .4)  (1)  r I  141  0  ii$•  'I 1 41; I., . et  4  ' I 411 „C. i '.-ro C  . •,- I  I)  •• 4  -r-4 r -1 0 0.. -1)  (1)  (1)  .'--.: .4 I  4- I '.-• 1/  -1-1.  0 (C4  .1 \ r•  ." r,. 4 (1)  Ti F.1 1.11  H.  .(-: )1  . : (1,1)1i -r- I 01  I.  :s-.. 4 I .(1) F;  -1 /  ..--, 4) -4 I 5, 0 .r• ;-•  r I .. -I  I /  1-.1 (U. r• ... -; I # ...  (li  7,1  () c..  -. 4  ', I  S':, C)  ( )  : -) -i-i 5,  1)  ,. :. I (i C;  415  '.---:  (1) (it  (4  ro  ,i) it)  r/  0 .1) i1 (. .1-i 51  r) tki  1 1,  (:4  •!--I  tli  C) r) ro -, I. 4 ." • 7,C)  fr : 4..)  () ..(-1 4) • 4. 0;  '.• ; 4) ., i ft)  .  11  -I) C: ., I ck; .  1-2 :  1  fi)  c:  I- I 1 -1 1  .r..1  -. 1 (1) r.:..: C) (1) (11 . ;, (1) ::`  c .1 I 0  (r.  ( 4 i  -r I  t•) i- .I  ri) -r I  i.":1( . 1i  5-1  '.‘. C) .r -1 -1-) 7:1 r-. 1 0 II) a)  CJ  e)  r- - I  S: 01  ' i j  54  -'. V I 1" F -I  r .) ;i .i) (1) :7•':.  •1 I .!.... -I--/  • 1-: - 'i 1  ,C) .c.: ()  (1) EA)  CO al -, i 4-)  0 ‘* • -1- I f --I 1) 01  C.:  5.  'rl  61 . 171 . r) 1)  :  ,e, -1:r C I  0  V.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  C)  (;)  I  ro I ( I  /  (11  (1) )  .;) . 4 ; 4,  (!) II)  1)  (t.1 t ), tr.):  .  i) - -i - I 4.5 (II .i. 1  t1) Ile  -I  •  (1) ' . .. A  f ,!' '... :  ., ,1 -I ( (1 I 1  -, I  I •1  4. •  Oi  (t.1  (! i I i, I 1  ••  to ,i) ,I . ()  (j)  A: ./ ) . o.ti ro  I' ,_;(,  .1 4  ,C,  10  S: IIII 1  ,:-.,-;  (1)  ,*,  (t) ()  ..:;  ()  (-)  ( 1)  1  (L)  I)  4c  si)  ID  r .  -I ' '...  .()  ,.  ,' .  (  (II  5- I I) I •  A; i -•  -I N.  r.  i) 05)  1-1. 1 .)  ;1) I t-4  I (5'l •• I  ',. 1  .f 5  ....  (I.,  1  (31  • .1  ):  1  III  ,si 1i.)  i,/  •i , ... ;  1".$ t,  I. 1  5 I 51 1 /  .:  1  I  •  : i. I  1,  c. ,) 1  . .1 .  IA  .  •,-1 ,c.: I  S: •1 -3 1 ) °, I  •r:I  .- :•  1-,(1  ,I:s  (I)  .  ;0 .)  Oi ,‘  ,.ti -',  /  . ' N ' a  01  ,() 14)  ;1  di :  -, .1  0 •r. I in  II)  "  f. •  I  (7) . i  41 Oi S:  :I  U)  ( )  '(.1 4 .1 S; (1) ( -.  ::: Li)  cl  11) •••.:  (1  $.-;  (II  I  I, I  •i - I 0  ''- I I -1 :..1  (4 -1 1'")  4-)  o -I  (11  F1  c)  ill  .()  c, ,  0  .  (..)  1 1  (I)  .11  ., I  `r ..1  (I)  n.  .  )  ,( : ro  r -4 r I  ;I  (I)  T.  ;l1  (I)  (I)  ..--/  • .• • (f)  (-)  ft)  .,- I  -,  ..  ( . .i  1  ()  :"...  r)  li.•  g  (ii  .C4  (j)  t •:'  tifl  (1)  C4  C>  .1 I  r)  -1.1  '11  ;‘1  (0  CO  •,- i  .., I  0  r• i  .C .  id  .(..:  -5. I  I ... •• •  7.0  .../  I  "CI  :1  7:1  ,(...,  1)  l", I  .v. .:  4)  14)  q)  fit)  ., I  I  [, 4  (1)  ii  (1)  C)  ...-1  --..  ',:i  ri  (1)  0  (11  • 3'  . `,.  -1-)  1 I  ''-1  r)  r --1  .' I  S..: () •5 I  0  0  -r1 r,..4  • -1  -I 1  CNI  1-1 01  s......-  ,(. 4.1  0  . rf  , k•_1 (:)  C.;  (I)  o ciii  i -1  i,d-  (I)  .  0 . I)  .. r)  g-.:  (1)  (i)  '1)  C.)  . •>-: (1)  '(')  f.:1  -I \  ,C:  • .5.1 C)  r•  !... co  41  4  (I)  r.-- !  f,;i  I -..  ., .1  g I  - il  C.,i  1--I  -(III  . (1)  1. - "1  ',.; I  . (. III 'r i  1I.i  .., I  .1  (j)  41)  ' ' 1 .1  .1-1  .  ;i  (1  --15 ( .',I  i ';  . : 1;11)  5- )  (.: 1;0  r0  (2) 7)1)  01  (I'  a.) • .,.(-: .1:'  $  1.1 I  F I  'Ci  ;i •0  Cs.r._!(:)1 *. 1  (---' '... -r-I  .15.!: (.' ..:). gi (,)  ••C 1 1 I -, --.  C4 1  .  Co I  0  ,(.:  ..-{  -:-/).  g-• c.),  I --1  ol)  ', I  0  10  .,111) ...1 . (1 i  ' Cl':() 1 ..I  ". I  I  I  ;:  r -I  ,,C,  4  ', ),  r)  -I $ .1 -1' .  ,  t', : :11  j)  '  (.I i f  t: ,..  ';,', (") . l )  .., i  ‘.• :  -. 1  • ri I I  1'  -;: .; I  11)  ;i  r 1 C I  .1 i  r)  •-: 0) (11  (1') ,C; .1 )  g1  ("(1.: 4) •,;: 1)  .  .  .,I :  1:k 1  0i  k 11 i  C i  •  '...  .()  :  •• ) r. i  (1)  i  1:11 ) I:)  01  I :.  -5 I  II)  i.'. •  :: • 1",  4  ,• ,  i)  t ' ri ,  :  1  1)  I  •  .-5 I  (kJ il./  .,..',  •It1)1.  I  $i, I  !,I  :).  (.5  1'. ...  ..6  (.)  .1  r. .o  ..1.  1  I .  ! -,, 1 *)  . ..,.  WI •  ,  .if  : , 11  1;  1.0  (1)  iii  5.. )  IA  5,1  10 /  I 's li i  .-)  . I. 1  I  (1)  1. :, I I  i  Oi  I ).  (I) A .;  ro' 1 do ' 'i  0 C1  !:: l ,  t") ,C,  Cil  (.(1--/I I. 10  r-3'  0  : g7.1 )  ro • (I)  ( . 1 I  ::::  .';',. •.: :', H.  1„0  ... .-  H. J_.1  (1)  'i t  II'  : ',,  . -. I  •A )  it)  !. :  I'  (. -kl ., , .  .•I i  y. i _  0)  ., • C7 : 1  -11 •C' o I  ., I  (),  , .z , ; i;)  I'  .,  (i) .„  , I  '., . ., I  F()  ti)  I  ..ra l  („) 4)  .7)  0  ,....  If)  •r - I  • :. 1  (1)  ;-1  't I  5  ,I)  .., I  v! 5) I.: 5..1 A ; !, ;S.', I'  io  A; (II  •  :i  11)  i: •  (.1 i  '.. •  (:) .7..)  , t .  .1)  i  I 1  0  ii)  ,.::  oi .c)  ,t ) :1  ., i  .. •  (1  -I  ii) 'i 1  1.;  r,  '.. :  II)  •• I  el ,  S..'5  il) F1  I'  1. 1  (-) ,I :',  i-: . (I)  (.1 5 ";  r -,'  . r.1  ..r.:  i  5p  :--.,  Fi  I N  •,  !.,  Fi  (I',  1 r)  .1  .  5 ,  '.). 0  1),  i• -.,  II)  (-)  q I  •rs  r0  r  n  5),  ..--.  ;,  `ii  •  -C) ilt  ,',.:  ..C) .  C-1 1 •  .11  I'  It)  (-.)  r, ,  C)  (-)  (), .  -5 I 0i  ( I)  Cs C.  4-)  ....,  GI  :1  ( '.4  ,15  '-'• (L)  ro  (I)  r- I I  .15) (1)  I . • ;.  I "/  •rl  11.) (I)  :;"-.  (11 t• .. 1  '.(",  oil f: 4  ";  .. I  (tj  r).  S.;  U./  til 4) (1)  :.-)  (I)  n 1  •-•  ,  ,4 i '  (1)  (3)  .:  .  4)  r I  I r e)  -1' -  I  •1 - 1  I i' I  t-,  •./  : •- 3  r -1 -i  (II  , 1  •:,,_),  .r  i:  I)  'il  ;' 1 ;  1() „ ,;  11)  10  ;1)  .1 1  11)  ..1.N  .c:  5.1)  *  .  0)  0)  ()  1,0  o) ;•4  • -4  .1 '; g1  0.t  'Cl3  al  •I'l  ;1  il)  ..C.)  ;/)  t-- 1  :: i  ai  ::'  11)  ;I  (I)  r -1  -c-i  1) .4  C.)  4---4  kC)  •- I  r •5.  (r)  ( g_1 1 ,  (3)  1.. • ill  (3)  !.: •,- 1  (I)  :1  g4 oi  C4 f.),  •5_1  (I) r.)  -1. )  o) 4,-)  .1 -.N  4:1  :1  g-4  1  'F 1  (It •••  3.-i  g-1  -i• I  (1)  0  r, ,  7r i  c":  CI I .  0  1-1 -1-) ';"1 ' il 1  GI  4-.). s:: 3)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  D  ' . e  ., 1  •; i i • ei .• I  r I  .I.  . ,, if/ to f: i  I. 1  1  I o  1  s: ..  : •-•  4  r)  r)  (1)  r• I (ii  ,.  :.: 1  r)  4  'ci r,  rf)  11 •• 1  : I  (.)  5t  Cl;  r1) .''.-  .11 •r -1  r‘?  II)  A;  14 I I ,  t) 4  s: -,1 c.)  $ ',  ; ii ;  '.; i  A r  ..:, ;  CO  gt  : *,  .; i  tti  (1  I • 1  .  . $  t • •'.  (I.'.  I \k  fI I  1  1  ... •I I  54  -,')  .T. i  I  '... :  .•  ,. 11  I  ...  ,  . 1  :: ]  CO  • .. ,  .4 1  . s)  1,-1  I .•  S:  li's  1 .:.  o; 1- I  •4 i  .. I  1  •  (ti  :-..•  ...,1  :1 0  ' '„,..  Y.,  '' -o $  I1 :1  !)  I. )  C41  `,--..  1.1 I  t)  ki,',  i: ()  ,  c)  ILI  !-:  fo)  A:  1 )  ... ; -1  1:).  I •  . i'  ... o.  , ...  -$  Ill i  I  ;  i'  .•  .1  r I  I  , •  ''.  .,. :  2.  ,-. )  •) I .,  I 1  .- C,  ...  $ ,.  • .;  )  , i  I  ...I  r, ,  i') ••1;  • j:  I  1 I ..  .' .  •  (I) S. , 1  .i ) • .  .' i  (I/  ,i)  • ..•  4  :i :  I  ri  ( ••  ( 1  'I)  1'  •• 1  '7 i  I  •!I  ., I  .  . o  j  :  -, f .. 1  ,o,  ., i •.  i:  iii  1 .5  (1)•  41)  tli 1 1  ,' ') 1  Ij)  (-, I  1  7,!i  1'  t:  .0  rAS  e I  1  !  I, I  (• .•.  i:  %ii  IA  r.)  ()  (11  l'i  0,  .- 1  ...  . 4  rki  (,)  .  fo••• /  f.i)  11)  .  . 1 I  r 1-," .  r  I I  .c;  11.  I  $;  .;  a  ,•  fi)  :--.,  I  :1  •  •,.'  IP  1  61  t:  ri)  r  .• .  5,  %  ',1  r--1  .4•-1  ry$  Ft'  gI  .1  ,. .... I. '  ...1  C„)  il:  'cl  0  V)  ,t", -II  c:  •r)  w  (....  '1 -)  ,: ( t:i1 :ii:. ) : -: ,t:C) ;  .C.  •4,-1  ••, I ,..,  .1 i  ., 1  e  1 •  1'1  t)  r,..,  (-1  I.P  C) ( -1  (I)  Ali  ($  . !,I I  )  S;  01  1  -1•1  I  I.•  .. I  (I)  .r :  (I)  (I)  .1-N  I)  '  r..)  .i ',  1,0  ;.'  S; -. I  ,,  i..:  ...: . ,()  ., I !:.  ....  s:', .  oi %. $  ..  i  .•,1  (-) •oi 1  -• I  •  l. I \  t ,.,  .1 21  III  s; -, I  .( ' ,  f t)  ., ff)  k.r $  .1 i  .., 1  I  • .  (ti  ft)  -• I  (1)  r.  ot  .:4 I  ... '' .. 1  i '  *4 . I  -..  "I  1.• ')  i' 1  if)  •(1  ti i  ., 'CI  !._;  In  4 -1  .C.  ,(-; I  •(•)  I r)  1_, .1  w  (()  .'.  .1'  r-,-•  F:1  (2) F-1  1 -I  .  7': 1 ). I  • o',  .  c)  ri;  ..- 1;  1  . II,  -I '  , I  c.:  .1)  .- .  •  (lc  e. "  () 1 ..  ...  .1)  C.)  ....  I  .- ) w  4 1.•  .! -I  c:... .4  (11  'i .1  • ) ...  ,..  tki  -. I  i,. I  ,l )  IA  ,r•; . 1.  'I.'.  -r•I  CI i  I  rf)  .*.1  : ili .,::  11)  •• i  () ., i  .1 N  ()  c)  (1)  .0  :.•  I- I  ,(1  ti)  in  C:.  i:  c) ., 0 •r - I  c..)  -. i  f.: (1)  4-) -  . 1  .-:.  !.A1  ••'.1 ... PO  i,, 1  :-:  I  • i;  i  .  ',' ';  I, . t • i k t )  I,; 1: .  1  I: ‘'.  'I  ( ,  ' I 0;  f' )  1 1 1  (ti  C11  A;  (..)  ci .  •,' 1  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (Ii II)  :1  4- 1  I  4 -.  7 *.()  I  I  ,-  )  f:;  :.1  . f.ri  •  .; 1  (1)  .•  (Ai  :  .1  (  (t I  r  .1 r 1  yi  !  k 1 ! c). )  •  .1)  •  11  *1  •  ()  '!) ••  !)  .•  I.  t  • 1  t  !  •4 I  rs (  i  •, 1 1 • 45  .4  1  \  1: ; 1 .. i  •4 4  4,1  .. I  I  .• . , 1 4', i  •'1  . I  .  (:  I  .  I,1  " .1) C I t 1  I,)  iI 1  1 4  r r I  S: 1 '  :--, I'  !.:  'S'  II 4  *4  FA)  ,- 1  .1 .;  4.1i Cl  •,  ,  C.:4  ' S )  ,-, i 4 I  1,4  ..ti  ,  •. I t,, 4,) ,  i  ,j, I  II , tii  I. ,  ;:  CO  ttt  ! I  4: ,  I.,  r:4  ( .1)  /.)  •  ..  ' -i i  .1 !  .  fs. : .t I  ...,'. ).S  ....t• (tt  I  tp  4')  ti  1' :  '1 1  •;  ,1  (') f .•  •  4I1  .1 't  : ...  ..41  4i)  '  1•  . i  I I  *44  ,I  j  4.4  ).( 1  (S'  r)  <II f/)  r1  4  . • I:  II)  C .1  , -• 1  *4 I  •• 4  I,Ii  ,.C4  (I)  CO  (1)  i I ..  .....,  r. i  4  II,  ., I  •:1,'  .6.. •4. ..• g  i  iii  .,  I  ( i  ) 1 1 1  I  (1)  1'  '4:1  1  ill  41)  I-)  .• , ,  1 49  ,( :  I'  :—  -, I ().  •I  j I 1  -. 1 ft:  -, 1  :: I  (.,  I  1' 1  I -I  *4 I  r,  -' ...,  -.--i  ..: -:,  :  (•t  0 C-..)  41.4  (.: . >.  if) •,1  -.-1  ',: i  'I)  (I.,  :-, 111  : -i  : 1 I.; , 1  !.: , :1  1i)  ft, f:-i  .1  :1  ., 1  4 4.4 .' 1  •i I 'I i ) I:)  .t, : 1 I  .1 I.  ( 4  ',, . C). I t  41)  :4) 'i 1  I  C4 . •I  (I;  1) .1'  'I 1 ; ';• 70  1=4  I  r .. I  (.). (11  .1  r) 4-i-1  r7i  (I  :,.  C)  ti)  .lii  (r)  ' I  •  ft 1 I ::: 4),C  ..--. 0.4  t 1 .1/ (14  .-) •I )   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ( 71.  •  •  •! (  1  ,$  .' I  ;  ')  4  .  4  I,  7:1  I  ° 1  1  . I 4 !, lo  I, i 4.; '. I  I I  1.' ;.  4•. \  I  Li)  t  !  ••• (*.j  C..)  4' '1  ••• e i. -',  ; .  0.1  (I)  I ii  I_)  1  f .. ,  1  I  •  •.-.  )  !! ,  (  ,  ! 4, .1  .';  .11 . 7 1 fij  I  I  ..; :  ..  ';  or )  -4  1  i  I "‘  ...  1  Ii  ....4  1  !. .1 1  I  6 : I  1 :  f' . 1  .  :: :  I  $  . 1  0  •  !,• 1  1  . 1  :  I  TO  .  1  ..  A  r4,  (;)  ... (1 ) .  ;  '1  ;7 i  !  7i  1  4-41  (;) , "..  —  (4  1, 1  ;‘,',  4 ,,  !....  I'  (.7 1 •;)  4 I . i  .i )  •  -..  ,. ,  ',..,  ! 4  4 e  H  04  •••1  r. I  •,  t. t  ci  '• ).  ()  1 -  4 )  (. )  . i (1 1  i  ! ,  ON I— I  \, )  1  V  1  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  =MEMM.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10  Accordingly, it is proposed to amend Part  1.  Lot  • ;1..  I  I. •  . 1613 by revising Section 217 as explained below: 29 C.F.R. Section 1613.217 is deleted and replaced by the following: Adjustment of complaint and offer of  §1613.217 hearing. (a)  ThC  agency  arid,  .  by mutual mal  complainant may, enter into an infor-  • "jut,mant z, , of a complaint at any time  from the initiation of precomplaint counseling until the issnca -  " = final agency  decision on adiustment.o_ a comclint may include an award of •  ('c)  pay  :=17,o71  other  hanava- an adjustment  plaint  the corn-  .--ivad at, the terms of th.,  adjustment shall be reduced to writing, with a copy of ,he terms of the adjustment provided the complainant.  A copy  of the terms ofthe adjustment shall also be made a  of the complaint  (Where the adjustment is arrived  during  precomplaint counseling, a complaint shall be established -and the terms of ,he adjustment made part of it.)  If the azency  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  11  does not carry out, or rescinds specified  AZY-Irric,  of  •••••  any action  adj'astmnnt-  for any reason not attributable to acts or conduct of the complainant, the agency shall, upon the complainant's written request,  the complaint for furt'ner  processing from ,he point processing  cmac.Z.nd  under the terms of the  (c)  If the prtie- have not entered into  an informal adjustment by the conclusion of the investigation, vide  •-•  olcq_ortunity for  . , N• • ,4  iew M. L1St  d :t 12.z,.tmnnt of the  complaint on :s.'n informal basis after the ne-Nrrn1  file  -3 r,==n-  nr-ss rnviewed  th.a  •.v  -  4-  For this purpose, the agency shall  furnish the complainant or his recresentative a copy of ,he invnstic-= -4-7n after rnrvni -ri ig it from the investigator, and provide opportunity for the complainant Idiscuss the investigative file with appropriate officials. (d)  If the discussions referred to in sub  section (c) do not result in an adjustment of the complaint, the complainant shall be notified in writing:  I) of the proposed  disposition of the complaint, (2) of his  •  12  •  right to a 1-a=rinc • . and decision head or his designee if he notifies the agency in writing within 15 calendar days of receipt of the notice that he desires a hearing, and ("-) of his right to a decision by the head of the agency or his designee without  haP-ino-  4.1   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (e). If the complainant fails tonotify the • agency of his wishes within the 1 D - -day period prescribed in naragratn (A') of this section, .he approoriate  cual Employment  OPportunitv Officer may  discos it ion  of the complain. pro'oosed In the notice sent 0  this  under paragraph  (d)  as the decision of the  pg.nr., 1r  on the orl-nicsin u when aele:-'ated the .authority to make a dels4 on for the head under those circumstances.  f the Ps-arcv  When this is  done, the Equal Employment Opportunity Officer shall transmit the decision by Latta- to the complainant and his representative which shall inform the complainant of his right of appeal to the Commission and the time limit applicable thereto and of his right to file a ci, action as describedTih §1613.28 1 . If the Equal Employment Opportunity Officer does not issue  ev-)  0  (1)  ,s11 4 -)  )4  4)  7:1  0  -r 0 (1)  rf)  (1) 1-1  )  0 )  (1)  4 -1  4._)  (1)  4 -1  r--1 ( (-\  c'")  r  (1)  1  0 .r  0 41)  fl 71  S-4 0  CI)  4-)  0  4-)  U) . •(--i  .C1  01  (1) 'CI  (1)  0  (1) •r-1  rc.1 (1) rt.1  -4-)  1  OA  (1)  (I) 1,1) 0 4)  :;"--  ifi  I   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  a   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  November 23, 1979  Ms. tether Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Conaway Affairs The White Nouse Washington, D. C. 20500 Doer Ms. Peterson: 1 an writing in response to Mc. Jack Watson's November 15, 1979 memoramdms to agency heeds, ea the subject of the implementation of Executive Order 12160. Although the Federal Reserve, as am independeet agency, Le e not subject to the regairements of Uscutive Order 12160, we believ provithat the Board is already in eibetantial ceeformity with its on of sion. I amderstand that Ms. Jima Bart, Director of our Divisi your Ceesemer and Community Affairs, has already been in contact with l Reserve office on this setter. Also, for your information, the Federa with regard intend* to publish a statemftt describing its practices to this wetter in the Federal Register shortly. Sincerely, (Signed) John M. Denkler Jabs S. !Makler cc: Ms. Mart Mrs. Mallardi Mr, Mulrenin Mr. Allison  ETMulrenin:whw 1.11-#109  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  November 15, 1979  (p)  MEMORANDUM FOR:  ALL AGENCY HEADS  FROM:  JACK WATSON  SUBJECT:  / Implementai t n of Executive Order 12160  I On September 26, the President sI-gned Executive Order 12160, which strengthens Federal consumer programs. A copy of the President's remarks at the signing ceremony is attached, There are two items which require your immediate attention: 1. Draft plans for compliance with the Order are to be completed and forwarded to Esther Peterson at the White House by November...._a;3., It is important that this deadline be met, 2. The Order requires that the head of each agency designate a senior -level official, who reports directly to the agency head, to work full-time on oversight of consumer affairs activities. Please move as expeditiously as possible in appointing your designee. The person you appoint will represent you in working with the Consumer Affairs Council created by the Executive Order. Agencies not subject to the requirements of the Executive Order are invited, and strongly encouraged, to comply with the Order on a voluntary basis. It is equally important that such agencies submit their draft plans to Esther Peterson by November 23. ""••••-anone-n."1%,  If you have any questions, please call Esther Peterson, the President's Special Assistant for Consumer Affairs, at 456-6590. Thank you for your attention to these matters. Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  SEPTEMBER 26 e 1979  Office of the White House Press Secretary  THE WHITE HOUSE REMARKS OF THE PRESIDENT UPON SIGNING OF EXECUTIVE ORDER ON COORDINATION OF FEDERAL CONSUMER PROGRAMS Room 450 Old Executive Office Building 11:50 A.M.  EDT  THE PRESIDENT:  Thank vou.  Congressman Rosenthal and Esther Peterson, distinguished representatives of consumer groups from all over the Nation: I have just signed an Executive Order entitled "Providing For Enhancement and Coordination of Federal Consumer Programs." This is a result of a lot of work by me and by 50 leaders in our Government who represent the major agencies, by many consumer groups throughout the country, by Members of Congress, who have been in the forefront of the fight for consumer rights, and I think above everyone else, by Esther Peterson who deserves, and who has, the gratitude of everyone here. The longer I have been in the White House as President, the more I have recognized the importance of each individual person in our country. Traveling around the Natio n during the long campaign years and since then, it has been a striking thing for me to have brief encounters with, and conversations with, Americans Quite often, as they touch a President's hand, or pass me in a corridor, or on the street, that they impar t to me in that brief, rare moment their deepest thoughts. And quite often I am struck with how distant they are from Government and how many of the decisions of Government that are made that impact that person's life are never known or understood by them. They have no direct representative within an agency or within a decision-mak ing body that is relatively obscure but vital. I think it is particularly important that their voices be heard in Government on a continuing, sustained basis . And that is the reason for this Executive Order. As you know, the first year I was in office I proposed to the Congress, and we fought to the last vote, to get an independent agency established, an independent office established, to protect consumers' rights. We have not yet been able to get that legislation passed. It is still absolutely important. And this Executive Order does not supplant the need MORE   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ..•  • Page 2 for a coordinated, single Consumer Protection Agency. for all of us to remember that.  It is important  But at the same time, I have had to turn to alternative means by which I as President could help protect consumers' interests in the most effective way. I asked Esther Peterson to join my staff. She is at my right hand. She works with other members of the White House staff and with every agency in this Government, in the most highly effective way. She has been assisted by large numbers of volunteers who have confidence in her and who share her determination to protect the consumers in our Government. We have now come to a point of realization that her presence in the White House, no matter how effective, is not enough. There are so many agencies in the Government. And I asked her a few months ago to consult with the Office of Management and Budget, with the agencies themselves, to see how could expand her influence. And the result of all that work we is this Executive Order which is now effective. It prescribes a standard for the protection of consumer interests throughout Government, a single, carefully drafted, comprehensible standard that will provide coherence and unity and a better understanding of the purposes that we want to accomplish. And it also establishes a strong leader within each agency who will be designated by the head of each agency to protect consumer interests. Esther, of course, will continue to represent me directly in these relationships. But in this process of evolving the Executive Order, I think we have aroused to a high pitch of interest the leaders throughout Government who will be affected by the Order itself. OMB is extremely reluctant to expand the bureaucracy or to make an ineffective Government effort possible. And they are extremely important to save taxpayers' funds. They are enthusiastic supporters of this Executive Order because they see that this is a contribution to the efficiency of Government and does not create additional bureaucracy nor delay decisions in their final judgments.  MORE   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  111  Page 3  I might add one other thing, and that is that recent trends in government have been very disturbing to me, particularly on Capitol Hill. The attacks that are being made against the Federal Trade Commission, the recent effort in the Senate to have every regulatory decision be subjected to proof in court before it can go into effect, the efforts to block sections of bills that would directly give consumers a stronger voice in Government, the trend toward increasing one-House vetoes over decisions made by aaencies responsible for protecting consumers' rights, these kinds of trends are a baL: omen. And I would like to ask all of you to monitor very carefully what goes on in Government to prevent these unwarranted encroachments on the basic rights of every American citizen. We have worked together in the past. Many of you have been in the forefront of battles to make the Civil Service System more effective. You have helped me greatly in the progress that we have made so far in hospital cost containment to reduce the inflationary pressures on American citizens. And, of course, you helped me with the evolution of the concepts of the cooperative bank, and many other items on which we share a major interest. We are in this fight together. And I welcome your support and the partnership that we share. And I am particularly grateful to your leader and to my leader, Esther Peterson, who will continue the fight with us as her army. And I am very grateful to serve in this capacity under one of the greatest leaders in Government. And now I would like to introduce to you Esther Peterson. (Applause)  END  (AT 12:00 Noon EDT)  •  c-,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  United States of America  Office of Personnel Management In Reply Refer To   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Washington, D.C. 20415  November 9, 1979  Your Reference:  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Federal Employee Attitude Survey  As one of the Office of Personnel Management's responsibilities under the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, we are undertaking a detailed evaluation of the impact of civil service reform. I believe that our plan represents one of the most thorough and carefully designed evaluations of a new public policy ever attempted. Part of that evaluation will measure Federal employee reactions to various aspects of the legislation as it is implemented. In order to do that, it is necessary to know employee attitudes before the implementation actually occurs. Therefore, we conducted a survey in May, prior to implementation of provisions of the legislation. The preliminary results of that survey are enclosed with this memorandum. The most significant finding is that the Civil Service Reform Act indeed addresses the problems with which the employees themselves are concerned. For example, the responses to questions about performance appraisal are consistent with the legislative requirement that the Federal performance appraisal system be completely overhauled. Also, there is a clear desire by managers and supervisors to have an effective mechanism for rewarding outstanding performance with pay. The detailed analysis of the survey results is now under way, and we will provide you with a final report early next year. If you have any comments or questions about this survey, please let me know.  'WVIan k. Campbell Director  ,v  Enclosure  CON 114-24-3 January 1Q74  1  SINGLE ITEMS - PART I  General Organization 16  Disagree ,  New employees in this organization are well qualified to perform their jobs. Management is flexible enough to make changes when necessary. In general, disciplinary actions taken in this organization are fair and justified.  24 29  Undecided  Agree  39  23  38  31  18  23  27  50  12  11  77  '  General Groups  ';:t•  42  I have confidence and trust in my co-workers.  Items listed in this section are grouped into content areas, but, do not constitute scal es snrt will be analyzed on an individual basis.  .r.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  51  - , - ,1,-- rv., e I ' .k . If.t; I t ......,. %;ii.?'..;•" ,-; s •.  ---  r in  tkv.,•-• 1- • 164‹,1,  2  General Performance Contine,encies  3 8 14 20 97 102  103 104 105  Disagree  Under the present system, it is very difficult to motivate employees with financial rewards. I am not sure what determines how I can get a promotion in this organization. Under the present system, supervisors here get few tangible rewards for excellent performance. This organization moves its marginal and unsatisfactory workers to positions where they can be ignored. Working hard leads to pressure from co—workers not to work so hard. Working hard on my job leads to good job performance. Working hard leads to gaining respect from co-workers. I will be demoted or removed from my job if I perform my job poorly. I will be given more routine work or less work if I perform my job poorly.  Undecided  Agree  34  16  50  48  7  45  31  24  45  46  22  32  74  9  17  15 15  11 14  74 71  36  29  35  44  27  29  15 54 14  11 10 9  74 36 77  21  12  67  10  10  80  30  25  45  General Satisfaction  49 115 !  116 117 118 119  All in all, I am satisfied with my work group. I am satisfied with my chances for getting a promotion. I am satisfied with the amount of job security I have. 1 am satisfied with the chances I have to accomplish something worthwhile. I am satisfied with the respect I receive from the people I work with. I am satisfied with the recognition I receive for public service.  r-4-17,1  •-•-T-Nyr •1 • • • t n.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r31g.F  •  W. % t  2A  General Perfromance Contingencies  121  Not At All Likely  I can get the things I want from performing my job especially well.  45  Somewhat Likely  32  Very Likely  23  f   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Employment Opportunity 142  143  144  145  LI  Worse  About the Same  Much Better  Compared to older employees, younger employees are treated.  8  75  17  Compared to other employees, handicapped persons are treated  3  78  19  Compared to male employees, female employees are treated  12  64  24  Compared to other employees, minority employees are treated  10  •  '1  4e.  LI  32   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  General Performance Appraisal 23  26 38 58 59 63 92  96  Disagree  There is a tendency for supervisors here to give the same performance rating regardless of how well people perform their jobs. I understand the performance appraisal system being used in this organization. Performance appraisals do influence person nel actions taken in this organization. My supervisor and I agree on what "good performance" on my job means. My job performance is carefully evaluated by my supervisor. My supervisor gives me adequate informati on On how well I an performing. The standards used to evaluate my per formance have been fair and objective. In the past I have been aware what sta ndards have been used to evaluate my performance.  Undecided  Agree  32  13  55  25  14  61  22  19  59  18 23  17 19  65 58  30  13  57  20  26  54  24  16  60  30  17  53  36  19  45  20 46 18  12 15 8  68 39 74  60  24  16  General Supervision 30 36  56 66 69  74  Supervisors here cooperate with each oth er for the attainment of the organization's goals. Supervisors in this organization take the time to help marginal and unsatisfactory workers imp rove their performance. My supervisor maintains high standards of performance for his/her employees. My supervisor and I jointly set my performance objectives. My supervisor helps me solve work rel ated problems. My supervisor evaluates my performance on things not related to my job.  • ;•.,  '„0  ,•  4  General Joh Characteristics 12 77 82 83 85 87 95  99   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .  I have the authority I need to accomplish my work objectives. I don't have enough work to do to keep me busy. On my job, tasks are set up so that I know what I will be doing from day to day. I have too much work to do everything well. I have control over how I spend my time working. I have all the skills I need in order to do my job. My job is pretty much of a one person job-there is little need for meeting or checking with others. I have to depend on the work performed by co-workers in order to get the materials or information I need to do my work.  1 r. / !  T•77 iiitil e 1 1  t  4' k  1  1 ci  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  21 85  9 3  70 12  32 68 19 11  5 8 6 8  63 24 75 81  72  3  25  41  6  53  •' •  5  Whistlehlower Provisions 35 73  I am not afraid to "blow the whistle" on things I find wrong with my agency. I am confident that my supervisor would not take action against me if I were to bring to his/her attention cases of inefficiencies or waste.  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  21  19  60  17  20  63  18  22  65  23  28  49  39  37  24  Equal Employment Opportunity 18 27 34  Affirmative action policies have helped advance employment opportunities of women and minorities in this organization. Affirmative action policies have not had an adverse impact on the overall productivity of this organization. Affirmative action is not as important an issue in this organiza— tion now as it was several years ago.  Not Important At All  Sorimnat Ii-nortart  Very I.T..portant  How important was the following factor in your deci:lion to wprk for the 7edera1 Government? 141   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Only job Jppartunity available at time.  1,...,1- • •-vas . )  r..1  I. 7  at  to-  59  19  r"" \  ,)  1 EAllf  22   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6 SINGLE ITEMS - PART II Executive Development I am given adequate opportunity to participate in training and development programs.  11  24  Undecided  Agree  22 *18  10 12  68 70  22 35  61 39  17 26  38 14  18 14  44 72  42 63  38 20  20 17  Disagree  Senior executives receive adequate training to improve areas in which their performance has been evaluated as less than satisfactory?  1  I understand how individuals are selected for senior executive positions in my agency.  13  In my agency, individuals from outside the Federal Government are selected for senior executive positions over better qualified career civil servants.  How important is each of the following factors in selecting individuals for Senior Executive positions in your agency? 50  Technical and professional qualifications  51  Not Important At All  Somewhat Important  Very Important  8 2  28 16  64 82  Ability to mange people  14 10  23 18  63 72  52  Program management experience  10 9  29 26  61 65  53  Personal favoritism  47 64  22 19  31 17  # Top figures indicate GS-13 - 15 manager responses. * Bottom figures indicate executive responses.  -  '  ."•••npr...*^.-•  • 4• 1. 4.11.‘p  gr. ft  •  • .6Po.  ' it:  1•••  1 . 7••• •  1 MCI  7  ;  ,  Determinants of Executive/Supervisory Performance (answered by supervisors only) Please indicate the importance of each of the following job factors in determining your own performance rating. 39  Willingness to take action against ineffective employees.  40  Development of your employees  41  Achievement of Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) objectives  Not Important At All  Somewhat Important  19 25  27 28  54 47  9 11  18 19  73 70  16 15  29 31  55 54  42  Achievement of greater efficiency in operations  6 5  12 14  82 81  43  Achievement of program objectives  3  1  5 4  92 95  10 11  19 15  71 74  44  Ability to obtain resources needed to achieve program objectives  4 •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Very Important  • $  • L 1  ,1 "  06 r  uwI   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  8 Equal Employment Opportunity  45  46  47  48  Less Qualified  Compared to other employees hired into or pro moted into Senior Executive positions, minorities in this agency are: Compared to other employees hired into or pro moted into Senior Executive positions, handicapped persons in this agency are: Compared to other employees hired into or pro moted into Senior Executive positions, women in thi s agency are:  Morn Qualified  34 32  64 67  2 1  10 11  87 87  3 2  19 15  75 79  What do you believe is the biggest proble m associated with the process of hiring minorities in your age ncy? (1) Not enough qualified minority candidate s (2)  No effective "mechanism" to identify potential candidates  71  72  15  15  (3) General management resistance (4) Other  1  As Qualified  10  $7..,, I 1-11,3:, ,f,7--r)-,.7---.A---.,.,.;.; .  ?  V4 %iv ' ( -,. ) k,-  3  ki t:'. 2• •  41 1  •  10  1111  ,..evt  8A ,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Equal Employment Opportunity - Continued  49  Which area in your agency offers the greatest job opportunities to minorities over the next five years?  (1) Personnel  6  6  (2)  Clerical  23  23  (3)  Administrative  15  16  39  37  2  3  15  15  (4) Technical (5)  Financial  (6) Other  UI  -  or vat .1  ' 4t7.  1044  4  ).47  /• 4 # •  ' 1 fts;14   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  9  Paperwork 19  28  Disagree  Personnel actions rewarding employees for good performance are avoided in my agency because of the paperwork that is required. It takes too long to process the paperwork needed to fill vacancies here.  Executive Mobility 74  75  To what extent has your agency benefited from its job mobility provisions? To what extent has the internal reassignment of senior executives impaired the continuity of agency programs?  Undecided  Agree  56 63  14 18  -30 19  16 22  8 7  76 71  To A Little Extent  To Some Extent  31 25  40 40  29 35  49  37 34  14 12  36 36  al  23 22  25 23  34 37  41 40  54  76  77  To what extent are there obstacles that impede executive mobility within your agency? To what extent are there obstacles that make it difficult to move from one agency to another?  '11ft  t !  4.  IA.71'1:  pr  .4 7 77•"  Pa),  To A ilreat Extent  irx1  Improtance of Pay Determinants  Important At All  Somewhat rTiportant  Very Important  How important is each of the following in determining your pay? 54  your length of service?  22  40  )0 ,0 )0  57  the amount of responsibility on your job?  7 10  16 9  77 81  60  the amount of effort you expend on the job?  23 20  32 32  45 48  37 47  45 36  18 17  0 1  3 3  97 96  10 12  24 28  66 60  #`•  Preferred Importance of Pay Determinants How important should each of the following be in determining your pay? 63 your length of service? 1 -t*  66  The amount of responsibility on your job?  69  the amount of effort you expend on the job?  .  '  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  No  I .4.rTc  N.. I  ,  '41  S  S.  11 •  MISCALLANEOUS 2  3  9  6  •••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10  12  14 18  26  Senior executives are responsive in implementing top management's policy changes. There are insufficient incentives to retain highly competent senior executives in my agency. In this organization, it is unclear what has to be done to remove or demote an employee for unacceptable performance. My agency recognizes supervisors who take the time to develop their subordinates' knowledge, skills, and abilities. The personnel office in this agency helps me perform my job effectively In my agency, it is difficult to attract competent personnel for senior executive positions.  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  11 6  19 10  70  36 35  27 18  37 47  60 53  9 14  31 33  35 23  24 27  11 50  46 44  16 16  33 40  3 50  42 19  24 31  7  19 20  67 73  29 41  32 24  39 35  7 6  6 3  27 91  Top management generally supports the person.iel decisions made by supervisors in this agency. A senior executive in the private sector has the same or greater responsibility as a senior executive in the Federal sector. If I think of an idea that will benefit my agency I make a determined effort to implement it.  A:  T r  7'11, #..  c" . --  •,/,  7  di . ; 4 r •  •  ,  V.f) '11-  Nfs"   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  11A  MISCALLANEOUS - Continued 27  I am satisfied with my chances for getting a performance award.  33  Senior executives are removed from their positions when they perform poorly.  78  Undecided  30 31  10 17  60 52  39 26  15 24  46 50  37 38  50 39  13 23  14 25  58 41  28 34  Supervisors here feel their ability to manage is restricted by unnecessary rules and regulations.  29  34  Disagree  The procedures necessary to remove ineffective senior executives deter the initiation of such actions.  In general, career appointment senior executives perform their jobs:  somewhat better  59 58  the same as noncareer senior executives  37 39  somewhat worse  4 3  •••••  1 TiAl"N rAbil' Q1  Agree  _  at% United States I Office of N ' y Personnel Management  Cd'ol  1900 E St.. NW Washington. D.C. 20415 News Unit. Room 5110 (202)632-5491  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, November 9, 1979  FOR INFORMATION Tom Kell  OPM RELEASES ATTITUDE SURVEY RESULTS  (Washington, D.C.) The Office of Personnel Management (CM today released preliminary findings of the first Government-wide attitude survey of Federal employees. The survey was administered last May to establish a baseline of employee attitudes about their jobs and work environment prior to implementation of the 1978 Civil Service Reform Act. The results of this survey will be compared with future annual surveys to determine and measure attitude changes resulting from changes in personnel policy, i.e., establishment of new performance appraisal systems and merit pay. For comparative purposes, results of the Federal employee attitude survey were matched with results of a survey of workers in the private sector conducted by the University of Michigan in 1977. Comparison of survey results reveal that both Federal and private sector employees have similar attitudes toward their jobs. The survey questionnaire was completed by 14,000 Federal employees who were randomly selected to ensure a representative cross section. Groupings included Federal agencies, pay levels, pay systems, and supervisory and nonsupervisory personnel. The survey will be analyzed in detail and then published in a final report early in 1980. The survey contained 147 questions which were answered by all respondents, and an additional 79 which were answered only by those GS-13 or equivalent and above to probe attitudes of mid- and seniorlevel managers and supervisors. Commenting an the survey results, OPM Director Alan K. Campbell noted that FedPral employees reflect many of the same concerns OPM has with personnel management.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  2.  "No single aspect of personnel management receives as great an emphasis in civil service reform legislation as performance appraisal," Campbell said. "This survey demonstrates that Congress was right in giving it that emphasis. Later surveys will tell us whether Federal departments and agencies are succeeding in making appraisal processes more helpful and fair.'I Campbell pointed out that half of those surveyed felt their performance ratings accurately represented their job performance and accomplishments and that only 25 percent found their performance ratings helpful in determining their contributions to the organization. Preliminary findings of the survey are summarized in the attached document.  NOTE:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  a  •  A copy of the complete survey with responses grouped by subjec t is available on request from the Office of Public Affairs, Office of Personnel Management.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (ard States of America  Office of Personnel Management  • Washington, D.0 20415  1979 FEDERAL EMPLOYEE AniTUDE SURVEY PRELIYINARY FINDINGS  The Civil Service Refill! Act of 1978 introduces far-re, 110ling changes in Federal personnel management.  As part of a five-year evaluation of the  impact of these reforms, the Office of Personnel Management undertook an opinion survey in May (before the reform changes had been put in place) of a representative sardle of 20,000 Federal workers nationwide, asking about their attitudes toward their jobs and workplaces.  It will be repeated  periodically to determine whether and how attitudes change as reform is implemented.  The responses are of particular interest because this is the first systematic survey ever undertaken of the entire Federal civilian workforce.  Of the  20,000 questionnaires sent out, 14,000 were returned, for an unusually high return rate of 70%.  We can be 95 percent confident that workers' attitudes  are within five percentage points of what is reported in the survey results.  This redort summarizes those findings from the survov problems which the civil service reforms address.  h ich rolatc to the  In aliiition, the survey  enables us to draw some comparisons between the attitudes of the Federal and private sector workforces.  These comparisons contradict many of the  stereotypes of the Federal worker.  Implications of Federal Survey Results for Civil Service Reform The civil service reform legislation has as one of its primary goals the improvement of management of the Federal workforce, through emphasis on performance feedback  and the strengthening of the relationship between  performance and all personnel actions such as pay increases, promotions or demotions.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  The information which the survey provides on the attitudes of Federal employees today on such issues as the quality of supervision, the usefulness of performance feedback, and the link between good performance and financial rewards underscores the need for these changes.  Attitudes Toward Supervisor asked generally about the competence of their supervisors, Federal employees respond quite positivelv.  About three-quarters of the sample feel  their supervisors help them solve work -related problems.  Employees say their  supervisors generally know the technical parts of their jobs, are adept administratively and, to a lesser extent, deal well with their subordinates.  Although employees also rate supervisors high on defining job duties, they rate them lower on setting goals:  My job duties are clearly defined by my supervisor. Disagree Undecided Agree  My supervisor sets clear goals for me in my present job.  20Z  Disagree  32%  5  Undecided  13  Agree  55  75  In general, workers are dissatisfied with performance feedback from their supervisors -- the method of giving it, the feedback itself, and the usefulness of it.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  3  Federal employees would like much more feedback from their supervisors than they now receive. 68  Oaly 197 , receive such feedback often or always, while  would like to receive it thAt frequently.  How often do you receive feedback from your supervisor that helps you to improve your performance?  How often would you like to receive feedback from your supervisor that helps you to improve your perfortance?  Never/Rarelv  /46  Never/Rarely  Sometimes  35  Sometimes  29  Of  19  Of  68  One form of feedback is provided by the current performance appraisal system; and there is substantial dissatisfaction with it. formance appraisals fair and accurate.  Only half call their per-  And over half say that supervisors  give the same rating regardless of performance.  The current usefulness of performance feedback is questionable at best. Almost half of the employees said their performance ratings are not useful in assessing their strengths and weaknesses, improving their performance, or determining their contribution to the organization.  Even more say that  feedback is not helpful either in planning for or receiving needed training.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  In  oHnion how much did Your last performance appraisal help you to... helpful  S0:7ewhat Helpful  . Very Helpful  Assess your stren:,ths and weaknesses in performinf ,.eur job? Establish a plan for Your trainin developnent?  and  Receive netded train inn?  60  25  63  20  Determine your contribution to the or.;anization? Improve Your p(rfornance?  15  31 46  30  Consequences of Performance  One of the major goals of reforming the Federal civil service is to tie rewards to good performance.  Most employees do not believe there is such  a tie at present, nor do they believe that poor performance is likely to lead to any adverse consequences.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  How likely is it that I will be promoted or given a better job if I perform especially well?  How likely is it that I will get a cash award or pay increase if I perform especially well?  Unlikely  567.  Unlikely  (0%  Somewhat likely  27  Somewhat likely  22  Very likely  17  Very likely  16  when an employee continues to do his/her job poorly, supervisors here will take the appropriate corrective action.  I will be demoted or removed from my position if I perform my job poorly.  Disagree  43%  Disagree  36%  Undecided  12  Undecided  29  Agree  40  Agree  35  It is interesting to compare responses of the Federal sector on this topic to responses of the private sector in a 1977 University of Michigan survey. PRIVATE SECTOR:  PRIVATE SECTOR:  when you do your job well, are you likely to be offered a better job at the place where you work?  When you do your job well, are you likely to get a bonus or pay increase?  No  63%  110  Maybe  10  Maybe  Yes  27  Yes  65% 9  26  A similar percentage of people in each survey doubt they will be rewarded for good performance.  Approximately 60% in both sectors say good performance is  unlikely to result either in a promotion or in increased pay.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1•  6 Executive Pay and Selection Civil service reform offers new pay incentives for managers* and senior The Federal survey asked them how satisfied they are with  executives*. their pay.  More managers than senior executives are satisfied with their  pay -- 567, compared to 457,.  This result is not surprising in view of the  pay cap for senior executives.  All in all, I am satisfied with my pay.  Disagree Undecided Agree  Managers  Executives  36%  48%  8  7  56  45  Managers and executives were asked about the way executives are chosen. Only 9% of the senior executives (and 26% of the managers) feel selection of executives is primarily a matter of partisan politics.  in my agency is The assignment of individuals to senior executive positions more a function of partisan politics than of any other factor. Managers  Executives  Disagree  36%  74%  Undecided  38  17  Agree  26  9  from just *Managers are employees at grades GS 13-15 and equivalent who earn top-level under $30,000 to about $50,000 per year. Senior executives are executives management above grade level GS -15. There are over 10,000 senior from in the Federal government, mostly in Washington, D. C., and they earn about $48,000 to $50,000 per year. Most senior executives are now members of the new Senior Executive Service.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  The procedures used to select people for senior executive positions are fair. !lanagers  Executives  Disagree  21Z  15Z  Undecided  53  29  Aree  26  56  Here again executives indicate that senior executive Aelection is fair while  managers are largely undecided.  Futnre Uses of the_ Survey Data _ Analysis is presently proc(edin'; on the responses of subgroups within the workforce.  When completed, it will show whatever differences exist in  responses by agency, grade level, race and sex. at  Information on workforce  toward equal employment opportunity, which can only be meaningfully  interpreted by lookin;, at :;ubgroup responses, will be made available at that time.  But the most important applicition of this survey data will occur when results are available from future surveys.  It will then be possible to deter-  mine whether the attitudes expressed by the workforce in last May's survey have indeed changed as a result of reformin2 the Federal civil service.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3  Comparison of Federal and Private Sector Responses  Although not designed for this purpose, the survey of Federal workers pennits us to make some comparisons between the attitudes of Federal workers and workers in the private sector.*  The questions in the Michigan survey are worded somewhat differently from those in the Federal survey.  This may account for some of the differences in  re.-Ton-ies found in the two surveys; therefore, comparisons must be made cautiously.  Nevertheless, the questions are close enough to provide in-  sight into employees' views of quality of working life in the Federal and private sectors.  Both surveys ask questions about overall at  toward the job.**  Although  there are some differences in the responses of Federal and private sector workers, they are not dramitic.  If different wording is taken into account,  it is clear that the two questionnaires do not reveal substantial differences in Federal and private sector job satisfaction.  *The data on the private sector workforce are taken from Quinn, Robert P. anu Graham, L. Staines,The 1977 Qualit; ot Employment Survey., The Vniversitv chigan 1977. of Michian Ann Arbor, **For ease in comparing Federal workers with private sector workers, all five categories of answers to each question in the Federal survoY arc "jvcn. However. when presenting the Federal survey data alone, we combined five responses into three in 0rder 10 simplify the results.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  9  FEDERAL SECTOR: In general, I am satisfied with my  Strongly disagree Disagree Undecided  PRIVATE SECTOR:* All in all, how satisfied would you say you are with vour job?  Agree Strongly agree  18  .Not at all satisfied Not too satisfied  3 127, 9  In general, I like working here. Strongly Iisagree Disagree  2 6  11  Undecided Agree  8%  Somewhat satisfied Very satisfied  42}.. 89 47  7 56 85  Strongly agree  29  dissatisfaction is the intent to look for a new job elseOne outcome of job __ where.  Results in the Federal and private sector are similar.  FEDERAL SECTOR: During the next year, I will probably look for a new job outside this organization.  Strongly disagree  25 60%  Disagree  35 17  Undecided Agree  13 1 23  Strongly agree  10  *Numbers do not sum to 100% due to rounding.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  PRIVATE SECTOR: Taking everything into account, how likely is it that you will make a genuine effort to find a new job with another employer within the next year? Not at all likely  68%  Somewhat likely  16  Very likely  16  10  Both surveys also asked about commitment to the organization.  Once again  the question wording is different, hut in this case there is a substantial difference between Federal and private sector employees, with Federal workers showing a greater commitment to their organizations.  FEDERAL SECTOR: I care little about what happens in this organization as long as I get a paycheck. Strongly disagree  45r l 90Z  Disagree  45  Undecided Agree  3 4 7  Strongly agree  PRIVATE SECTOR: My main interest in my work is to get enough money to do the other things I want to do. Strongly Disagree 11 Ilr  3  53%  What happens to this organization is really important to me.  Disagree  42  Agree  35} 47  Strongly disagree  2  Disagree  5}  Strongly agree  12  77,  Undecided Agree  8 49 85  Strongly agree  '136  In a question asked identically on both surveys on whether employees feel their work is meaningful, the responses are virtually the same:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1I  FEDERAL SECTOR: The work I do on meaningful to me.  P:;V:\TE SECT0R:* Same question.  joh i -;  Strongly disagree  Strongly disagre,' 107 Disagree  8  Disagree 7  Undecided Agree  Agree  57 1 83  Strongly iv,ree  Strongly agree  26  But when asked how hard they work, Federal workers are more likely to say they work hard than their private sector counterparts.  Nine out of ten  Federal workers think that th,y work hard, compared with 757! in the private sector.  The difference in the wording of the questions may account for part  of this difference.  PRIVATE SECTOR:* My joh requires that I work very hard.  FEDERAL SECTOR: I work hard on mv job. Strongly disagree  1  Disagree  11  Strongly disagree 287,  57, Disagree  Undecided Agree  56  Agree 71  Strongly rirec  3'4  *Numbers do not sum to 100Z due to rounding.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Strongly agree  12 How do employees in the two sectors rate the people with whom they work? While both groups are positive, Federal employees judge their co-workers a little more positively than privately-employed workers do. FEDERAL SECTOR: The people I work with generally do a good job.  PRIVATE SECTOR: The people T work with are competent in doing their job.  Strongly disagree Disagree  Not at all true 11 5  Undecided Agree  6%  17% Not too true  14  Somewhat true  44 1  3 70 91  Strongly agree  83  21  Very true  39  Both Federal and nrivate-sector workers are happy with the amount of job security they have.  FEDERAL SECTOR: I am satisfied with the amount of job security I have. Strongly disagree Disagree  PRIVATE SECTOR:* The job security is good.  41 1 171 10 j  Not too true  16  63  Somewhat true  34 1  Not at all true  9 25%  Undecided Agree  77 Strongly agree  14  *Numbers do not sum to 100% due to rounding.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  76 Very true  42  15  In sum, then, responses of public and private sector employees to the Federal and University. of Michigan surveys indicate a substantial similarity in attitudes toward their jobs and places of work.  Both groups seem gen-  erally satisfied with their jobs and job security, and a majority of each group is apparently content to stay where it is, at least for the coming year.  Both groups feel they work hard, and both respect their co-workers.  These findings differ with the oft-heard popular view that there is considerable workforce dissatisfaction -- in short the surveys present substantial evidence that morale is high.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  GPO 882  162  't-  TEE 77.DERAL EMPLOYEE ATTITUDE SURVEY SCALES SEPTEM3ER 1979  Prepared by: Productivity Research 3r.-inch Office of Productivity Programs Workforce Effectiveness and Development Group 0:flee of Prsonnel Xlna,lement  I.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Numller appearii.1 ta e:Ich Ltel represr!nts thit tcn3 21.12enent in the 1979 F7A3. •  •  T  4(  4..  z-  ! - #  I {IN.,?„4  1. PART I — GENERAL SECTIONS SUPERVISORY CHARACTERISTICS/PERFOTIANCE APPRAISAL  Si  OVERALL SUPERVISION/COMPETENCE  Undecided  Agree  62  My supervisor deals with subordinates well.  25  16  59  65  My supervisor knows the technical parts of his or her job well.  16  11  73  My supervisor handles the administrative parts of his or her job well.  17  15 .  68  My supervisor encourages me to help in developing work methods and job procedures.  27  8  65  My supervisor encourages subordinates to participate in important decisions.  37  16  47  My supervisor asks my opinion when a problem related to my work arises.  21  6  73  70  S2   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org 0 Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Disagree  DELEGATION 55  61  71  .  ; •-• ; •(  ' I  , •  $  ft*  -•  Wsi' ;', .-71111 ;  I Im  aJ, 7  If  S3  INDEX OF QUALITY OF PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL 72  106  80  107  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  My supervisor discusses uith me the specific reasons for the performance rating that I receive.  26  15  59  Information that I receive about my performance usually comes too late for it to be of any use to me.  55  22  23  My performance appraisal takes into account the most important parts of my job.  20  21  59  My performance rating presents a fair and accurate picture of my actual job performance.  29  22  49  This organization considers performance appraisal to be an important part of a supervisors' duties.  19  24  57  My supervisor considers the performance appraisal of his sub— ordinates to be an important part of his/her duties.  21  22  57  •:-•  S4  IMPORTANCE OF PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS  ii 68  57  S5  TASK ORIENTATION 64  My supervisor insists that subordinates work hard.  22  20  58  67  My supervisor demands that subordinates do high quali ty work.  19  17  64  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  It  ';v1r••"'"' " ' _ ' t. , • r1 1" ;: ; 11.• • I  '• ..°'  17.  Fei  S6 125  127  S7  Sometimes  Often  How often do you receive feedback from your su?ervisor for good performance?  39  37  24  How often do you receive feedback from your supervisor that helps you improve your performance?  46  35  19  How often would you like to receive feedback from your supervisor for good performance?  2  40  58  How often would you like to receive feedback from your supervisor that helps you improve your performance?  3  29  68  PREFERRED FREQUENCY OF PERFOTIANCE FEEDBACK 126  ,•  Rarely  FREQUENCY OF PERFORtIANCE FEED3ACK  128  4.• .;.1;  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1 i;  •  rk—r • •• te!; ,'  "7" "'"!‘'• • %  ;  .• • -. 0. 11,e . •r1 •!•  -Tes  :few  4 Not Helpful at all SS  Somewhat Helpful  Helped a Great Deal  OVERALL HELPFULNESS OF PERFORMANCE EVkLUATION In your opinion, how much did your last performance rating help you to  •:1  129  assess your strenghts and weaknesses in performing your job?  44  32  24  130  establish a plan for your training and development?  60  25  15  131  receive needed training?  68  20  12  132  improve your performance?  44  31  25  133  determine your contribution to the organization?  46  30  24  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  20  5  32  13  S9  WORK FACILITATION/GOAL SETTING  I.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  54  60  My job duties are clearly defined by my supervisor. My suparvisor sets clear goals for ne in my present job.  "r I,  A ?. .1 •  •  •  •  p,  ?  •  -31,f  .7  "fizf0441k  75 55  1  .....?!411 P-671i.! 111  5  sYsTF.nrc  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  The information that I get through formal channels helps me perform my job effectively.  26  12  62  I am told promptly when there is a change in policy, rules, or regulations that affects me.  38  7  55  In this organization it is often unclear who has the formal authority to make a decision.  58  5  37  32  In this organization authority is clearly delegated.  27  13  60  37  It takes too long to get decisions made in this 31  14  55  Overall, this organization is effective in acco7..plishing its objectives.  13  12  75  This organization is responsive to the public interest.  13  18  69  01  0..1GANIZATIONAL CO1UN1CATION 2  11  02  ORGANIZATIONAL AUTHORITY 7  :  CHARACTEaiSTICS  organization.  03   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ORGAINZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS 6  31  -7 772.7r7 '' •'',0 'z' `) i  I tw It  r %Tv gr Al 1  1 al I  6  GOOD PERFOTIANCE OUTCO!IES  04 PO  Not At All Likely  Somewhat Likely  Very Likely  56  27  17  20  29  '51  How likely is it that you will be pro-noted or given a better job if you perform esp2cially well?  122  How likely is it that your own hard work will lead to recognition as a good performer?  123  How likely is it that you will get a cash award or unscheduled pay increase if you perform your job especially well?  62  23  15  How likely is it that you will have better job security if you perform especiely well?  45  28  27  124  PERFOTIANCE CONTINGENCIES  05  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  22  Under the present system, financial rewards are seldom related to employee performance.  37  15  48  17  Promotions or unscheduled pay increases usually depend on how well a person performs on his/her job.  48  13  39   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  II;ri  7*?"):-":7r,"-Tp737  r  I  • r.  7  Op  ORGANIZATUMAL TRUST  Undecided  Agree  15  Employees here feel you can't trust this organization.  38  16  46  33  People in this organization will do things hehind your back.  27  19  54  Employees do not have much o2portunity to influence what goes on in this organization.  30  12  58  It's really not possible to change things around here.  41  14  45  When changes are made in this organization, the employees usually lose out in the end.  38  21  41  There are adequate procedures to ?,OL the performance rating that I receive reconsidered, if necessary.  20  26  54  If I were subject to an involuntary personnel action, I believe ny agency would adequately inform me of my grievance and appeal rights.  23  16  61  I am aware of the specific steps I must take to have a personnel action taken against me reconsidered.  40  14  46  07   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Disagree  CHANGE Oi:IENTATION 21  9  4  ADEQUACY OF GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES 19  39  40  •  141,-x...r.1.1win 7 %rot. • ,  • •'•  r •;.-1 7 . "  st,  -  1,1 ;74 ; 1  • n114%.:  ."041  • •  09  POOR PERFORIANCE CONTINGENCIES 5  13  010  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  When an employee continues to do his/her lob poorly, supervisors here will take the appropriate corrective action.  48  12  40  Disciplinary actions in this organization arc avoided because of the paperwork that is required.  43  24  33  I often think about quitting.  61  9  30  During this next year I will probably look for a new job outside of this organization.  59  18  23  INTENT TO TURNOVER .25 101  c   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r  V  1RIV,111 velt*,,mr  cfgf  JOB CHARACTERISTICS  J1  Undecided  75  My job is challenging.  19  5  76  84  My job makes good use of my abilities.  25  8  67  8  6  86  GENERAL J03 SATISFACTION 1  In general, I like working here.  81  In general, I am satisfied with my job.  15  9  76  94  All in all, I am satisfied with the work on my present job.  15  10  75  Doing my job well gives me a feeling that I've accomplished something worthwhile.  5  3  92  Doing my job well makes me feel good about • myself as a person.  2  2  96  I enjoy doing my work for the personal satisfaction it gives me.  8  8  84  J3  INTRINSIC MOTIVATION 86  98  100  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Agree  CHALLENGE  J2  A  Disagree  ;1‘17:10  . 73`!"!"!) 0 C;:z , . r" . 07••••7-v: . - 1",:^7 . 't ' • (• , 2?Tit I ' e,%%, • t. •  ••,  r  I Ft5  In J4  MEANINC/I:TORTANC: 78  90  93  33  J6  7  83  6  6  88  I have a great deal of say over what has to be done on my job.  31  9  60  I have a great deal of say over decisions concerning my job.  39  17  44  My job gives me tha opportunity to use my own judgement and initiative.  10  6  84  EFFORT 89   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10  The work I do on my job is meaningful to me.  Agree  FREEDOM 79  s  Undecided  Tha things I do on my job are important to me.  J5  :  Disagree  I work hard on my job.  146  Please rate the amount of effort you put out in the performance of work activities during an average workday.  L 1  •  117•7 ' 1 0 11%  5 No Effort 1  5 Some Effort 10  90 Extreme Effort 89  11 J7  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  11  12  77  3  2  95  I care little about what happ2ns to this organization as lonz as I get: a pay check.  90  3  7  What happens to this organization is really important to me.  7  8  85  ROLE CLARITY 91  On my job I know exactly what is expected of me.  76  Most of the time I know what I have to do on my job.  J8  0a0ANIZATIONAL INVOLVEMENT 28  :4  10   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1  -„  f  .\  •, • -r • ---","r'"11""" .. . • a  -  •  ••  •  (4144-,w  11 CROUP FUNC.7107:IYO  Cl  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  GUOUP COAESIVENESS 44  I feel I a-.1 really part of my work grout).  11  8  81  46  There are feelings among members of my work group which tend to pull the group apart.  51  13  36  6  3  91  G2  CROUP EFFECTIVENESS 41  The people I work with generally do a good job.  43  ny group works well together.  12  9  79  48  My co—workers encourage each other to give their best effort.  27  17  56  G3  CROUP DECISION—AAKING 47  In my group, everyone's opinion gets listened to.  29  11  60  45  If we have a decision to make everyone is involved in making it.  46  12  42  In this organization conflict that exists between groups gets in the way of getting the job done.  48  11  41  Because of the problems that exist between groups, I feel a lot of pressure on the job.  64  10  26  52  Coordination among work groups is good in this oranization.  35  16  49  53  In this organization, competition between work groups creates problems in getting work done.  58  15  27  G4  INTERGROUP RELATIONS 50  f:. A 1.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  51  r. r  r  z r•  •  •  41  3,,t77-ci-  I 11 UZOIVIOUAL ATTITUDES  Al  Not Important At All  IMPORTANCE - EXTRINSIC  Somewhat Important  Very Important  112  How important are your chances for getting a promotion?  6  18  76  113  How important is the amount of job security you have?  4  15  81  114  How important are your chances for receiving a performance reward?  17  29  54  A2  IMPORTANCE OF EXTRINSIC REWARDS IN REASONS FOR 'EMPLOYMENT How important was each of the following factors in your decision to work for the Federal Government? 134  Salary  9  34  57  135  Fringe benefits  8  26  66  137  Promotional opportunities  10  27  63  139  Job security  6  20  74  A3   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  IMPORTANCE OF WORK ITSELF IN REASONS FOR EULOYAENT How important was each of th.! following factors in your decision to work for the Federal Governments? 136  Challenging work responsibilities  10  27  63  138  Opportunity to have an impac: on public affairs  43  31  26  140  Opportunity for public service  33  32  35  1. . , it3  z t  ..:  ..  ,---,-;i 7sz 7,  e.-77 '11:-"" ."' 0,..• -7.. c•.• il• ... 1  7,"' .  .1, ....ei ,,z,........4. . . i t. ,. , ,:ta  , a.  ii  •  14  A4  Not Important At All  — INTRLICSIC  Somewhat Important  Very Important  1  5  94  1  9  90  3  22  75  • 2  13  85  •  109  111  AS  H.  important is it to get a feeling of azex.Iplishment from your job?  }ow in?)rtant are the chances you have to n .- .rethin3 vorthwhile?  In2JaTANCE — SOCIAT. FACTDRS 1)3  110   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Hlw important is the friendliness of the people you ',.-ork with? How ir.Tortant is the rcspect you receive from the people you work with?  7—Vf7  t• . 1.•. .  . P  e.  1ili ;  WI  1 PiI  ! ,1   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  15 PART II, GS-13 AND ABOff. SECTION  SES1  FAIRNESS OF EXECUTIVE SELECTION  5  Disagree  20  17  SES2  Agree  * 15  53 29  26 56  41 23  34 27  25 50  26 13  43 26  31 61  36 74  38 17  26 9  32 55  35 16  33 29  47 66  33 16  20 18  35 21  23 26  42 53  40 30  27 23  33 47  The procedures used to select people for senior executive  positions are fair. 4  Undecided  # 21  When an individual is hired or promoted into a career senior executive position, one can feel assured that the decision was based on merit. individuals are selected for senior executive positions on the basis of job performance. The assi;nment of individuals to senior executive positions in my agency is more a function of partisan politics than of any other factor.  EXECUTIVE RESPONSIVENFSS TO CHANCE  16  22  Senior executivas are reluctant to express opposing views to top managem3nt in this agency.  Senior executives in this agency are reluctant to try new ideas and approaches.  SES3  DEVELOPENT OF POTENTIAL EXECUTIVES  15  7  Training that individuals in grades CS-13 and above receive helps prepare them for executive positions. There are adequate prosIrams in my agency that focus on the development of future senior executives.  # Top figure indicates GS-13 - 15 manager responses. * Bottom figure indicates GS- 16 - 18 executive responses.  r  V  [iv  Ei  I  II-   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  16 EXECWCIVE AUTd0..tITY  • SES4 31  I do not have enough authority to detecmine how I get my job done.  32  I do not have enough authority to carry out decisions which fall within the real!.1 of established policy without consulting my supervisor.  Disagree  Undecided  Agree  70 77  7 8  23 15  72 77  6 7  22 16  26 19  6 7  68 74  12 12  53 27  35 61  37 62  51 26  12 12  20 22  55 30  25 48  I have the authority I need to accomplish my work objectives. * Item 12 is from part 1 FEAS  12*  SES5  CAREER — NONCA2F7R COOPEP.ATIO!'. 25  Senior executives and nonc:lreer executives work well together toward the attainment of ni;ency objectives.  30  Lack of cooperation between senior career and noneareer executives gets in the way of getting the work done.  21  SES6  LIPORTANCE OF PAY DETEWIINANTS (BACKGROUND FACTORS)  55 56  your training and experience?  64 65  Somewhat Important  Very Important  20 18  37 30  43 52  9 7  24 20  67 73  14  41 41  46 45  3 3  15 19  82 78  Not Important At All •  For the purpose of determining your pay, how important is . your education?  SES7  ,4*  Political appointees in this agency respect the ability of career employees.  PREFEaRED IHPORTANCE OF PAY DETER!1INANTS (BACK(tOUNG FACTORS) For the purpose of determining your pay, how important should he . . . 13 your education? your training and experience?  1 /' ..rar  I  •  /  •  s  .  543 F  •It  ,  SESS  I::1.)0aTANCE OF i'AY DETF.:1:1INANTS (PF.RFOR`IANCE FACTORS)  53  For the purpose of determining your pay hot,' important is the quality of your job performance?  59  your productivity?  •/'  •  17  Not Important At All  SES9  Somewhat Important  Very Important  13 14  23 17  64 69  17 14  26 24  57 62  PREFERRED IMPORTANCE OF PAY DETERMINANTS (PERFORMANCE FACTORS)  67  For the purpose of determining your nay how important should he . . . the quality of your job performance?  68  your productivity?  1  1  97 99  11 8  87 91  20  24 19  56 61  20 20  25 21  55 59  5 5  8 8  87 87  5 5  12 11  83 84  2 1 SES10  IMPORTANCE OF PAY DETERMINANTS (WORK GROUP FACTORS)  61 62  SES11   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  I  2  For the purpose of determining your pay how important is. • . thc quality of your work group's performance? 20 tho productivity of your work group?  PREFERRED IMPORTANCE OF PAY DETERMINANTS (WORK GROUP FACTORS)  70  For the purpose of determining your pay how important should be • . • the quality of your work group's performance?  71  the productivity of your work group?  1  •• )'  4 •  7;1 iZ.  e .  i  • I..t •  •  ••  IRV   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  AUTilOaITY OVEf: PEI:SONEL ACTIONS  1:ESI2  Disagree  Undecided  fkgree  35  o I do not have enough authority to remove S eople frm S if they pe r-.form poorly. their  39 41  8 8  53 51  36  I do not have enough authority to promote people.  34 44  5 5  37  I do not have enough authority to hire people.  46  5 7  61 51 55 41  38  I do not have enou1 authority to determine my emplS yee's pay.  52  SES13  19 22  8 11  73 67  37 38  50p. 39  13 23  14 25  58 41  28 34  36 48  8 7  56 45  39 48  10 9  51 43  E't:ECUTIVE REIOVAL 33  34  SES14  Senior executives are removed from their positions when they perfor.l. poorly. The procedurea necessary to remove ineffective senior executives deter the initiation of such actions.  SATISFACTION 'ATITH FAY 23 8  1ES15  All in all, I am satisfied with my pay. Considering my F;kills and the effort I put into my work, I zm satisfied with my pay.  INDIVIDUAL BENEFITS 72  73  Fmm  EXECUTIVZ 10BILITY  To what extent has your career benefited from job r.ohility in your agnncy? To what extent does an individual's acivancement in your agency dapend upon his/her willingness to change positions?  111  / i  44.1  J  To Some Extent  Not At All  To a Very Great Extent  46 50  21 16  33 34  19 25  33 40  48 35  I 4 ri..1 / 7  r  17124 I  P  0  „"s2y,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  VI/  j  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  November .6, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  There are only two weeks remaining in the 1980 Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) and we have reached a crucial point. Secretary Bergland, this year's Chairman of the CFC of the National Capital Area, has advised me that the campaign is doing quite well in terms of an increased level of personal giving, but that the overall pace is behind that of a year ago. To speed up the pace and insure we reach this year's goal of $12,875,000 your personal and visible attention is required. The voluntary agencies supported by the CFC provide essential services to the young, the aged, the sick and handicapped, but they can meet their commitments throughout the year only if we meet our commitment now. Thank you for giving this very important and deserving cause your personal attention.  EXOUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDLNT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.0  cw  20503  2  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Inventory of the Four Commodity Classes of Furniture  Recent events have demonstrated the need to improve the management of office furniture by Federal agencies. As a result, the Inspectors General of the Federal agencies have launched an audit of inventory and management practices of the four furniture commodity classes under the leadership of the General Services Administration's Inspector General, Kurt Muellenberg. The inventory required by this review should be conducted as expeditiously and accurately as possible so that the General Services Administration can proceed with necessary procurements. I urge your prompt attention to this matter to ensure that appropriate priority and emphasis have been placed on early completion of this inventory.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Ja/s T. McIntyre, Jr. D ector  1p,  •  eited States of America  el  Office of Personnel Management  • Washington, D.C. 20415  •  I  In Repry Refer To  6  •  194:1.  t  YOU?' Kelerence  r  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF ADMINISTRATION OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT:  REPORTING OF EMPLOYMENT BY FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT  •  Five agencies (Environmental Protection Agency, Export-Import Bank, Federal Trade Commission, General Services Administration, and Veterans Administration) are currently participating in an experiment involving reporting employment by full-time equivalent (FTE). This experiment is to determine whether full-time equivalent (i.e., work-year) employment controls, rather than the "head count" ceilings, can: (1) increase employment opportunities for permanent part-time workers, and (2) improve personnel and position management, and overcome some of the criticisms directed at the existing end-of-year ceiling control system, while maintaining the size of the Federal work force within acceptable limits. A copy of this memo is being provided for comment under separate cover to the agency members of the Interagency Advisory Group (IAG) Committee on Federal Personnel Management Information Systems. Agencies not represented on that LAG Committee are invited to provide comments also. In view of the likelihood that a full-time equivalent (FTE) ceiling system will be implemented government-wide within the next few years, we are providing for your comment a copy of the reporting instructions currently used for this system (Attachment 1). We are requesting that you review these instructions and provide the following input to OPM by November 16, 1979: (1) your agency's lead time requirements for implementing the FTE (workyear) reporting system; (2) difficulties or problems that have to be overcome in order to move to an FTE reporting system; (3) brief description of the internal mechanics/system for your agency's current SF 113-A reports to OFM; (4) comments on the attached reporting requirements, instructions and formats; and (5) any other comments your agency wishes to make regarding the FTE reporting system. We are aware that this new reporting requirement will necessitate the establishment of close coordination between agency line management, personnel and budget offices, and agency accounting functions and systems. We ask that Heads of Administration make a personal effort to insure that such coordination occurs effectively. As a matter of interest in your impact evaluation for your own agency, the five agencies in the experiment established an effective FTE reporting capability within six months of receiving the requirements from OPM.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  CON 114-24-3 January 1979   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •••  Comments should be sent to: Dr. Philip A. D. Schneider Deputy Assistant Director for Work Force Information Agency Compliance and Evaluation U.S. Office of Personnel Management (Room 6410D) Washington, D.C. 20415 Once we have received and analyzed your comments, we will proceed to finalize the reporting formats and instructions and forma lly establish a maximum feasible lead time schedule for implementing this new reporting system. Appropriate adjustments in SF 113-A reporting will also be announced at that time. It should be noted that these requirements apply to a full-time equivalent ceiling system covering all employees which will not begin before FY 1982. This is separate and apart from a requirement in P.L. 95-437, the Federal Employees Part-time Career Employment Act of 1978, that agencies begin counting permanent part-time employees on an FTE basis beginning in FY 1981 (See Attachment 2). OPM instructions will be issued on this requirement in the near future. Questions regarding the full-time equivalent experiment or the requirements of P.L. 95-437 may be directed to Mr. Ron Byers at (202 ) 254-6546 or Ms. May Eng at (202) 254-7638. 1.. 11 . / 2 Yd.Lr .4 r7 Jule M. Sugarman Deputy Director  .••  Attachments  me.  •  r ye,  • DRAFT Attachment 1  ) INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING THE REPORT OF FULL-TIME EQUIVALENCY (SF 113-C 1.  •  General  aghic  Effective for the period September 20, 1981 to October 31, 1981, (and for subsequent reporting periods as shown in Attachment 6), all agencies will be required to report Federal civilian employment on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis, using the Monthly Report of Full-time Equivalency (SF 113-C). This FPM Letter issues instructions to agencies for collecting and reporting Federal civilian employment data on a full-time equivalent basis. The detailed instructions which define the line items on the reporting form are in Attachment 2. The reporting form SF 113-C (Report of Full-time Equivalency) is at Attachment 3. Attachment 4 is a completed form with illustrative data; Attachment 5 explains how the figures shown in Attachment 3 were obtained. One report is required from each department and agency which submits the SF 113-A Monthly Report of Federal Civilian Employment to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM). (Reports are not required for bureaus or suborganizations within an agency.) Agencies employing non-U.S. citizens in U.S. territories and foreign countries are to submit separate SF 113-C reports for: (1) Total Work Year Ceiling Employment (including direct hire nationals of foreign countries and U.S. territories) and (2) Total Direct Hire Nationals (only in Foreign Countries and U.S. Territories).  •S gr°74  t Revisions to the current and any previous month's SF 113-C repor ions to should be provided to OFM as soon as possible. Minor revis d be reports can be handled by phone; extensive corrections shoul made by submitting a revised report. 2.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Time Schedule for Reporting and Submitting FTE Data employment The starting date for collecting full-time equivalent data are to data for Fiscal Year 1982 is September 20, 1981. These pay periods be collected within each agency over the 26 biweekly Attachment 6 from September 20, 1981 through September 18, 1982. covered by each is a schedule for FY 1982 showing the period to be  Orli%  %.0•4"-%  1  .111•0=M  nPI6 r C  la vt It : -  _ ‘"- 1.•  _  ••  • •'..•  •  _ •-•1?•   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • DRAFT Attachment 1 (2)  report, and the date the is to cover at least two end of the month. (Most a few reports will cover  report is due at OPM. Each report to OPM biweekly pay periods ending closest to the reports will cover 2 biwekly pay periods; 3 biweekly pay periods.)  The Report of Full-time Equivalency is due along with the SF 113-A on or before the 15th of the month which follows the end of the reporting period (e.g., the January report is due February 15), and is to be submitted to:  I.  Office of Personnel Management Work Force Analysis and Statistics Branch Surveys and Information Section 1900 E Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20415 Attention: SF 113-C, Room 6441  4 ' 044  010••••••••••-  DRAFT ••••  -  -.4.-  -  .41%e  f.4  '‘is  •  • D  •  so.  tr.4 1  Attachment 2  DEFINITION OF LINE ITEMS ON THE MONTHLY REPORT OF FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT EMPLOYMENT (SF 113-C)  MCI vaz oinr ,04V  Definition of Lines Line la.  Total Ceiling Employment  n Show data for employees (including direct hire nationals of foreig countries and U.S. territories) covered by Office of Management and Budget work-year ceiling, who receive pay for any part of the pay periods reported, including those on paid vacation, paid sick leave, t and persons who have separated from the agency during the curren reporting period.  '0V -4  Exclude persons and hours worked by those in nonceiling programs and other OMB-approved exemptions. Nonceiling employees include the following:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (1)  Summer Aids appointed under Schedule A authority, section 213.3102 (v);  (2)  The Stay-in-School Program, employees appointed under Schedule A, section 213.3102 (w);  (3)  The Federal Junior Fellowship Program, employees appointed under Schedule B, section 213.3202 (0;  (4)  Persons in the Worker-Trainee Opportunity Program who are in developmental jobs (for a twelve-month period from date of appointment) who were selected from the Worker-Trainee register, appointed under the Veterans Readjustment Appointment (VRA) authority, or appointed under the Worker Trainee Temporary Appointment Pending Establishment of a Register (TAPER) authorization.  (5)  Employees on leave with pay pending separation by disability retirement who meet all of the following criteria: (a) their application for disability retirement has been approved by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management; and (b) their use of sick leave actually exceeds, or is scheduled to exceed 30 calendar days.  1•16...../1•••  )„  ‘1...• •.  11"t ...`r •  •  • DRAFT Attachment 2 (2)  (6) Employees on leave with pay pending separation by optional retirement who meet all of the following criteria: (a) Employee has to retire because of ill health. (b) Employee is on sick leave and the employing agency has received a licensed physician's certificate covering the entire period for which the employee has requested sick leave. (c) Employee meets age and service requirements for optional retirement. (d) SF 2801, Application for Retirement, has been sub— mitted for retirement to become effective when sick leave expires. (e) The employee's use of sick leave exceeds or is scheduled to exceed 30 calendar days. (7) Those employees covered by any official exemptions granted by OMB to the agency. next Any employee who changes status from one pay period to the (e.g., from temporary to permanent) during a report period will reflecting be recorded (hours and employee count) in the line item his status during the last pay period. Lines (b) and (c) with lines la, As shown with each of the 7 employment categories (i.e., by employees 2a, 3a, etc.), straight time means hours of work performed l, sick, at their rate of basic pay. Include hours paid for annua holiday, and other paid leave. or in excess Overtime is hours of work in excess of 8 hours in a day reference on hours of 40 hours in an administrative work—week. For Supplement 990-2. of duty, pay and leave, see Federal Personnel Manual include both (1) Note that the straight time and overtime lines should work force and hours worked by employees comprising the current active y during the (2) hours worked by employees who separated from the agenc current reporting period.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  DRAFT  Lt!!  ca=  A,  •• DRAFT' Attachment 2 (3)  Fury Line 2a.  Full-Time With Permanent Appointments  r  Show on line 2a, data for employees (including direct•hire nationals in foreign countries and U.S. territories) included in line la who are full-time and are in tenure group 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, or 7. The definition for employees with permanent appointments is shown below. (Also see FPM Supplements 292-1, 296-31, and FPM Letter 296-55 for specific use and definitions of Tenure Group codes.) Tenure Group 1:  Competitive Service - Tenure Group 1 includes employees serving under career appointments who either have completed probation or are not required to serve probation, and who are not serving in obligated positions (i.e., positions to which another employee has statutory restoration rights after military duty or reemployment rights under sub-part B of part 352 of OPM's regulations). Excepted Service - Tenure Group 1 includes employees whose appointments carry no restriction or condition such as conditional, indefinite, specific time limitation, or trial period.  Tenure Group 2:  ?mle'  r,4 !MINIM"'  Competitive Service - Tenure Group 2 includes employees serving under career-conditional appointments, and those under career appointments who are serving probation or who are in obligated positions. Excepted Service - Tenure Group 2 includes employees who are serving trial periods, who are indefinite solely because they are serving in obligated positions, or whose tenure is equivalent to career-conditional tenure in the competitive service in agencies that have that type of appointment (for example, excepted appointment-conditional).  ve Tenure Groups 4, 5, 6, and 7: Include employees in the Senior Executi and Service (SES) serving under SES career appointments (4, 5, or 6) SES noncareer appointments (7).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  DRAFT 4.. • . .747  •  •  DRAFT Attachment 2 (4)  For purposes of this report, "permanent appointments" consist of Tenure Groups 1, 2, 4; 5, 6, and 7. Line 3a.  Other Employment  Include entries for: full-time employees (not in tenure group 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, or 7) with temporary or indefinite appointments; part-time employees with either permanent, temporary, or indefinite appointments; and intermittent employees with either permanent, temporary, or indefinite appointments. Lines 2a plus 3a should add to la. Lines 4a, 5a, 6a, and 7a should add to 3a. Line 4a.  Part-Time With Permanent Appointments  Show data for employees (including direct hire nationals of foreign countries and U.S. territories) included in line 3a who are part-time and have permanent appointments (i.e., are in tenure group 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, or 7) as defined in line 2a. Line 5a.  Part-Time with Temporary and Indefinite Appointments  Show data for employees included in line 3a who are part-time and have temporary or indefinite ._ppointments (i.e., in tenure group 0, 3, 8, or 9). The sum of lines 4a and 5a should equal the total number of parttime employees. Line 6a.  Full-Time with Temporary and Indefinite Appointments  Show data for employees included in line 3a who are full-time and have temporary or indefinite appointments. Lines 2a and 6a should equal the total number of full-time employees who are subject to ceiling. Line 7a.  Intermittent  Show data for employees (regardless of type of appointment) included d in line 3a who have no prescheduled tour of duty (i.e., usually employe on an irregular or occasional basis).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  C4::ef : few  DRAFT 11111111•••••••••  •  • DRAFT Attachment 2 (5)  Definition of Columns Column 1.  Employment/Hours  In column 1, each line (a) entry will show the number of employees in the specified category (e.g., full-time with permanent appointments) who contributed to the hours worked during the current reporting period. Each line (b) entry, i.e., straight time, will show the number of hours worked by the specified category of employees at their rate of basic pay during the current reporting period. This includes hours paid for as annual, sick, holiday, and other paid leave.  katal•  Each line (c) entry, i.e., overtime, will show the number of hours worked by the specified category of employees in excess of 8 hours in a day or in excess of 40 hours in an administrative work-week during the current reporting period. Since FTE reporting to OPM is structured around two (or occasionally three) biweekly pay periods, those agencies conducting alternative work schedule experiments should report in the same manner outlined herein. For reference on hours of duty, pay and leave, see Federal Personnel Manual Supplement 990-2. Column 2.  Full-Time Equivalent for Current Reporting Period  The full-time equivalent is the number of full-time employees it would take to work the total number of hours worked by all employees during the current reporting period regardless of work schedules. In column 2, each line (a) entry is the sum of the line (b) and (c) entries immediately following. Each entry (b) is obtained by dividing the corresponding line (b) entry in column 1 by the number of hours in the full-time work schedule for the current reporting period (e.g., 160 hours for 2 biweekly pay periods consisting of 40-hour administrative work-weeks). Each line (c) entry is obtained by dividing the corresponding line (c) entry in column 1 by the number of hours in the full-time work schedule for the current reporting period. When computing entries for column 2, round to the nearest whole number. See the example for line lb of column 2 in Attachment 5.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  . r• -e7  _  ••••Ir.**tAio‘  • Attachment 2 (6)  Column 3.  Work-Yearsi Current Reporting Period  These entries represent the number of work-years performed by ceiling employees during the current reporting period. In column 3, each line (a) entry is the sum of the line (b) and (c) entries immediately following. Each line (b) entry is obtained by dividing the corresponding line (b) entry in column 1 by 2,080; the line (c) entries for column 3 are obtained similarly. When computing entries for column 3, carry the divisions to 3 decimal places and round to 2 places. See the example for line lb of column 3 in Attachment 5. Column 4.  ''skAt  Cumulative Work-Years to End of Current Period  These entries represent the number of work-years performed by ceiling employees since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period. (Show the cumulative number of pay periods covered by the current period on the report.) Entries in column 4 on lines lb and 2b are the wily amounts reported that are subject to the Office of Management and Budget work-year ceilings. When computing entries for column 4, carry the divisions to 3 decimal places and round to 2 places. See the example for line lb of column 4 in Attachment 5. Column 5.  11.••••.•••  Work-Year Ceiling  , In column 5, entries will be shown only on lines lb and 2b. These figures which are the work-year ceilings assigned by the Office of Management and Budget, will remain constant for each reporting period unless a change has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ••••••••••••••  'e7.7  :  •  Attachment  3  Reporting Form for Report of Full-Time Equivalency (SF 113-C) Department or Agency: Report Period: Lmployment Coverage: Work-Years  Employment/Hours Category Employment and Hours (1)  1.  Ia.  Total Paid Ceiling Employees b. Straight Time c. Overtime  2a.  Full-time with Permanent Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  3a.  Other Employment b. Straight Time c. Overtime 4a.  .4  e  Part-time with Temporary and Indefinite Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  6a.  Full-time with Temporary and Indefinite Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  7a.  Intermittent b. Straight Time c. Overtime  '  r 01`1" ouT") c a a Ewngs  .•  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Certified  Current Period (X Pay Periods) (3)  Ceiling (5)  XXXXXX  Part-time with Permanent Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  58. •  Full-Time Equivalent for Current Period (2)  Cumulative To End of Current Period (X Pay Periods) (4)  XXXXXX .XXXXXX  •  Official Position  t  ,e_fgrit  Location  Date  Fr  I --WV,  kici.  •  *4.  FACSIMILE  Attachment 4  Reporting Form for Report of Full-Time Equivalency (SF 113-C) Department or Agency: Report Period: Employment Coverage:  Department of Government February 21 - March 20, 1982 Total Agency Employment  Work-Years  Employment And Hours (1)  Full-Time Equivalent for Current Period (2)  Employment/Hours Category  '5;  is.  Total Paid Ceiling Employees b. Straight Time c. Overtime  120,511 18,834,800 493,172  120,800 117,718 3,082  9,292.29 9,055.19 237.10  55,769.23 54,807.69 961.54  28.  Full-time with Permanent Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  81,328 13,012,480 383,904  83,727 81,328 2,399  6,440.57 6,256.00 184.57  38,269.23 37,500.00 769.23  3a.  Other Employment b. Straight Time C. Overtime  39,183 5,822,320 109,268  37,073 36,390 683  2,851.72 2,799.19 52.53  17,500.00 17,307.69 192.31  4a.  Part-time with Permanent Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  3,576 286,080 29,268  1,971 1,788 183  151.61 137.54 14.07  923.07 865.38 57.69  5a.  Part-time with Temporary and Indefinite Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  2,011 160,880  1,006 1,006  77.35 77.35  463.94 461.54 2.40  Full-time with Temporary and Indefinite Appt. b. Straight Time c. Overtime  10,523 1,683,680  10,523 10,523  809.46 809.46  4,907.70 4,903.85 3.85  Intermittent b. Straight Time c. Overtime  23,073 3,691,680 80,000  23,573 23,073 500  1,813.31 1,774.05 38.46  11,205.29 11,076.92 128.37  6a.  55  •5 ..„!   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Current Period (2 Pay Periods) (3)  Cumulative To End of Current Period (13 Pay Periods) (4)  7a.  Official Position Director of Persnnnel Location Washington, D. C. Date 4/10/82  Certified  , V-1d+, ( •  r?  .  :  • ,!  b .t  'A.  F  XI pr-  • Ceiling (5)  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Attachment 5 at Attachment 4 Procedures for Calculating Figures for Full-Time Equivalency Report Form Shown Employment/Hours, I IC, and Work -Years for Current Reporting Period  Employment/Hours Category Line  Employment and Hours (I)  Full -Time Equivalent (2)  Work -Years (3)  Is.  Total Paid Ceiling Employees  120,511 equals total number paid during current reporting period, including persons who separated during current period  120,800 equals the sum of lines lb and lc of this column  9,292.29 equals the sum of lines lb and lc of this column  lb.  Straight Time  18,834,800 equals hours of work performed by full-time, part-time, and intermittent employees at their rate of basic pay  117,718 equals  9,055.19 equals  line lb, column 1 or 160 a/ 18,834,800 160 a/  lc.  Overtime  493,172 equals hours of work in excess of 8 hours in a day, or 40 hours in an administrative workweek  (4) 55,769.23 equals the sum of lines lb and lc of this column  •  54,807.69 equals the total straight time hours worked since the start of the first 1 or column lb, line reporting period to the end of b/ 2,080 the current reporting period 18,834,800 m 9,055.192 (in this example 6 months) by employees in la divided by 2,080 b/ 2,080 (rounded to two decimal places)  3,082 equals  237.10 equals  line lc, column 1 or 160 a/  line lc, column 1 or 2,080 b/ 493 172 2,080 b/  493,172 160 a/  Work -Years Cumulative to End of Current Period c/  961.54 equals the total overtime hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in in divided by 2,080  a/  biweekly pay during the current reporting period, which covers two 160 equals the number of hours available to a full-time employee periods.  b/  2,080 equals the number of hours in one work -year.  c/  of the current reporting period is six months. Time span since the start of the first reporting period to the end  21 • —7,1 •  • • II.•  10  Ir-ift. IP •  •  (24  Attachment 5 -Time Equivalency Report Form Shown at Attachnent 4 Procedures for Calculating Figures for Full tinu Period Employment/hours, FIE, and Work -Years For Current kepor  2a.  2b.  2c.  Full-Time Equivalent (2)  Employment/Hours Category line  Employment and Hours (1)  Full-time With Permanent Appointment  81,328 equals number of fulltime employees with tenure codes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 who contributed to hours worked during current reporting period  13,012,400 equals hours of work performed at their rate of basic pay by employees in 2a  Straight Time  383,904 equals overtime hours of employees in line 2a as defined in line lc, column 1  Overtime  Work-Years Cumulative to End of Current Period c/  Work-Yrnrs (3)  (4)  83,727 equals the sum of lines 2b end 2c of this column  6,440.57 equals the sum of lines 2b and 2c of this column  38,269.23 equals the sum of lines 2b and 2c of thiv column  81,328 equals  6,256.00 enuals  line 2h, column 1 or 160 a/  olumn 1 or 2,2h 1 zl line  37,500.00 equals the total stroioht tine hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reprrting period by employers in 2n divided by 2,0E0  13,012,4P0 160 a/  13,012,4P0  2,399 equals  184.57 equals  line 2c, column 1 or 160 a/  line  303,904 160- a/  column 1 or  383 904 2,UbU •b/  769.23 equals the total overtime hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 2a divided by 2,08U  •  1  a/  d, Which covers two biweekly employee during the current reporting perio time fulla to able avail hours of r numbe the 160 equals periods.  b/  2,08U equals the number of hours in one work-year.  c/  period is six months. d to the end of the current reporting lime span since the start of the first reporting perio  4. :  •*,  ,4 t  1. It'   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10 .  •  1/'  1  -..  • 4'fa'  •  •  r-  r  •  or  lc is-if rif  • .644   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  Attachment 5 Procedures for Calculating Figures for Full-Time Equivalency Report Form %own at Attachment 4 Employment/Hours, Ill, and Work-Yenrs for Lurrunt keportino Period  3e.  3b.  Employment/Hours Category Line  Employment and Hours (1)  Full-Time Equivelent (2)  Work-Years (3)  Work-Years Cumulative to End of Current Period c/ ((i)  Other Employment  39,183 equals number of: part-time employees with permanent appointments; part-time employees with temporary and indefinite appointments; full-time employees with temporary and indefinite appointments; end intermittent employees who contributed to hours worked during current reporting period  37,073 equals the sum of linen 3b end 3c of this column  2,851.72 equals the sum of lines 3b and 3c of this column  17,500.00 equals the sum of lines 3b and 3c of this colpmn  5,822,320 equals hours of work performed at their rate of basic pay by employees in 3a. The sum of lines 4b, 5b, 6b, and 7b should equal line 3b  36,390 equals  2,799.19 equals  line 3h, column 1 or 16U a/  line 3h, column 1 or 2,L80 b/  17,307.69 equals the total straight time hours viorked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the currrnt report inn period by employees in 3a divided by 2,060.  Straight Time  5,822,320 160 n/  3c.  Overtime  109,268 equals overtime hours of employees in line 3a as defined in line lc, column 1. Line 4c, Sc, 6c, and 7c should equal line 3c  683 equals  52.53 equals  line 3c, column 1 or 160 a/  line 3c, column 1 or 2,080 b/  109,268 160 a/  a/  5,P22,320 2,08U h/  •  192.31 equals the total overtime hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 3a divided by 2,080.  •  109 268 160 a/  biweekly payr:, 160 equals the number of hours available to a full-time employee during the current reporting period, which covers two periods. 2,0811 equals the number of hours in one work-year. Time span since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period is six months.  ;1  " 17  'A  csh.  ..e...: ,5 43  Attachment 5 Procedures for Calculating Figures for Full-Time Equivalency Report Form Shown at Attachment 4 Employment/Hours, FIE, and Work-Years for Current Reporting Period  4b.  Employment and Hours (1)  Full-Time Equivalent (2)  Part-time with Permanent Appointment  3,576 equals number of parttime employees with tenure codes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 who contributed to hours worked during current reporting period  1,971 equals the sum of lines 4b and 4c of this column  Straight Time  286,080 equals hours of work performed at their rate of basic pay by employees in 4a  1,788 equals  137.54 equals  line 4b, column 1 or 160 a/  line 4b, column 1 or 2,080 b/  •••  Overtime  29,268 equals overtime hours of employees in line 4a as defined in line lc, column 1  151.61 equals the sum of lines 4b and 4c of this column  923.07 equals the sum of lines 4b and 4c of this column  • 2_7_86 080 . 160 a/  4c.  Work-Years (3)  Employment/Hours Category Line  Work-Years Cumulative to End of Current Period c/ (4)  286,080 2,080 b/  183 equals  14.07 equals  line 4c, column 1 or 160 a/  line 4c, column 1 or 2,080 bi  29,268 160-W  29,268 2,080 b/  865.38 equals the total straight time hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 4a divided by 2,080  57.69 equals the total overtime hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 4a divided by 2,080 4110  ;  a/  160 equals the number of hours available to a full-time employee during the current reporting period, Which covers two biweekly Pay periods.  b/  2,080 equals the number of hours in one work-year.  lc/ its  A   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Time span since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period is six months.  • •  •  Attachment 5 Procedures for Calculating Figures for full-lime Equivalency Heport Form Shown at Attachment 4 Employnent/hours, FIE, and Work -Years For Current keporting Period  5a.  5b.  Employment/Hours Cateqory Line  Employment and Hours (I)  Full-Time Equivalent (2)  Work-Years (3)  Part-time with Temporary end indefinite Appointment  2,011 equals number of part-time employees with tenure coces 0, 3, 8, and 9 who contributed to hours worked during current reporting period. Lines 4a and 5a should ecual the total number of employees with a part-time work schedule  1,006 eouals the num of lines 5h nod Sc of this column  77.35 equals the sum of lines 5h end Sc of this column  463.94 ermaln the sum of lines 5b end Sc of thia column  Straight Time  160,880 equals hours of work performed at their rate of basic pay by employees in 513  1,006 equals  77.35 equals  line 5b, column 1 or 160 a/  line 5b, column 1 2,08U b/  461.54 equals the total straiciht time hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 5a divided by 2,ueu  160,880 160 a/  Sc.  i:ork-Yeors Cumulative to End of Current Period c/  Overtime  None  None  160"0 2,(JUU b/  None  (4)  r  •  2.40 equals the total overtime hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reportrny period by employees in 5a divided by 2,08U  •  17-1 e -444, rits soreVi•V el A  a/  160 equals the number of hours available to a full-time employee during the current reporting period, which covers two biweekly pay periods.  b/  2,08U equals the number of hours in one work-year.  c/  lime span since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period is six months.  0.111f A •'r   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Tfir .(0,.11  4 e, ,  - 1194.40;z.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Attachment 5  (6)  Procedures for Calculating Figures for Full-Time Equivalency Report Form Shown at Attachment 4 Employment/Hours, UTE, and Work -Years  68.  6b.  or Current Reporting Period  Employment/Hours Category Line  Employment and Hours (1)  Full-Time Equivalent (2)  Work -Years (3)  Work-Years Cumulative to End of Current Period c/ (4)  Full-time with Temporary and Indefinite Appointment  10,523 equals number of full-time employees with tenure codes 0, 3, 8, and 9 who contributed to hours worked during current reporting period. Lines 2a and 60 should equal the total number of employees with El full-time work schedule  10,523 equals the sum of lines 6b and 6c of this column  809.46 equals the sum of lines 6b and 6c of this column  4,907.70 equals the sum of lines 6b and 6c of this column  1,683,680 equals hours of work performed at their rate of basic pay by employees in 6a  Straight Time  • 10,523 equals  809.46 equals  line 6b, column 1 or 160 a/  line 6b, column 1 or 2,000 b/ 1,683,680 2,000 b/  1,683,680 160 a/  6c.  3.85 equals the total overtime hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 6a divided by 2,080  None  None  None  Overtime  4,903.85 equals the total straight time hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 6s divided by 2,080  160 equals the number of hours available to eit full-time employee during the current reporting period, Which covers two biweekly pay periods 2,080 equals the number of hours in one work-year. c/  Time span since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period is six months.  ,-  i e ")  4. ;et  %  es  • -  0";  r  ,  C141 4 , 1  '  Cul '7J  1••••--  Attachment 5 Procedures for Calculating Figures for Full-Time Eouivolency Report Form Shown at Attachment 4  Employment/Hours, FIL, rind Work -Years for Current heportind Period I'   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Employment/Hours Cnteriory Line  Employment and Hours (1)  Full-Time Iqutialent (2)  Work -Years (3)  4ork-Years Cumulative To End of Current Period c/ (4)  78.  Intermittent  23,073 equals number of employees (regardless of type of appointment) with no prescheduled tour of duty who contributed to hours worked durinu current reporting period  23,573 equals the sum of lines 7h and 7c of this column  1,813.31 mulls the sun of lines lb ano 7c of this column  11,205.29 equals the sum of lines 7b and 7c of this column  7b.  Straight Time  3,691,660 equals hours of work performeo at their rate of basic pay by employees in 78  23,073 equals  1,774.85 equals  line 7h, column I or 160 n/  line 7h, colunn 1 or 2,080 b/  11,076.92 equals the total strsicht time hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by mployees in 7a divided by 2,COU  3,691,660 160 a/  7c.  500 equals  80,000 equals overtime hours of employees in line 78 as defined In line lc, column 1  Overtime  line 7c, column 1 or 160 oi FO 000 160 e/  3,691,6f10 2,CHU  30.46 equals line 7c, column 1 or 2,U6U Li/ U0 U0b 2,118U  •  126.37 equals the total overtime hours worked since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period by employees in 7n divided by 2,080  •  ii 160 equals the number of hours available to a full-time enployee during the current reporting period, which covers two biweekly pay periods. 2,080 equals the number of hours in one work-year. Time span since the start of the first reporting period to the end of the current reporting period is six months.  F  .•  f -43•"'"-' '• • -•  ()!,•-•  ,.$ tt .  I  .  g'r-  of •  0.  •  O  r  D  ' Att.  Attachment 6 NEI FY 82 Time Schedule for the Monthly Report of Full—time Equivalent Employment (SF 113—C)  Report Number  Period Covered  Date Due  1  September 20 — October 31, 1981*  November 15, 1981  2  November 1 — November 28, 1981  December 15, 1981  3  November 29 — December 26, 1981  January 15, 1982  4  December 27, 1981 — January 23, 1982  February 15, 1932  5  January 24 — February 20, 1982  March 15, 1982  6  February 21 — March 20, 1982  April 15, 1982  7  March 21 — April 17, 1982  May 15, 1982  8  April 18 — May 29, 1982*  June 15, 1982  9  May 30 — June 26, 1982  July 15, 1982  10  June 27 — July 24, 1982  August 15, 1982  11  July 25 — August 21, 1982  September 15, 1982  12  August 22 — September 18, 1982  October 15, 1982  *Covers 3 biweekly pay periods. Note:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The first report for FY 1983 is to cover the period September 19 — October 30, 1982. The second report is to cover October 31 — November 27, 1982 and so on. Each report is to cover at least two biweekly pay periods ending closest to the end of the month. (Most reports will cover 2 biweekly pay periods; a few reports will cover 3 biweekly pay periods.)  ruir  •  r  Attachment 2  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET • O.,  •  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  BULLETIN NO. 79-11  July 18, 1979  TO THE READS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT:  Executive Branch Employment Ceilings  1. Purpose. This Bulletin provides guidelines for a modification of the employment ceiling control system for agencies and establishments of the Executive Branch. It establishes new procedures for fiscal year 1981 under which part-time permanent employees will be counted against employment ceilings established in accordance with paragraph 4 of OMB Circular No. A-64. 2. Backaround. The Federal Employees Part-Time Career E7p1oyment Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-437) was ehacted to provide increased part-time career employment opportunities throughout the Federal Govern:nent. The Act defines part-time career employment, i.e., part-time permanent employment, as scheduled employment of 16-32 hours a week. Part-time permanent employment does not include employment on a temporary or intermittent basis (5 U.S.C. 3391). Effective on October 1, 1980, part-time career employment, under personnel ceilings applicable to an agency, must be counted as a fraction determined by dividing 40 hours into the number of hours of such employee's regularly scheduled workweek (5 U.S.C. 3394).  05:  The possibility of moving to a full-time equivalent control system for all employees in fiscal year 1982 or later will be considered during the next 12 months. No decision on this possibility will be made before next year. 3. Coveraae. This Bulletin applies to all Executive Branch departments and establishments subject to employment ceilings determined by the President and assigned by the Office of Management and Budget. .••••powimar-  4. Employment ceilings for fiscal year 1981. End-of-year employment ceilings will continue to be established for the same components as in the past and will exclude disadvantaged youth and personnel participating in the Worker-Trainee Opportunity Program ('TOP). (The basis for the 1979 and 1980 employment ceilings will remain unchanged.)  1 e .  •J  2 This a. Full-time employment in permanent positions. ceiling remains unchanged and represents the upper limit of full-tire employees in permanent positions for September 30 of each year. b.  Total employment.  This ceiling will represent the sum  of: (1) Full-time employment in permanent positions (as described above). (2) All part-time permanent employment regardless of length of scheduled workweek (i.e., all such employees with These employees will be counted as a tenure codes 1 or 2). fraction that is determined by dividing 40 hours into the number of hours of such employee's regularly scheduled workweek during the last pay period of the fiscal year. (NOTE: These are not the actual hours worked, but the hours of the regularly scheduled workweek.) (3) All other employment, i.e., personnel employed on a temporary (full-time or part-time) or intermittent basis. The actual number of these employees will continue to be counted, as in the past, as prescribed for the "Monthly Report of Federal Civilian Employment" (SF 113A). for basis The reporting. compliance and 5. Agency determining agency compliance with established employment ceilings will be the data submitted to the Office of Personnel Federal Civilian the "Monthly Report of Management on Employment" (SF 113A). Reporting on actual total end-of-year employment will continue to be necessary to meet information requirements of the President and the Congress, including the requirements of section 311 of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (P.L. 94The Office of Personnel Management will issue revised 454). reporting requirements, consistent with the employment ceiling definitions listed in this Bulletin.  111••••••••—  •••••• 41.  •  -  i •• *4-k  As a part of the 1981 budget submissions, agencies should be prepared to furnish, for the budget year, an estimate of parttire permanent employment in the fractional terms described in paragraph 4.b.(2) and also an estimate of the actual number of such employees. 6. Effective rescinded.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  date.  #  141'  This Bulletin remains in effect until  • • t k;•••••:••  irq-1  t -•  s . af—  Ni•   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 g these instructions should 7. Inquiries. Questions regardin ves responsible for the be addressed to the OMB representati agency's budget estimates.  IIle "r). 4 111P•Mm...-  mes T. McIntyre, 'rector  tyiP7  ,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  /V 3   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  lik nited States of America Office of Personnel Management  Washington, D.C. 20415 '  In Reply Refer To  Your Referirnct:  -43 October 22, 1979 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation, established by the Congress as the official memorial to the 33rd President, administers an outstanding scholarship program for American college students who have long range career interest in Government. To support the Foundation's program for students selected through nationwide competition as Truman Scholars, the Office of Personnel Management has approved, under provisions of E.O. 12015, a career related work-study program. Truman Scholars who complete academic requirements and who perform satisfactorily during work-study assignments may be converted to positions in the career service. Our instructions and other guidance for participation are published in chapter 308 of the Federal Personnel Manual. Each year the Foundation selects 53 Truman Scholars from among the Nation's top students. These scholars are selected at the end of their sophomore year and may receive Foundation support through 2 years of graduate study. These students also represent an additional resource for meeting the Government's recruitment goals. The Civil Service Reform Act emphasized that it is the national policy of the Federal Government to recruit a competent, honest, and productive work force reflective of the Nation's diversity, and to improve the quality of public service. We, in the Office of Personnel Management are dedicated to providing the necessary tools needed by agencies to meet this objective, but their full value will not be realized unless agencies make active use of them. I encourage your personal support and request that you urge your management and personnel staff to utilize this staffing method. OPM staff, in the Student Programs Section, telephone: (202) 632-5678 and the Executive Secretary of the Truman Scholarship Foundation, telephone: (202) 395-4831, are available to work with your staff in the development of work-study assignments.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Alan K. Campbell Director  CON 114-24-3 January 1979   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  October 24. 1,79  Mr. John Carr Executive Director White House Conference cn Families Executive Cffice Building Washington, D. C. 20506 Dear Hr. Carr: I am writing in response tc the Presidential memorandum of (ctober 15, 1979 to Executive Departments and Agencies requesting appointments to the Interagemcy Task Force for the White House Conference OD Families. The Federal Reserve Board, as an independent regulatory agency, has no programa which impact family life as anpated by the work of the White loess Conference on Families. Therefore, we do not think it aIIropriate to make an appointment to the Interagency Task Force. However, we fully support the objectives of the Conference and indeed may find it helpful to observe Conference activities from time to time. Toward this end, we request that you inform Mr. Jerauld C. Kluckaan, Aosociate Director, Division of Consumer and Commmmity Affairs, about Conference activities. Mr. Kluckman serves as the official staff member witb primary responsibility for community *Hairs activities and, es such, Board interests in the area of is in the best poson oIen family life. Sincerely, (Signe, * John M. uenkier Joan M. Desikler cc:  Mr. Mulrenin Mr. Kluckman Mrs. Mallardi  ETtiu1renin:mhw #WH — 102  •...".1110  •••  •OS  •••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  October 15, 1979  c.rQ  7c,i' OCT ri r'u ,  021 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  In July, the National Advisory Committee of the White House Conference on Families held its first meeting. The Committee adopted a plan of action for the Conference, which includes hearings, state activities, and White House Conferences at several sites throughout the country. A major goal of the White House Conference on Families, which I called for in my campaign for the Presidency, is to identify public policies which strengthen and support families as well as those which harm or neglect family life, and to recommend appropriate changes. To accomplish this goal, the Conference must have the support and assistance of every Department and Agency within the government. I am, therefore, directing Department and Agency heads to cooperate fully with the staff of the White House Conference on Families. Such cooperation should include, but not be limited to, the following: Identifying and cataloging programs, policies and research studies which impact on family life; analyzing the impact of selected policies and programs; publishing studies, reports and other informational materials relating to families; providing detailees, logistical assistance meeting facilities and other resources for Conference activities earmarking discretionary funds for projects which support the goals of the White House Conference on Families, and informing employees and constituent groups about Conference activities. To demonstrate this Administration's commitment to the goals of the WHCF, I am requesting Agency and Department heads to be available to make presentations at the hearings which will be held this fall and at the White House Conferences scheduled for June and July of next year. To coordinate government-wide participation in the Conference, an Interagency Task Force will be established. Please designate one of your Special Assistants or an Assistant or Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy or  SIAl•••110-  WI/   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •OD  •se 2  Planning who has knowledge of family-related programs and a capacity to draw on the resources within your Department to serve on this Task Force. Notification of this appointment should be sent to John Carr, Executive Director of the White House Conference on Families (472-4393) by October 25, and your designee should plan to attend the first meeting of the Interagency Task Force scheduled for November 1. Thank you for your assistance in helping strengthen and support our nation's families.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ••  • •  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  OCT 02 7979  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF SELECTED DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Compliance with Executive Order 12044 -Improving Federal Regulations  One of the highest priorities of this Administration is the streamlining of the Federal reg ulatory system. The President has placed great emphasis on the responsibility of department and agency heads to ass ume responsibility and to exercise oversight over the ir regulatory processes, so that Federal regulations can be made simpler, more effective and far less burdensome on the public and the economy. The Office of Management Fire' for evaluating progress under the President 's prcig:cam -a program laid out in large measure by Exe cutive Order 12044. Our report to the President on age ncy compliance with the Order is attached. The report sets out several steps to be tak en by agencies and OMB to improve our performance, and my staff will work with yours to address specific recommendati ons and situations. I urge you to continue to give these matter s your serious attention. Your support for the Presid ent's program is vital to its success.  04-400.1.. ames Tlc:yre, Jr. Director Attachment  /O,  • U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION Office of Workers' Compensation Programs Office of the Director  SEP 20 Ert9  Washington, D.C. 20210  File No.  •  MEMORANDUM FOR:  ALL FEDERAL AGENCIES  FROM:  RALPH M. HARTMAN Director, Office of Workers' Compensation Programs  SUBJECT:  New Policy in Regard to Releasing Form Letter CA-1038, Notice of Approval of Continuation of Pay, or Request Additional Evidence while COP Continues  4-  It has been found that the release of a Form Letter CA-1038 in each case involving continuation of pay (COP) was not serving a useful purpose for employing agencies or the OWCP. The preparation and release of that letter consumed resources which could be put to more productive use in other areas of case development and adjudication. Therefore, in order to service cases more efficiently and expeditiously, Form Letter CA-1038 will no longer be released in COP cases when the claim is not controverted by the employing agency. It will, however, be released when additional development information is required by the adjudicating District 4)ffice or when an emplbying agency specifically requests verification of the COP payment. •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Therefore, if an agency wishes such specific verification of a payment, a request should be submitted to the adjudicating office along with the report of injury.  •  Include your address, ZIP code, and file number on all correspondence FMTerrpirminammopmemigs  • •  •  Steps to Improve Compliance with E.O. 12044 The Office of Management and Budget has just completed its first, formal review of agency compliance with Executive Order 12044. Based on our assessment of agency performance and public views on needed improvements, agencies should adopt the following measures to assure effective implementation of the Order. 1. Since predictability is important to the users of the semiannual agendas., agencies that do not meet their originally scheduled date for publication should: 1) publish a notice on the scheduled date, explaining the need for postponement; and 2) set a revised date for publication. 2. A basic purpose of the semiannual agendas is to inform the public when to expect agency regulatory action. At a minimum, all agendas should include a more accurate estimate of when the public can expect the agency to take the next step in the rulemaking or review process. It is particularly important that agencies develop specific schedules for their sunset reviews. These schedules should include all key steps to be taken in the review process. 3. In Federal Register notices, the summary paragraph is particularly helpful to members of the public who are monitoring regulatory activities in a number of agencies. The summary paragraph should include mention of both the classification of the regulation (nonsignificant, significant, or major) and the availability of a regulatory analysis if it is a major regulation. 4. In order to assist us in evaluating the quality of regulatory analyses, agencies should establish a procedure for sending to the Office of Management and Budget's Regulatory Policy and Reports Management Division a copy of all draft and final regulatory analyses as soon as they are made available to the public. In addition to the above steps, the report indicates actions to be taken by OMB to improve overall performance. We will:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  - conduct a seminar for agency managers on management techniques to improve policy oversight of regulations; - provide model regulatory analyses to agencies and seek methods to combine the analytic requirements of various impact statements into a single analysis; - investigate with the General Services Administration possible problems created by the Federal Advisory Committee Act; establish with the Office of the Federal Register and the Office of Personnel Management Programs to improve the clarity of regulations; and - take steps to increase the participation of State and local interest groups and officials.  •0 , ..• nniscatreina.:o;!-  '"Voi  Ae   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT •  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  -  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  OCT 1  1979  /7.9ocT_ 5,  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE BRANCH DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  President's PLperwork Reduction Program  We have recently completEd another in the series of reports to the President and Concress on cutting the paperwork imposed on the public by Jederal agencies. A copy is attached. We have made substantial r-ogress. Since President Carter took office, we have redu:ed the amount of time the public spends each year in filling out Federal forms by more than 125 million hours. But our rate (DI. progress has slowed, and potential paperwork requirements associated with new programs and laws are threatening to reverse the trend. Because of the importance of this effort to the Administration, we will shortly be issuing new guidance and procedures for managing Federal information requirements. In view of the forthcoming guidance, the effective date of the fiscal year 1979 deadline for paperwork reduction is extended to October 22, 1979.  0441011{  James T. McIntyre, Jr. Director Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  • \  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  October 1, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Urban and Community Impact Analysis (UCIA)  ft   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  In his urban policy message to the Congress just over a year ago, the President promised to establish a process that would keep him advised of the potential impacts of major Administration proposals on our cities and rural areas. This process was set in motion by Executive Order 12074, and by Office of Management and Budget Circular A-116, which provides you with detailed implementing instructions. At this time, I request that you review the procedures within your own agency to make sure they are adequate to carry out this requirement in a timely fashion. I also request that you inform me within the next two weeks who the responsible official for this process is in your agency and who the day-to-day contact is. I intend to see that the results of urban and community impact analyses are fully considered during my reviews of budget and legislative proposals and appreciate you assistance in this effort. The information requested in this memorandum should be addressed to Harrison Wellford, Executive Associate Director for Reorganization and Management, Office of Management and Budget. Detailed questions may be directed to John Helmer, 395-5017.  Ja9es T. McIntyre, D . ector   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ElaUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIINT_ OFFICE OF MANACEMENT AND BUDGET V.ASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  -5 OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  OCT  1 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT: Interagency Committee on Implementation of Circular A-76  OMB Circular A-76. "Policies for Acquiring Commercial or Industrial Products or Services Needed by the Government," was revised and issued on March 29, 1979 to clarify the Government's policy of reliance on the private sector for goods and services, and provide more specific guidelines for agency implementation. Each agency is required to take actions to implement the revised circular and to submit reports to the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP). Submissions received to date by OFPP indicate that many agencies are encountering difficulty in complying with these requirements. To facilitate such compliance. I am responding to suggestions from agencies to provide a means for exchanges of information by establishing an "Interagency Committee on Implementation of Circular A-76." This Committee, to be chaired by William D. Russell, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Logistics, OFPP, will have as its principal objective assistance to agencies in their efforts to achieve consistent, effective, equitable, and expedient implementation of the revised policy. Specific requirements of Circular A-76 imposed on each agency include: 1.  Designate an official at the Assistant Secretary or equivalent level to have overall responsibility for implementation.  2.  Establish an office as a central point of contact to respond to all requests concerning inventories and reviews.  3.  Issue internal instructions for implementation of the Circular, within 90 days, providing a copy to the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP).  4.  Prepare a complete inventory of all Government commercial and industrial activities in the agency and a schedule for review of each activity within the next three years, publishing the schedule and providing a copy to OFPP within 120 days.  •  •  EXECUTIVE CF7-"ICE CF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF AANAGEME.NT AN .`..ASH I NGTON  20503  BUDGET  !019 OCT-  September 27, 1979  g--s• MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Inflation and Budget Restraint  As we review your budget proposals, I want to clarify the revision made this year to OMB pricing policy to take into account anticipated inflation. A number of questions have been raised about the revised policy indicating some feeling that additional resources are available to offsot the effects of inflation. This is not the case. The revision recognizes that realistic planning in this period of higher inflation requires that we consider its eroding effect on your capability to carry out your programs. At the same time, I do not want to raise e::pectations that your planning ceilings will be revised upward to compensate for that erosion. The Federal Government cannot and should not immunize itself against higher costs. Like the public, we will have to tighten our belts and limit our expectations. Separate indicators have been provided for indexed programs because benefit levels for these programs are established in law. The indexed programs should be treated precisely as they have been in the past. In addition, as a basis for determining the effects of inflation on your programs, OMB has informally provided your staff with two general indicators of assumed future price levels --one for Federal nonpay purchases, and one for a State and local purchase index. The deflators are intended as general guides and are not applicable to your entire budget. For example, Federal payrolls are not affected by the deflators because we budget for Federal pay increases separately. There may be reasons to use alternative adjustments. In many instances prices for specific programs should not be expected to rise in the same amount as the general deflator. However, I will expect OMB examiners to be familiar with whatever measures are used and the justification for them. All those involved in development of the budget need to exercise judgments necessary to reach appropriate program totals within constrained budget levels. These judgments should take into account, as best we can, an assessment of the effects of inflation on program levels and resulting priorities within the budget ceilings.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 The constraints that we face in the 1981 budget are real. You are already aware that the planning targets the President approved represent real restraint. Neither the recent change in our pricing policy nor any other developments have changed this policy. I am confident, however, that together we can prepare a budget that meets both national needs as well as the overall need for serious constraint.  J,tries T. McIntyre, rector   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT  r•-..•  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHING -1" :DN. D.C. 20503  1919 OCT - I (1' II: 14.8 September 27, 1979 OFFIr7.'  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978  The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 provides management with the opportunity, challenge and tools to direct the government's work force in the most efficient and economical manner. Equally important, the Act furnishes substantially greater protections for Federal employees against unwarranted and improper actions on the part of management. The statae clearly spells out prohibited personnel practices and the safeguards available to employees who "blow the whistle" on fraud, abuse of authority, waste and mismanagement. The responsibility for ensuring that employees are protected against unauthorized personnel practices is assigned to the Office of the Special Counsel of the Merit Systems Protection Board. Your organization's full cooperation with the Special Counsel is essential to its success. It is important that investigations be conducted promptly and thoroughly; that reports be submitted to the Special Counsel in a timely fashion; and that the Special Counsel's recommendations for corrective measures be given prompt consideration and speedy action. I am pleased with the general cooperation you have given to the Special Counsel's office during the past several months. The actions of that office, the work of the Inspectors General and the provisions of the Civil Service Reform Act can do much to assist you in our efforts to reduce fraud, waste and mismanagement in Federal programs. I welcome your continued support.  James T. McIntyre, Jr. Director   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Mir  111.  a n" I NI  THE WHITE HOUSE  ,•$.  WASHINGTON  1939 SF_P 77  : 05  September 26, 1979 I  rIT.117F  To Chairman Paul Volcker 1 am today issuing an Executive Order designed to improve the management, coordination, and effectiveness of agency consumer affairs activities. The Order requires Executive agencies to develop plans and procedures for the effective performance of five major consumer functions, and it establishes a Consumer Affairs Council to enhance interagency coordination of these efforts. 1 am requesting that independent regulatory agencies voluntarily comply with the Order. The activities of these agencies substantially affect the health, safety, and economic well-being of consumers. Implementation of the provisions of the Order will help to ensure that these activities are informed by a heightened awareness of consumer needs and interests. Sincerely,  The Honorable Paul A. Volcker Chairman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System 20th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20551  • t  !•„.  ••e•  • "- •  —._  •  r•  •  • 0,• " -0) T • 4 4.84 ...% ..••••14.,41..1.4%zicip-'41,12 .1,..:,... s...V.,41•4;;ZI   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  2.11  September 26, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES I hereby designate Esther Peterson, my Special Assistant for Consumer Affairs, to be Chairperson of the Consumer Affairs Council established by Executive Order 12160, which I issued today.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S THE WHITE HOUSE WAS  rr, 1)1  \TI  September 25, 1979 r c  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Reducing U.S. Employment Abroad  In May, based on reports to me from our Ambassadors abroad, I directed the Secretary of State and the Director, Office of Management and Budget, to review the number of U.S. employees abroad. A Review Group was formed to examine the problem. Teams visited 12 of our largest diplomatic missions and prepared a report which indicates that there are opportunities for reductions in our missions overseas by consolidating or eliminating functions, basing activities on U.S. territory or other means. I am directing the Secretary and the Director, in close cooperation with the heads of the agencies involved, to examine the specific recommendations in the Review Group report and to recommend to me implementing action, where appropriate. Part of this review has already been completed, and I am today directing several actions be taken now. (1)  One of the major workload factors at some posts is the large number of official visitors who require assistance from our employees stationed overseas. In order to reduce the workload and employees abroad, we need to hold the number of official visits to the necessary minimum. Accordingly. I am directing all senior civilian and military executives to make a special effort to insure that overseas trips are absolutely necessary. Furthermore, I am asking the Department of State, in addition to already existing requirements for clearing foreign travel at the Assistant Secretary level and above, to establish a system for minimizing official travel at all levels to posts which are from time to time especially overburdened.  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .40  2  1116 (2)  At many of our posts abroad, administrative support activities are fragmented among the various agencies represented. This results in too many people doing too little work while some basic services are not being adequately provided. To eliminate duplication and improve efficiency, I am directing that, in consultation with affected agencies, the Secretary of State establish joint administrative organizations at all U.S. diplomatic missions abroad, where efficiency and reduction of personnel will result.  (3)  I have decided that the Drug Enforcement Administration's regional offices abroad should be closed by the end of Fiscal Year 1980, and American personnel associated with regional operations withdrawn, except that I will assess the Bangkok regional office closing date during budget hearings this fall.  (4)  The tremendous workload associated with processing refugees in Southeast Asia has already stretched State and Immigration and Naturalization Service overseas personnel resources. To alleviate this problem, I have proposed budget amendments to the Congress to cope with this situation. In doing so, I have considered fully the impact this request might have on the program to reduce overseas employment, but I can find no alternative in this special circumstance.  (5)  The current system for monitoring overseas direct employment (MODE) must be improved, to assure that employment abroad is the minimum needed to fulfill U.S. interests. There are significant opportunities for improvements to the present system. I am asking the Secretary of State, the Director, Office of Management and Budget, and the Assistant for National Security Affairs to prepare improved management and control procedures.  On August 3, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget asked all agencies that have personnel at diplomatic missions abroad to participate in a special zero-based budget review of overseas functions and positions. The results of this special review will be incorporated in the Fiscal Year 1981 budget.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  October 5, 1979  Dear Jim: This is to confirm conversations between our staffs to the effect that Mr. Elliott McEntee of the Division of Federal Reserve Bank Operations will serve on the interagency Task Force on Debt Collection. Mr. McEntee and his associates have been involved with related studies of government debt collection and payment practices in conjunction with the Treasury and the General Accounting Office. This experience will, I am sure, be useful in the context of the current study. Sincerely,  The Honorable James T. McIntyre, Jr. Director Office of Management and Budget Executive Office of the President Washington, D. C. 20503  EGC:ccm  7$'411   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  111EXECUTIVE OFFICE  OF THE PRESIDENT  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  AUG 2 1  1919 SF_P 26 n"  19  19/9 r-7  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Debt Collection  The amount of overdue debts owed the Government is a matter of increasing concern. Since I last wrote you in March, our recognition of the issue has been matched by a growing awareness in Congress and the media. While we have included debt collection in the Financial Priorities Program, we believe stronger measures are required to collect the monies owed. Toward that end, we have created a Debt Collection Project under the newly formed President's Management Improvement Council. Following the lines of the successful President's Cash Management Project, the Debt Collection Project will seek answers to individual agency problems while pursuing solutions at the general government-wide level as well. The project is intended to build on initiatives already planned and underway, including those mentioned in responses to my March memorandum. Mr. Wayne Granquist, our Associate Director for Management  and Regulatory Policy will be responsible for the Debt Collection Project. In order to coordinate this joint effort, we request you designate a representative to help us in developing specific plans, coordinating the work in your agency and keeping you informed as the work progresses. To begin early consideration of the work plan, we would appreciate receiving word of your representative designee during the next two weeks. For any additional information, please call Jerry Bridges at 395-3967.  J es T. McIntyre, J Director /  •11.  EXOUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIONT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET \,*, ASH I NGTON. D.C. 20503  vmSc SEP  WB  9  Honorable Paul A. Volcker Chairman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Washington, D.C. 20551 Dear Mr. Chairman:  The Office of Management and Budget, in accordance with Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1978, is preparing a report for the President to submit to the Congress by January 31, 1980, regarding the administration of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.of 1974 (ERISA). This report will evaluate (1) the effectiveness of the Reorganization Plan in alleviating administrative problems under the Act; and (2) legislative proposals for a long-term organizational structure for the administration of ERISA. The report is being developed with the help of an advisory task force comprised of representatives from the Departments of Labor and the Treasury, and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation and a number of part-time consultants experienced in the employee benefit field. Because your agency may also be concerned with the ERISA program, and because the report will be submitted to the Congress by the President,if you would like to participate, we would like you to desj7775.7 s-ttady te"Tff-ETJE567 -51-77.FTTrit-e-inTormation r'egarclinggour agency's interests and later to review and comment on draft materials, and to coordinate on the completed IScument. The January 31, 1980, reporting date necessitates an extremely tight schedule. Would you please inform John McGruder at OMB (tel. 395-3714) of the name of our designee as soon as . %Your cooperapossible, and no lat7r-fhan September tion is appreciated.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  John P. White Deputy Director  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  November 8, 1979  Mr. Kenneth Baker Planning, Evaluation and Information Division Cffice of Program Planning and Evaluation Equal Employment Cpportunity Commission 2401 E Street, N.W. Washington, D. C. 20506 Dear Mr. Baker: I am writing in response to Ms. Eleanor H. Norton's recent memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies requesting budget and related data an the federal government's internal equal employment opportunity program required by Cffice of Management and Budget (CMB) Circular A-11. As you may know, the Federal Reserve Board is not part of the federal government's appropriation process and, as such, is not subject to the requirements of (MB Circular A-11. Cur annual budget data is printed in the Federal Budget as an annexed budget without substantive review by CB and without inclusion in the budget totals. Since this data is aggregated at a high level, there is no separate break-out of resources dedicated to our Equal Employment Cpportunity (EEC) Program. However, mention is made of those resources in our EEO Affirmative Action Program which has been sent in the past to the Cffice of Personnel Management. I am enclosing a copy for your information. Please call me on 452-3766 if I can answer any questions regarding this matter. Sincerely,  TM Edward T. Mulrenin Assistant Staff Director Enclosure cc: Mrs. Mallardi/ Mr. Denkler Mr Daniels WH-#89 • ETMulrenin:m1„   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •-v&  e 1--(01. Js. .  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION  •  •  WASHINGTON. D.C.  20506  • •  _ -  ;:' • ..), 1... -s,)0.0••:„.".  c rrn'  '''.•,.„,  49  MEMORANDUM TO:  Heads of Federal Departments and  FROM:  Eleanor Holmes Norton Chair  SUBJ:  Agencies  Special Preparation and Submission of Data for ties Analysis of Federal Civil Rights Activi unities) (Federal Service Equal Employment Opport Report Due:  11/02/79  ty Commission this year for the The Equal Employment Opportuni d agency in collecting first time is serving as the lea Federal Government's budget and related data on the ortunity program (Federal Service internal equal employment opp s), as required by the Office of Equal Employment Opportunitie cular No. A-11 entitled Management and Budget in OMB Cir Budget Estimates." "Preparation and Submission of  1  t or agency is required to For this purpose, each departmen Employment Opportunity prepare and submit to the Equal outlined in sections 53.1 Commission a two-part report as Composite data, A-11. through 53.4 of OMB Circular No. then submitted by the based on agency submissions, are in OMB's Special Commission to OMB and are reflected Activities (excerpts from Analysis of Federal Civil Rights the President's Budget). statement, should include: ive rat nar the , ort rep s thi of I Part (a)  e   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  gram, a concise description of the pro and any new directions in the program, er significant cost-effectiveness or oth implicaanalytic findings which have gram. tions for the conduct of the pro iveness Include comments on the effect goals; of the program in meeting its  ,  ilmomplw  •  Ile  ▪ ,  (5)  comments concerning :he reliability of the data, exolanation of data sources and estimating procedures, and the actions planned to improve data collection in subsequent fiscal Data not supported by the periods. agency's internal reporting system should be indicated as such;  (c)  other program indicators or data that provide additional information on program level and progress (e.g., discrimination complaints processed, and evaluation reviews conducted); and  (d)  indicators of achievement (EEOC Form 353 is to be completed for this portion of the report.).  classificaThe format for the data required in Part II, the program tion schedule, is somewhat different from but largely consistent The general activity category "Program with that of past years. ories Direction and Research" has been broken down into four categ Further, ned. so that more descriptive and refined data may be obtai /adminisyou are being asked to apportion the costs of management am activities trative and clerical personnel among all the various progr ory as in as appropriate rather than including them in a single categ the  past.  As your agency's from your budget be updated after when approved by  FY 1 81 budget has not been approved by OMB, data However, this data is to request may be used. your budget has been approved by OMB and again Congress.  t are Because many of the activities reflected in this repor technot identifiable as specific budgeted items, sampling but niques may be used to develop data where applicable; tive to samples should be sufficiently large and representa To assure the greatest possible accuracy, this be reliable. budget ✓ eport should be prepared in conjunction with your Your planning should allow sufficient lead time to o ffice. EEOC Form 353A is o btain any necessary internal clearances. budget data. t o be used to provide the requested staffing and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  W  •.•  •••• ••  •  ok„  „. ••  ••  '  •  4 •  3  In order to improve the accuracy, timeliness, and consistency of submissions, we urge all agencies to adhere to the instructions We are attaching the following set forth in this memorandum. for preparation of your report: -  -  EEOC Form 353 (Attachment A) Definitions For Reporting "Federal Service Equal Employment Opportunities" Budget Data Under OMB Circular No. A-11. (Attachment B) EEOC Form 353A (Attachment C)  We are asking each agency to submit its report to the Equal EmployIf ment Opportunity Commission no later than November 2, 1979. you have any questions or need further information please contact Kenneth Baker (634-6800) or Edison Elkins (634-6855) at EEOC Headquarters, Washington, D.C. ..••••••  OMB Circular No. A-11 is exempt from the clearance provisions of onB Circular No. A-40; therefore, the interagency reporting requirement outlined in this memorandum does not require clearance under A-40. Please address your response to: Planning, Evaluation and Information Division Office of Program Planning and Evaluation Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 2401 E Street, N.W. 20506 Washington, D.C. ATTENTION:  Kenneth Baker  Attachments  Copies to:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Directors of Equal Employment Opportunity  La.  '!...• •  •••• • •• a  '  1111.  a  c--  •  •  :I 1  r?Al  -)Ufkl .7'.'Fi ^Y":"- :IT "...PPr.'"TUNITY ;7, 7'-.- .S(71,1RCc. 7EPO7T STAFF i ll (,•' —) ea' ,  --;ROGRP.r./ -FP CT' r.--.....7.:::-EcctcP4t.L 'I,  TYPE  cy  INVESTIGATION  COMPLAIN T  , _  7-7,5,7 7111,Ar-:;...... A ,2.. vp.z. - ::: -  1 FULL TIME  FY c' I  rv  1  79  1  7 1YL7 7PC"' LL  .7 01-L  r.c::3 6e, YRS.' I•  TIME  PART TIME_ I t IACTL.I TOTAL WORK YR:.; [ 1 i FY 1 FULL TIME I ,I \t$ I F-A=T TIM=' . E5...• TOTAL •••,"=-$.$ YRS. I t FULL TIME FY 1 cq  AT TIME  EST.  • .  , YRc.! TOTAL A:R.  ry -0  FULL TIM=  .  I  =AFT "r'MF  ACTL.  TOTAL . 4fORK YRS. 1  FULL TIME  FY c.,,, ;sr)  PAR"' Ttm= TOTAL WORK YRS.  EST.  2  OUTLAY  ,  I .1 ES. 1  D  -.  '•  'e  $d$  tOTAL V.C.Ry. YRS,. - pc.c r ..._ ...  Z ACTL. -J' 0 Lij 7v i III In I LIJ Z ::: E.  C  CELIGATION  LE_C• 4 L  lc'  .7-' ,A -=. 7 TIME  (  •  CL.Er-"ICAL  r..is TA '7), .r  'WE  7I•  0 (..)  'UC C E-..- 1" r-  FY  FULL Timi"-:  ,s7  = APT  EST•  . -rci 7:-  .  "."'IMr r  •  ;  L1J  .  >  Z r•  ,scRy.7 MRS.  FY  FLI..,.. "Iv=  79  :-.1.c- •Tim..7  A C T L•  T'OT AL 'AC:=K Y=.3. FULL TIME  FY  PART TIME  AFFIR  Ki  V TOTAL WORK YRS.  EST. FY  ' FULL TIME  1'1  PART TIME  EST.  TOTAL WORK YRS.  . 1  FULL TIME CART TIME  I  TOTAL VIORK YRS. ,  'OGIR4  'AL 1.6  FULL TINE .  PAP'!" TIME TC - 4.... W:=P, FU'LL TIME 'PART TIMF  MEN T PROGRAM  HISP ANIC  _  PLOY  -c.- 4.... y, r,•,:: w yr-15 FY  FULL TIME  7('  - cc- "'my= :.-,  AOTL.  tDL §0P11 Y. 'T.:YE , r'-' ...L  F'r 5 S('  1 .= :.. r-- - 7;y:"  E5.  TC - LL WORK ‘1  GY  F'6.-... - IME"  Si  7.:-:•:.T TIME  ES.7  TOTAL ri;;.Y.  [CV  --7 L  sT  5...  .  L L TIME  } --th. r I  i  " .•"= c. • Ill. -C. - L.- v•Om,  4  0  IJI  ..'  —  FY  >  '  17U:.........!Mr:  I  .."  .:.  )7  C.-) AL  Ec  —. 1^11,,::  •  I .  7C7L.'  wOm.c YPc.I  FY  FULL I"Mr-  Si  CART TIME  =ET.  7- CTAL V.Co'y Y.  cy I. i-()  FULL TIME r.- rv...-  1m m-  TOTA... 'AORK 'RS.  j  ACTL. •J FY FULL TIME  Digitized for .... FRASER re.https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ...  I  0  Mr  . • L:ATA  .! )..,;:  i )"  /:)• ,-('  ..:: t•IlimBER  '----,-  C ., -,_ .._ OBLIGA TIONS  in ( thousand.$)  *-,'; OTHER  _., ,..  OUT LA yc ......,..  In  (tilousanc:s)  1  OTHER _  * Include investigations conducted by CSC/OP:11 * * List below each contractor and give financial data.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .. HE:APIs/Gs  CCNTPACTEC lVESTIGATIONS  I ) -`'  ry  so  I y 5.1  • Attachment B •  - .corting "Federal Service Ecual Employment efinit:cns for F.= Opportunities" 3udcet Data under (X.IB Circular No. A-11.  l  'r146 ; pamig■-  I  Staff Categories A.  :4anagement and Administration - includes all supervisory s aria administrative professional staff (e.g., EEO Director and Assistants, Supervisors) and pro-rated overhead administrative staff (Budget Analysts, Computer Programmers, Accountants, Personnel Specialists, etc.).  B.  Other Professionals - includes line staff responsible stifor performing EEO functions (e.g., Counseling, Inve gation, Special Programs, Upward Mobility).  C.  D.  ide Clerical Support - includes clerical staff who prov direct support to EEO activities as well as overhead ine support (e.g., duplicating and word processing mach iners, operators, time and attendance clerks, voucher exam etc). input Legal Support - includes legal staff who provide tation and guidance in both the development and implemen of the agency's EEO activities.  Note:  and part-time. Staff resources are divided between full-time  and full time The total work years include both full time staff equivalents:FTE) for part-time staff. l support and Management/administration, other professional, lega s associated with clerical support personnel work years and cost g the program the agency EEO program are to be apportioned amon ctor spends approxcategories as appropriate, e.g. if an EEO Dire laints files and imately 45% of his/her time in reviewing comp ng process, preparing agency decisions, 35% in the counseli affirmative action and 20% in planning and managing the agency's l costs should be program, those percentages of his/her personne EEO program officials shown in the appropriate categories. Where s should be prorated. and staff are part-time, salary and other cost program, but whose A person who is employed full time in the EEO category would be time is divided between more than one program es, but would be shown as part time in each of those categori category. Only shown as full time in the summary or "total" on less than a full those persons who worked in the EEO program -time section of time basis should be accounted for in the part this last category.  ,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  II  PrograTi Cateorie 770 CounsPlin;: A. : training, supplies All costs (salaries, benefits, travel, performance of equal and equipment, etc.) incurred in the This includes employment opportunity counseling duties. employees,superall time spent discussing problems with reviewing records, visors and managers, making inquiries, ing reports on attempting informal resolutions, and writ counseling. •  Complaints Complaint Investigation (Processing Formal of Discrimination) laint proAll costs incurred for discrimination comp aring and cessing (investigations, hearings, and prep ude: schedulrendering decisions). Costs should incl s, and travel, ing investigations, salary, benefits cost ort personexpenses of investigators and clerical supp and expenses nel; costs to agencies for the services outside conof examiners, reporters, transcripts, stigators; tractors, and training of complaint inve esentatives costs of time spent by management repr oyee repreand employee representatives (when empl official sentative is another agency employee on time time) in presentation of the complaint; and transcripts spent writing reports, reviewing hearing s. and preparing and issuing agency decision  C.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Upward Mobility Programs designed All costs incurred for programs specifically r-level to provide maximum career opportunity for lowe nt) who are employee (generally, below GS-9 or equivale are in positions or occupational series in which they their unable, without program assistance, to realize full work potential. lity, agencies In reporting costs figures for upward mobi should include: (1)  (2)  fees and Formal classroom training - tuition, -government supplies charged by government and non lled, and if facilities, trainee salary while enro ry, space, training is in-house, instructor sala and supplies. nee salary On-the-job-training - trainer and trai ning only. for percentage of time devoted to trai  - • I.-  --Tr= -  .....1•••••••••••••.-  ••••  3  •=111.  •  '44  are 3  ••-• 4-0  of time 2urinc.' which services by the trainee.  Administrativ/succor - costs - counseling, manpower planning, s'Kilis survey and analysis, trainee selection, ]ob restructuring, training plan development, program coordination, monitoring, and evaluation.  Mit ' - 1 91 n  16;04:  Training and developmental efforts designed to improve current cerformance and traditional career intern, cooperaoccupational , tive education, worker-trainee, or st- Li4 mn+- employment programs are not considered as upward mobility programs for this report. D.  Affirmative Action All costs (salaries, benefits, travel, printing, supplies and equipment, etc.) incurred in the development and imple mentation of affirmative action plans. courses Also included in this category are costs of training with and conferences specifically -elated to and identified implementation of the affirmative action plan (i.e. trainee and instructor salaries, course costs, travel, etc.)  E.  :W 41  * 10: r  Federal Wcr.s.en's Program ies All costs (salaries, benefits, travel, training, suppl of this equipment, etc.) incurred in the administration program.  F.  Hispanic Employment Proaram supplies, All costs (salaries, benefits, travel, training, of this equipment, etc.) incurred in the administration program. Other EEO Activities costs Any general program direction costs and all other expended not otherwise accounted for in categories A-F in the agency's internal EEO program.  H.  Total The total of all the above categories.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  V7A.67. Omimmum4-  a  •  3.  ions for Recortinc -.-fini•= al 7lolovment Opoortunities" edel 5rv1 A-11 3udc.'et D=1- =, under :-13 circular I  Term  Definition  Obligations  The dollar value of orders placed, contracts awarded, services received, goods purchased, salaries incurred, travel, and other similar transactions during the fiscal year that will require payment during the same or future period.  Outlays  The actual expenditure of funds to pay for obligations.  Federal Workyears  The amount of paid time worked in any category of employment, or full or part-time (include overtime as well as regular hours). Report this time in terms of workyears (2080 hours = 1 workyear).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r— bow._  11Peennim— E  s9.7  -33 _  ',•••  . • ' • 13A ,333 .0*  ,...., 4M7.1.74! ...,Z.N.pnwo. ' t.,Z...r.  ‘11111r  FEDERAL E.:::,..1.! Emr-LcYY1- CPPOUUNITY s-,- L - s',:::, RFr.T. EnR FY 7?  •  V.L., rr,L.OAL2 BASiS OF DISCRIV:N;•T ION ALLEGED  2 -  CCUNSELED  1 ! I  RACE'  .  1  El-:---ARA.-7ION  I  ;4ErRIMAN:.: E.':•:_!: 1 7tON/A ,---- RAISAL  FE-  NO.  POV( F;C1 -.SS TIMa -  A  UNTIMELY  OUTSIDE PURVIEW  7 I 3 I.  SOSrENSIC.`...N ' EL IGION  COMPLANT I DETAILS 1 OF CLOSURES  R F ..! E -  A. ,7-r C•IN'T m ENT .RmrA .L ' I REC.'..:CRDI_r_O .c.r IO N i ACT 4 C‘. t _. `• -. ,I-"-- ;72* --"• RE. AScICINMEN 7  No U W E :71 R  I  n .,)  NO.  ISSUS F. ALLEGED  S  IDENTICA. .. 70 PREVI0‘.'S COLA !NT  TOTAL  MALE. HOURS TRAINING  MALE  -"WE AN: N HISA PANIC T L OTHER  VI I 77E.NDANCE-.:  Rc--.1--T_M.E.NT ASSIGNMENT OF DUTIES EXAMINATION/TEST .K CO WC  0 (Spec:•:. N  WITH CORRECTIVE ACTION  7 H -N L., R 4 Vi L  WITHOUT CORRECTIVE ACTION  -  '-:•Y INCLUDIN5 OVERTImE 1  DISCRIMINATION  CCNVL- RSICN -0 FULLTImE,CC HANOI("AID  r5 ri! E R  z,EINE7ATEMENT AWARDS  • OTHER (Specify)  OF=ICIALS FOUND TO Bc-  4  CISCRIMINATING ...=  -  SE.T T -EMENT PRIOR TO DECISION.  F.E;-'RISAL AGE  _ ...,.  • • TOALNDIS  FOUN:  NO DISCRIMINATION FOUND  TOTAL  7., DISCIPLINARY ACTION ' 1  NO.  INVE.S-IGATICNS  PROPOSE,: DISPOVTICN  Ni.:,.--.:•F.:31  -_:=AD= HEARINGS  SUSPENSION  3i SOFERVISORY • _ S G  TO N'.L.)N.SURERVISCRY  _  OF REJECTIONS  LATERAL  . L_  OF DECISIONS ON MERIT  TOTAL  INVOLUNTARY DOWNGRADE  NUMBER OF CASES WITH NUMBER CORRECTIVE ACTION -I-AK EN•  WRITTEN REPRIMAND  IN COUNSELING STAGE ORAL REPRIMAND  IN COMPLAINT STAGE TRAINING  -  PRIOR TO DECISION  COUNSELING , CTHER (pecity)  WITH DECISION  AC7L-. PROJECTNS . COUNSELING SUMMARY  .  FY 79  FY 8C.7  ACTL. (PROJECTNS COMPLAINTS SUMMARY  IFY el  FY 7S  "•Rc TFAINrO ER: .-22UNSEL,  TOTAL ACTIVE COMPLAINTS ON HAND AS OF OCTOBER 1,17.7E  TOT AL PECL'ESTS AS Cr 1C,  COmPLAINTS FILED  F ::: F,  c...-.:uNnE_ING N U r.•  REOUESTS FtECEIVED FOR N COIJNEELIG TOT  L IN:.-Iv'i:UALS  E _  COUNSELE:  FY 8.0 I FY 81  COmr>LAINTS CLOSED  COMPLAINTS INVESTIGATED  AGENCY FINAL DECISIONS  COUNSELING SESS:ONS  C N'P- A I N T.S .."-,t7J.-EZ., 7C _ • c;  S.7'...;.5 C.,;•- A CT IV EL CO!•'.:*._4INTS ;7-. 1- Z..= c :: -t. ............. I PEI.7..1r,.,. p-,....__- .A.Nr'.7.  ::::7•Zr  NC.  c,r.- :7:-,,,•!rv. t.,•..-, :.==E::......s  ;  P.V C. '.. D.:•‘:. ...................•  -! ----J--.• .: / I. COURT  1  A.55Ir.:NM'N7 TON.'E.r.Tc:•  •  [  INVESTRF. R...7_":"--.7-- ENDING FRC:POSE: DIERCEiTION  CHARGES OP' R=PRISAL: I  :.j.5,-CSITICN IS::....::-.-' F ILED  I  i  PENDING HEARING  t 1  PENDING DECISP:',•!•: FOLLOWING_ COMPLAINT EXA.MINERS REPO!. i  RESOLVED orre.-.77,,,...............7rr....4",........  ...............r.r!-."...r...r...........,,...,...-.,.....---..,.,.....4  I OTHEF (pecify)  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  . y ...  .  .. •  4  .••••••••••••••••••  _ ••-•  '"" ER 0'cloN  7  DOLLARS  NO.  NO.  I  NO  I  DCLLAFRS  ^  F  ET_ TT!  A 7,  v,  F2;KING  •:'• Z.- 7 • 51.e.- tf:.;  -  ••••  •  i••  TCTA.'  _  A" : •  •••  "  r.  •••• r7-  F.7.•  0  0  TOTAL  .  •  •  v. . , • 44',  •  • • 1-  t-  riznrnx -10>  I  :•••••*:. -••  TOTAL  r—ers.  •.;  AMOUNT OF E;e1.:::‹PAY  r  EACKPAY  CT -ER THAN AECA'E  -I.: 7 0  •  t.' • ••';'i"'  TOTAL  F.  E  •4  101.AL-  r  TOTAL ALL C.7.1-'-c•c' TOTAL EACKPAY  REMARKS: •,-1,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  s!,cc is rir.cr-.-r.‘2,  (xtIc shec:s)  Ot-   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • THE WHITE HOUSE  -)4  WASHINGTON  September 19, 1979  V.EnRANDUM FOR TiiE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  The Selection and Development of the Senior Executive Service  The Senior Executive Service, the keystone of the Civil Service Reform Act, was inaugurated on July 13. The SES offers one of the most promising avenues for improving the management of the Federal government. I know that you share my satisfaction and pleasure that over 96 percent of those eligible to join the Senior Executive Service did so. It is essential that we take advantage of this demonstration of confidence in the Service and maintain the momentum which it has created. I know that you will take a continuing interest in the SES and in the development of those who will join the Service in the future. One of the most important ways of accomplishing this is by establishing a strong Executive Resources Board in your organization to oversee the administration of the Senior Executive Service. This Board will also direct executive development systems to identify and train candidates for future membership in the SES. The people who serve on these Boards hold the key to the future of the SES. It is imperative that you impress upon the Chairperson and members of your Executive Resources Board the importance this Administration places upon executive selection and development. The Office of Personnel Management has established criteria for executive selection and development programs. I believe these criteria provide the flexibility you need to devise a system which meets the specific characteristics and needs of your organization. Central to every program must be the identification and selection, in advance, of top performers who have executive potential and whose talents should be developed to enable them to take top-level responsibilities. This will involve both wide competition and a very careful selection for the executive development programs required by the Reform Act. I also want to make certain that women, the handicapped, and members of minority groups are given full consideration when selections are made.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • ..   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 We have the opportunity, now, to establish systems that will provide an effective, motivated, and exemplary corps of career executives to serve the needs of our Nation in the years to come. There are no more important actions we can take to provide long-term benefit to Government and more efficient delivery of services to the public.  • ••‘  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  1S79SU 17  r" II: 45  September 14, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  1.1k  sl  President's Management Improvement Council  One of the highest priorities of my Administration has been, and remains, improving the management and performance of the Federal government. Together we have made some significant progress toward that end. Civil Service Reform, regulatory reform, cash management improvements, paperwork reduction, Federal grant reform, and our efforts to prevent fraud and waste are producing substantial improvements in the operations of the Federal government. I recognize that you are already doing many things to improve management in your departments or agencies. Yet as I meet and talk with individual citizens and groups, I am constantly reminded that there continues to be widespread distrust of government, and widespread dissatisfaction with how well the Federal government does its job. I believe that there are further management improvements which need to be undertaken, and I seek your commitment to take a fresh look at management problems in your agency. /9   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  I would urge you to give special attention to the problems of delivery of service to the public. There continue to be many instances throughout government of slow response to client needs, backlogs of work, overly complicated procedures, and insensitivity or indifference in dealing with the public. In many cases improvements can be made in practical, down-to-earth ways by line managers and supervisors, if they have your strong backing to do so. As part of this renewed commitment to Federal management, I have, by Executive Order, established the President's Management Improvement Council. This Council, co-chaired by the Directors of the Office of Management and Budget and the Office of Personnel Management, consists of representatives from Federal agencies and State and local government, executives from the private sector and labor organizations, and academic leaders. Its purpose is to work with you in a renewed effort to bring all of our collective expertise, experience, and knowledge to bear to generate the highest level of performance in the Federal government. c  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 I am convinced that there is much that we can learn -and must learn -- from sources outside the Federal government to improve the efficiency of our operations and our delivery of public services. The Council brings us an added dimension to help identify and solve the difficult and persistent problems of managing complex government institutions. I have asked the Council to focus its attention especially on the more practical problems affecting the delivery of services to the public. In turn, I am asking you to view the Council as a resource to advise and assist you in addressing your critical management problems. The Council will keep me informed of its activities and will bring significant problem areas to my attention. I urge you to seize the opportunity which the Council represents and renew your commitment to an efficient and responsive Federal government.  • THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  September 13, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  The Human Rights of Undocumented Aliens  Protection of the basic rights of all persons in our land is a vital part of our commitment to a just and humane society. This Administration's policy on human rights can only be effective if we assure the rights of all persons in the United States, whether or not they are citizens of this country. I will continue to enforce vigorously this nation's immiThose found in violation will be dealt with gration laws. But persons accused of being undocuas the law prescribes. mented aliens must be treated fairly and humanely. No one in our country should be vulnerable to mistreatment or exploitation because he or she is afraid to secure protection of the law. Since many of the problems in this area are under state and local jurisdiction, I sent letters to the Nation's Governors on May 4, asking for their concern, assistance and advice in In those letters, a copy of dealing with these problems. the text of which is attached, I also described some of the significant efforts the Federal Government has made in this area. The work of each of your departments and agencies touches upon some aspects of the treatment of undocumented aliens in I will not dwell on all Government the United States. activities in this message but will mention some issues of particular importance.  4  A number of Federal, or Federally-assisted, social welfare and medical programs by law must exclude specifically persons who are not citizens or legal permanent residents of the In such cases, I ask that the concerned United States. agencies review their policies and practices in implementing these requirements to ensure that they are, clear, equitable, adequately disseminated and understood and compassionately   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  applied within the limits of the law, and that they are carried out with respect for the basic dignity and privacy of all persons concerned. I urge you to give full cooperation to Consular and other officials of Mexico and other countries who, in the discharge of their duties in the United States, seek your help in investigating possible incidents of abuse involving their citizens. I also ask you to work closely with the Department of State and the working groups of the U.S.-Mexico Consultative Mechanism. I urge you to continue to keep this Administration's commitments in mind as you develop and carry out your programs and I would particularly welcome your recommendations of possible remedies for additional problems in this area of which you may be aware.  Attachment:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Letter to the State Governors, Dated May 4, 1979  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  MAY 4, 1979  Office of the White House Press Secretary  THE WHITE HOUSE  The following is the text of a letter from the President to the 50 governors following conversations with Mexican President Lopez Portillo:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  During my visit to Mexico City in mid -February, I had a frank and useful discussion with President Lopez Portillo on the complex issue of border law violations and particularly the problem of undocumented workers. We agreed to cooperate closely to explore the quesiton in the context of the social and economic problems involved--a solution that also respects the dignity and human rights of those concerned. One aspect of this question, the treatment of undocumented workers in the United States, has been of particular concern to me and to President Lopez Portillo, As I stated in Mexico, it is my responsibility to enforce our immigration laws. Those individuals who violate the law will be dealt with as the law 'prescribes. But it is also our responsibility to deal fairly and humanely with any persons accused of being undocumented workers. For some time we have been making a special effort at the Federal level to ensure their fair treatment under the law. The Immigration and Naturalization Service has steadily improved the conditions under which undocumented workers are temporarily confined and has adopted a number of measures to prevent mistreatment and to allow apprehended aliens time to settle their atfairs etore aeparture. The Department of Labor is making a special effort in those areas believed to have a sizeable presence of undocumented workers to enforce wage, hour, safety and health standards and to assure that workers who are apprehended and removed from the country receive all wages due them. Since many of the problems that undocumented aliens experience are under state and local jurisdiction, I ask that you give these concerns your close personal interest. I, in turn, would welcome your suggestions of areas you might suggest in which further Federal action would be useful. The Department of Justice is giving special attention to investigating and, where warranted, prosecuting, possible civil rights violations against any persons of Hispanic origin. Our country's deep commitment to standards of justice and humaneness requires us to protect the basic rights of all people who find themselves in this nation.  JIMMY CARTER   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EPCUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIONT COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 722 JACKSON PLACE N W WASHINGTON. D C 20006 r7  \  September 14, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF AGENCIES  I am pleased to send you a copy of the President's 1979 Environmental Program. This booklet contains President Carter's August 2 ressage on the Environment, the President's directives to agency heads on the twelve new initiatives contained in his ressage, and the detailed White House Fact Sheet. The Council looks forward to your assistance in implementing the President's program.  GUS SPETH Chairman   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .' UNITED STATES OF AMERICA GENERAL SERVICES ADMINIS-WTION WASHINGTON. OC 20405 I  • •  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Use of Portable Fans  fans There has been considerable controversy over the use of portable within space controlled by the General Services Administration since the issuance of the Department of Energy's Standby Conservation Plan No. 2, Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions. portable I have reviewed the situation and decided to limit the use of fans to those areas where the temperature levels prescribed by the n President (78 degrees) cannot be attained with our central ventilatio energy systems. This decision is necessary to assist us in achieving nal goals established by the President. The slight increase in perso y comfort achieved with portable fans is not justified by the energ dy exists. requirements when the prescribed 78 degree temperature alrea h have It should be noted that Federal buildings of the Executive Branc 1974. maintained summer temperatures in the 78-80 degree range since of this I need your support in informing employees of your department decision decision. I have enclosed the point paper which led to this for your information and assistance in expla ing the policy.  FR IAN III R Administra or Enclosure  fr  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Keep Freedom in Tour Future With U.S. Savings Bonds  4  C4141111•1. SWIM% AO•••••111.1010•1*  11.  •  Offilliof Buildings Management Public Buildings Service July 25, 1979 POINT PAPER  DECISION NEEDED BACKGROUND  RECENT DOE ACTIONS   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Policy on Use of Portable Fans in GSA Buildings ated GSA discontinued the use of portable fans in GSA oper ided buildings years ago when buildings generally were prov ning with integrated heating, ventilating and air-conditio (HVAC) systems. With adequate cooling and controlled, need filtered ventilation, it was felt that there was no s for fans. The use of fans in large private-sector building cy diminished greatly about the same time. Current GSA poli on fans (from Federal Property Management Regulations, shold 101-20.116.3) is as follows: "The operation of thre fans heaters, portable space heaters, and portable electric in Government-owned or -leased space is prohibited." •  y The draft "Standby Conservation Plan No. 2, Emergenc 1979 Building Temperature Restrictions," published June 1, ), in the Federal Register by the Department of Energy (DOE ent, perfor consideration at public hearings and for comm GSA mitted the use of free-standing fans within rooms. strongly recommended that the statement on fans "be use restructured to be quite restrictive -- limiting fan Standby to valid needs." However, the final version of , Plan No. 2 includes no limitations on the use of fans both central and portable type. In fact, fan use is can encouraged to circulate air for more comfort. This em. be, and is, accomplished by the central fan syst ic and Standby Plan No. 2 is now in effect for both publ recently private sector buildings, since President Carter proclaimed an energy supply emergency.  EMPLOYEE AND the media have shovyn MEDIA ACTIONS : Employees, and employee groups and use of great interest in the use of portable fans. The loyee portable fans is being seen by many as an "emp No. 2. right," based on the provision of Standby Plan ADVANTAGES OF a portable fan provides PORTABLE FANS : (1) The circulation of air by d to improved comfort for most individuals subjecte F). higher ambient temperature (say above 78 degrees react (2) Employees hear and see fan operation and most favorably.  2 DISADVANTAGES OF *(1) The purchase of a great number of portable fans for PORTABLE FANS $6 million GSA buildings would be costly -- in the order of if installed in only 20 percent of the space. ure (2) The use of portable fans will not lower the temperat level in the space where they are operated. In fact, the heat from the motor adds to the heat load on the airconditioning system. e safety (3) The general use of portable fans would introduc Fans and fire hazards. Fan cords are a tripping hazard. ed fans knocked or tipped over create an injury hazard. Fray create a fire hazard. a large (4) Unless left in place year around (and possibly on and number of fans operated year around), the collecti in the storage of fans in the fall and the return of fans spring would be a costly operation. , (5) Ceiling type fans, if used instead of portable fans ended would be very expensive to install on the usual susp s ceiling. 'Also, ceiling fans could prove quite hazardou in areas with the normal 8-9 foot ceiling height. (One Post manufacturer placed a full page ad in the Washington all recently urging the installation of ceiling fans in Federal buildings.) controlled *(6) The general usage of portable fans in GSA oxispace would increase the energy use for HVAC by appr e results mately 6 to 9 percent. This increased energy usag plus the from the electrical energy to operate the fans the space extra cooling load to offset the heat added to the knowledge by the fan motors. This estimate is based on to be that the building HVAC system would still have all buildings. operated during the cooling season in almost if at all This increase in energy use should be avoided , were possible since GSA, and other Federal agencies all energy recently directed by the President to reduce over percent for the period April 1, 1979 through use by March 31, 1980. energy cost *Backup information on cost of fans and the to operate fans is attached. GENERAL COMMENTS   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  of portable (1) Any decision not to permit the general use ry from employees fans will undoubtedly bring on a great outc and the media.  3 with (2) An informal telephone conversation Standby Plan No. 2 Mr. Henry Bartholomew (primary author of ulted in his offwe understand) of DOE on July 23, 1979, res limit fan use to hand agreement that it seemed sensible to problem areas in buildings, only. gram in existence (3) Under our energy conservation pro the 78-80 degree since 1973, GSA has operated buildings in t the need for F range during the cooling season withou portable fans. fan operating in (4) Open windows, or open windows with ion of the HVAC the room, will not permit the non-operat ldings generally. during the peak cooling months in GSA bui period in the Open windows are helpful only for a short loyees having spring and fall and then only to those emp Open windows are offices on the perimeter of the building. block type buildings always an overall disadvantage in large with large interior office areas. ALTERNATE DECISIONS   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  mitting) portable (1) Adopt a policy of providing (or per generally. electric fans in GSA controlled buildings mitting) portable (2) Adopt a policy of providing (or per cific buildings where fans only at specific locations in spe proper temperature there is a problem situation and the ling season. level cannot be provided during the coo having large windows Example, the west corner of a building al to use fans would and an inadequate HVAC system. Approv after full be granted only on a case-by-case basis it was not possible justification, only in locations where the existing HVAC to provide the proper temperature with system. ic fans in GSA (3) Prohibit the use of portable electr present GSA owned or leased space, thus continuing the policy. three alternates (The merits and disadvantages of these of Decision Paper.) are covered in the preceding portions  RECOMMENDATION:  ision 2 be adopted. It is recommended tftpt Alternate Dec  ACTION  Alternate (1) (2) (3) is adopted.  /  t7- 7/72  Adtinistrat r..,of General Services—  ( ate  BACKUP INFORMATION DINGS INITIAL COST AND OPERATING COST FOR FANS IN GSA BUIL be increased energy The impact of adding fans to Federal buildings will in addition to the use - not a reduction. The portable fans are operated not in lieu of the building ventilating and air-conditioning system, Standby Conservation building ventilating and air-conditioning system. The able, to circulate Plan No. 2 encourages the use of fans, central or port air. INITIAL COST log. They range from There are five fans listed in the Federal Supply Cata the standard 12" and 30" pedestal fans to small hassock fans and include 16" desk fans which can be mounted on the wall. of portable fans, The average cost per fan is $48. We estimate the cost 1,000 square feet of if used throughout the building, would be $120 per occupant space. GSA building in all For example, if portable fans were permitted in the would be $58,000. The the occupied areas the purchase cost of the fans s per square feet increased energy use would be approximately 7,500 BTU' annually. ENERGY CONSUMPTION , the direct increased If additional fans are added throughout a building .3 watts per square foot electrical connected load for the fans would be e. (Based on fan having or 1,000 watts for each 3,300 square feet of spac feet.) 1/6 horsepower motor serving an area of 400 square by the portable fan motor The additional cooling load added to the space or approximately 1 BTU/SF. would be approximately .3 watts per square foot of approximately 30 The Federal buildings have been designed for a load added for portable fans BTU's per square foot. The 1 BTU per square foot oximately 3.0 percent of then would be an increase in heat load of appr the design load. ventilating for energy conSince our buildings have reduced lighting and inal maximum design of 30 servation, the systems never operate at the orig increased electrical energy BTU's per square feet. Therefore, the actual to six months each year use for the portable fans for approximately four nding on the number of would be between 6.0 percent and 9.0 percent depe portable fans in the building.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 2 SUMMARY INFORMATION 586 square feet. If fans GSA controlled total occupiable space is 252,143, would be 56,051,360. were purchased for 20 percent of this space the cost and the additional The additional cost for electricity to operate the fans cted from the fan cooling load imposed on the building from the heat reje d be approximately motors based on 1,000 hours of operation per year woul dings will have a $403,200. The extensive use of portable fans in GSA buil Program, making it significant adverse impact on the Energy Conservation ervation goals. even more difficult to meet the President's energy cons  PBE:R. E. SIMMERS   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  566-1735  7/25/79  1177777727  3PLCIIL iPOIT  •e  • .TO:  -‹4k  716  June 22, 1979  ADMINISTRATOR - A  SUBJECT:  Three Suspicious Fires  BUILDING  Regional Office Building  LOCATION  7th & D Streets, S.W., Washington, DC  UPI  NO. OF OCCUPA:  NET SQ. FT. x  GOV'T OWNED  LEASED  JUP,I3DICTION  of June 22, 1979,• three i•IIESS:krili: During the night of June 21, and early morning . suspicious fixes occurred in the subject building stigation of smoke in the 3500 At approximately 2100 hours on June 21, an inve pied bv HEW, har apparcn,...v peen corridor determined a fan in Room 3523, occu the •ower cord having several left running. This fan was in bad repair with her fan were also found Lett breaks in its insulation. A coffee pot and anot The office occupants were questioned on. The only damage was that to the fan. fan. They stated that all regarding the normal routine as it concerned the day. appliances were turned off at the end of each work  • •  was received at the Regional Control At 0029 hours on June 22, a waterflow alarm water coming from Room 2319, Center. The investigating FPO found smoke and fire involving a table top with occupied by 3PC. Sprinklers had controled a r near the table, but it was not papers- placed on it. There was a coffee make the cause of the fire. Damage damaged by fire and therefore, most likely not rs, plus two movable partitions. from the fire was limited to the table and pape This fire has been determined to be arson. of smoke on the fifth floor was A short while later, at 0225 hours a report r a desk in Room 5707, occupied received. A trash can was found burning unde aled that someone had moved the - trash by HEW. Reports by office occupants reve r the desk. Papers, apparently can from across the room and placed it unde h can and set afire. This fire, from on top of the desk, were placed in the tras to the trash can and the too, has been labeled as arson. Damage was only unidentified documents it contained.  COMMISSIONER, PBS - WPOA  Thompson RECEIVED FROM: Mike RECEIVED BY: Donald Bathurst - PBAD TIME: 9:00 a.m., 6/22/79  FIRE PREVENTION DIVIS [0i., CONTACT: DIRECTOR, ACCIDENT AND cc' PB  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4111,111..  4111111111101•111111111.  hi  •  2  es ed on these fires, and the exact caus No .official estimates have been issu been Federal Bureau of Investigation has are still under investigation. The arson by s that have been determined to be fire two the on st assi to ed call rtment. GSA and the D.C. Fire Depa  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  1919 SEP 13 r"  September 11, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  14  Federal Law Enforcement Coordination, Policy and Priorities  A comprehensive review of Federal law enforcement, police and investigative activities was completed by my Reorganization Project and a copy furnished to you by Jim McIntyre on January 4, 1979. The review documented the need for better coordination and management of existing Federal resources. As you know, Executive Order No. 11396 directs the Attorney General to "coordinate ... the criminal law enforcement activities and crime prevention programs of all Federal departments and agencies." I have asked the Attorney General to place more emphasis on this responsibility, and, specifically, to initiate additional efforts to develop and coordinate Federal law enforcement policies, focusing our capabilities and resources on national priorities. The Attorney General and his staff will be meeting with the heads of the primary law enforcement agencies to determine ways that existing resources of Federal law enforcement and prosecution can be more efficiently and effectively focused on the priority areas of white collar crime, public corruption, narcotics trafficking, and organized crime. I consider this to be a most important matter. I know that can count on your providing the Attorney General with your full cooperation and assistance.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT  •0 • 1,W 4 •.A.1  •j  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET •  •  WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503  1 .1S  " 7"  OFFICE OF FEDLRAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  1579  cr7v.  1 4 ; 6)1•1  Policy Letter 79-3  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES Subject: Goal Setting  On October 24, 1978, the President signed into law Public Law 95-507 amending the Small Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958. Section 221 of Public Law 95-507 requires the head of each Federal agency after consultation with the Small Business Administration to establish realistic goals and report their achievement in awarding contracts of $10,000 or more to small business concerns and to small business concerns owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals. As provided in P.L. 95-507, the goals shall be jointly established by the Head of the Agency and SBA and whenever they fail to agree on established goals, the disagreement shall be submitted to the Administrator of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy for final determination. The purpose of this Policy Letter is to transmit uniform policy guidance, set out in the attachment issued by the Small Business Administration, for establishing such goals. This policy is effective immediately. For further information, contact: Edward Odell, Deputy Director Office of Procurement and Technical Assistance Small Business Administration Washington, DC 20416 (202) 653-6332  1- . c James D. Currie Acting Administrator e J  44,414dfrif4atillaatlY sce7YeilAy  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION . 1 WASHINGTON, D. C. 20506  eMPLot,  S.  •  ‘)•:. .47  A  1S79SEr 10 r -  19  C'Erri  (-1  OFFICE OF THE CHAIR   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MEMORANDUM •  TO  All Agency Heads All Agency Directors of Personnel All Agency Directors of EEO •  I •  i  FROM  Eleanor Holmes ::orton, Chair C .k6( Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  SUBJECT  Proposed EEOC Instructions for Affirmative Action Flans R,-cuired ly Section 71 7 of Title VII and Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as Amended  •• •  ••  The attached Instructions for the FY '80 transition year have been revised based on agency c=ments submitted in response to the EE30 memorandum of June 8, 197;1. The incorporation of many comments received has been extremely helpful. Additional agency comments are now solicited; revisicns and suggestions will be incorporated in the final Instructions in a manner consistent with our focus on ensuring a results-oriented approach to affirmative action. As required by Executive Order 12067, these proposed Instructions are hereby submitted for comment for 15 workin,7 days. Written comments are to be submitted and should be addressed to: by COB October 1 1 Mr. Alfredo Mathew, Jr., Director Office of Government Employment Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 2401 "E" Street, N.W., Room 4208 Washington, D.C. 20506 There were some structural and content revisions which should be noted. These include: o  The integration of Phases I and II, so that there is now a two Phase process with two submissions required.  o  The addition of an implementation process for affirmative action planning which is data driven, goal directed and provides a stepby-step methodology, and  o  of affirmative action goals for a minumum of The estallish:.1ent tv tar9to1 occupations.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Page 2 :here were additional modifications recommen ded on September 4, 19 when the prcp:zed Inst 79, ructionz received form -11 Commissizn review approval. These reco and mmendations will be incorporated into th docunent. Other revi e final sions will be conzid ered and included duri 15 day formal comment nr, the period inciudinc, some changes based on comm received from agency ents personnel who attended the September 5th worX conference sponsored ing by EEOC where these In structions were discus detail. In addition sed in , the management dire ctive for affirmative plans covered under action Section 717 of Title VII will be put in th format as the affirm e same ative action plans co vered under Section the Rehabilitation Ac 501, of t. Should you have any questions regarding th e above, please feel contact Mr. Richard free to Dickerson, Director, Federal Affirmative OGE (telephone number Action, 634-6915). Attachment  BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  t  t>  To: From: Edward T. Mulrenin  Date:  L,  7a  i74:••P .4 /  , --1(#1\1 t t  tv.,1 i..`i .,1/4,4\i*crikt  ) Pq 9 A v Of i vti c4ii  (f 1  1),‘,,J  /i 11  ( 5- IV tit L  (Air  ', 1 ,f e Jr' sti\A c Ae7 0 rnk  -e  '0,1 • i  (1) (54X  . ,  A (4 f (revii et 0  4( (k t /  I/ j/'  W/ 1  fb  it," ff kfi ifik.  % -1) kA i‘...4.1)( 51 1-421`V  e  6i-lvt__  vvc /.7Y  . ) —1 C'  Hz g  S-i  )e(1  ci,trviika4 f. vci r iv(Y) a.,c ,y-ii.;V /140«c,,,,,(1ed , ot.i.f.N pcikt(i)  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .e,  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT  1919 SEP -6  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ----;cr SEP 0 4 1979  OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  MEMORANDUM TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT: Implementation of OMB Bulletin No. 78-11, Use of Consulting Services In a memorandum to you dated May 22, 1979, OMB Director McIntyre reemphasized the President's concern regarding agency use of consulting services and requested that you give special consideration to further reducing the use of those services. As pointed out in the memorandum the President's concerns prompted issuance on May 5, 1978 of ONiB Bulletin No. 78-11, "Guidelines for the Use of-Consulting Services." In order that we n-)ay be responsive to the Congress in the preparation of testimony for hearings in early October, we would appreciate information regarding your implementing actions. Please furnish by September 21, 1979, a copy of the directives and instructions issued by your agency to implement the guidance contained in OMB Bulletin 78-11 for carrying out the President's request to reduce the use of consulting services. The requested copies should be forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget attention OFPP. Inquiries may be directed to Herman Shipley, telephone 395-6810. z  / James D. Currie c  <  Acting Administrator  c  9: 48  • GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES ,ASHING7 ON, D.C. 20548  1 August 17, 1979';. ENCIES:  wmalilMa  ssued a report to the Congress on the' to contractors. That report ("The Fedfral Tmance Is Good But Should Be Better,'" hough the Government's bill paying per,forad, lengthy delays sometimes occur. We at could be taken to improve the timeliness A4  (!///:  Z,OV .  2  2  report, the Office of Management and Budget nts and agencies to improve the timeliness of ased on our recommendations. I am writing at .11 on the actions, if any, that have been taken a result of that guidance. Specifically, I of any actions your department or agency ing areas: in contracts and purchase orders. for paying bills without waiting is in hand.  or certifying and paying invoices DeLvices (such as utilities, data processing time sharing, and building and equipment rent). - Increasing the use of imprest funds to pay small bills. - Reviewing payment center procedures for scheduling payments in accordance with due dates or discount dates. In addition, I would be interested in learning of any other actions taken within your department or agency that will improve the timeliness with which its bills are paid. I would also be interested in any information you might have concerning the timeliness with which your department's or agency's bills are being paid at the present time. I would appreciate receiving the requested information, if possible, by Se tembe If you find it difficult to meet this date or if you ave any questions about this request, please call Mr. James Wright on 275-5108. Thank you for your cooperation in  —411111181   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Imatter.  Comptroller General of the United States  •  • COMPTROLLER GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES WASHINGTON. D.C. 2048  August 17, 1979  B-160,25 HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES:  On February 24, 1978, we issued a report to the Congress on the-7 timeliness of Federal payments to contractors. That report ("The Fedyral Government's Bill Payment Performance Is Good But Should Be Better,'" FGMSD-78-16) concluded that although the Government's bill paying performance is more often good than bad, lengthy delays sometimes occur. We recommended specific actions that could be taken to improve the timeliness of Federal payments. Since the issuance of that report, the Office of Management and Budget has issued guidance to departments and agencies to improve the timeliness of their payments to contractors based on our recommendations. I am writing at this time to request information on the actions, if any, that have been taken in your department or agency as a result of that guidance. Specifically, I would be interested in learning of any actions your department or agency has taken in each of .the following areas:  IIIL o?-rtttr.."  - Including payment terms in contracts and purchase orders. - Implementing procedures for paying bills without waiting until a receiving report is in hand. - Simplifying procedures for certifying and paying invoices for recurring services (such as utilities, data processing time sharing, and building and equipment rent). - Increasing the use of imprest funds to pay small bills. - Reviewing payment center procedures for scheduling payments in accordance with due dates or discount dates. In addition, I would be interested in learning of any other actions taken within your department or agency that will improve the timeliness with which its bills are paid. I would also be interested in any information you might have concerning the timeliness with which your department's or agency's bills are being paid at the present time. I would appreciate receiving the requested information, if possible, by Se tembe . If you find it difficult to meet this date or if you ave any questions about this request, please call Mr. James Wright on 275-5108. Thank you for your cooperation  n  .  matter.  " i7 ... Comperolier  General of the United States  • ••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Ott',   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  46-r1  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT I  OF MANAC.:Mc'N"AN  •  :1 3UDG,ET,  2C503  AUG 2 8 1979  ITMRUG29 P11?! 50 FILIVED OFFICE Ili  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF SELECTED AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Government in the Sunshine Act  On June 9, 1978, the President directed the Office of Management and Budget to monitor agency compliance with the Government in the Sunshine Act. For the first six months of fiscal year 1979, our review shows that: Fifty agencies held a total of 1,031 meetings under the Act. Of those meetings, 454 (44 percent) were open to the public, 379 (37 percent) were closed, and 199 (19 percent) were partially-open and partiallyclosed. Thirteen agencies had no closed, or partiallyclosed meetings: Copyright Royalty Tribunal Federal Farm Credit Board Foreign Claims Settlement Commission Inter-American Foundation Interstate Commerce Commission Mississippi River Commission National Council on Educational Research National Mediation Board National Museum Services Board National Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Postal Service Board of Governors Tennessee Valley Authority Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences •  Two agencies (Board for International Broadcasting and the Export-Import Bank) had no open or partially-open meetings.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 2 •  Five other agencies had no meetings that were entirely open: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation National Railroad Passenger Corporation Overseas Private Investment Corporation Postal Rate Commission Railroad Retirement Board  This data indicates that a greater percentage of meetings were held open to public observation than during the Act's first year. During that first year, 38 percent of the meetings were open (compared to 44 percent currently), and 26 percent were partially-closed (compared to 19 percent currently). However, the percentage of closed meetings has remained about the same (35 percent versus 37 percent). A copy of the summary data is attached as Exhibit A. Although this trend is favorable, each agency should review its procedures and practices to ensure that meetings are closed only when absolutely necessary. In addition, Exhibit B attached, provides guidance on notice and meeting procedures which we believe will further the purposes and meaningfulness of the Act. These procedures will be a subject of our future monitoring of agency compliance. Wayne G. Granquist, Associate Director for Management and Regulatory Policy, is providing a copy of this memorandum to your agency's Sunshine Act "contact person." He is indicating to that individual our intention to continue a vigorous monitoring activity, including reviewing meeting notices, attending "open" meetings to observe agency practices, and periodically requesting reports from covered agencies. In case of any questions, please contact William E. Bonsteel of Mr. Granquist's office, telephone (202) 395-5193.  s T. McIntyre, ctor  Attachments  Ellh.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Exhibit A NUMBER OF MEETINGS October - December 1978 Part Open Closed Open/Closed Board for International Broadcasting Civil Aeronautics Board Commission on Civil Rights Commodity Credit Corporation Commodity Futures Trading Commission Consumer Product Safety Commission Copyright Royalty Tribunal Council on Environmental Quality Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Export-Import Bank Federal Communications Commission Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Federal Election Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Farm Credit Board , Federal Home Loan Bank Board Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Federal Labor Relations Authority Federal Maritime Commission Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission Federal Reserve System Federal Trade Commission Foreign Claims Settlement Commission Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation Inter-American Foundation International Trade Commission Interstate Commerce Commission Legal Services Corporation Merit System Protection Board Metric Board  January - March 1979 Part Open Closed Open/Closed  O 14 4 1 11 6 1 0  1 4 0 0 32 o 0 o  0 1 0 1 0 5 0 o  0 9 3 1 11 17 0 2  1 5 0 0 42 5 0 1  6 0 15 O 6 17 2 11 0 4  0 27 9 4 8 3 0 o 1 2  9 0 6 8 5 0 o 14 2 8  4 0 11 1 3 15 1 9 0 0 3  0 27 1 6 2 7 0 16 1 0 3  10 0 7 7 10 0 0 0 1 0 10  12 1 4 1 0 1 2 8 3 0  1 15 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  1 11 4 0 0 0 12 0 1 2  10 7 5 14  4 15 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0  3 7 2 0  1 2 6 3 1 2  4 1 0 3 0  13 0 1 0 0  •  F  NUMBLR OF MFETINGS.  or.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  October - December 1978 Part cpen Closed Open/Closed Mississippi River Commission National Commission on Libraries and Information Sciences National Council on Educational Research National Labor Relations Board National Mediation Board National Museum Services Board National Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation National Railroad Passenger Corporation National Science Board National Transportation Safety Board Nuclear Regulatory Commission Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission Overseas Private Investment Corporation Parole Commission Postal Rate Commission Postal Service Railroad Retirement Board Railway Association Securities and Exchange Commission Tennessee Valley Authority Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences Total  January - March 1979 Part Open Closed Open/Closed  4 3  0 0  0 1  0 3  0 1  0 0  1 0 3 1  0 5 0 0  0 0 0 0  , 2 1 3 1  0 7 0 0  0 0 0 0  1  0  0  2  0  0  0 1 3 53  0 1 1 32  2 0 2 0  0 3 8 50  0 3 0 19  3 0 5 0  1 0 1 0 5 0 2  8 0 7 1 0 0 1  1 2 0 1 0 2 3  3 0 1 0 3 0 0  10 0 6 1 0 2 0  0 1 0 1 0 0 4  (information not provided) 0 11 0  9  0  3  0  0  1  0  0  221  177  104  233  201  95  Total Open: 45i,  Closed:  0  378; Total Part Open/Closed:  199.  •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Exhibit B  Notice and Meeting Guidelines  Meeting Notices. If a notice of a meeting subject to the Sunshine Act is not made in a timely manner, or in places where those who may wish to attend a meeting may see it, or if a meeting is too often changed, the purposes of the Act are not met. A notice should be published for each meeting. Even though the regulations of an agency may provide that meetings will be held at regular, specified times (e.g., the first and third Thursday of each month), a notice should be given for each of these meetings so that someone who may have missed the publication of those regulations in the Federal Register, and does not have ready access to them, may learn of the meeting. vd/Mo ••=10  •••• MEM  Notices should be published sufficiently in advance of a scheduled meeting to enhance public attendance. During the first six months of fiscal year 1979, although more than 85% of the notices in the Federal Register appeared on or before the date of the meeting, only about 20% were published seven or more days before the meeting. The meeting notice should provide much more information about the matters to be discussed at meetings than is generally now provided. Listing docket numbers, and indicating that the matter to be discussed will concern "personnel", are not adequately informative. Enough information should be provided to permit the public to reasonably understand what the meeting will concern so that an informed decision as to whether to attend can be made. When a meeting is to be closed or partly-closed to public observation, the notice should, in an understandable fashion, refer to and discuss the exemption(s) which permit the meeting to be closed and why the subject of the meeting requires that it be closed. For example, a notice stating that a meeting will be "closed -- personnel matter", is far less informative than one stating that:  a S  • 2  A   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  "This meeting will concern the Board's views of the appropriate United States response to certain offers made by the Republic of China. Premature public disclosure of the options, plans, and opinions of the Board could seriously compromise the interests of the United States. Accordingly, the following Members are voted to bar public observation of this meeting, because the premature disclosure of the matters to be discussed would be likely to frustrate implementation of the proposed agency action. This action is taken within the meaning of the exemption provided under 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(9)(3) and 14 CFR Section 310b.5(B)...." .00.0 =MO  •II•  Once a notice has been given for a meeting, it should not be changed or amended except in the most compelling of situations. During the first six months of this fiscal year 993 meeting notices were published -and 426 notices of changes. Changes may not be observed by those who are interested in attending meetings and may result in substantial inconveniences. Nonetheless, when it is necessary to issue notices to change meetings notices, such notices should be given as soon as possible, and should refer clearly to all pending notices of the same meeting. We frequently find it difficult to match change notices with the original, or to determine exactly what change is being made. For most agencies, publishing notices in the Federal Register constitutes the sole means of informing the public of upcoming meetings. This publication should not be the sole effort to notify the public. Many agencies now also post notices at their various offices Additional efforts should be used to inform the public of upcoming meetings, including the publication of , notices in newspapers, newsletters and the trade press and by utilizing mailing lists and "hot lines."  are Meeting Procedures. The manner in which "open" meetings used conducted vary widely. The following practices have been and by some agencies and have facilitated public access to, understanding of, meetings. Many agencies have name Identifying the principals. y displates for members and commissioners; one agenc retributes a seating chart to observers, and other ssioners) quired speakers (staff, and members or commi to identify themselves.  •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S  3 ARO ..MID  MOM IMO  •=1  Providing a meaningful description and detailed explanation of discussion topics. A number of agencies distribute background materials and staff papers which summarize the issues in each agenda item. Some agencies have a staff member, or the chairman, summarize each item, and the issues and options for discussion. Agencies should make every effort to enhance the public's ability to observe meetings. The public should be provided with complete information, including tools (staff memoranda, reports, and other background materials) to enable the public to follow discussions and better understand the decisionmaking process. Ensuring that the discussions are audible to the public observers. Prominently displaying copies of meeting notices, and directions to meeting rooms, in agency reception areas, elevator lobbies, etc. Indicating public seating areas in the meeting rooms, and providing copies of agendas, background papers, and guidelines for observers.  .•=1.  Clearly providing guidelines for the use of cameras, tape recorders, etc. The public should be permitted to use cameras and recorders in a non-obtrusive manner. Agency requirements of prior notice or advance permission with respect to the use of cameras or recorders act as unnecessary barriers to public observation of open meetings.  Agencies should use these and other methods to ensure that the meetings which are open to the public are as meaningful as possible to those who attend. While the business to be conducted at these meetings may often be of an urgent nature, care should be taken to avoid the use of agency jargon and acronyms that could make it meaningless for the public to attend.  •  111  United States of America  Office of  Personnel Management  AUG 2 2 1979 Jr Reply Refer To  111 Washington, D.C. 20415 - 1 -T1  0,0  c)  tip  U=0  r_I:  c.  Ye• -"ftefer erica: f .771  ___-1  1\.) ....,,,j -71  TO:  r  7 •  I,  -9 I) ..  Heads of Departments and Independent Establishments  6   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Blacks in Government (BIG), a national non-profit organization Concerned 07 -787-17rofessional and cultural development of Black government employees, will hold its first national conference October 18-20, 1979 at the Shoreham Amer7777notel in 77777-gt577777.7—"'""" 01101016116110661001,1601104106160.11611111111161111110111110111111111111 1MO1111  With its theme "Unite for Action," the conference provides a forum for discussing major problems Black Americans face today. The conference will surely attract individuals from Federal, State and local governments, and from national Black organizations. The conference has the promises for providing a unique experience. You may wish to encourage the participation, of your employees in this conference as part of your agency's training activities. Registration forms can be requested by contacting Norman R. Seay, conference chairman at (202) 436-7211.  Jule M. Sugarman Deputy Directo r  CON 114-24-3 January 1979   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4ION  a  EXATIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDE" OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASH I NGTON, D.C. 20503  1979ritifl%7 [171 9: 24  AUG 2 2 1979 F  ' '  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT:  National Supply System  On August 9, 1979, President Carter approved my recommendation to establish a National Supply System. Specifically, the President approved a preliminary system definition and an implementation schedule which were developed under the joint auspices of the National Supply System Advisory Board and the Administrative Services Reorganization Project. As you will note in the attached memorandum, the President strongly supports this effort and assigns to it a high priority. This project to develop and implement a uniform, integrated, Government-wide supply system, which has been under consideration for many years, will be a substantial undertaking. Success will require your full cooperation and assistance, particularly in the support and staffing of the necessary interagency work groups. The Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy, who is assigned the leadership role in concert with the National Supply System Advisory Board, will Pe contacting many of you for assistance and support in the process of accomplishing this project. I encourage you to respond as affirmatively as your resources permit. I intend to maintain a close interest in this project and am committed to give immediate attention. to the resolution of difficult issues which may arise. If you have any questions regarding this matter, please contact Mr. James D. Currie, Acfing Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy, at 395-7207.  es T. McIntyre, Jr. rector Attachment  • •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  0 ..   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE  0  WASHINGTON  August 9, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR:  THE HONORABLE JAMES T. MC INTYRE, JR. DIRECTOR OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  SUBJECT:  National Supply System  I have approved your recommendation for the establishment of a National Supply System, as described in the attached documents. Steps planned to fully describe and implement the system should be taken promptly under the leadership of the Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy, acting in concert with the National Supply System Advisory Board. To support this action, I am requesting that you advise the heads of executive departments and agencies of the priority which I assign to this project. Their full cooperation and assistance will be vital in the development, implementation and direction of the National Supply System.  NA IONAL SUPPLY SYSTEM• PHASE I - PRELIMINARY DEFINITION AND DESCRIPTION I. PREAMBLE The purpose of this document is to provide a definition of a National Supply System (NSS), along with a brief description of the principal features and characteristics of that System. U. DEFINITION The National Supply System (NSS) is a uniform, integrated Federalwide system for the acquisition, supply, and distribution of personal property and related services, with authority to establish, enforce, and monitor policies and procedures, world-wide in scope and application. III. OBJECTIVES The System will be one which is designed to accommodate both normal peacetime, as well as emergency and defense-wartime requirements. The System will seek to:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A. Eliminate overlap and duplication, improve cost-effectiveness and provide for more effective utilization of existing Executive Branch personnel in the management of acquisition and supply programs. B. Establish a coherent, predictable, and responsive process for use by Executive Branch agencies in acquiring supplies and related services necessary for mission performance with flexibility essential to accommodate the diverse needs and capabilities of the participants. C. Provide for a greater degree of reliance on the private sector in meeting supply and logistics needs so that: 1. Government duplication of private sector capabilities can be minimized; and 2. The Government's potential for benefiting from competition within the private sector can be enhanced. D. Establish a Government-wide comprehensive approach to the resolution of acquisition and supply problems in the Executive Branch. E. Create a body of complementary procedures for use by manufacturers and suppliers in responding to the supply and service needs of Executive Branch agencies. F. Facilitate the implementation, in a more rapid fashion, of technical and systems improvements on a Government-wide basis. G. Assure that policies associated with acquisition and supply reflect and respond to the national security and other national interests, as directed by the President.  •  2  •  IV. FUNCTIONS The System would encompass the following: A. A unified body of supply poes,program directives, and related central management activity. B. A cataloging system for the identification, specification, and standard tion of items. C. A standard system for the acquisition of material. D. An item management system for designating managers for individual items and/or classes of items which will optimize the one item/one manager concept. E. A standardized requisitioning and issue procedure with automated and manual capabilities, and an order status tracking capability. F. A standardized logistics communications system. G. A system of contract administration to include quality assurance. H. An integrated distribution system to accommodate the receipt, inspection, storage, issue, and movement of material in which the depot facilities will -ISusn a common-use basis. be I. An integrated system for the reutilization and disposal of excess and surplus property. J. A system for collecting, developing, communicating, and disseminating acquisition and property management data which takes into account the needs of the Congress, the Executive Branch, and the private sector. K. A supply management system to include requirements computation, initial provisioning, and inventory management. L. Continuous close cooperation with central personnel management authority ISSomote programs for improved qualification and position classification standards and similar activities towards improving the recruitment, training, career development, motivation and performance evaluation of acquisition and supply personnel. T3I;U1.gIJJ RE A. The System will be applicable to each department, agency, committee, commission, and board of the Federal Government. Each entity will participate in the system as a manager, operator, or user, or in a combination of these roles. Executive Branch entities will participate under a mandatory charter; the Legislative and Judicial Branches may participate on a voluntary basis; however, if they choose to participate, they will do so within the same parameters and restrictions as the Executive Branch. NATO and other friendly foreign countries may also participate in selected aspects of the System. Contractors and quasi-governmental agencies may become users of the System when sponsored by participants.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 B. The System will include: 1. A single, top level, central executive policy authority, designated by and reporting to the President; 2. Full and continuing representation in major policy and program formulation and key decision making by system participants, at the level of department/agency head, and in relation to the. size and significance of such participants' contributions to, and reliance on the System; 3. Consultative mechanisms to assure continuing advisory and supportive inputs from recognized, knowledgeable private sector expertise to assure that full consideration is given to commercial, industrial, and socio-economic aspects and impacts of Federal supply activities; and 4. A policy and management structure to assure fulfillment of statutory and Executive Branch requirements by developing standardized policies, procedures and management standards governing the operation of the System, and to provide for evaluation and compliance. Operational mechanisms will assure that implementation of National Supply System policies and programs associated with the acquisition and control of principal end—and related depot-level repairable—items of personal property which are mission-unique to a single department or agency will be the responsibility of that department or agency unless specifically excepted by law or Presidential direction. Implementation of operational mechanisms associated with the acquisition and control of items of personal property, other than those indicated above, will be the responsibility of an agency or agencies designated by the central executive policy authority described in V.B.I. above.  Approved:  August 9, 1979   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  NATIONAL SUPPLY SYSTEM PHASE II - PLAN AND SCHEDULE FOR COMPLETING PRELIMINARY DEFINITION AND DESCRIPTION  I. INTRODUCTION The purpose of this document is to provide a recommended plan and schedule for completing the Preliminary Definition and Description of the National Supply System. IL SCOPE OF PLAN AND SCHEDULE Completion of the definition and description of the National Supply System (NSS) will include: A. The further definition and delineation of the NSS, description of its functions and their components, and, upon approval by the NSSAB, development of the respective roles and responsibilities of the participants, proposed policy setting authority, and organizational structures; B. The development of the implementing charter, policy statements, orders and similar directives for bringing the National Supply System into existence: C. The clearance and coordination of such implementing documents with all participants and other interested parties, including publication in the Federal Register; D. Revisions to such implementing documents, as required, on the basis of comments received; and E. The development and coordination of all transition plans, schedules and other arrangements for phasing into the new National Supply System. For each of the functions described in Part IV of this report, there has been included a listing of examples of a number of significant components. Also noted. are known projects or studies toward the enhancement of the National Supply System objectives. In addition, specific reference is made to some activities uniquely required to further define, describe and implement that function with respect to the National Supply System. These should all become part of, and integrated into, the plan and schedule of work for the development of the National Supply System, and should be coordinated by the National Supply System Implementation Task Force. Unified policies, programs, directives, procedures and standard forms are required for all of the functions, as referenced in IV, A below, so these will not be repeated as a required item under each function.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  III. NATIONAL SUPPLY SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION TASK FORCE (NSSITF) The organization through and by which the work of completing the definition and description of the National Supply System will be accomplished, will be known as the National Supply System Implementation Task Force (NSSITF). This Task Force should be staffed by personnel from Executive departments and agencies. Details of personnel would be based on the cooperation and concurrence of the agencies affected, and with regard to the relative degree of participation of each department or agency in the National Supply System, as well as on the need for top level, functional expertise and analytical ability. The Task Force will consist of a senior level Director, a Functional Coordinator for each major function identified in the National Supply System Definition, and Work Groups for each function and/or major sub-function. The Task Force Director and the Functional Coordinators, to the extent practicable, should be collocated to assure close coordination in development of unified National Supply System plans and policies. In addition to the staffing requirements referenced above, a budget allocation should be provided for the operation of the National Supply System Implementation Task Force, for adequate support staff, and for all logistical and travel requirements. IV. FUNCTIONS The specific functions, components, related ongoing and scheduled projects, and activities uniquely required for each function, are indicated below: A. A Unified Body of Supply Policies, Program Directives, and Other Central Management Activity. Components: • Policies  • Management Concepts  • Program Directives  • Organizational Structures • Budget and Accounting System Design  • Plans and Schedules  • System-Subsystem Designs • Evaluation Plan • Public Information Program • Participant Role Definitions • Transition/Phasing Arrangements • Standard Forms  1. Currently Underway: See listings of specific projects associated with Functions B through L, below. 2. Scheduled: See listings associated with Functions B through L below. 3. Required: In addition to those National Supply System projects currently underway, or scheduled, as identified for Functions B through L below, it is necessary to develop: (a) Unified, Federal-wide policies, programs, systems, directives, procedures, and standard forms for each of the functions, in consonance with Section III, Objectives, of the Preliminary Definition and Description of the National Supply System;  • 3 (b) Specific plans and policy and program directives to assure a fully integrated and consistent, phased implementation of each system, program and procedure, as described in Functions B through L (c) Unified Government-wide budget, finance and accounting policies and procedures to assure orderly funds transfers, property accountability, and other requirements associated with common service acquisition and supply; (d) Programs to improve understanding of Federal acquisition and supply policies, both within the Service, and by organizations and individuals doing business with the Government: (e) Programs for identifying, evaluating and correcting, on a continuing basis, overlappings, duplications. inadequacies, inconsistencies, inefficiencies, and other errors or omissions in Government supply policies, procedures, regulations and directives, and in other policies, regulations, and laws affecting supply; (f) A detailed transition plan for the orderly phasing of sub-systems into the National Supply System, and for reviewing such subsystems to identify excess system resources (facilities, equipment, personnel, software). B. A Cataloging System for the Standardization of Items.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Identification, Specification  and  Components: • Identification of items • Assignment of National Stock Numbers • Registration of all National Supply System Federal Catalog System  participants in  the  • An integrated data base of cataloging data for common use by National Supply System participants • Item Management data • Control of the entry and exit of items • Standardization of items • Cataloging publications to satisfy user needs • NATO and other friendly foreign government participation 1. Currently Underway: Office of Federal Procurement Policy/DoD/GSA joint project for development of specification management improvement program. 2. Scheduled: National Supply System Task Group #3 is to develop programs and procedures to assure systematic entry and control of items into the NSS, and NSS Task Group #4 is to develop means to maximize Civil Agency participation in the Federal Catalog System.  •  4  3. Required: Development of a program to require registration of items in the Federal Catalog System. C. A Standard System for the Acquisition of Material. Components: • Includes all functions associated with acquisition of material, other than those listed elsewhere, ie: • Requirements Forecasting  • Advertising  • Source Determination  • Solicitation  • Centralizea/Decentralized Procurement • Schedules  • Negotiation • Evaluation  • Local Purchase  • Award  1. Currently Underway: (a) A single. unified acquisition regulation (Federal Acquisition Regulation). Also, see Function J. (b) Unified policy guidelines for implementation of the Commercial Products Acquisition/Distribution Program. (c) Improved Multiple Award Schedule Contract Program. (d) Market Research and Analysis Programs. (e) Implementation of Major System Acquisitons policy (OMB Circular No. A-109). 2. Required: Specific procurement assignment criteria as required for Functions C and D. D. An Item Management System for Designating Managers for Individual Items or Classes Which Will Optimize the One Item/One Manager Concept. Components: • Standard Inventory management systems • Inventory Management Assignments • Supply Support Assignments 1. Currently Underway: An effort by OFPP/DoD/VA/GSA/DHEW to establish a single government-wide system to procure and assure Quality of medical and nonperishable subsistence items. 2. Required: Specific item and procurement assignment criteria as required for Functions C and D. E. Standardized Requisitioning and Issue Procedures with Automated and Manual Capabilities and An Order Status Tracking Capability. Components: • Reauisitioning and Issue System • Uniform Priority System   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 5  • Reporting System • Transportation System • Intransit Item Visibility System F. A Standardized Logistics Communications System. Components: • System-wide automated digital network • System-wide automated addressing capability • Standard Input/Output Codes and formats • Communications systems dedicated to logistics traffic transmission • Manual and mechanical Interface with the Digital Network G. A System of Contract Administration to Include Quality Assurance. Components: • Standard quality assurance procedures • Adherence to specifications, contract delivery dates, and production schedules • Pre-award and post-award audit of contractors • Contractor compliance with affirmative action and socio-economic program requirements 1. Currently Underway: (a) Consolidation of contractor affirmative action compliance within the Department of Labor (b) Development of the Federal Procurement Data System (See Function J). H. An Integrated Distribution System to Accommodate the Receipt, Inspection, Storage, Issue and Movement of Material in which the Depot Facilities will be Used on a Common-use Basis. Components: • Depot Operating Systems  • Depot Transportation Systems  • Receiving  • Expediting and monitoring  • Issuing  • Material marking  • Packing/Crating/Handling  • Consolidation/Staging  • Stock Control  • Material Movement  • Storage (Physical Inventory, Warehousing, and Preservation)  • Traffic Management • Positioning/Repositioning  • Retail Stores Operations 1. Currently Underway: (a) National Supply System Task Group 42: development of criteria and data base for consolidating wholesale government supply distribution facilities. (b) The preliminary efforts of DoD in reviewing their thirty-four general purpose depots for potential consolidation.  at; ••  6 (c) The preliminary effort and plans of GSA/FSS to reduce their depots. I. An Integrated System for the Reutilization and Disposal of Excess and Surplus Property. Components: • Utilization Screening • Reporting • Repair, Rehabilitation and Reclamation • Reutilization and Reassignment • Donation • Sales J. A System for Collecting, Developing, Communicatin g, and Disseminating Acquisition and Property Management Data Which Take s Into Account the Needs of the Congress, the Executive Branch, and the Private Sector. Components: • National Supply Data System • Ability to provide required and recurring reports • Additional related systems to program plans, budg ets, costs, personnel data and other information as required 1. Currently Underway: A Federal Procurement Data System, including a Federal Data Procurement Center, for assembling, organizing and prese nting contract placement data for the Federal Government, is to commence operation October 1, 1978. 2. Required: (a) An advisory group to recommend additions, deletions and changes to the National Supply Data System. (b) An interagency committee to determine required programs and data elements, and to test, implement and oversee the developm ent of programs for the National Supply Data System. K. A Supply Management System to Include Requirem ents Computation, Initial Provisioning and Inventory Management.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Components: • • • • • • •  Demand history/program data Economic order quantities Requirements Determination (peacetime, wartime, emergenc y) Source selection of repairs parts Registration of items in Federal Cataloging System Establishment of method of supply Item accounting—National inventory records   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7 • Establishment of stock levels • Inventory, shelf life: surveys, adjustments and reconciliation • Credit returns/excess/disposition L. Continuous Close Cooperation with Central Personnel Management Authority to Promote Programs for Improved Qualification and Position Classification Standards and Similar Activities Towards Improving the Recruitment, Training, Career Development, Motivation, and Performance Evaluation Of Acquisition and Supply Personnel. Components: • Classification standards • Qualification and performance standards and appraisal methods • Analysis and development of recruitment sources for qualified personnel • Training and career development programs • Recognition and awards programs • Certification and Licensing programs 1. Currently Underway: Federal Acquisition Institute is developing career programs for acquisition and contracting personnel. These should be expanded, in cooperation with GSA and CSC, to include all supply personnel. 2. Required: A task group to develop a code of ethics, examination, licensing and certification programs, and to develop an awards and recognition program, for special achievements of supply, and acquisition personnel. V. SCHEDULE Note: Actions are to be taken with full input and consultation with agencies affected. and approval by National Supply System Advisory Board. The schedule also envisions continuing coordination with other related projects. studies and cost-benefit analyses. underway elsewhere in the Federal Service, in the development of the products needed to complete the definition and description of the NSS. The dates listed are initial targets and are subject to adjustment, when necessary, to assure quality products.  A. August 1. 1979 • Approval of the National Supply System Project Summary by the President • Charter for Task Force and appointment of Task Force Director • Appointment of Functional Coordinators • Organization of Work Groups including necessary administrative support B. December 1, 1979 • Development of completed, formal National Supply System definition, and of initial drafts of major policy and program directives  8  • Coordination of the above with NSS participants and other interested art ies • Negotiation and resolution of comments by the National Supply System Advisory Board C. March 1, 1980 • Development of initial drafts of comprehensive descriptions and of policy and program directives for each of the functional areas • Coordination of the above with NSS participants and other interested parties • Approval by the National Supply System Advisory Board of completed, formal National Supply System definition, and final drafts of major policy and program directives D. June 1, 1980 Approval by the National Supply System Advisory Board, of final drafts of comprehensive descriptions, and of policy and program directives for each of the functional areas. E. August 1, 1980 Subsequent to completion and approval by NSSAB, of comprehensive functional descriptions, policy and programs directives, as per D above, delineation of roles and responsibilities of NSS participants, and of management authorities and organizational structures. Coordination with all interested parties, negotiation and resolution of comments and approval by the National Supply System Advisory Board. F. December 1, 1980   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Issuance of all policy, program and management directives, establishing the National Supply System, with phased implementation to begin March 1, 1981—this gives a seven month lead in, transition period for actions to be effected at the beginning of FY 82, le October 1, 1981.  Approved:  August 9, 1979  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT • OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND  ilDGET  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  1979 flflfl 27 "  25  AUG 2 1 1979  7AC MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Debt Collection  The amount of overdue debts owed the Government is a matter of increasing concern. Since I last wrote you in March, our recognition of the issue has been matched by a growing awareness in Congress and the media. While we have included debt collection in the Financial Priorities Program, we believe stronger measures are required to collect the monies owed. Toward that end, we have created a Debt Collection Project under the newly formed President's Management Improvement Council. Following the lines of the successful President's Cash Management Project, the Debt Collection Project will seek answers to individual agency problems while pursuing solutions at the general government-wide level as well. The project is intended to build on initiatives already planned and underway, including those mentioned in responses to my March memorandum. Mr. Wayne Granquist, our Associate Director for Management and Regulatory Policy will be responsible for the Debt Collection Project. In order to coordinate this joint effort, we request you designate a representative to help us in developing specific plans, coordinating the work in your agency and keeping you informed as the work progresses. To begin early consideration of the work plan, we would appreciate receiving word of your representative designee during the next two weeks. For any additional information, please call Jerry Bridges at 395-3967.  Jafries T. McIntyre, Director  6/1  111  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EAUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIINT T,I3ArD OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  4  ••  IIUIT  WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503  19791111(3 1 6 ." 9: 50 OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  — August 10;i'i9779' OENC.MANDUN FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES Subject:  Federal Procurement Data System Reports  Enclosed are the first and second quarterly reports and selected special analyses as inal publications of the Federal Procurement Data System. This System, which became operational in Fiscal Year 1979, implements a provision of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, yublic Law 93400, requiring the establishment of a ".... system for collecting, developiny, and disseminating procurement data wnich takes into account the needs of the Congress, the executive brancn, ana the private sector." Tne Federal Procurement Leta Systeo will provide quarterly reports and an annual report coverin3 all executive a9ency acquisition. The quarterly re-ports contain total procurement uollars and number of transactions distributed by agency and !Jy state. In addition to the three special analyses enclosed, the quarterly report will list and describe in Appendix I, other special analyses as subsequently developeo for publication on a quarterly basis. The quarterly reports, for the periods ending December 31, 1978, and ',larch 31, 1979, have been delayed due to ditficulties associated with establishing a data collecting activity of this majnitude. These reports are still preliluiaary, since all ayencies have not fully reported, but the data should serve general information needs. An initial set of all subsequent quarterly reports will be sent to each agency approximately sixty days after the end of the reportiny period. Additional copies may be acquired on a reimbursable basis from the: Director Federal Procurement Data Center 1815 North Lynn Street, Suite 320 22209 Arlington, Virginia Telephone: (202) 696-5069  alb   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  For your inforfflation, members of the public will be able to acquire the reports individually or through subscription from: Superintendent of Documents . U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402  •: .;"7 -7 C  irp  James D. Currie Acting Administrator  Enclosure  •  %  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  lirimvE  OFFICE OF THE PREADENT  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  do, ‘. L. •  WASH INGTON. D.C. 20503  1979 nur.-, I 3 r."1 F.: 51 August 7, 1979 rk  r  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTA BLISHMENTS SUBJECT:  Controlling Year-End Buying  As we enter the last quarter of fiscal year 1979, I ask you to make sure that we continue to use public funds wisely by avoiding unnecessary year -end buying. I cannot overemphasize that prevention of unne eded or unwise Federal Government spending is an esse ntial part of our efforts to control inflation. Public funds should be used only for necessary program purposes, and should not be obligated solely to commit fund s before they lapse. Please issue instructions to your contract and program offices assuring that: Obligations for the fourth quarter of the fisc al year are no higher than for the third quar ter, except where seasonal requirements, essentia l program objectives, or procurement lead-tim es justify a higher level, or where more money is needed to restore program slippages to appr oved levels; Purchases are not made to avoid what otherwis e would be an outlay shortfall; •••••• MOW  Grants are subjected to rigorous review and are not made just to keep funds from lapsing; and Orders for services, supplies, materials, and equipment are no more than are needed to meet approved program objectives. (1) The need for the following should be closely controlled and reevaluated:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 o Procurement of additional hours or items of supply or equipment not in the original procurement with funds that would otherwise  of service that were request lapse.  o Purchase of additional items not contained in the original procurement request or contractor proposal with funds negotiated out of contractors' proposals or those available because estimated needs were in excess of the funds actually required. o Exercise of options, orders against basic ordering agreements or requirements-type contracts, or the funding of the latter years of a multi-year contract. (2) Funds obligated to cover unpriced items, such as spare parts, should not be in excess of the current best estimate of need for those items. In addition, those in excess of the original procurement request should be clearly justified. (3) Letter contracts should be closely monitored and funds should not be obligated in excess of that allowed by regulations, nor should letter contracts be used as a vehicle to obligate funds that would otherwise lapse. (4) When contracts are modified or change orders issued to increase level of effort or procure additional items or services, the additional requirements must be validated. (5) The procurement of consultant services and modifications of current consultant contracts should be reviewed for compliance with OMB Bulletin 78-11, May 5, 1978. (6) Purchases or orders for administrative supplies or services, such as office furniture, supplies, or renovation, should not be approved unless planned in advance or needed to meet an emergency. (7) Purchases by or orders from central procurement offices, such as the General Services Administration and the Defense Logistics Agency, should not be in excess of current utilization factors and optimal inventory levels.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3  Those responsible for review of procurement and grant actions (e.g., contracting officers, program officers, legal counsel, auditors and Inspector General personnel) should consider noncompliance with this memorandum as an indication of waste. I count on your full cooperation and personal attention to save the taxpayers as much money as possible in support of the President's fiscal objectives.  e T.c'li. McIntyre, Jr. 441.4-6-6irector  I mes  IL  THE WHITE HOUSE WAS H I NGTON  C1Z)  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF  \/\  24.1.1.  :1  DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  in c) .  In my Environmental Message of August 2, 1979, I recognized the important natural, historic, and recreational values of our Nation's river corridors. It is important for cri the federal agencies to set an example of sound management .Tor state, local, and private landowners by taking an aggressive role in protecting Wild and Scenic Rivers which 'low throuah public lands. In addition, I recognized that the 1968 National Trails System Act is designed to promote the development of recreational, scenic, and historic trails for persons of diverse interests and abilities -- including the young, the handicapped, and the aced -- and that the National Trails System is in its fledaling stage. The Act provides for designating trails on state, local and private lands, but only 130 trails have been established since enactment of the Act. In my Environmental Message I stressed the importance of expanding the rational Trails System. Therefore, I am directing that each of you take the following actions:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  0  Each federal agency shall encourage states, localities and private land holders to designate trails on their lands and to participate with federal agencies and trail users in designing and creating an overall National Trails System which will provide more fully for the trail needs of America.  0  Each federal agency shall, as part of its normal planning and environmental review processes, take care to avoid or mitigate adverse effects on rivers identified in the Nationwide Inventory, preoared by the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service in the Department of the Interior. Paencies  -  3.11  .)  -1•••  2  shall, as part of their normal environmental review process, consult with the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service prior to taking actions which could effectively foreclose wild, scenic, or recreational river status on rivers in the Inventory.  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  0  Each Federal agency with responsibility for administering public lands shall, as part of its ongoing land use planning and management activities and environmental review processes, make an assessment of whether the rivers identified in the Nationwide Inventory and which are on their lands are suitable for inclusion in the Wild and Scenic Rivers System. If an agency determines that a river would be suitable for inclusion in the System, the agency shall, to the extent of the agency's authority, promptly take such steps as are needed to protect and manage the river and the surrounding area in a fashion comparable to rivers already included in the Wild and Scenic Rivers System. In addition, the agency is encouraged, pursuant to the revised Guidelines, to work with the Agriculture and Interior Departments to prepare legislation to designate the river as part of the Wild and Scenic Rivers System if appropriate.  Please give these assignments your immediate attention.  /1-e7   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  For your information: THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  Board Members Mr. Axilrod Mr. Denkler Mr. Kichline Mr. Kakalec  August 2, 1979  , 7(-0 -1  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF  r.,  (-CD M7  EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  SUBJECT:  The Administration's Budgetary Policy rl  C.%)  Speculation about changes in the Administration's budgetary policy and proposals to deviate from existing budget restraints are undesirable and tend to undermine the anti-inflationary purpose of our budgetary policy. The following four points should be clearly understood: 1.  Economic conditions do not require a change in budgetary policy this year, including any tax reduction program, and I do not contemplate proposing any such change.  2.  I remain committed to a policy of fiscal and monetary restraint as a centerpiece of this Administration's anti-inflation program.  3.  Any suggestions for deviation from this Administration's budgetary policies or proposals are to be cleared with the Director of the Office of Management and Budget.  4.  We will, of course, continue to monitor the course of the economy as we consider our economic policies.  r 7 it
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102