View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

IF  whi-l-e House (31---70) A prk I— "ScA ly Pi-79   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Collection: Paul A. Volcker Papers Call Number: MC279  Box 9  Preferred Citation: White House Correspondence, No. 33-70, 1979 April-July; Paul A. Volcker Papers, Box 9; Public Policy Papers, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library Find it online: http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/MC279/c284 and https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/archival/5297 The digitization ofthis collection was made possible by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. From the collections of the Seeley G. Mudd Nlanuscript Library, Princeton, NJ These documents can only be used for educational and research purposes ("fair use") as per United States copyright law. By accessing this file, all users agree that their use falls within fair use as defined by the copyright law of the United States. They further agree to request permission of the Princeton University Library (and pay any fees, if applicable) if they plan to publish, broadcast, or otherwise disseminate this material. This includes all forms of electronic distribution. Copyright The copyright law of the United States (Tide 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or other reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or other reproduction for purposes not permitted as fair use under the copyright law of the United States, that user may be liable for copyright infringement. Policy on Digitized Collections Digitized collections are made accessible for research purposes. Princeton University has indicated wI at it knows about the copyrights and rights of privacy, publicity or trademark in its finding aids. However, due to the nature of archival collections, it is not always possible to identify this information. Princeton University is eager to hear from any rights owners, so that it may provide accurate information. When a rights issue needs to be addressed, upon request Princeton University will remove the material from public view while it reviews the claim. Inquiries about this material can be directed to: Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library 65 Olden Street Princeton, NJ 08540 609-258-6345 609-258-3385 (fax) mudd@princeton.edu   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • 4//1 2o   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON 4 ;"  July 12, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES AND MILITARY PERSONNEL  Federal government employees traditionally have responded generously in aiding those less fortunate than ourselves. Particularly noteworthy have been the tremendous compassion and support we have demonstrated through our contributions to the Combined Federal Campaign. Once again, this yearly opportunity to support the services of voluntary health and welfare agencies, including the United Way, The American Red Cross, National Health Agencies and International Service Agencies, by participating in the Combined Federal Campaign is upon us. These agencies help make our community a better place in which to live; they alleviate pain and suffering, and seek cures from dreaded diseases; they bring hope to those in overseas lands, and reinforce a sense of security in the aged, infirm, and handicapped. In the spirit of neighborliness, we will continue our tradition of generosity and concern for others through contributions to the Combined Federal Campaign. I am confident of your support.  r• -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  • •••  THE WHITE HOUSE le  WASHINGTON  19,79 jtn  04  July 30, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions Program  omit I have invoked "Standby Conservation Plan No. 2, Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions" (the Plan), which establishes limits on temperature settings for heating, cooling, and water heating in commercial, industrial and other non-residential buildings. The Plan became effective on July 16, 1979. I believe it is important that the Federal Government take the lead in setting an example of compliance with the requirements of this program. Under the Plan, the Department of Energy has primary responsibility for administering this program. Secretary James R. Schlesinger has delegated to each Federal agency head certain responsibilities for assuring his or her agency's compliance. I am directing all agency heads to give this effort their full cooperation in order to ensure the success of the program. The specific obligations of each agency head are enumerated in Secretary Schlesinger's delegation letter.  t44  In order to make building temperature restrictions uniform between Government-owned and privately-owned buildings, the directive about thermostats in my April 10, 1979, memorandum to all agency heads is hereby rescinded.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  //7  etal  •  -  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  1979 JUL Int  July 18, 1979  rr-717  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Management of Federal Legal Resources  I have today signed an Executive Order entitled Federal Legal Resources concerning the management of Federal legal resources. In addition to the matters specified in that Executive Order, and subject to the statutory responsibilities of the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, the Attorney General shall plan, coordinate, and operate programs to provide suitable training for Federal legal personnel. The functions now performed by the Legal Education Institute of the Office of Personnel Management shall hereafter be performed by the Department of Justice.  „1,,Jz,e.7 —  /e7i4v   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  I  .•• IN 0  THE WHITE HOUSE WASH I NGTON  •  •  R"  / I  r 19,79 JL 16  t:,29  July 11, 1979 Dear Mr. Miller: We are writing to seek your agency's help in identifying Federal programs that give consumers quality and price comparisons of providers of local services. We have become painfully aware that a marketbasket of services that cost $100 in 1967 costs more than $223 today. We believe that if consumers had comparative cost and quality information conveniently available to them, they could cut that $223 down very substantially. That seems to us an important way of combatting inflation'. We have found that there are some Federal programs under which information of this kind is being gathered, evaluated, and distributed. We do not know their extent, however, and we are concerned that there does not seem to be any central clearinghouse to which consumers can turn for this information. We are, therefore, sending you the enclosed questionnaire in an attempt to compile an inventory of these programs and to determine whether additional activities along these lines would be justified. We would be most grateful if you would have someone on your staff complete our questionnaire according to the enclosed instructions and return it by July 25 to Howard Seltzer, Room 435, Old Executive Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20503. If you have questions, please address them to Mr. Seltzer, at 755-8875. And thanks, Sincerely,  fred E. Kahn visor to the President on Inflation Enclosure Mr. G. William Miller Chairman, Federal Reserve System 20th & Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20551   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ther Peterson dvisor to the President on Consumer Affairs  •  INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING CONSUMER SERVICES INFORMATION QUESTIONNAIRE Attached is a questionnaire to identify programs in the Federal government that gather, evaluate, and/or disseminate comparative cost and quality information on consumer services. Please use a separate questionnaire for each Trogram. A.  Definitions  1. Examples of consumer services include: health care and health insurance; legal and accounting services (including tax preparation, financial counseling and/or management); banking, lending and credit; auto repair, financing, and insurance; residential maintenance, rental, sales and financing; appliance maintenance; personal care (including cosmetic services, laundry and cleaning, shoe repair, and physical fitness and sports instruction and facilities); food away from home; vocational and avocational instruction; and child care. 2. The services information activities that you should include are: Gathering and/or evaluating and/or disseminating to consumers specific comparative information on the cost and/or the quality of identified local, individual service providers. B.  Response Instructions  Part I. Include the name title, and phone number of the questionnaire. If your agency information programs, complete questionnaire.  of your agency and the name, person completing the does not have any services Part I and return the  Part II. Item 1. Please supply the name and phone number of a person who can provide more detailed information about the program. Item 2. Specify whether the program is financed by grants or contracts, or is administered in-house and indicate the annual funding level for each year of operation. Item 3. Include the date on which the program began and (if applicable) the date on which it ended, and the current status--e.g., is it still receiving Federal support? State or local government or foundation support? Is it self-supporting? Inactive?   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  44,z 11111R111•••"-  •  •  2 y, 7  Item 4. Describe the activity briefly, including the target and population, objectives, methods of gathering information (e.g., consumer surveys, provider surveys, rigged cars) and evaluating it, and methods of disseminating information to consumers. Enclose samples of materials used if possible.  0 4V)  W  • f•S' ,  Item 5. Identify the person who performed the evaluation of the activity, the result of the evaluation, and, especially, any measurable effect on consumers or the marketplace (e.g., mass media publicity of good and/or bad providers, changes in business volume, official enforcement action against substandard providers).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Mir  Please return to: Howard Seltzer Esther Peterson's Office Room 435, Old Executive Office Building Washington, DC 20503  F04;  -  AO  CONSUMER SEOCE INFORMATION QUESTIONNIKE (Please complete one questionnaire for each of your agency's programs.)  ion -  Part I  sc ' NO  twa 1.  Department or Agency  2.  Preparer (Name)  (Title)  (Phone)  3. If your agency has no services information programs, please check here / / and return the questionnaire. Otherwise, proceed to Part II. Part II 1.  Name of Program Contact Person  2.  Is this program supported: by grant  in-house  by contract  01111111011MW-  If the program is by grant or contract, who is the grantee or contractor? (Name, address, and phone number)  What is the annual level of funding? 3.  What is the duration and current status of the program?  4.  Briefly describe the activity (please see instructions).  5. Has the program been evaluated? results.  If so, describe the  Please return to: Howard Seltzer, Esther Peterson's Office, Room 435, Old Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  July 18, 1979  The Honorable Bob Sorgland Secretary of Agriculture Washington, D. C. 20250 Dear Bob:  The Federal Masers* Board is pleased to participate in the 1980 Combined Federal Campaign and I will be happy to serve as Chairman for the Board's program. Mr. John M. issikler, Staff Director for Mammgoment, will serve as Vice Chairmen for our CFC Drive. Mr. Dolklor is located in Soma 16-2047 and his telephone number is 452-3764. Sincerely,  MR/tn bcc:  Mrs. Mallardi (2) Mr. Denkler Ms. Hobbs  WH #66   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  ;  r  130ARD THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  E ;-‘  i  1919 JUL 1 6 r1  59  July 12, 1979 r 771 -7  "  r  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  It is a pleasure to announce The Honorable Bob Bergland, Secretary of Agriculture, has agreed to serve as Chairman of the Combined Federal Campaign for the National Capital Area this fall. The solicitation efforts of the United Way of the National Capital Area, the National Health Agencies, and the International Service Agencies are combined into a single drive to meet the needs of more than 150 local, national, and international health, welfare, and social service agencies in this one drive. These organizations deserve our wholehearted support, to enable them to provide assistance to our neighbors and friends who have special needs. By working through the Combined Federal Campaign we can provide the voluntary agencies a beacon of hope for providing the needed assistance. The Combined Federal Campaign offers a unique opportunity through a once a year gift--a pledge made easier through the use of voluntary payroll deductions--for Federal personnel to help persons in our community, in our Nation, and in overseas lands. I am confident Mr. Bergland will have your wholehearted support in this endeavor. Additionally, I hope you will commend the campaign with its payroll deduction feature to Federal employees and military personnel in your organization. I request that you serve personally as Chairman of the Combined Federal Campaign in your organization and appoint one of your top assistants as your Vice Chairman. Please advise Mr. Bergland of the person you designate as your Vice Chairman.  IIM1111111111111."-  •  ;••:*  11  •  y   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r  ,-=  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT:19 j1_11_  -5 fr  148  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  r,;471 -r  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF SELECTED DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Review of Plans to Eliminate Waste and Fraud in Government Programs  We have completed our assessment of the plans submitted by Executive departments and agencies to eliminate waste and fraud in government programs. The plans have been reviewed by both management and budget staff at OMB. We have also shared the plans with the Department of Justice. The plans generally represent reasonable approaches which should continue to receive support by the agencies. Based on our review of these plans as well as the more elaborate plans that were required of the Inspector General agencies, we have developed some general guidelines which we believe will be useful to you in assuring that your acti vities to eliminate waste and fraud are as effective as poss ible: •  Agency anti-fraud and waste plans should be coordinated with other program and management evaluation activities of the agency to take full advantage of the strengths of each involved unit and to avoid duplication.  •  Agencies should consider undertaking fraud and abuse prevention surveys such as those conducted by some of the Inspector General agencies. (Agriculture and HUD have conducted such surveys and may have helpful advice to offer.)  •  Agency vulnerability assessments generally can be strengthened by specifically identifying the activiti es that are most vulnerable, assessing the sources of vulnerability, and determining corrective actions. Agencies should then set specific priorities for action among identified areas of vulnerability and consider addressing these particular priorities as part of a positive program, rather than using a more generalized approach to preventing and detecting fraud and waste.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 In line with the high priority the President has placed on government-wide efforts to eliminate fraud, waste, and mismanagement, on May 3, 1979, he established the Executive Group to Combat Fraud and Waste in Government. While this Group is composed primarily of statutory Inspectors General, much of the subject matter it will address will be of interest and benefit to non-IG agencies as well. One of the key issues the Group will be addressing is how it will relate to and provide for participation by non-member agencies. The Group is a potential source of valuable assistance for your agency. We will continue to work with you and from time to time exchange information to assure that our mutual efforts are effective. My staff and others who assisted in the review of your plans will be available to elaborate on the guidance in this memorandum or to discuss your particular plan further. Please contact Howard M. Messner, Assistant Director for Management Improvement and Evaluation, if you have any questions or would like to discuss any of the points we have raised.  Deputy Director cc:  Honorable Benjamin R. Civiletti Deputy Attorney General  •  BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE  FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM •  WASHINGTON,O.C. 20551 •••4*  OFFICE OF THE VICE CHAIRMAN  ;• * • /?AL RES°1 • • ..• ••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  July 31, 1979  The Honorable Esther Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs The White House Washington, D. C. Dear Ms. Peterson: Thanks for your letter and the description of your Consumer's Resource Handbook. It looks like a valuable reference work and one that is responsive to consumer needs. As you may know, the Board has recently published a Consumer Handbook to Credit Protection Laws. Enthusiastic response from consumers to this publication, which culminated a series of 10 pamphlets on the consumer credit laws, required its reprinting in a quantity of two million, an undertaking which severely strained our budget. Still on our agenda is a publication to explain consumer rights under the Electronic Funds Transfer Act. During the past year, the Board and Reserve Banks intensified their campaigns to inform consumers of their credit protections, with a new series of consumer workshops, production of a school curriculum package and a movie on credit rights, and experimentation with new techniques in distribution and marketing of materials to reach a wider consumer audience. Sponsorship with the White House and other agencies of the first Consumer Education Fair in April proved to be a valuable experience for us both in broadening our horizons on consumer problems and in designing our overall consumer education strategy and commitment for the coming years. This strategy must, as you can appreciate, place its emphasis on the credit education which is our responsibility in implementing major protection laws. Thus, while we are extremely impressed with the merit of your project, we are constrained both by budgetary considerations and the need to continue on our planned program to fulfill this primary responsibility.  -•   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The Honorable Esther Peterson  -2-  I am pleased that our Consumer Affairs Division was able to supply some support in the drafting of your Handbook, and we stand rcndy to give you whatever other editorial assistance we can. Sincerely,  Frederick H. Schultz  ;  WH-64  4.  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  •  I  I. , •  1  1•  L  1973SP?6 r" 9: 19 177 -r  I.  4  June 18, 1979  Dear Chairman Miller: For some time, The U. S. Office of Consumer Affairs has worked closely with a number of Federal agencies in a cooperative effort to publish a unique document. The result is the Consumer's Resource Handbook which is designed to direct the public to the best sources of help with consumer problems, and to reduce the vast volume and costs of misdirected inquiries and complaints that pour into federal offices. The Handbook will be ready for distribution by midsummer. In order to achieve the enormous potential benefits -not just for the public, but also for Federal agencies -we need to disseminate the publication free to as many people as possible; to do this, we need your help. We are in the process of accumulating a multi-agency funding pool to cover the costs of printing. Because agency -specific information services and methods of consumer complaint handling are enumerated and described, we are asking each agency for financial support. Our goal is to distribute five million copies of the Handbook over the next 18 months. The preface of the Handbook will contain a statement from the President. Following the President's remarks, we have reserved space for a message from you which will appear on the copies for distribution by your agency and for your own internal use. Please take a few minutes to look over the attached description of the Handbook; we think you will like the product. During the next few weeks, Esther will contact   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  you to explain the project further, show you a draft of the publication and answer any questions you may have. We appreciate your cooperation and support. Sincerely,  Jac H. Watson, Jr. Se retary to the Cabinet and ssistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs  Esther Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs  Enclosure  1111111•11.0"'  The Honorable G. William Miller Chairman Federal Reserve System Washington, D.C. 20551   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  •  CONSUMER'S RESOURCE HANDBOOK  Description wilmorr.  The Consumer's Resource Handbook has been designed to inform consumers of the best ways to handle problems with goods and services and tells where to go for help with such  imam,  common problems involving auto repair, airline overbooking, false advertising and many more.  The Handbook describes a  variety of mechanisms available to consumers for assisting with the satisfactory resolution of consumer problems, including state and local consumer agencies, small claims courts,  t1.4%  Better Business Bureaus, consumer arbitration panels, Federal agencies (where appropriate), action lines, legal service agencies, and others.  How It's Organized  0••i!t••  The Handbook consists of three main sections: (1)  A primer of complaint handling outlining numerous  complaint resolution procedures to be followed, and descriptions of both governmental and non-governmental sources of help such as those listed above.  This section gives basic information  (such as a sample complaint letter pointing out what information should be included) as well as more sophisticated information,  LL_  such as an explanation of small claims courts and how to use  P  4113 '...11•  them.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  A chart highlighting general complaint handling Procedures,  ink&  2  agencies and organizations that can provide help, and various options open to consumers, is also included in this section.  (2)  A listina with descriptions of Federal consumer  offices arranged by topics ranging from "advertising" to hmier "warranties". wise  Federal offices having jurisdiction or other-  aling with these topical areas are described under each  heading.  Addresses and phone numbers (including toll-free  numI- rs) are given, and a key and legend system tells readers if agencies will handle consumer complaints; if they can merely provide information; if they collect consumer complaint data but will only act when a broad public interest will be served if these data point to generic, safety or other problems with a particular product; and references to other listed related agencies or regional offices.  This section explains which agencies should be contacted, when, and under what circumstances for consumer information or assistance with problems.  A listing of Federal Regional offices is also included in this section and is referred to when these offices are the most appropriate sources of help.  Consumer tips on a number of products and services are given throughout this section to help avoid or resolve common consumer problems.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  There are tips on:  .1 •  • 3  ADVERTISING APPLIANCES BANKING AND CREDIT CLOTHING AND FABRICS DRUGS FUNERALS  (3)  HOUSING INVESTMENTS MAIL ORDERS MOTOR VEHICLES TRANSPORTATION WARRANTIES  A directory of state and local government consumer  offices ]isting some 800 offices and agencies where consumers  can turn for information or for help in resolving complaints. An introduction to this section explains what these offices generally do, and how readers can contact them.  In addition  to inclusion of what might be referred to as "traditional" consumer offices, the Handbook also lists offices dealing with specific subject areas including state offices on aging, energy, insurance, state chartered banks, transportation and utilities, and weights and measures.  innomilmorea.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  OM.  •  r  THE WHITE HOUSE WAS  June 14, 1979  - •,  1273n 122 r". • 410 CFT1,7  Dear Mr.1er: I am writing to ask your help in a project that will enable Federal agencies to be more responsive to citizens, and insure that those who look to government for help will more likely find assistance. The project is the Consumer's Resource Handbook, a publication we have developed with the cooperation of many Federal agencies, including the Federal Reserve Board, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Comptroller of the Currency, National Credit Union Admonistration and the Federal Home Loan Bank Board. The Handbook is a guide to Federal services, and is written specifically to help individuals locate the service that will most likely help solve their problem. A side benefit of the Handbook will be a reduction in the volume and cost of misdirected inquiries and complaints the consumer now sends to the Federal government. The help I need is to be able to distribute this publication free to reach as many people as possible. Recently, Dan Rumelt of my office met with Joe Sims and Naomi Salus of your staff to discuss our efforts to accumulate a multi-agency fund to cover printing costs, and they can fill you in on the details. We are asking for this help because governmentwide consumer complaint handling and information services are enumerated and described in the Handbook, and we are certain you will agree that this publication will be a great resource for both government agencies and the public. The President has given his support for this project and his comments will be the preface for the Handbook. Following his remarks, we have reserved space for a message from you which will appear on the copies for use within your agency and which are distributed by your agency.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  Mr. G. William Milk  2  I hope you will take a few minutes to look over the enclosed description of the Handbook and that you will be able to extend your support for this wor while cooperative effort. Sin  ely,  sther Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs  The Honorable G. William Miller Chairman, Board of Governors Federal Reserve System 20th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20551 • •• •  Enclosure ripMEM•••  cc: Mr. Joseph Sims Special Assistant to the Board Office of Public Affairs Federal Reserve System 20th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20551 Ms. Naomi Salus Senior Staff Assistant Office of Public Affairs Federal Reserve System 20th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20551   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .••••••..  •  ._  111-• 11111Mlise  ...=••■•••••  CONSUMER'S RESOURCE HANDBOOK  Description  The Consumer's Resource Handbook has been designed to inform consumers of the best ways to handle problems with goods and services and tells where to go for help with such common problems involving auto repair, airline overbooking, false advertising and many more.  The Handbook describes a  variety of mechanisms available to consumers for assisting with the satisfactory resolution of consumer problems, including state and local consumer agencies, small claims courts Better Business Bureaus, consumer arbitration panels, Federal agencies (where appropriate), action' lines, legal service agencies, and others.  How It's Organized  The Handbook consists of three main sections: (1)  A primer of complaint handling outlining numerous  complaint resolution procedures to be followed, and descriptions of both governmental and non -governmental sources of help such as those listed above.  This section gives basic information  (such as a sample complaint letter pointing out what information should be included) as well as more sophisticated information, such as ,an explanation of small claims courts and how to use them.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A chart highlighting general complaint handling procedures,  .1 .0., Vtie 001  • -2-  agencies and orcanizations that can provide help, and various options open to consumers, is also included in this section.  (2)  A listino with descriptions of Federal consumer  offices arranged by topics ranging from "advertising" to "warranties".  Federal offices having jurisdiction or other-  wise dealing with these topical areas are described under each heading.  Addresses and phone numbers (including toll-free  numbers) are given, and a key and legend system tells readers if agencies will handle consumer complaints; if they can merely provide information; if they collect consumer complaint data  re';:r1 111111••••••  but will only act when a broad public interest will be served if these data point to generic, safety or other problems with a particular product; and references to other listed related agencies or regional offices. 0•••••••••-•-•  This section explains which agencies should be contacted, when, and under what circumstances for consumer information or assistance with problems.  A listing of Federal Regional offices is also included in this section and is referred to when these offices are the most appropriate sources of help.  Consumer tips on a number of products and services are given throughout this section to help avoid or resolve Common consumer problems.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  There are tips on:  iimmum•  •  S 3  ADVERTISING APPLIANCES BANKING AND CREDIT CLOTHING AND FABRICS DRUGS FUNE PALS  (3)  HOUSING INVESTMENTS MAIL ORDERS MOTOR VEHICLES TRANSPORTATION WARRANTIES  A directory of state and local government consumer  offices listing some 800 offices and agencies where consumers can turn for information or for help in resolving complaints. An introduction to this section explains what these offices generally do, and how readers can contact them.  In addition  to inclusion of what might be referred to as "traditional" consumer offices, the Handbook also lists offices dealing with specific subject areas including state offices on aging, energy, insurance, state chartered banks, transportation and utilities, and weights and measures.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .7;A   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  June 22, it?"  Ne• Julia Wang 32211C Niesessburrettst bitiess.L vs Vsebbmbie, De Cie SOON Dear Sae illatialitt In lespoiss your nemorisiata aim 14, 1979, subject: Piepesed liempssey ibindiss Tuipiiisturs Seetrietions Itele restored tbe peepesed esiostellaiso sad find Progrea4 diet MI bore me eamest WA* =gee& to thetetimigeou *repose indiceptlee4 se see plowed le taboo pia thalt She ere beibiltess mieed by the timed of eleveteeee iparettilivithin the peemmetsee at fm.th in the prepOSOS goidaleme for biotin, cooliazi and domestic hot voter. Simeeraly, (Signed) John M. Denkier  Jobs K. Dodder bee: Mt.. laderson Mirs Grizzard HaLiar& (41.63) New adobe  aWumucjs   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  June 20. 1979  Ms. Julie Rattner Room 3224C 20 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 20585 Dear Ms. Rattner: In tiix. to your memorandum of June 14, 1979, subject: Proposed Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions Program, we furnish herewith the information you have requested. The Board of Governors owns and operates the following properties: a.  Board of Governors Building, 20th & Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C.  b.  Board of Governors Martin Building (annex), 20th & C Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C.  Our comments on the proposed regulations will be submitted by June 22, 1979. :1it4 -tp (Signed) Jo::n  Denkler  John M. Denkler bcc:  Mr. Anderson Mr. Grizzard Mrs. Mallardi (WH-63) Ms. Hobbs  DEAnderson:dj  U.DEPARTMENT OF ENERG 'DATE:  memorandurr  June 14, 1979 r •'!  REPLY TO ATTN OF:  — --Proposed Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions Program . .  SUE3JECT:  Heads of Agencies  TO  6,3 .8  A special Task Force has been set up at the Department of Energy to implement the Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions Program. Under the Program, you will be responsible for assuring your agency's building and facilities personnel are informed of the Program's requirements. A copy of the June 1, 1979, Federal Register Notice, in which the proposed regulations were published, is attached for your review and comment. Comments on the proposed regulations are due by June 22, 1979. It is important to note that the proposed rules will be applicable to all Federal buildings and facilities, and they will take precedent over the President's April 10, 1979, Memorandum to Heads of Agencies. Subpart G -- Investigations, Violations, Sanctions, and Judicial Actions -- is applicable to all operators of Federal buildings. Violations of the Program are subject to civil penalties up to $5,000 for each violation. In order to help us distribute the necessary information and forms tS you, please send us the total number of buildings which your agency by the number occupies nationwide. This figure should be broken IS of buildings that the agency owns, the number that are leased from GSA, and the number that are leased from privately-owned companies. This information should be sent no later than June 20, 1979 to: Ms. Julie Rattner Room 3224C 20 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20585 202-376-4476 We appreciate your cooperation. erely,  Federa  y, Directo Program Bran  Attachment  DOE FORM AD-10A   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (12-77)  78-1520M   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A :7  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE .PRESIDENT OFFICE CF MANAGEMENT ANINkyjWt.F  :05  NASH INGTON. D.C. 20503  IT 177"- rr 7  JUN 18 W9  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Advisory Committee Reduction  In transmitting the Seventh Annual Report on Federal Advisory Committees to the Congress, the President announced in his letter of March 23, 1979, that the total number of advisory committees was 816 at the end of 1978, a reduction of 59 from the number at the beginning of the year. The total reduction, from the 1,159 at the beginning of 1977, is a substantial achievement of the objectives to assure that unnecessary committees are terminated and new committees are established only when they are essential to meet the responsibilities of the Government. In the last six months, the number of new advisory committees has begun to rise again. I hope you will redouble your efforts this year to keep advisory committee numbers under tight control.  2  J mes ' T. 41,/ /1n7re, rector  r.  N EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSIO WASHINGTON, D. C. 20506 June 14, 1979  ) ) 44' C) •I  MEMORANDUM OFFICE OF THE CHAIR   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4'  -1  -•••  0:1 '711  TO:  'All Heads of Agencies  f(q1-4  FROM:  Eleanor Holmes Norton Chair  EL:  Order 12067 Request for Comment on Draft Executive Annual Report  comment a draft annual report of I am submitting for your review and lementing Executive Order 12067. the efforts of this Commission in imp coordinate all Federal governThe Order requires this Commission to grams and to transmit an annual ment equal employment opportunity pro ss in early July each year. The report to the President and the Congre provide Federal agencies an n sio mis Com the t tha es uir req o als er Ord ore final submission. I have bef ort rep the on t men com to ty uni opport ed interagency coordination rov app our and er Ord ive cut Exe the ed attach procedures for your information. transmitted within 15 working All comments from agencies should be days, or by July 9, 1979. Please direct comments to: Francesta E. Farmer, Director Office of Interagency Coordination sion Equal Employment Opportunity Commis 2401 E Street, N. W. 20506 Washington, D.C. Attachments   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  June 13, 1979  NI. Imuld A. Kienlen MMeoutive Office of the President Office of Management and Budget Washington, D.C. 20503 Dear Hr. Kienlen: In reply to your letters of March 8, 1979, and Occupational bay 29, 1979, eliciting our comments regarding we have Safety and Health Programa for redeye' Bmployees, reviewed the order and find we have no comments. We do, however, continue to endorse and support both the letter and the spirit of these programs. Sincerely yours,  John M. Denkler Staff Director bee:I/Mrs. Mallardi Mr. Anderson Ms. Hobbs JD:sep   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ------  -  -  •••  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  GENERAL COUNSEL  May 29, 1979  Honorable G. William Miller Chairman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Washington, D. C. 20551 Dear Mr. Chairman: We have not received your comments on a proposed Executive order entitled "Occupational Safety and Health On March 8, 1979, we P_ro_grania_for_Federal EHI3IO-S-7-7 mailed a copy of that proposal to you. The period for comment has been extended for two weeks. If you have any comments they should be received no later than Tuesday, June 12, 1979. Comments may be submitted to this office (395-5600).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r. Ronald A. Kienlen of  Sincerely,  Lailaw  ?41 )2,chkeil_ M. Nichols  William General Counsel  r  LT7=mmglimimirmo.  „-•  EXECUTIVE OFFICE CF THE PRESIDENP ,  T  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET s  4.  ri  S .17: . r • e 3  4 N%-.2  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  ,  GENERAL COUNSEL  March 8, 1979  Honorable G. William Miller Chairman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Washington, D. C. 20551  MEL  Dear Mr. Chairman: Enclosed is a proposed Executive order entitled "Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.” In accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 11030, as amended, it was submitted to this office by the Department of Labor. On behalf of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, I would appreciate receiving any commen..t.s you may have concerning this proposal. If you have any comments or objections they should be received no later than Thursday, April 19, 1979. Comments or inquiries may be submitted by telephone to Mr. Ronald A. Kienlen of this office (395-5600). Sincerely,  e )12.i2M William M. Nichols General Counsel Enclosure   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • a  oil• • I• I im• •••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  %iszr•or ofrr tAreed#09  A  ll,DEPARTMENT OF LABOR  piakzelm  OFF,CE OF THE SECRE7ARY WASriiNGTON ••'"  •  /44A"P MAR  197  MEMORANDUM FOR JAMES MCINTYRE (z-211  FROM:  RAY MARSHALL  SUBJECT:  Federal Workplace Safety and Health  I am very concerned about our poor record in preventing job-related accidents and illnesses among Federal workers. A few facts should put this problem in perspective: --yore than $1 billion annually goes to pay compensation and related costs for Federal workers because of accident and illness. --The number of workdays lost by Federal workers because of job-related reasons more than doubled between 1973 and 1977. The number of illnesses and injuries. has gone up by about 50 percent in the same period. Injury rates in the private sector have declined during the same period. The economic costs of this problem are obvious. But there are other problems, as well. The business community has been quick to note that we vigorously enforce OSHA standards in the private sector but do not appear to do so within the Federal government. They contend that this double standard is inequitable. This attitude erodes the commitment to voluntary compliance that is at the heart of the OSHA program.  r,,, •  11. L.,  11%  , rV"', P;h  110  EXECUTIVE ORDER  Occupational Safety And realLh Programs for Federal Employees The Federal Government, as the largest employer in the United States, has a sperind obligation to set an exa:ple for the Nation by providing safe and healthful employment and places of employment for its empl oyees. For more than seven years, the Federal Governme nt has been seeking to carry out this obligati on under the terms of two Executive Orders (11612 issued in 1971 and its successor 11807 issued in 1974). Both Orders were base d upon the authority of the President as Chief Executiv e and were issued to further the purposes and the implemen tation of the comprehensive Occupational Safety and lIcalth Act of 1970 as well as section 7902(c) of title 5, Unit ed States Code. Progress has been made since the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 but it has been limited and sporadic. Too many agencies have made only minimal efforts to provide safe and healthfu l wor!:places even though the increased knowledge of health hazards and the need for their control make it cle r that additional effort will be necessary. This new Order is being issuitd to reflect our firm commitment to making public service in the Federal Government a safe and heal thful occupation for our civilian and military personnel. The provisions of this Order are intended to ensu re that agency heads manage their operritions in a manner that provides their employees safe and healthful empl oyment and places of employment, and to ensure that agency htads are provided with the direction and assistance on methods, procedures and technical considerations necessary to .manag e in this manner. I expect agency heads and all manageme nt officials, consistent with this Order and the management impr ovement provisions of the Civ7. 7 1 Service Reform Act of 1972, to take safety and health needs into account when formulating mana gement policy, and in particular any recommendations of the Secretary ot Labor. I expect the Secretary of Labor, consistent with this Order, to provide the impetus for renewed agency efforts, working with the Federal Advisory Council cn Occupational Safety and Health, the Administrator of the General Services Administration and the Executive Office of the Pres ident. I also expect all employees and their represen tatives to actively participate in these efforts, cons istent with this Order and other labor relations policies .   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  , pmegow...  .' •  • T51:REFOT 1)y virtue of the anthorr vested in me Prcid,!nt of the United Staten, and Chief Executive, and • alf,o in ordor to carry out the provisions of section 19 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and the provisions of section 7(;02. (c)(1) of title 5 of the United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows: Scope of This Order SECT:ON 1. This Order applies to all agencies of the E::ecutivo Branch of the Governmr2nt. For the Purposes of this Order, the term "agency" means an Executive Department, as defied in 5 U.S.C. 101, or any employing unit or authority of the Executive Branch not within an Executive Department. In addition, since the Occupational Safety and Health Act ("the Act") covers all Federal employees, the Socretary of Labor ("the Secretary") shall cooperate and consult with the heads of 2.eneics in the Legislative ard Judifal Branches of the Go\,ernment to aid them in adopting safety and health programs consistent with those of agencies to which this Order is ap?licable. This Order covers all employees of covered agencies, both civilian and military, consistent with the porpose of the Act to provide comnrehensive protection to all employees in the Nation; but the Secretary shall postpone the exercise of his authority under this Order during the conduct of military maneuvers and similar military activities. Duties of Heads of Agencies SECTION 1 The head of each agency, after consultation with the representatives of the employees thereof, shall: (1) Establish, maintain and implement an occupational safety and health program in accordance with the requirements of this Order and the mandatory regulations of the Secretary issued pursuant thereto, and furnish to employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. (2) Designate or appoint, to be responsible for the management and administration of the agency occupational safety and health program, an agency official with sufficient authority to represent effectively the interest and support of the agency head. (3) Require budgetary identification for the agency's occupational safety and health program with a plan for distribution of the resources throughout all levels of the agency. Indicate resources for the program as a separate item in budget presentations to OMB.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  f.  (0  mnnsgean( Establish an occup::r:ional iliclude the maintemnce ment inForition Cy!;LiTh which of such records of occupational accidents, iniuries, illn2sses such and their causes, and thr cc:.pilat ion anri trnnsnitta1 of rereports bar;ed upon this information, as the Secretary may quire pursuant to section 3 of the Order.  MOO  under (5) Comply with all applicable standards issued dures Section 6 of the Act, except where, riursuant to proce r and standards similiar to those provjded for private secto temporary emnlo . -icrs under that section of the Aot or permaimn: variances, the Secretary approves complianec:. Witt alter-late standards. In addition, agency heads ara encouraged to adopt standard- to protect employees from hazards nut covered by Section 6 standards. (6) Assure prompt attention Lo rc;ports by employees ; conditions and : or others of unsafe or unhealthful workin: assure prompt abatement of any unsafe or unhealthful working condir_ions discovered throucYh this or any other meons, includin those conditions involving facilities and/or equipment furnished by another Government agency, informing the Secretary of significant difficulties encountered in this regard. (7) Ensure that needcd safeguards are incluec-d in the agency occupational safcty and health program to ensure tnat ion, no employee is subject to restraint, interference, coerc partidiscrimination cr reprisal by virtue of such employee's program, cipation in the agency occupational safety and health lthful including the filing of a report of an unsafe or unhea or working conditiz,n, the initiation of any proceeding under mony related to this program, participation fpv comment or testi in such 7roceeding, or the exercise by such employee on his or her own behalf or that of others of any other right: afforded by section 19 of the Act, this Order or he Secretary's regulations. by (8) Assure periodic inspections of agency workplaces nize personnel with sufficienr technical competence to recog laces; unsafe and unhealthful working conditions in such workp ng and assure prompt abatement of unsafe or unhealthful worki those conditions discovered through this means, including another involving facilities and/or equipment furnished by ficant Government agency, informing the Secretary of signi difficulties encountered in this regard.  , 1111111111111111m  (9) Provide adequate safety and health training for superofficials at the different management levels, including cc:cu: . avisory employees, employees responsible for conducting   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 o.••••.•om..  S  _ional safety and her-21th inspect- ions, and other employees. Such training shall inciu-_le dis:;(•!Amition of informntion concerning t-he oDerarion of the ar,ency occupational ,safety31) 1 health program and the means by which each such peJ:5on may participate and assist in the operation of that proL;rm. (10) Submit to the Secretary on an annual basis a report containing such information as the Secretary shall prescribe. (11) Cooperate with and assist the Fecretary in the performance of his duties under section 19 of the Act and sections 3 and 4 of this Order. Duties of the Secretary of Labor SECTION 3.  The Secretary shall:  (1) Naintain a liason with the Executive Orace of the President in matters relating to this Order, and provide leadership and guidance to the heads of agencies to assist them in fulfilling their occupational safety and health responsibilities. (2) Issue detailed and flexible regUlations to assist l agencies in establishing and operating effective occpationa n1-iRre -o their individual safcfr7 and hc-1" r -"• a7-n-r. missions, sizes, and organizations. Such regulations shall reflect the recuircment of section 19 of the Act for consultation with employee representatives. to (3) Prescribe recordkeeping and reportinc, requirements enable agencies to assist the ScretarY in rilePtin,j the require Lents imposed upon him by section 19(b) and section 24 of the Act. (4) Provide leadership and guidance to agencies in the occupational safety and health training of their personnel. Assist agencies in couiplying with their duties under section for the agencies 2(9) of this Order by coductirj where the Secretar:. deems necessary and appropriate, upon request and reim3ursement for the expenses incurred. (5) Facilitate the exchange of ideas and information throughout the Government with respect to matters of occupational safaty and health through such arrangements as the Secretary deems appropriate, including but not limited to, the estaolishment and continuance of Field Federal Safety and Health Councils. (6) Provide technical services to agencies, where the Secretary deems necessary and appropriate, to study the causes of accidents, injuries and illnesses, to identify spcfcific unsafe or unhezI1Crful working conditions, and to   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  _  •  .evaluate te erfee:ivenes of a;;e:;cy safety and health protection!; v;th respect to such causr!s or working conditions. Such servic may be perfrmr.d upon request of an . (1ency win reimbu7.-:,emctnt for the (xperles incurred by the Secretary, or at the initiative of the Secretary pursuani_ to his responsibilities and authority under this Order. (7) Evaluate the occupatiomi safety and hcalth progr=s of agencies, and submit to the President reports of such evaluntions (or sulmaries of the reports), together with agency res?onsPs. t'nreto.. These evaluations shall be conducted at least once annually for all or selc,ctcd portions of the larger, more hazardous agencies, and as the Secretary deems approl) - rite for all othr--r. agencies, throl_wh such headquarters or field reviews as the Secretary decas necessary.  low  (8) Sdbnit .to the PreL;id:-nt each year a slmrnar7 report of the status of the Federal agency occupational safety and health program, as well as analyses of imlividual agency progress and problems in correcting unsafe and unhealthful working conditions, together with recomndations for ilriproving their performInce. Authority of the Secretary of Labor SE'TIO:1 4. In csarryin7, cut his responsibilities under section 19 of the Act and section 3 of this Order, the Secretary 1.3 authorized: (1) To enter without advance notice or delav and at reasonable timps any factory, plant, establishm2nt, construction site, or Ether area, workplace cr environment of an agency where work is performed by an employee of an agency. (2) To inspect and investigate during regular working hours and at ocher reasonable times, and within reasonable limits and in a reasonable manner, any place of employment of an agency and all pertinent conditions, structmres, machines, apparatus, devices, equipment, and materials therein, and to cuestion privately any employee or employee representative. Subject to regulations issued by the Secretary, a representative of the employer and a representative(s) authorized by his employees shall be given an opportunity to accomperty the Secretary or his designee during such an inspection. Unere there is no authorized employee representative, the Secretary or his designee shall consult with a reasonable number of employees concerning matters of health and safety in the workplace.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5 -t  f•  (3) To invti;-,ate i-;ny alietion by on employee covered by this CI- C.cr or by a rc:,rescntative of such =ployees of the e:dst,ince of a workl)l -lor, hazard or that the aL;ency is not rroting its responsibilities under this Order or as contained in the regulations published purt to section 3 of this Order. This provision shall not apply to unifor-med members of the Armed Forces on active duty status. (4) To prescribe such rules and rrgulations as he may deem necessary Lo carry out his respom:iWilities under this Cho manner in section, including regulations dealinT. which insp2ctions and investigtions authorized under this section are to be conducted. Federal Adv'.sory Comcil on Occ-inntiorr:1 Safety and Health SECTION 5(1) The Federal Advisor y Council on Occupational Safety and Health, established pursuant to Executive Order 11612, is hereby continued. It shall advise the secretary in carrying out responsibilities under the Order. The Council shall consist of sixteen members appointed by the Secretary and shall include, eight representatives of Federal a7,ncies and eight represenLatives of labor orunizations 11E:present1ng Federal employees. The members shall serve for three-year terms with the tc--ms of five or six members expirins each year, provided this Council is renewed every two years in accordance h the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The members cu. _ntly serving on the Council shall be deemed to be its initial members under this Order and their terms shall expire in accordance with the terms of their appointment. (2) The Secretary, or a designee, shall serve as the aairpcIrson of the Council, and shall prescribe such rules for the conduct of its business as deemed necessary and appropri:Ite. (3) The Secretary shall space and furnish the Council and staff services, and shall respect of the Council as may Advisory Committee Act.  make available necessary office necessary equipment, supplies, perform such functions with be required by the Federal  Effect on Other Powers and Duties ' t •  SECTION 6. Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or alter the powers and duties of the Secretary or heads of other Federal agencies pursuant to section 19 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Chapter 71 of   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6  • •  t:it.e 5 of the uniOd .)tritzes Code as a-!en dedlik the Civil 'Service R.2foim Act of 1973,F se,:Lions 7901, 7902, and 703 of title 5 of the 1::litcd Staie!: Code, or any other provision of law, nor shall it he con :rd to alter any other provisions  of la:: o— Execut:ive Order 1r.7ov1ding for collective barTylining agreement!-, and procedures. patters of official leave for employee representatives involved in activities pursurint CO  this order shall 1)a determined between each ancy and these reprusenntives puruant to the procedures under section 7131 of title 5 of the United States Code or applicable collective bargaining agreement. Termination of Existing Order n 1974 o0 SECTION 7. Executive Order Po. 11807 of September ‘.., is hereby superseded.  LILL ‘ ,..r••ev ,  The White House   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Pillamow^  •  7  1_  al COOL Gener Serlies  Information Security Oversight Washillikn, DC 20405 AdrWstration Office  -  15 JUN 1979  r  rr:  Honorable G. William Miller Chairman of the Board Federal Reserve System Washington, D.C. 20551 Dear Mr. Chairman: that originate Section 5-402 of Executive Order 12065 requires that agencies regulations adopted or handle classified information submit a copy of any ight Office. Further, pursuant to the Order to the Information Security Overs ations be published Section 5-402 of the Order requires that unclassified regul in the Federal Register. Order 12065 The information security program established by Executive this correspondence, became effective on December 1, 1978. As of the date of received a copy of the Information Security Oversight Office (IS00) has not the regulations that your agency intends to adopt. Order for promulgation While no definitive date was established by Executive should be in effect of such regulations, it is apparent that such issuances We can only assume, in the six months after the effective date of the Order. office, that your agency absence of your regulation being received in this am established by the has taken no action to place into effect the progr President. y regulations to the President It is our intent to report the status of agenc our report concerning during the first week in July 1979. To insure that final version of your imyour agency is correct, it is requested that the than 2j91 plementing regulation be provided to this office no later enio ngem arra sary neces the Further, it is requested that your agency make Federal Register have the final version of your regulation in the hands of the informed of those no later than September 2, 1979, and that this office be arrangements •  Sincer9ly, "-/  /.4  , Or  AW44"—:: .j11 MICHAEL T. BLOUIN Director   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  July 9, 1979'  Mr. Michael T. Blouin, Director Information Security Oversight Office General Services Administration Washington, D. C. 20405 Dear Mr. Blouin: In response to your letter of June 15, I am pleased to enclose for your information a copy of the Board of Governors' policy statement relating to national security information. As you are aware, the Board of Governors does not have classification authority. We receive classified information primarily from the Central Intelligence Agency, the State Department and the Department of the Treasury. The Board's policy and implementing instructions have been established in strict accordance with the national security information regulations of these agencies. In addition, these departments conduct periodic reviews of our security arrangements and procedures for handling their classified materials. The Board's policy statement relating to national security information is consistent with Executive Order 12065. Sincerely,  Signed) John M. Denkler, John M. Denkler Staff Director Enclosure JMD/JMH:laj WH-#61 bcc:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Mrs. Mallardi Mr. Grizzard Mr. Henry Ms. Hobbs Mr, Garwood Ms. Kelsey  •  •  NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION POLICY BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  I.  POLICY  The national security information policy of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System shall operate consistent with Executive Order 12065. II.  PROGRAM  The Associate Director for Building Services in the Division of Support Services is designated as the Board's official responsible for the implementation and oversight of its information security program. Questions, suggestions, and complaints regarding all elements of this program will be directed to this individual who will be solely responsible for changes to the program and for assuring that it is at all times consistent with Executive Order 12065. The Associate Director serves as the Board's official contact for requests for declassification of materials in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order 12065, regardless of the point of origin of such requests. The position has general responsibility for assuring (in coordination with the Deputy Secretary of the Board) that requests submitted under the Freedom of Information Act are handled in accordance with that Act and the declassification request submitted under the provisions of Executive Order 12065 are acted upon within 60 days of receipt. III.  PROCEDURES A.  Mandatory Review  A mandatory review procedure has been established to handle requests by a member of the public, by a government employee, or by an agency, to declassify and release information. In coordination with the Deputy Secretary of the Board, all requests for mandatory review shall be handled by the Associate Director for Building Services or a designee. Under no circumstances shall the Associate Director and/or the Deputy Secretary of the Board refuse to confirm the existence or nonexistence of a document requested under the Freedom of Information Act or the mandatory review provisions of Executive Order 12065, unless the fact of its existence or nonexistence would itself be classified under Executive Order 12065. B.  Handling  Documents bearing the classifications "TOP SECRET," "SECRET," and "CONFIDENTIAL" should be delivered to the International Information Center (IIC), B-1127. The staff of the IIC shall expeditiously deliver such documents   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  2  to the authorized persons whose official duties require knowledge or possession of the particular material. In the event an authorized person or designee is not available to receive such documents, they shall be retained by the IIC and stored in an appropriate fashion until the authorized person or designee is available. The Associate Director for Building Services and other senior officials of the Board are authorized to receive certain classified national security information in accordance with their official responsibilities. All classified documents shall be made available only to those persons or their designees whose official duties justify knowledge or possession of such material. In the event an authorized person or designee is not available to receive such documents, they shall be turned over to the IIC or to the office of the Associate Director for Building Services for storage, unopened, until the authorized person is available. Under no circumstances shall classified materials that are delivered to an authorized person be stored other than in designed containers in IIC or in the Division of Support Services. C.  Reproduction  Classified materials may be reproduced only in accordance with Executive Order 12065, Section 4-4, and any limitations imposed by the originator. Should copies be made, they are subject to the same controls as the original document. Records showing the number and distribution of copies shall be maintained by the handling office and the logs stored with the original documents. These measures shall not restrict reproduction for the purposes of mandatory review. D.  Storage  All classified documents relating to national security information shall be stored in a combination safe located in the Information Center located in the Division of International Finance, B-1127, or in other containers authorized by Executive Order 12065. Combination locks shall be changed as required by ISO() Directive #1, Section IVF5A. The combination of the safe shall be known only to authorized staff of the IIC and appropriate Board security officials. E.  Employee Education  All employees who have been granted a security clearance and who have occasion to handle classified material shall be advised of detailed handling, reproduction and storage procedures, and shall be required to review Executive Order 12065 and appropriate 'SOO directives. F.  Agency Terminology  The Board does not have the authority to classify national security information. Material used at the Federal Reserve Board shall not bear the classification "TOP SECRET,!' "SECRET," or "CONFIDENTIAL" except in relation to information contained within the material that has been classified for national security purposes by a duly authorized agency. The authority to classify this type of information has been reserved to other agencies and departments of the Federal Government.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6 .  $  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  1979 JII! -2. r"  June 29, 1979  Dear Chairman Miller: The President shared with our office your response to his letter of May 16th regarding public participation in the government regulatory process. Esther Peterson is away on vacation, but we did want to let you know that we had received your reply. Our staff is presently reviewing responses from your office, and others, and had already received a note from Janet Hart on this topic. We will be in touch with your office if we have any further comments or questions. I am sure Mrs. Peterson will be very interested in your response since she has followed the Consumer Advisory Council so closely and is familiar with your commitments to regulatory policies that can serve the interest of consumers.  i t::: r—, r41 " " r. ; ' F r I, .. i.  Rodney E./Leonard Deputy Director U.S. Office of Consumer Affairs The Honorable G. William Miller Chairman Federal Reserve System Washington, D.C. 20551   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4.roolak..  •  /r& ,'72 /J//  3   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE  FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM WASHINGTON, D. C. 20551 orric E  OF STAFF DIRECTOR  FOR MANAGEMENT  I 'r•% June 13, 1979  The Honorable James T. McIntyre Director Office of Management and Budget Washington, D. C. 20503 Dear Mr. McIntyre: In response to your memorandum of May 22, this is to inform you that the Board's Legal Division has oversight responsibility for administration of the Privacy Act within the Board of Governors. Mr. Neal Petersen, General Counsel and Director of the Legal Division, can be reached on 452-3293. Sincerely,  s John M. Denkler  t  for•rou""--  BOARD OF GOVERNORS 0 r THE  FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  Office Correspondence To  Joan Hobbs  From MaryEllen  A. Brown  Date Subject:  June  1979  OMB MemiOrandum Entitled  "Presidential Privacy Initiative"  The above OMB memorandum appears to require a written response on one point, at least: the designation of a Board office or official to bear oversight responsibility for internal administration of the Privacy Act, in accordance with instructions set forth in the memorandum. As you may know, OMB has an unusually free hand in Privacy Act implementation, and it is probably within its statutory power to make this request of all Federal agencies. As you also probably know, Griff Garwood exercises a coordinating and general oversight function for the Act within the Board, and I suggest that you ask him for his views about the OMB memorandum, especially as to whether he'd be willing and able to assume the expanded oversignt role described by the memorandum. If he declines the task, then, probably either I or John Weis would be the next likely candidate. (You might also ask Griff his views about who should do it if not he, since he may have someone else in mind.) Also, it probably would be sufficient to designate an office rather than a person--e.g., Secretary, Legal, Personnel--to perform the oversight role. As a final comment, you might just point out in the reply letter to OMB that the Board's staff has already submitted comments to OMB about various Privacy legislative proposals recommended by the President, and that we expect to comment again later about them, when requested to do so by the Congress.  cc:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Griff Garwood Neal Petersen  SPAIPMel.es  June 5  mit•Ps0 To:  Griff Garwood  From:  Joan Hobb  e  -91111110.1100..."  There is attached the memorandum of May 22 from OMB that is the subject of Mary Ellen Brown's memorandum to me of June 4. I believe you received a copy of her memo. Do you feel we should respond naming an official with over-sight responsibility? If so, who should it be? And who should sign the letter?  -1111111111111M  C/G  Thanks for your help.  451 r%  LT 3 vcr.r.41- to..) 410.. o .• 6.... tt Attachment  t_  Ar-es.  64.‘  feVk d. • r" s es". 4 L.ftt.  Hvi L 0/vivete  To  HA  14 fvv-(  if ,. v't"- = • I 7.) 11%.4, /.1 1,),4 ; 'Ice_  •••••1111•••11..1111MIS.L.-.AMISAIIAMMII  s,iikr y T..c7- ' urrsee c.- v. p4..et dot Pe e#4 ert-r. r c % c,c-rs 7-  omplim  e  Ms;  r  ert r  , 4  9• fro  /  . Te ci  511. 1  •s  ..€ c TT  St,)5 e$ r ) s roi rfv•  4.1 ;7"7 Ap.,,c_ ?-1..c_ €40 re? G.-7:  11.011•••••••  1-41•b al. •  Pdr ye  orS  •  ch...fs.31" 4r. *7*.  1.44 M-77 erYCe,  armlioNalmalMa   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  la •  El   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  E.XECUTIVE OFFICE CF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE CF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  mAy 2 2 1919 0 •-•  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES Subject:  Presidential Privacy Initiative  As you know, the President on April 2, 1979, sent a Message to the Congress announcing a wide range of initiatives to While a number of I?rotect individual privacy. these initiatives were directed toward new legislation, he also asked the Office of Management and Budget to implement a number of administrative actions regarding the Privacy Act of 197 14. Specifically, the President asked that action be taken to -II  extend Privacy Act protections to certain data systems operated by recipients of Federal grants; of "strengthen administration 'routine the use' provision of the Privacy Act, which governs disclosures of personal information by Federal agencies; "ensure that each Federal agency an .has office responsible for privacy issues raised by the agencies' activities; "improve the selection and training managers required by the Privacy Act;  of 'the  system  prove oversight of new Federal information systems at an early state in the planning process; and "limit the amount of information the government requires private groups and individuals to report." As a first step toward making these improvements, I am asking each agency head to designate an office or official within his or her agency to bear oversight responsibility for the administration of the Privacy Act within that agency and to work with us in implementing eSe actions directed by the President. The Preside ntial Review Memorandum and other background papers leading to the President's decision that each agency should have-- Privacy Act oversight official contemplate  ..  .   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  that the official should have substantial authority for ovPrseing agency administration of the Act. While the duties of these officials were not comprehensively defined, it anticipated that they would include: o  Issuing any instructions, guidelines, or necessary to administer the Privacy Act;  o  Assuring the consistent application  of and policies within the agencies; and  o  Providing for  standards  regulations  the effective education of system managers and decision makers who are responsible for the maintenance of systems of records.  Please provide this Office by June 15, 1979, with the name, address and telephone numbers of those who have been assigned responsibility for overseeing administration of the Privacy Act within your agency. We plan to establish task groups to develop specific plans for carrying out each of the improvements directed by the President, and would appreciate it if you would identify the areas you wish your agency to participate in. Any questions may be directed to the Information Systems Policy Division at 395-3785.  e A.110...'1-00  Ja es T. McIntyre Di ector  ,  t  June 5  tit"! To:  Griff Garwood  From:  Joan Robb  There is attached the memorandum of May 22 from OMB that is the subject of Mary Ellen Brown's memorandum to me of June 4. I believe you received a copy of her memo. Do you feel we should respond naming an official with over-sight responsibility? If so, who should it be? And who should sign the letter? Thanks for your help.  Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  11111111.1111110."  116immoift•   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE CF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE CF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  MAY 2 2 1919  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES Subject:  Presidential Privacy Initiative  As you know, the President on April 2, 1979, sent a Message to the Congress announcing a wide range of initiatives to protect individual privacy. While a number of these initiatives were directed toward new legislation, he also asked the Office of Management and Budget to implement a number of administrative actions regarding the Privacy Act of 1974. Specifically, the President asked that action be taken to -"extend Privacy Act protections to certain data systems operated by recipients of Federal grants; "strengthen administration of the 'routine use' provision of the Privacy Act, which governs disclosures of personal information by Federal agencies; "ensure that each Federal agency has an office responsible for privacy issues raised by the agencies' activities; "improve the selection and training managers required by the Privacy Act;  of  the  system  "improve oversight of new Federal information systems at an early state in the planning process; and "limit the amount of information the government requires private groups and individuals to report." As a first step toward making these improvements, I am asking each agency head to designate an office or official within his or her agency to bear oversight responsibility for the administration of the Privacy Act within that agency and to work with us in implementing the other actions directed by the President. The Presidential Review Memorandum and other background papers leading to the President's decision that each agency should have a Privacy Act oversight official contemplate  Cit   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  2  that the official should have substantial authority for overseeing agency administration of the Act. While the duties of these officials were nct comprehensively defined, it anticipated that they would include: any instructions, guidelines, or necessary to administer the Privacy Act;  •Issuing  o  Assuring the consistent application of and policies within the agencies; and  standards  regulations  Provng for the effective education of system managers and deon makers who are responsible for the maintenance of systems of records. Please provide this Office by June 15, 1979, with the name, address and telephone numbers of those who have been assigned responsty for overseeing administration of the Privacy Act within your agency. We plan to establish task groups to develop specific plans for carrying out each of the improvements directed by the President, and would appreciate it if you would identify the areas you wish your agency to participate in. Any questions may be directed to the Information Systems Policy Division at 395-3785.  .410011+1.01..0  es T. McIntyre ector   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  I979JU'  e •I  ' ¶E2  June 11, 1979  0 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF  FROM:  EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES 7 , Greg Schneiders  SUBJECT:  The Presidential Medal of Freedom  I am interested in obtaining staff recommendations of individuals deserving of The Presidential Medal of Freedom. .........m.priwwwwmmmorlmwmwommmmwm This award is traditionally presented on or around the 4th of July and is awarded to individuals who have "made an especially meritorious contribution on (1) the security of national interest of the United States, or (2) world peace, or (3) cultural or other significant public or private endeavors." The Medal may be awarded posthumously. I would like to have your considered suggestions by June 30. Obviously due to the President's foreign travel schedule the announcement of recepients will not be made until some time during the 2nd week in July.. Attached is a list of all previous recipients.  •  : r-  I  a)  v) (n -0 Q) >I  G  •  1,1 0'4  0  n r!) r. 1 Pi  rJ  •  kr, k.0  kr) lot)  .; ' -4  6  —  etti  M  0 (r)  co co co oo N r-i r-4  r-i 01 ••zr r-1 n kl) kr) l0 01  CO lD tfl (r) cr) r-1 r-1 r-4 r-1 r-- r-- N r-i  cr) r-1 r-1  u-) ••.„  0 .r:  kD 00 kr) CO q30 CO 00 D 00  'A (11 .L1 4)  , •  411 •ri :`, ILI  OD ri  C) ..C: rti  • rd :11 •r•4 r1 (I 0 ill  c9  - V,: -4 in 0  (f) .;) ••  u) n s re ill C) v--1 rr rU Ill > 4 Ei C-4 v-1 ' 1 RI El re fll cf) P1 /II Pi :74 t -1  0  1: nf a) rt1 ol I) 0 01 > a) r: •,-1 • a) .r: )-4 :› 0 • K. (J) (11 0 M . 4-1 r: 4 : 4 • C; 0 ill rd (1) a) • r_ rt.li tn /-1 _1 am) I 0 1.11 0 U) •r-i 0 al u) [Li r11 -P r-1 u1 - f--1 rtl •ri a) u) , 4 •,--1 CI. :_>. , i 0 r. r, ir4 ,--1 ni r: ••-I : 0 n; al .c: rZ FA 1-i 0 4 :(4 IS t)0 14 (1) 0 rU SI U) :4 Q 0 )- 1 C.) 8  rA CV r-1 rq 1-1 C4 CV r-1 CV  • Xs  ••  ru • r: ,c: a) •r-i •r4 vl 0 C) )1 I: r-I 1(5 •H ).! r, a) a) •••-) A •r-i c3-1 0 la. 0 C) r.; fil E-4 U  :::: / 1 C.9  (11 .1 •)  a,  :(;)  >, a) C. a) :>• ;4 A  f".41 •H a) )1 )-1 O4 04  Cq  cq  •ri Y4  C14  rt,1  4 C)  CI) kl n4 I I.4  Ii C)  r.  ( 4j  r-1  1-4 P, fil C-4  0 411  al  .I)  0 :)•1 4") rCi r: (1) (n u) 0 1-4 4 P4 CI  •'' ;  ri fel 0) -1. el V) VD kr) ko 0  ko CD cr t.0 CD kfl r-i e\,) r-i *%•.. (\I C•1 r-1 r-i  01 r--1 I-1 01  A11  .11 IA (1) Or 0 u)  • • • • F) . (loll 64 (1; re• 0 .d rl $4 411  ••••  ti rd (.9  r--)  U 1 1; C.)  01 01 01  .1.14  ci  III  70 (f)  ikl  01   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  Pablo Genevieve CLIFFORD, Clark co::..:::, James E. COPE1=, Aaron reBAKEY, Dr. :slicha 1 1.7411  I., •  n .m. ,  DISNEY, Walter DOEIE, J. Frank D:23INSKY, David EDWARDS, Lena • omas Ste 46.  —  •—••  ENDERS, John F. FONr7ANNE, Lynn FORD, Henry, II FRANKFURTER, Felix John W. HAP.RTYkN, W. Averell HESSURGH, Theodore M. HOLrPON, Karl 1-7007 Bob JOHNSON, Clarence Edgar F. Frederick KELLER, Helen 7:77‘14 NT=DV John Fitzgerald Kl-DHU7H, Robert J. -nm== Robert 7.• LASKER, Ma--y Herbert H. (Governor) TT=WIS John L. L7 vPYINN, Walter LOCK77, Eugene MuY-ohv LOVETrP, Robert A. LUNrn, Alfred Me.CLOV I John J. Ralph ..,:A_'.12:P 21, Robert S. 1.:c, Y.=cDONALD, J. Clifford John W., Jr. , George Aley.ander Jean :.:0TrSON, Samuel Eliot • .16%.•••••••••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -2  4.0  •  12/6/63 12/6/63 1/20/69 12/6/63 9/14/64 1/20/69 9/14/64 9/14/64 9/14/64 1/20/69 9/14/64 9P4/6q. 1/20/59 12/6/63 9/14/64 1/20/69 12/6/63 9/14/64 1/20/69 9/14/64 12/6/63 1/20/69 9/14/64 1/20/69 9/14/64 9/14/64 12/6/63 (Posthumously) 12/6/63 2/6/68 1/20/69 12/6/63 (posthumously) 9/14/64 9/14/64 2/7/68 12/6/63 9/14/64 12/6/63 9/14/64 28/28/68 12/6/63 (posthumously) 1/20/69 12/6/63 12/6/63 12/6/63 9/14/64  -3. •  MU:•LTORD, Lewis MliNOZ-MARIN, Luis MURROW, Edward R. NIEBUHR, Reinhold PECK, Gregory POPE JOHN XXIII,His Holiness PRICE, Leontyne RANDALL, Clarence B. RANDOLPH, A. Philip ROCKEFELLER, Laurance S. ROSTOW, Walt Whitman RUSK, Dean SANDBURG, Carl ST?:.(7N, Rudolf S:,1ITH, Merriman ST7TCHEN, Edward STEINBECK, John TAUSSIG, Helen B. TAYLOR, George W. VANCE, Cyrus R. VAN DER ROHE, Ludwig Mies VINSON, Carl WATERAN, Alan T. WATSON, Mark S. WATSON, Thomas J., Jr. WAUNEKA, Annie D. WE3B, James E. WHITE, E. B. WHITE, Paul Dudley WHITE, William S. WILDER, Thornton N. WILKINS, Roy WILSON, Edmund W=H, Andrew YOUNG, Whitney M., Jr.  9/14/64 12/6/63 9/14/64 9/14/64 1/20/69 12/6/63 9/14/64 12/6/63 9/14/G4 1/20/69 1/20/69 1/16/69 9/14/64 12/6/63 1/20/69 12/6/63 9/14/64 9/14/64 12/6/63 1/20/69 12/6/63 9/14/64 12/6/63 12/6/63 9/14/64 12/6/63 12/9/68 12/6/63 9/14/64 1/20/69 12/6/63 1/20/69 12/6/63 12/6/63 1/20/69  (Posthumously)  Presented by President Nixon ALDRIN, Edwin E., APPOLLO 13 Mission Operations Team ARZISTRO,NG, Neil A. B7HRENS Earl Charles BROSIO, Manlio Michael COLLINS ELLINGTON, Edward Kennedy FOLLIARD, Edward T. FORD, John GOLDWYN, Samuel   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  8/13/69 4/18/70 8/13/69 4/22/70 9/29/71 8/13/69 4/29/69 4/22/70 3/31/73 3/27/71  . I I  jorrolhalb•  HAIS, Fred Wallace., Jr. 'HENRY, William M. HOFFYaN, Paul G. HOPKINS, William J. KROCK, Arthur LAIRD, Melvin R. LAWRENCE, David LINCOLN, George Gould LOVELL, James A., J r. LOT,.:MAN, Dr. Charles LeRoy MOLEY, Raymond ORYz,NDY, Eugene '74 'l'am P. Rocers 77"-;.NS, SWIGERT, John Leonard, Jr VANN, John Paul WALLACE, Dewitt and Lila  4/18/70 4/22/70 (posthumously) 6/21/74 6/2/71 4/22/70 3/26/74 4/22/70 4/22/70 4/18/70 7/27/74 4/22/70 1/24/70 10/15/73 4/22/70 4/13/70 6/16/72 (posthumously) 1/28/72  Presented by President Ford 1/10/77 ABEL, I. W. 1/10/77 BARDEEN, John 1/10/77 BERLIN, Irving 1/10/77 BORLAUG, Norman 1/10/77 BRADLEY, General Omar N. 2/10/76 BRUCE, David K. E. (with distinction) 1/10/77 BURKE, Admiral Arleigh 1/10/77 (posthumously) CALDER, Alexander 1/10/77 CATTON, Bruce 1/10/77 Di:.IAGGIO, Joe 1/10/77 DURANT, Ariel 1/10/77 DURANT, Will 1/10/77 FIEDLER, Arthur 1/10/77 FRIENDLY, Judge Henry J. 10/14/76 GP 2iF;M, Martha (with distinction) 1/10/77 JOHNSON, Lady Bird 1/13/77 KISSINGER, Henry A. 1/10/77 MacLETSH, Archibald 1/10/77 MICHENER, James Albert 1/10/77 O'KEEFFE, Georgia 8/5/76 OWENS, Jesse 1/10/77 ROCKEFET.LER, Nelson A. 1/10/77 ROCKWELL, Norman 4/1/76 RUBINSTEIN, Arthur (with distinction) 1/19/77 RUMSFELD, Donald H. 1/10/77 SHOUSE, Katherine Filene 1/10/77 THOMAS, Lowell 1/10/77 WATSON, James, D.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  k  MEP :r. •  ,  -3-  Presented by President Carter KING, Martin Luther SALK, Jonas  7/11/77 7/11/77  GOLDBERG, Arthur  7/78  MEAD, Margaret  1/79   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (posthumously)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  p  ••• •  '• •  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION WASHINGTON. D.C. 20506  1279,013  '  r" ':C3  June 7, 1979  MEMORANDUM TO  :  Heads of Agencies  FROM  :  Eleanor Holmes Norton, Chair EEOC  SUBJECT:  Procedures on Interagency Coordination  s of agencies a On December 8, 1978, I sent all head operation draft of procedures developed by EEOC for ived comments under Executive Order 12067. We have rece h we have and suggestions from several agencies whic d in the carefully analyzed and which are reflecte attached revised draft procedures. I request If you wish to comment on the attachment, June 29, that your suggestions be sent no later than ce of 1979, to Francesta E. Farmer, Director, Offi calls should Interagency Coordination. Informational 0). be directed to Herbert Hammerman (653-549  Attachment  •  • March 2, 1979  •  • •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Revised Draft Guidelines of Procedures on Interagency Coordination •  1.  Purpose  11.11=10."'  of advice, These procedural guidelines set forth the methods oyment Opportunity consultation, and review between the Equal Empl and agencies Commission ("EEOC") and other Federal departments  4  N._  ent and ("agencies") that have been adopted for the developm cy, procedure, publi..ation of any proposed rule, regulation, poli rtunity or orier ("issuance") concerning equal employment oppo ("EEO"), pursuant to Executive Order 12067 ("Order"). bility to The Order has charged the EEOC with the responsi of all agencies provide leadership and coordination to the efforts Executive Orderi, in th• enforcement of all Federal statutes, oyment opportunity regulations and policies which require equal empl national origin, age without recmrd to race, color, religion, sex, or handicap (section 1-201).  To this end, the EEOC has the  efficiency, and responsibility "to maximize effort, promote and inconsistency eliminate conflict, competition, duplication jurisdictions of. the Federal among the operations, functions, and departments ang agencies." ties under the Order, the In carrying out its responsibili nt of the Order; will EEOC will interpret the meaning and inte development of issuances ccnsult with affected agencies during the   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  000091  -2 •  MT?: pertaining to its responsibilities under the Order; and will •  t make formal submission of issuances to affected agencies at leas 15 working days before they are publicly announced.  (Section 1-303)  The Order requires the EEOC to attempt to settle all matters in  4  dispute with other agencies, and it requires other agencies to comply with all final issuances of the EEOC. In addition to the above, the Order gives the EEOC specific ion, and responsibilities to set standards, minimize duplicat rimination, achieve uniformity with respect to definitions of disc ons, investigatinns and compliance reviews, enforcement acti • of records, reporting and record-keeping requirements, sharing publications and findings and documentation, training programs, ion. (Section 1-301) informational programs, and interagency cooperat • 2.  Definitions  utive and "Departments" and "Agencies" mean those Exec regulatory Commissions, independent agencies, agency components, onsibilities or authority advisory bodies having EEO programs resp r own Federal employees. other than EEO responsibilities for thei ce, program. division, sub"Agency Component" means a discreet offi programs, divisions or, subagency, or any group of these offices, y and/or statutory responsiagencies, having policy-making authorit •  bility for EEO.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  000092 1161•••••••  r•  • - 3 -  "Affected Agency" means any agency as defined above, whose 'programs, policies, procedures, authority or other statutory mandates (including coverage of a group of employers, businesses, unions, state and local governments or other organizations) indicate that the agency may have an interest in the proposed issuance. "Issuance" includes, but is not limited to, any rule; regulatio guideline; order; policy directive; procedural directive; legislative proposal; publication; or data collection or record-keeping instrument, and includes agency documents as described above, or revisions of such documents, developed p.ursuant to court order.  "Issuances" do not  include orders issu,ld to specific parties as a result of adjudicatorytype processes. "Significant Issuance" means any issuance that must be published pursuant to Section 1-305 of the Order.  In determining whether an , . /11 ••••••••••••••-  issuance is significant, the EEOC shall apply the following criteria:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  o The type and number of individuals, businesses, organizations, employers, unions and state and local governments affected; o The compliance and reporting requirements likely to be involved; . of ion eliminat and cation o The impact on the identifi  gh 7:i •  discrimination in employment;  r  o The relationship of the proposed issuance to those of other programs and agencies.  ‘i 3  allimm••••••••••••  1  - 4 -  "Internal or Administrative Document," pursuant to 1-304, means any document  relating to internal EEO programs or any  setting forth administrative procedures for the conduct  document  -of programs (e.g. internal reporting requirements, forms, tables of  4  organization, etc.) Internal or administrative documents do not include compliance manuals, training materials or any other internal documents setting forth 'procedures for the resolution of complaints; standards of review or proof; or any other policies, standards or directives having implications for non-Federal . ••  employees. 1111=11111P  "Consultation" means the period.of informal discussions, submission, review and comment occurring among the EEOC and nce. affected agencies before formal submission of the issua •••••• %Ed ••• ••• •••• 011.  D  a Submissicn" means the act of formal transmittal of  , 111141=411111114..  4 cation-ready document by the issuing agency to the  working days. EEOC and other affected agencies for at least 15 publication of The formal submission shall take place before the any issuance as a final document. interim "Publication" means either the publication of an of the formal submission document for public comment, or, at the end issuance as final period as defined above, the printing of an  •  Federal or private in the Federal Recist=r and/or in any other publication.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  3.  Establishment of Organizational Components to Implement Executive Order 12067 The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has established a  IMEN1441P...•  new Office of Interagency Coordination ("OIC") to serve as the central point of contact and to coordinate and consult with other agencies on 4  any issuance covered by the Order. 4.  Notification to EEOC of Development of Rules Whenever 'an agency of the Federal government ("initiating agemcy")  proposes to develop an issuance, it shall immediately advise the Chair of the EEOC (attention the Director, OIC) of its intention, indicate the appropriate office or person responsible for the development of the issuance, and provide any drafts of the issuance to the Director, OIC. Issuances related to internal management or administration are exempt from the consultation process under the Order; however, it shall be the responsibility of the EEOC to determine the extent to which a particular issuance is covered by an exemption. Consultation, as required by Section 1-304 of the Order should begin: . Whenever an agency or agency component has a proposal under development that will require consultation and coordination pursuant to the Order; or . Whenever a concept paper or draft issuance has been developed on which consultation and coordination will he required; or ..•  . Whenever an agency must develop an issuance or revise an issuance pursuant to court order; or . Whenever an agency or agency component deems that the aims of the Order --that is, consistency, efficiency and reduction of duplication and overlap--will be best served bv.early consultation on the issuance among the affected agencies.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  r  4 .  "ft  - 6 -A responsible agency official shall initiate consultation by making a request of or submitting the appropriate documents to the EEOC. Except as provided in Section 10 below, in no instance shall there be formal submission to the EEOC or the affected agencies without prior consultation pursuant to Section 1-. 304. The requirement for consultation applies equally and to the same extent whether or not the agency plans to publi.F.h the issuance for comment. 5.  Rules Promosed by EEOC Whenever the EEOC proposes to develop an issuance, the procedures  outlined in these guidelines shall also apply, Section 1-303 of the Order.  ES  set forth in the  The EEOC shall advise and consult with  other affected agencies whenever it plans to develop or to publish an issuance, in the same manner and to the same extent as other agencies are required to do in Section 4 above and in other sections below. 6.  Scooe of Consultation Determined At the start of consultation, the EEOC shall determine what  other agencies would be affected by the proposed issuance, and the initiating agency shall consult with such agencies.  However, agencies  may consult with any other agencies that they believe would be affected by the issuance. by the parties.  The consultation period shall be determined  During the consultation period, the EEOC shall seek  to resolve any disputes with the initiating agency before publication.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  C./)  .1=1,  7  /Mb  e of Publication for Comment nc va Ad in on si is bm Su al Form  7.  intends to publicly anNounce cy en ag ng ti ia it in an t en ev e In th g comments from the the proposed issuance, forpurpose of receivin 4  bmit the issuance to the EEOC public, the agency_ must formally su before any •announcement.  Before publicly announcing the proposed  er with EEOC and agree on a mutunf co l al sh cy en ag ng ti ia it in e th , ance less than 15 workin7 days, during no , me ti of th ng le le ab pt ce ac ly al submitted to all effected ly al rm fo be l al sh which the proposal nt to Section 1-304 of ua rs pu es ci en ag d an s Federal department to ission shall be sufficient bm su al rm fo of od the Order. The peri encies time in whic'. to ag d an s nt me rt pa de allow all affecteded itiazing agency uay proe in e Th . al os op pr properly review the has working days if the EEOC 15 r te af t en mm co to publicaticn for otherwise communicated the or me ti of n io ns te nct requested an ex need for more time 6.  to review the proposal.  Absence of Consultation Formal Sub-,ission in  ready has an issuance which was al cy en ag ng ti ia it in an If e Order 1, 1976, when Executiv ly Ju re fo be or under development on en no consultation, be s ha e er th h ic wh and on 12067 became effective, notify the EEOC of the agency shall immediately edure shall apply: oc pr g in ow ll fo e th osals and existence of such prop  the   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  p.  6111121111ft.  •  - 8  (a) EEOC shall confer with the initiating agency and shall _determine whether the proposal should be the subject of informal consultation and/or formal submission to other affected Federal departments and agencies pursuant to Section 1-304 of the Order. This does not preclude the right of the agency to consult with any other agency it wishes. (b) If the EEOC decides that informal consultation and/or formal submission is necessary, it shall confer with the prOposing agency and agree on a mutually acceptablelength of time for the informal and/or formal submission. (c) The period of formal submission shall be sufficient to allow all affected departments and agencies time in which to properly review the proposal. While such period may be longer, in no instance may it be shorter than 15 working days. 9.  Review of Public Comnents and Pr000sed Final Rule Whenever an acency publishes an interim issuance pursuant to 1-305 of the Order or other applicable law, it shall  provide the 1 270C with a cozy of the publication and any staff analyses of the comments and hearin=s, proposed final issuance.  f any, and a copy of the  The time needed to review these  materials shall be agreed on by the EEOC and the initiating agency. Such reviewing time shall be sufficient to allow all affected Federal departments and agencies time in which to properly review the mater als provided.  Ef.  While such time may be longer,  in no instance may it be shorter than 15 working days. 10.  Te7Porarv Waiver of Guideline Reouirements in the event that the proposed issuance is of great length   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  p.  7-‘ ill•nammm•••  - 9  cr complexity, the EEOC may, in its discretion, grant a temporary waiver af the requirements contained in Sections 4-9.  Such  waivers may be granted (a) The period of consultation and thorough review required for these documents would be so long ai to disrupt normal agency operations; or (b) The initiating agency is issuing a document to meet animmediate statutory deadline; (c) The initiating agency presents other compelling reasons why interim issuance is essential. In the event of a waiver, the  ating agency shall clearly  indicate that the issuance is interim and subject to review. As part of the waiver, the  t  ating agency shall certify,  . . - n vritinc, that the EEOC reserves the right, after publication, to review the document in light of the objectives of the Order, an= may require substantive conforming changes. Notice of Uaresolved Dis=utes Whenever a Federal department or agency believes that there exists a dispute between itself and the EEOC concerning the promulgation of a final issuance that cannot be resolved through good faith efforts, it shall notify the EEOC of the dispute and reasons therefore before any steps are taken to refer the dispute to the Executive Office of the President pursuant to 1-307 of the Order.  HoweVer, nothing in this section sha"  be interpreted to preclude a Federal agency from referring a  LI   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  Wk.  -  10  MI6  dispute to the Executive Office of the President if 15 working days after submission to EEOC, or any period mutually agreed upon, have elapsed. 1111111-  12.  Confirmation that Dispute Cannot be Resolved The Chair, EEOC, shall confirm to the Executive Office  of the President, in writing, that further good faith efforts on the part of the EEOC and the department or agency involved would be ineffective in achieving a resolution of the dispute.  13.  Interpretation of the Order In accordance with the objectives set forth in 1-201  and the procedures in 1-303 of the Order, the EEOC shall interpret the meaning and intent of the Order.  EEOC also  will issue procedural changes under the Order, as appropriate, after advice and consultation with affected agencies as provided for in these guidelines.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  JZL S, 1979  r. Steve Winebrenner Division of Data Processing Dear Hr. Winebrenner: personal thanks and congratulations for your efforts in helping your division achieve 100 per cent or sore of its 1979 Savings Bond Campaign Goal. am pleased to note your success in showing others that U.S. Savings Bonds can be an integral 2art of individual savings and investment programs wbile contributing to our national economic stability. appreciate your willingness and enthusiasm in the active support of this campaign. Please convey my appreciation to the nembers of your division lino supported you in the campaiiT.. Sincerely, gS  ,  /5„-QZ 1/1/  22.  (IDENTICAL LETTERS SENT TO): Mrs. Janet Reid, Office of The Controller Mr. Dave Balchunas, Division of Support Services Mr. Vince Gremona, Office of Staff Director for Federal Reserve Bank Activities Mr. Don Ring, Division of Federal Reserve Bank Examinations and Budgets Mr. Wilbert Cooper, Division of Support Services  •  •  ECUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPCRTUNITY COMMISSION  tMPlo, 4.  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20506 41 ;  1 ; Nb../  June 8, 1979  .57  ME.IORANDUM  TO  All Agency Heads All Agency Directors of Personnel All Agency Directors of EEO  FROM  Eleanor Holmes Norton, Chair  SUBJECT:  Proposed EEOC Instructions for Affirmative Action Plans Required by Section 717 of Title VII and Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.  The Civil Rights Reorganization Plan No. I transferred responsibility for monitoring and enforcement of these agency Plans from the Civil Service Commission (now OPM) to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. In a prior management bulletin to all agencies (EEO-MB -701 dated March 30, 1979) the EEOC indicated that the plans would be developed according to new instructions, and that the first transition year would require agency activities leading to actionand results-oriented multi-year plans, commencing in FY 1981. Attached are the proposed instructions to agencies for transition-year plan development. As required by Executive Order 12067, these proposed instructions are being submitted for comment for 15 working days. In addition, EEOC will be consulting with agencies during the 15 working day period in order to get suggested comments and revisions. In addition to written comments on the proposed instructions, EEOC also is seeking specific agency recommendations on two areas:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  o  The designation of functional components required to develop plans; (see Appendix 6 of the instructions), and;  o  The number and type of job categories and positions targeted by agencies for development of goals and timetables in FY 1980 (see Phase Two of the instructions).  OP  2  •  All written comments should be addressed to: opm--  Mr. Al Matthew, Director Office of Government Employment Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 2401 "E" St., N. W. - Room 4208 Washington, D. C. 20506  .„ 4„  Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r,  •  JUN 1 5 1979  The Honorable Esther Peterson Special Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs The White House Washington, D.C. 20500 Dear Ms. Peterson: Thank you for your June 8 letter asking that the Board extend the comment period for the proposed credit scoring amendments to Regulation B and also amend portions of the Federal Register notice accompanying those proposals.  •  In response to a previous request, the Board has decided to extend the close of the comment period for an additional 60 days, from June 20 to August 20. That extension should provide an adequate opportunity for the public to comment while not unduly delaying consideration of the petitions that gave rise to the proposals.  0  You also are concerned that one sentence in the Federal Register notice accompanying the proposals may be interpreted broadly to cast doubt on the applicability of Regulation B to users of credit scoring systems. The relevant sentence states that "the proper application of the specific rules to credit scoring systems remains unclear." That statement was intended merely to allude to the existence of confusion about the proper application of the regulation's specific rules to credit scoring systems. It was not intended to suggest in any way that the specific rules do not apply to those systems. In the context of the notice and given the explicit references in the regulation to credit scoring systems, we do not believe that there can be any reasonable doubt as to the general applicability of the regulation to credit scoring systems. If, however, you discover any instances in which a creditor using a scoring system appears to claim that it is not subject to Regulation B, please let us know. Finally, you are concerned that the proposals, with all of the multiple optiops listed, may appear too formidable for consumers to understand and to comment on intelligently. While some of the alternatives  t'   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  The Honorable Esther Peterson  - 2  are technical in nature, the general issues appear to be clearly stated. At this juncture, the Board is primarily interested in finding out what the public and the credit industry believe to be the proper application of Regulation B's specific rules to credit scoring systems. Since a number of comments already have been received, the best strategy appears to be to learn from those and other comments what the difficulties and possible solutions are before taking any further action, including any attempt to restate the issues or options. We appreciate receiving your preliminary reactions to the proposals and look forward to having your further comments.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Sincerely,  (Signed) G. Vdiiiiam Miller. v _  R.C. Plows:flh 6/14/79 RS-306 WH-57 fo 144\1 Tape #8  •  •1  •  THE WHITE HOUSE "  r"C.  WA S H I N GTO N  June 8, 1979  1--„P •  C:  Dear  Application o xedit Scorin Dock1t Num r  203  Miller:  The Board of Governors of tic Feder, Reserve S stem ("the Board") is currently soliciting comments regarding the application of Regulation B to credit scoring system practices. Comments must be received by June 20, 1979. The issuance of the proposed rulemaking by the Board has serious implications for the continued effectiveness of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act in assuring the availability of credit to qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, or age. In light of this, I would like to make the following comments. (The merits of the various proposals are not discussed in this letter.) First, the proposed rulemaking is so broadly stated that its issuance brings into question the current applicability of Regulation B to credit scoring systems. Credit scoring has long been a major tool for evaluating potential borrowers and Regulation B itself limits the use of credit scoring systems to ones which are "deaonstrably and statistically sound, cmperically derived." Yet, the proposed rulemaking finds the apnlicability of Regulation B to credit scoring systems in any respect to be "unclear." While I do not believe that it was the intent or the Board to relieve users of credit scoring systems of any liability under the Regulations, I believe that a creditor could maintain such defense based on the Board's proposed rulemaking against a claim that a system violated Regulation B. I, therefore, ask that the Board amend the proposed rulemaking to cover amendments to those specific sections of Regulation B which the Board concludes requirereconsideration for application   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 to a credit scoring rather than a judgmental system. The specific requirements of Regulation B should clearly apply unless and until amendments are adopted. The need to require consideration of alimony or other secondary sources of income was based on discrimination against women and the elderly relying on such income. While some amendments to Regulation B might be appropriate to reflect experience with credit scoring systems, those who rely on the Equal Credit Opportunity Act for access to credit should not be denied their rights while the Board considers those amendments. Nor should the Board's questionably legal proposal that a creditor using a credit scoring system may give judgmental reasons for denying credit which have no relation to the system itself be allowed to relieve such creditor of the Act's requirement that the specific reasons for denial must be given to the applicant. Second, the text of the proposed rulemaking is cumbersome and difficult to understand. In several instances the alternatives being proposed are not explained. For example, six alternatives are proposed for consideration of the amount of income from part-time employment; pension, or alimony. Yet, the discussion considers only two of such proposals --requiring consideration of such income or exempting credit scorers from the consideration requirement. It does not explain what, for example, would constitute a "judgmental override" for consideration of such income. Consumer groups revieming the proposal have found it extremely difficult to understand. Fairness in the issuance of proposed regulations dictates that the proposals fully explain the action contemplated. I request, therefore, that the rulemaking be rescinded until it can be simplified, rewritten, and issued in clear and comprehensible language. Finally, in light of the widespread use of credit scoring systems and the importance of the proposal to the continued viability of Regulation B and Equal Credit Opportunity, the comment time should be extended to one hundred and twenty (120) days from the date the amended proposal is issued to afford interested consumers adequate opportunity to address the issues and participate in the Board's rulemaking process. Even if the Board does not act to amend the proposals, the comment time should be extended by sixty (60) days to insure interested consumers the opportunity to prepare comments. Due process demands that consumer   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ir L  • 3 groups be given every opportunity to comment, particularly where the proposals arc as important to the principles of equal credit as is this action by the Board. staff and I would be pleased to discuss our request with von further or to otherwise assj you in this regard. Incerclv  ler Peterson Spe ial Assistant to the President for Consumer Affairs  The Honorable G. William Nillor Chairman, The Board of Governors Federal Reserve System Washington, DC 20551   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1  Kra f-4iv 7 a  I92 /  ' 4  I,  -W717  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  s  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503  CIRCULAR NO. A-34 Revised Transmittal Memorandum No. 8  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT:  Instructions on Budget Execution  This transmittal memorandum promulgates revised instructions for the treatment of funded annual leave in revolving funds. This revision in Section 25.1A of the Circular deletes the current exceptions for revolving funds with regard to the timing of obligations for funded annual leave. For all accounts, including revolving funds, amounts for annual leave will be reported as obligations when they become due and payable as terminal leave, rather than at the time the leave is earned. The provisions of this revision of Circular No. A-34 are effective upon receipt. The attached page containing Section 25.1A should be substituted for the present page containing that section.  im J  Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r" 4 o  es T. McIntyre, J4. rector  •  S -  Secs. 23.3-24.2  INSTRUCTIONS ON BUDGET EXECUTION (JULY 1976)  23.3 Distinguishing features of physical delivery and constructive delivery. The physical delivery or the passing of legal title of tangible goods and services, frequently character-: ized as an "off the shelf delivery," is most often the measure of an accrued expenditure in procurement and contract performance. Thus, when a contractor provides goods to the Government that the contractor could sell to others, the accrual occurs when physical delivery by the contractor and receipt by the Government takes place and title passes (that is, when goods are either delivered to the Government or to a carrier acting on behalf of the Government). However, when a contractor manufactures goods, structures, or equipment to the Government's specifications or performs special services at the Government's order, constructive delivery occurs in each accounting period when the contractor earns a portion of the contract price, and the accrual takes place as the work is performed. Formal acceptance of the work by the Government is not a test in such cases. When the accounts of the agency provide such Information, constructive delivery should be included in the accrued expenditure data reported under this Circular. In some cases, the performance required by the Government is directed toward a third party rather than the Government itself (for example, a contract for medical services to be rendered to patients or a grant for welfare payments). Even then the timing of the performance determines the time when it becomes an accrued expenditure. 23.4 Treatment of unfunded liabilities. In those cases where Congress has permitted liabilities to accrue without being charged to the bal-  ance of an appropriation, fund, or contract authority; the liability is considered unfunded and no accrued expenditure is recorded until obligational authority is provided. (Accrued annual leave of employees from general fund appropriations is a principal example.) However, the insufficiency of funding for transactions normally reportable as obligations is not a basis for excluding items from the reported accrual. 23.5 Recording accrued expenditures. Accrued expenditures will normally be recorded and reported at the level of an appropriation or fund. OMB will not normally require accrued expenditure data below that level. However, agencies may determine that such data should be accumulated at the level of individual activities in addition to applied cost information—for management purposes. 23.6 Accuracy and adjustment of accrued expenditure data. Accrued expenditure data should be reasonably reliable, using the guidelines established in section 25.2 ("Use of best estimate"), where appropriate. It is recognized that absolute precision cannot be attained for all types of transactions and that some of the data may be subject to subsequent adjustments, as invoices are received and examined and as bills are paid or settled. Adjustments in accrued expenditures will be made in the month in which the adjustment becomes known. Accounts for prior months will not be reopened to make such adjustments. At the end of the fiscal year, accounts will be held open to record accruals, cancellations, and adjustments before final September 30 reports are made.  Concept of Applied Costs 24.1 General concept. Applied costs, as defined in section 21, represent the value of resources consumed or used in operating programs, the value of materiel received or produced in procurement or manufacturing programs, and the value of wark put in place for public works programs. For loan programs, it will represent assets acquired. Generally, applied costs are associated with program outputs, so that such costs become the financial measures of resources consumed or applied in accomplishing a specific purpose, such as performing a service, carrying out an activity, or completing a unit of work.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  24.2 Recognizing applied costs. Applied costs are incurred regardless of when payments are made or whether invoices have been received. Applied costs will be the same as accrued expenditures, except as adjusted by the following: Accrued expenditures, as reported under this Circular, will be reported net of income earned and recoveries. (Reports on applied costs will not be reported net of such amounts.) Applied costs will include amounts for depreciation and unfunded liabilities (e.g., accrued annual leave), when such amounts are provided in the accounts of the agency.  11  S Secs. 24.2-25.1  INSTRUCTIONS ON RUOCET EXECUTION (JULY 1976)  A net increase in inventories will be an accrued expenditure but not an applied cost; and, conversely, a net decrease in inventories will be an applied cost but not an accrued expenditure (including both inventories in the hands of the agency and in the hands of contractors, which are reported as accrued expenditures under the constructive delivery concept). For investments in securities involving premiums at the time of purchase, applied costs will be amortized as charges over the time that the  investment is held; whereas, the entire premium will be recorded as an accrued expenditure at the time the purchase takes place. (See section 63.1 for further discussion of investments in U.S. Government securities.) Severance pay will be recorded as an accrued expenditure on a pay period by pay period basis, but the total amount of severance pay will be included in applied costs when an employee is separated under circumstances that make him eligible for such pay.  Application of Concepts 25.1  Application of obligations, accrued expenditures, and applied costs to types of transactions. The application of the concepts of obligations, accrued expenditures, and applied costs to various types of transactions is outlined below. Except in those cases where there are special statutory provisions to the contrary, reports on obligations and applied costs under this Circular will conform with' the guidelines listed below. Reports under this Circular on accrued expenditures will, in addition to the guidelines listed below, be net of income earned and recoveries. A. PERSONAL SERVICES AND BENEFITS Obligations incurred Include amounts earned by employees and others during the reporting period. Other charges based on salaries and wages, such as living and quarters allowances, equalization allowances under 5 U.S.C. 3373, and the employer's share of contributions to the retirement fund, premiums for insurance, such as health and life insurance, and FICA taxes, are obligations at the time the salaries and wages are earned. Include other allowances, such as uniform allowances and incentive awards, when they become payable to the employee. Severance pay will be reported as an obligation of the pay period covered, on a pay period by pay period basis. Authorized reimbursable expenses estimated to be paid to employees for real estate, temporary subsistence, and other expenses incident to dislocation at the request of the Government will be reported as an obligation at the time the orders are issued to the employee. Annual leave will not be reported as an obligation until it becomes due and payable as terminal leave unless specifically authorized by law.  12   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Accrued expenditures Same as obligations incurred, except that authorized reimbursements to employees for real estate, temporary subsistence, and other expenses incident to dislocation at the request of the Government will be reported on the basis of amounts earned by and payable to the employees. Applied costs Same as accrued expenditures, except that when the data are provided in the accounting system (1) accrued annual leave will be included in applied costs when earned—rather than when taken—even though unfunded; and (2) the prorata share of other types of leave, such as administrative and sick leave, that are anticipated to be taken and of employee benefits that accrue during periods when leave is taken will be included in applied costs. In addition, the total estimated amount of severance pay will be included in applied costs when an employee is separated under circumstances making him eligible for such pay. B. TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION Obligations incurred Include transportation requisitions and Government bills of lading issued to commercial carriers, commercial contracts, and intra governmental orders for specific transportation. Also include travel orders for employees and others for per diem allowances, incidental travel expenses, and for the use of motor vehicles. Obligations may be recorded on the basis of individual travel orders or on the basis of the total estimated travel to be performed during the month, provided such estimated amount is recorded at the beginning of the month. However, In those cases where the obligation cannot be reasonably estimated on the basis of travel or other orders (e.g.. annual travel authorizations), amounts may be reported on the basis of reimbursements earned by the employee. In case of  11.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  July 2, 197,  Sire Jeek 'atone Onto) of Federal Program Deportment of nnergy Washington, D. C. 20503 Deer Mr. Vitullo: ID response to your letter of June 80 1979, requeoting au Annual Import au Energy Misesemost Le the Podemei illevowomeet, the attached informottoe le provided for the lowed of Geworooro of the Federal Reserve Systss follados the guideline* corttAined In your isetructiase sod format. Siosose4, (Signed) John M. Denids. John M. Winkler Staff Director Attscbosat JLG/JMR:tsw 44 lie 43r4 cc: MirMaler Mr. Anderson Mr. Grizzard Meo Hobbs -9-11-4‘.t-12 /111/r4 *  rig 7.ti TV4Ta orrr4  .,frest!tr!-41  •  IAPPAIMAPII The Board of Governors of the Federel Reserve System is the nation's central bank. It regulates domestic banking, farm:haste* monetary policy, and performs economic research. -The point of contact for the Board of deveamess' energy conservation program Ls: Nib  M. John L. Crisaard Aumociste Director Division of Support Services 432-3816 Generals The Board has 1,439 employees in See facilities.  Isergy gusserustion Goals: Sedum purehnsed *foes and electrical energy consumption by 3 per sent. This perseatego goal is based on building renovation efforts la the final *tags of  completion. The full impact of energy consumptienw411 eat be known until s heating and a cooling season have bees experienced and adjustments mode.  2 . csilmt Traillocvf4cifort The Board has a general tronsportetion mem consumption papa gun with the objective of pereheeing energy effigies* kie2as within WA modem. MPS guidelines. !Chicle trip* are stheduled end pooled and the use of Undo is emeamseged. Tie or vehicle fleet has been reduced and a 10 per cent fuel and mileage reduction objective hoe been established.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The numbers mul types of vehicle* follow:  6 AP 5-paasonger automobiles 4 go 12 passenger Shuttle vial*  ;  1 - 1/2 ton pickup truck 1 - 1-1/2 ton stake end plistforn truck 1 - 4 wheel drive jscp All vehicles are Board owned. 7401 is privately purchased under contract. The total etne T  use by fuel type and  3'i  fellows:  %Watt 17,057.30 gels.  .s  2,132,300,000  •  • • •:  :  . •!  •  , ..!4!"." 5  •-• -ar rt  r7s•••r:  • •sra t  , •;77.1--..  ' ! 4 41/lit40014401611*** "" , •  •016   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • aim  2.1tgaC half) 8,772.20 gels.  1.096.500.000  _ The total energy used to edninistrative vehisles the base year:  Eal  figt.ollaa  mat  19970.0  2,496,250,000  The totvl ezargy cost for administrative vehicles for: aii611 $11.861.3)  llOO.OHSela. 3. buildici rr(WmmtlietTO  The square footage of the two buildings owned by the Federal Reserve Board is: 369,000 sq. ft. The total energy used to the two building by fuel typc follows:  /Mt Noctricuy  193,734,600,000 232,972,369,Un 89,401,200,000 24,660,720.000  flan  '  •  ^• ,  " •,  -Total energy used in the two bmildirgAr for the base year follows:  JOWA  nit  neougwy 440  233,133.370,000  ant The enemy used in buildings by category in WITUAST for: now= 525  Ekitralatt  632  afters  le  210 half) Stems  67  :•  ,  .  4.  04Coot of fuel by type fencing  feta  nit  ilarmariaz  .41112 ' 179413 $2411.410.00  F  it;Ktri,cip  $295,097.43  Steam  ei37,716.00  at hp1 )  11  sew buildings are plannet tbrouth 1945.  Carpooling is essouraged with appresiestely SO par mit of the arsplayoes partielpetias. *arm nwiliebegi IMISMONS borwe yielded cooperaties sal sseletasse too the seployees. Other mows sash as tielaspligg mid interior eters wielere aro Wes esplored IOW* will be fully evelwated and reported in liter *worts. 5. Simi at of eon efforts represeat the application of tried and pawns methods of wow eemservotiaa. De wseemiskitisee are offered at this time. V. dosaws* that effort be seoperted to dawelep seerose of mem ether fdasa petrolems*  "   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  *f.„ 404:.  74,fikigt •  ,  -Akt4,44—•344,-;rtAo•AAAti  :nittTf;„11• •  •  ' —'  ' `dr  •••-•  ••  :  1979 JIM -8 17" Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585  •  june'8, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR:  ENERGY MANAGEMENT COORDINATORS  FROM:  JACK VITULLO OFFICE OF FE2tPROGRAMS, DOE  SUBJECT:  ANNUAL REPORT ON ENERGY MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  The Department of Energy is now commencing to prepare the second Consolidated Annual Report on Energy Management in the Federal Government as required by Executive Order 12003. Within the next 10 days, a formal letter will be transmitted sion to the heads of all agencies by DOE requesting the provi ments in of data supporting your energy management accomplish this the last fiscal year by July 2, 1979. A draft copy of letter is attached for your information, together with a copy the of the suggested format and instructions and a copy of FY 1977 report.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  reShould you have any questions regarding the report requi Programs ments or the instructions, please contact the Federal chusetts Office (202, 376-4017), Department of Energy, 20 Massa Avenue, Washington, D.C. 20585. be Your cooperation in providing the requested data will greatly appreciated. Attachments  A  immomm  imomw  •44,  ,  wort 4 W'*' r   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  DRAFT  Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585  Dear prepare the Second The Department of Energy is now commencing to the Federal GovernConsolidated Annual Report on Energy Management in of the first report ment as required by Executive Order 12003. A copy is enclosed. quarters of fiscal We plan to cover fiscal year 1978 and the first two report highlighting year 1979 in this years report. The section of the h was well received agencies achievements and innovative projects, whic to contribute to last year, will be expanded. We hope you will be able this portion of the report. ral Government is Although the great majority of energy used by the Fede establishments, large accounted for by a few large agencies, all Federal rd overall Federal and small, have an important contribution to make towa gy in your agency operagoals. Your continuing efforts to conserve ener annual report offers tion is both needed and appreciated. This second nstrate its continued an opportunity for the Federal Government to demo President's recent leadership position and to document support for the a five percent reduction energy policy announcement and his request for in Federal energy use. been prepared to The enclosed suggested format with instructions has the most effective assist you in presenting your accomplishments in August 15 deadline for manner. So that we will be able to meet the receiving your input as submittal of the report, we would appreciate soon as possible, but not later than July 2, 1979.  is,•  r  ervation achievements In closing, I commend you for your energy cons they have been achieved thus far, particularly in view of the fact that ices in general. without any sacrifice of governmental serv Sincerely,  Enclosures I.  Stx  I S•  •- -  •  • INSTRUCTIONS AND FORMAT  MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT ON ENERGY ..(Small Energy Users)  's used to report your agency be may ow bel d te en es pr The format sults. ervation activities and re ns co d, an nt me ge na ma gy ener . S  1.  Introduction  gy ency indicating assigned ener ag r you of n sio mis the ees. Briefly describe number of government employ al tot e at im ox pr ap the responsibilities and d by the s that have been establishe al go on ti va er ns co gy er en State the her operations. Please ot all for and s, ng di il bu agency for transportation, r this report. provide a point of contact fo or on ation on these instructions orm inf r he rt fu r fo or ce an For assist contact the Federal Programs e as pe , ts en em ir qu re the overall report , 20 Massachusetts Avenue, 33 31 m Roo or , 17 40 637 ) 02 Office, DOE, at (2 Washington, D.C. 20545. 2.  •  General Transportation  ortation energy conservansp tra l era gen 's cy en ag Briefly discuss the (General transportation . es iv ct je ob nt me ge na tion program and rlergy ma The following information ) s. on ti nc fu e icl veh includes all admin;strative should be provided:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  mobiles, aircraft, ships and to au all of es typ and s er • Numb ortation equipment used for other energy-using transp icate if the vehicles or Ind . es os rp pu ve ti ra st admini fuel supplied by GSA. equipment are leased from and by fuel type (gasoline, and Btu in use gy er en al • Provide tot ns nistrative vehicle operatio diesel, etc.) for all admi first half of fiscal year the for and 8 197 r yea for fiscal l categories and conversion 1979 (See Attachment A for fue factors). e d in administrative vehicl use gy er en al tot the e id ov Pr h • 1975 (October 1, 1974 throug operations for the base year September 30, 1975).  8. sts for fiscal year 197 co gy er en al tot the e id ov • Pr  -1-  $_., -  r - •  •.:-• •:‘  4•40,:, 1# 'IN:4#7. 0•••••Vr. •  3.  Buildings Program Report  m all agencies that own, A buildings program report is required fro leases building space through lease or operate buildings. If your agency ts, please provide a separate GSA and is not responsible for energy cos ation to be provided where statement but do not include below. Inform available and applicable includes: Provide the total • FY 1978 inventory of building space. of buildings. gross square feet (GSF) and total number leased. Indicate if the,buildings are owned or Btu by fuel type • The total energy used in buildings in year 1978 (electricity, natural gas, etc.) for fiscal e Attachment and the first half of fiscal year 1979. (Se version A for information on fuel categories and con factors.) the base year • The total energy used in buildings for 1975). 1975 (October 1, 1974 through September 30, ry, in terms of • The energy used in buildings, by catego first half kBtu/GSF for fiscal year 1978 and for the of fiscal year 1973. for fiscal year • The cost of energy used, by fuel type, 1979. 1978 and for the first half of fiscal year p'anned to be • Information on new buildings that are h FY 1985. designed, constructed or occupied throug are feet, Include the number of buildings, gross squ nned occupancy expected energy use in kBtu/GSF, and pla date. 4.  Other Operations and Related Programs  not included above, that form Discuss any energy related programs, ion program or that contribute to the part of the agency's energy conservat goals. These could include, for agency's overall energy conservation and development programs, employee example, industrial programs, research pooling and vanpooling programs, energy awareness training programs, car ation is particularly sought on paper recycling programs, etc. Inform ive or that are potentially useful programs that have been unusually effect iveness of these programs and the ect eff the te ica Ind es. nci age er oth to or charts would be welcome. hs rap tog pho le tab Sui ed. iev ach ts benefi  5.  Recommendations  l Energy Management Program era Fed the ing rov imp for ons ati Recommend are requested.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -2  -  •." .  ;NJ -- rt'•  -"";  IMMO.  • ATTACHMENT A  -  NVERSION TO BTU CO D AN ES RI GO TE FUEL CA  of the Department by ed us e os th the are sources. Many of nversion factors co el g fu in s ow ou ll ri fo va e r Th t. nts fo e fuel Btu conten the Btu equivale ag p er lo av ve on de d se to ity, ba Energy s, are, of necess or ct fa on si er conv ors to ld use these fact ou sh es ri go te ca rting fuel usage by Agencies repo port. quired in this re re ta da p lo ve de   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  UNIT BTU CONTENT PER FUEL CATEGORY watt hour 11,600 Btu/Kilo Electricity  Gallon 138,700 Btu/  Fuel Oil  foot 1,031 Btu/Cubic  Natural Gas eum Gas Liquified Petrol e 6 Butane) (Including Propan Coal m Purchased Stea line Automotive Gaso oleum Diesel and Petr s Distillate Fuel ne Aviation Gasoli Jet Fuel  on 95,500 Btu/Gall Short Ton 24,580,000 Btu/ Pound 1 ,390 Btu/ on 125,000 Btu/Gall llon 138,700 Btu/Ga llon 125,000 "tuiCi llon 130,000 Btu/Ga llon 138,700 Btu/Ga  Navy Special  OP   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  JUN 4  1979  (--) --, i __ , I  rn  c_... —...1 cco  ri C., r.1  C.--..  1-''•  —4  c.  zr,) (.3) >  .... -it  MEMORANDUM FOR SELECTED HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  "TM  FROM:  SUBJECT:  WAYNE G. GRANQUIST ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FOR ANAG MENT AND REGULATORY POLICY Request for Comment on Proposed Information Collection Guidelines  Attached are draft interim guidelines for use in any collection of information on the race, ethnic background and sex of applicants for benefits under Federal programs. The collection of racial, ethnic, and sex characteristics of applicants for Federal benefits has been a thorny issue for many years. The main concern of the Executive Branch has been to prescribe conditions that would assure that information supplied by applicants could in no way be available to influence a decision concerning them. An equal concern has been that Federal agencies collect and have available sufficient information to assure themselves that they are not discriminating against any group in implementing assigned civil rights responsibilities. The proposed guidelines seek to deal with this matter in a way that protects the individual applicant while providing to the Government some assurance that eligible applicants are not being discriminated against, knowingly or unknowingly. We have had substantial consultation with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice in preparing these draft interim guidelines. We would appreciate receiving any comments or suggested changes in the proposed guidelines by c.o.b. July 15, 1979 in order that final guidelines may be prepared for issuance by the Director. Attachment  cD  • f' f- 1  • •  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Draft Interim Guidelines for the Collection of Race, Ethnic, and Sex Information on Applications made by Individuals for Benefits from Federal Programs. Past OMB guidelines for controlling and reducing reporting burden state that a request for clearance of an application form may not contain information other than that necessary to determine (1) whether an applicant is eligible to receive the benefit applied for or (2) the amount of benefit to which an eligible applicant may be entitled. As a consequence of these stringent guidelines, departments and agencies have had difficulty in obtaining sufficient information to assure themselves that they are fully meeting their obligations under civil rights provisions such as Title VI and Title IX. These guidelines for the collection of race, ethnic and sex information are intended to permit departments and agencies to collect information needed to enable them to meet their legal obligations while continuing to assure that the reporting burden on respondents is kept to a minimum. Information on an applicant's race, ethnic background and sex ought to be collected from all persons applying for a Federal benefit only when such information is necessary -- to determine eligibility to receive the benefit or -- to determine the amount of benefit payable to an eligible applicant or to determine whether a program is being administered to provide equal opportunity to all eligible groups in the population, regardless of race, ethnic background, or sex. Information on these personal characteristics may be collected in the course of the application process in accordance with the following guidelines: 1. Application for a benefit under an entitlement prograffl. An entitlement program is one that automatically accords a benefit to every applicant who meets the entitlement requirements-- for example, food stamps or veteran's benefits. Questions relating to the race, ethnic background and sex of an applicant for a benefit under such a program may be placed on the application form.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 2. Application for a benefit under a non-entitlement program. A non-entitlement program is one that accords benefits to some from among those that meet the eligibility requirements. For example, research grants are awarded from among qualified applicants I but not all qualified applicants receive grants. Questions relating to the race, ethnic background and sex of an applicant for a benefit under such a program may be placed on the application when the application is filed personally with the individual who will make the decision regarding the awarding of the benefits. This is because these characteristics will generally be known by the person reviewing the application. Questions relating followedr.ce, eth n i c b a c k gr o u n d to the r a n on -e n ti tle m a p li of hen oher mea n s o n o t e pp la e a n aanbp p l i ca tion are  ex rgr ro ay oc mi nmg  For these programs, questions relating to the race, ethnic background and sex of an applicant may be collected on a separate or detachable portion of the application. The separate or detachable portion of the application may contain identifying information (e.g., name, serial number of the form, or social security number) but must be processed and maintained separately from the application form. One way to carry out this requirement is to ensure that a separate or detachable portion of the application may be mailed to a separate address. pplication contains identifying information on m it should provide a description of the procedures e sure that the race, ethnic and sex information ants for a benefit is not being used in processing  III  3. Voluntary nature of reporting. No applicant may be required to furnish information on race, ethnic background or sex unless such information is necessary to determine an applicant's elbility to receive a benefit or to determine the amount of benefit to which an eligible applicant may be entitled. An application without that information must be processed exactly as every other application except where such information is necessary to determine eligibility for amount of benefit.  dill  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 Except in those cases in which race, ethnic background, or sex information may be necessary to determine an applicant's ability to receive a benefit or to determine the amount of benefit to which an eligible applicant is entitled, each application which seeks to collect race, ethnic, or sex information shall carry the following statement: "Although you are not required to provide this information your cooperation will help in determining compliance with Federal civil rights laws. In no instance will this information be used in considering your application. If you decline to provide this information, it will in no way affect consideration of your application." 4. Privacy Act notice. An application for a benefit made by an individual is part of a system of records under the Privacy Act if it is maintained by a Federal agency or for the use of a Federal agency. A Privacy Act notice is required by Section (e)(3) of that Act. For each application that seeks to obtain information on the race, ethnic background and sex of an applicant, the agency must include a Privacy Act statement that tells the applicant on the form which it uses to collect the information or on a separate form that can be retained by the individual-"(A) the authority (whether granted by statute, or by executive order of the President) which authorizes the solicitation of the information and whether disclosure of such information is mandatory or voluntary; (B) the principal purpose or purposes for which the information is intended to be used; (C) the routine uses which may be made of the information, as published pursuant to paragraph (4)(D) of this subsection; and (D) the effects on the applicant, if any, of not providing all or any part of the requested information;..." 5. Applications for benefits that do not create systems of records under the Privacy Act. There are Federal benefits that are applied for through State and local government agencies. Some of these applications may be kept by the agency receiving them and may not be subject to the provisions of Section (e)(3) of the Act. Even though the Privacy Act may not apply in these cases, it is desirable for all applicants to receive similar information.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4 6. Race and ethnic standards. Departments and agencies collecting information on the race, ethnicity and sex of applicants for benefits under Federal programs (including employment) will use the categories specified in Directive No. 15. "Race and Ethnic Standards for Federal Statistics and Administrative Reporting," issued by the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, Department of Commerce. 7. Department or Agency Responsibility. Any department or agency that collects information on the race, ethnicity, and sex of individuals applying for benefits or Federal programs is responsible for assuring that that information is not used in any way to enable anyone to discriminate against the individual to whom the information pertains.  •  •  United States of Arm_rica  Office of Personnel Management  Washington, D.C. 20415  June 1, 1979  In Reply Refer Tr,  Y('W  R00111(  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES Subject:  Federal Compensation Reform Legislation  Early in June, the President plans to send to Congress legislation which will substantially improve the Federal pay system. The legislation preserves the comparability principle for determining Federal pay, but attempts to improve its accuracy by making several major changes in it. Like civil service reform, compensation reform is of importance to all departments and agencies. We hope, therefore, that you will provide the kind of support for it that you did for civil service reform. The principal features of the legislation are:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  Including both pay and benefits, rather than pay alone, in comparing Federal and non-Federal compensation (Total Compensation Comparability).  -  Including State and local government pay and benefits, along with those of private industry, in the data on which Federal compensation scales are based.  -  Placing most of the white-collar General Schedule work force under a locality pay system.  -  Changing certain statutory features of the Federal Wage System for blue-collar employees to provide closer comparability with local prevailing rates.  -  Changing Federal premium pay laws to make them more consistent with the Fair Labor Standards Act and non -Federal practices.  -  Establishing flexibility in various Federal pay systems to allow the Executive branch to recruit and manage a quality work force.  ef_e„,lizg,  ••••"  /4L-4-4j't  CON 114 24 3 January 1979  4111O 'lay 31, 1q74  IS 79 ,P" -4"..c r. MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  C-Fr" Presidential Management Improvement Council —  The President has requested that the Directors of the Office of Management and Budget and the Office of Personnel Management jointly lead an advisory council to assist Federal agencies to improve their management and program performance. The Council members will be appointed by the President and will be composed of outstanding management experts from Federal, State and local governments, universities, the private sector, and organized labor. We will be developing a list of issues and topics for the Council covering areas of possible assistance to individual agencies. The work will be done primarily under agency leadership with assistance by the Council and will include both specific agency problems as well as cross -cutting, government-wide management improvements. Recent efforts to improve the Federal Government's handling of cash management, as well as the work with private industry advisors on designing merit pay, are examples of previous efforts which suggest some of the kinds of issues the Council may address. A project which we will suggest to the Council as high priority will be an effort to improve Government debt collection practices and performance. We will be calling on you to help us identify additional management issues for the Council, as well as examples of successful management improvements which can be widely disseminated throughout the Government. We will also need your suggestions on how the Council might help support your efforts to improve performance. We are attaching a copy of the President's memorandum to us on the Management Improvement Council and a fact sheet which contains further information. We are looking forward to working with you on this cooperative effort. OMB and OPM will provide the Council with a small staff to act as a secretariat and conduit for ideas such as the organization, staffing and prioritization of projects. We will be talking to you as we move forward.  (  e'  (  ilk. Car (///// . irector   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Office of P  s T. McIntyre, Jr. D ector Office of Management and Budget a  sonnel Management  Attachments  .  Y7o ba‘; ‘ ' 1 r 5z. ,91-tazer.c.eJ,  --c. , • e-ite4ezeA-e4e4.4.6  1 .  ,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Catherine: Letter #52 is a memo from the White House from the President about his economic polic y group and the coordination of economic policymaking, I don't know if it requires an answer.  If so used  something like the following:  Dear President Carter: Thank you for the memorandum on the Economic Policy Group and the Coordination of Economic Policymaking.  The Federal Reserve  will be pleased to continue to work closely with An the members of the APG.fyi/A)AW Sincerely,  •  •  •  THE WHITE  gca,  r.iuii  WASHINGTON  May 30, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR  THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES THE WHITE HOUSE STAFF  SUBJECT:  The Economic Policy Group and the Coordination of Economic Policymaking  To assure efficient coordination of economic policymaking, the following procedures shall be implemented immediately:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1. Under the direction of the President the Economic Policy Group (EPG) shall be the exclusive vehicle for coordinating the formulation, execution, and presentation of the Administration's domestic and international economic policies. 2. The EPG should normally operate through meetings of its Steering Group, consisting of the Secretary of the Treasury as the Chairman, the Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and the Advisor to the President on Inflation. The Vice President, the Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs and Policy, and a representative of the National Security Advisor shall participate ex officio in all meetings of the Steering Group. The Chairman of theconsulting with the Steering Group, shall invite the participation of other Cabinet-level members of the Administration as appropriate to cS nsider the issues under review. At the Chairman's call, the Steering Group should meet several times a week in the White H5use.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S 2  3. The Secretary of the Treasury, as Chairman of the EPG, is the Administration's chief economic spokesman, and major statements on economic policy by Administration officials should, whenever possible, be reviewed and coordinated by the EPG Steering Group. 4. The EPG Steering Group is responsible for advising the President so that all Presidential-decision memoranda reflect sound economic analysis and accurately relate the options presented to the Administration's overall economic program and priorities. For this purpose: -- The EPG Shall have an office in the White House. The EPG Steering Group shall have access to decision memoranda -- from agencies and from EOP and White House staff units -- which involve policy issues having a significant impact on economic variables (e.g., inflation, employment, real growth, productivity, competition, international accounts, etc.). The departments, agencies, and Executive Office and White House staffs shall work closely with the EPG to assure the efficient coordination of economic policymaking. 5. These procedures should be implemented without modification of normal Executive Office, domestic policy and legislative clearance processes.  474 o   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  e-ee. oegehA  t  . ia.te&g,  "r/A-2-re  etiv„  •  to •  'fL  #so  f  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. O.C. 205C3  1979JUN -4 P 2:03 _  May 24, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM:  JAMES T. McINTYRE, JR.  SUBJECT:  Preference for Award of Contracts and Grants to Labor Surplus Areas  The Labor Surplus Area Program, mandated by P. L. 95-224, provides for preference in the award of contracts to those concerns which will perform a substantial part of production within areas of high unemployment or within labor surplus areas. On August 27, 1977, with issuance of Defense Manpower Policy 4A (DMP-4A), the terms of this policy were extended to appropriate grant programs. Executive Order 12073, issued on August 16, 1978, reiterates Administration policy with respect to procurements in labor surplus areas. The Administration has decided to continue to include assistance efforts, where appropriate, in the Labor Surplus Area Programs. I have directed that a study be conducted to determine precisely which assistance programs are appropriate for inclusion in the Program. Although a substantial number of Federal assistance programs may not be appropriate for inclusion in this program, a wide range of programs are potentially affected. All Federal grantmaking agencies will be afforded the opportunity to participate in the study. To secure your assistance we will contact those individuals who have been designated by you to work with OMB staff in implementing the Federal Grant and Cooperative Agreement Act (P. L. 95-224). Richard R. Hite, Deputy Associate Director for Intergovernmental Affairs, will direct this effort on behalf of OMB. I urge you to provide your full cooperation.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  /'  ecte/Y  2ielf*  922-c2Wilrif-r)  COMPTROLLER GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES WASH I NGTON D.C. 206411  IS79 Hni 23 B-115398  r  I! I  MAY 17 1979  -,  icE  HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES How to keep the cost of Government at affordable levels and yet adequate to allow Government to deliver needed services is a chief concern of taxpayers and public officials. Federal executives and managers are looking more and more to their accounting systems as a major vehicle for effectively controlling costs of operations as well as guarding against waste, loss, and theft of public funds and other resources. This booklet will help you and your managers and their staffs make the best use of your accounting systems. The discussions and case studies in this booklet point out how these systems can help keep costs down, pinpoint opportunities to produce more at the same or lower cost, and guard against waste and fraud. The ideas presented come from our own experiences in working with agency accounting systems and from experiences of agencies and accounting and management consulting firms in developing, implementing, and using accounting systems. This booklet will help all managers in your organization better understand how the accounting system can help them do their jobs and solve the many problems they deal with each day. We believe it will help your accountants and computer specialists better understand how they can use their technical skills and expertise to build and run accounting systems that are responsive to managers'iaformation needs. I therefore urge you to widely distribute this booklet in your organization.  444 Comptroller  General of the United States Enclosure   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  -1-tAltae-  46 ,e-e#" 1 "'  r% 4,CA514414 --01 ‘.9Piteld&41e d4e4A411  -sr  T.' 1.. ...r.r.:00..r..1477-t.,-  •/ 1%,-4 ..4..r .-1 , "•  '  .•  • *' 1/7.=4: ro",••• - •-* gr • -7 -"I.:, • 4%•e••“.•  •:3.-4• 4,-rty  e;•••  •  S •  /__\ t-eif  •,‘• •:.  ••• ••  47  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  MAY 22 1979  MEMORANDUM TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT: Use of Consulting Services The President, in his May 12, 1977 memorandum to the heads of agencies, expressed concern over the excessive, unnecessary, and improper use of consulting services. He directed that all such arrangements be reviewed and that the results of that review be reported to this Office. As a result of the President's concern, OMB Bulletin No. 78-11, "Guidelines for the Use of Consulting Services," was issued on May 5, 1978. In addition to providing a definition, policy and guidelines, the Bulletin imposed a onetime reporting requirement designed to elicit information on the magnitude of consultant use by Federal agencies. In response to these actions agency use of consulting services declined by approximately eleven percent on a Government-wide basis -- a reduction due, in large part, to your efforts to improve management controls in this area. More, however, must be done and your continued emphasis is required to assure that the improper and unnecessary use of consulting services is stopped. It is important, in light of the President's concern, that you give special consideration to reducing still further your agency's use of consulting services in developing your plans and proposals for the FY 1981 budget. Your review of the enclosed summary data on executive departments and agencies use of consulting services should be helpful in this regard.  9  • e.e.rv es T. McIntyre, Jr. 'rector  Enclosures   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r-r  , 6321.4.41-4,vc.•164-1,  641).°  /1.4  i%risnAkai)t-d  97)044.4.4 .  •  411, THE WHITE HOUSE  1979n1Y21 FTF7 t rnF f.!:  WASHINGTON  May 18, 1979  I  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES The Task Force on Women Business Owners which began its work on August 4, 1977, presented me with its report, The Bottom Line: Unequal Enterprise in America, on June 28, 1978. I then directed the heads of all departments and agencies to analyze its recommendations and indicate what assistance they might provide women business owners. The Task Force found many obstacles facing women entrepreneurs, including a lack of adequate capital, lack of marketing opportunities, and lack of management and technical skills. The Task Force concluded that these deficiencies result, at least in part, from discriminatory practices. The Task Force also recognized the significant contribution which small businesses and women entrepreneurs can make towards innovation, full employment and balanced growth in our economy. To ensure that women can fully participate in our economic system I have today issued an Executive Order which establishes a national policy for expanding the opportunities for women's business enterprise. The Order creates an Interagency Committee on Women's Business Enterprise which will be the permanent structure for promoting, coordinating and monitoring greater efforts on behalf of women-owned businesses by the Federal government. The Order also directs Federal departments and agencies to cooperate with the Committee and to develop affirmative action plans for a greater role for women business owners in their business assistance and procurement activities. ie=,'4;;;•  There are many actions that agencies and departments could take to implement this policy. For instance, the Task Force noted that since women face special barriers in  .  '  0•"64.2r. .   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  -  •  • • •*.•  to"  le • .•" rot  -1 ..4.• • \  •  :Z. •4  •• -"T  . .  1 .., • ••''''Av.t.r •C *•••tta...7-711.2r'liElc'b.T7Stari el"!'  lot —'••• •  • r  2 acquiring the capital necessary for creating or expanding their own businesses, they need greater access to Federal loan programs. As part of this new policy, the Small Business Administration (SBA) has agreed to take the following actions: Establish a goal of $50 million in FY 1980 for direct loans to women under Section 7(a) of the Small Business Act; Initiate a pilot 7(a) "mini-loan" program in FY 1980 for women whose needs for starting or expanding a business are for amounts under $20,000 and evaluate the usefulness of this pilot program in creating successful enterprises over a reasonable length of time. Encourage full participation of women in procurement activities by instructing SBA's Procurement Center Representatives to locate and assist women-owned businesses; Try to add 15,000 women-owned firms to SBA's new Procurement Automated Source System (PASS) by .1_It of FY 1980. Recent data indicates that women-owned firms will receive only about $63 million in Federal procurement dollars in FY 1979. The Task Force found that efforts to encourage full participation of women in Federal procurement activity have been less than adequate. Therefore, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy has agreed to: Set the following overall goals for Federal prime contracts: 1)  An approximate doubling of the dollar amount of Federal prime contracts to womenowned firms in FY 1980 to at least $150 million.  2)  A redoubling of this amount in FY 1981 to $300 million.  Develop and implement a process for collecting data on the numbers and amounts of Federal prime contracts and subcontracts under Federal prime contracts awarded women-owned business;  ....try..  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r  .75".  ?  t  •  •  .  • 7-•  _  es  •  •  4= .4 =  3 Revise government-wide procurement regulations to assure that Federal prime contractors increase their use of women-owned firms as subcontractors. These revisions include: 1)  Developing clauses for inclusion in prime solicitations and in prime contracts which encourage the use of women-owned firms as subcontractors to the maximum degree feasible. I ' crf i a te rd w i th d f The Task Force also found a serious lack of data about women entrepreneurs and the types of the businesses they own. In order to develop this needed information, the Department of Commerce has agreed to have the Census Bureau update its 1972 survey on women-owned businesses and conduct a special survey to gather additional essential demographic data on the woman business owner and her enterprise. The Task Force stressed the importance of early education in encouraging women to have a free choice of all possible careers. Terefore, h the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare has agreed to take the following actions: Develop and promote educational and counseling programs emphasizing entreprenurial skills and business enterprise as a career option for both males and females. Develop such programs for use in the Nation's public and private secondary schools, institutions of higher education and vocational education I rograms. Report to me at the end of FY 1980 on the progress of such efforts and on future plans.  1". z  •  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  t.or  -c  •• _  • —• —  • ^'  •••••  .'"t" • r••'  *7 .'44; :i 4" --1k.4:4,.:"k. 4I,fivFJ•;V . _ 10,4614 : "3-1,;,\iric%6141  4,-"•.."Aie,  11=00.1111"-- -  -or  •  14 This memo and the Executive Order express my pers onal commitment to a national women's business enterprise policy. I expect the heads of all departments and agencies with business assistance programs and activities such as those mentioned in Section 1 of the Executive Order, and those with procurement authority, to substantially improve the quality of this assistance and support to business es owned by women. With your commitment and cooperation, we can greatly improve the opportunities for women who own businesses in our economic system.  rireg:r.  A  Cif  •  •  ,  . . • •i•   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • •••••.„,. C..4-;  • -`••••.:•'"" .  s  -•  ..1• •  •  - '' • ijk"-'4."..r.:A4.014e. •,..),  .;" •  7 4 : A.  in• !i -2**%,  • wZrie-'&45°At  The Honorable Geno Baroni Assistnnt Secretary for Neighborhoods, Voluntary AssocAtions pnd Consumer Protection U.S. Department of ousing And Urban Development Peon 4100 451 7th Street, S.W. Washington, P.C. 70410 Hand nelivered Pear Mr. Pernni: sub7lit comments on the recommendations of the rational Cormisnion on !:eighborhoods that relate specifically to areas of Federal reserve responsibility. Although the fotird was unable to revieli And ermment formally on the recommendations because of the deadline for response, the staff has prepared the accompanying mklmorandin based upon the Poord's previously stated positions on the issues raised by the Commission's recommendations. AM PlenSed  tn  1.1  I trust that these conrlenta will prove helpful to you and to the Administration. Please let us know If we can be of further assistance. sincerely,  R. C. Plows 5/11/79 Tape # 11  OW'  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ,4111•••••••••••S  411  BOARD OF GOVERNORS  •  OF THE  FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM  Office Correspondence  Date May 31, 1979  To  Chairman Miller  Subject: Comments on the Report of the  From  Division of Consume Affairs (Mr. Plows) 41P4 0  National Commission on Neighborhoods.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  As explained in the attached White House memorandum, the Administration has requested the Board's comments on the recommendations of the National Commission on Neighborhoods that relate to areas of Federal Reserve responsibility.  The comments are due at HUD by the close  of business tomorrow, June 1. t  11011111111 . 1111111.11  At Governor Partee's request, I prepared the attached memorandum and covering letter, basing the comments upon the Board's previously announced positions regarding the general issues raised by the Commission's recommendations.  Governor Partee has reviewed and approved the memorandum.  I would be pleased to answer any questions or make any necessary revisions.  .4R3 r rf, THE WHITE HOUSE  '!`  •"  L  • •r.  -  r—  V! r  .  .  1/AS H I N GT0 N ‘  1979 purr 16 PHI?: 05 May 11, 1979  r.rf.'ER'F!) OFFICE IF HIE  MEMORANDUM FOR CABINET SECRETARIES AND SELECTED AGENCY HEADS FROM:  STU EIZENSTAT  SUBJECT:  National Commission on Neighborhoods  Attached to this memorandum is the Final Report of the ion, National Commission on Neighborhoods. The Commiss ed appointed by the President in December, 1977, present 1979. its Final Report to the Administration in March, President The Report contains over 200 recommendations. The ed by has requested an Interagency review to be complet mid-summer. We are interested in implementing immediately those recommendations which are cost-effective and consistent with Administration Urban Policy objectives. Second, we want to identify those recommendations which require further review but which can be acted on later this year. Finally, if a recommendation cannot be implemented, we need to explain whY or offer other alternatives. We are particularly interested in your review and assessment of the recommendations which affect your program areas. This Report is being sent to the attached list of 19 key Agencies, Departments, and Administrations throughout the Government which administer or affect neighborhood-related programs. We would like you to assign someone in your Department or Administration to coordinate your response. The Department of Housing and Urban Development was the Administration's liaison to the Commission, and the President has asked Secretary Harris to take the lead for the Administration's review. Jim Braegy or Pat Hoban-Moore of HUD will contact your office shortly for the nam of the contact person. We are requesting your written comments by C.O.B. Friday, June I, 1979. Please send them to Ceno Baroni, Assistant Secretary for Neighborhoods, Voluntary Associations and Consumer Protection, Room 4100, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Questions should be directed to Mr. Jim Braegy at 755-0127. Thank you for your cooperation.  .6 te'10." *.4.. ". •,•4 •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ...•••••VJ  ;110". di *. :id, .  sve v. T.'•- • • • 4 4.  4,••  t"r•"1.1 • ...10.2r  %e-.• • Iv  s.. _Ar.3.6• 41:`40•4:pf • 40--• • ). 11.0  . r ... 1  . .  . ISA•10 •  V . 5• •  Federal Agencies to Rec2ive Neighborhood Commission Report  Treasury  W. Michael Blumenthal  OMB  James T. McIntyre Jr.  NEA  Livington L. Biddle Jr.  Neighborhood Reinvestment Corp.  William A. Ilhiteside  DOT  Brock Adams  CSA  Graciela Olivarez  Action  Samuel W. Brown jr.  NCUA  Lawrence Connell  Civil Rights Commission  Arthur S. Flemming  FDIC  George A. LeNaistre  Fed2ral Reserve  G. William Miller  HEW  Joseph A. Califano Jr.  LEAA  John M.H. Gregg  Fl LBB  Robert H. McKinney  Comptroller of the Currency  John G. Heimann  Commerce  Juanita IL Kreps  Interior  Cecil D. Andrus  SBA  A. Vernon laver  Labor  F. Ray Marshall  • •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .  T.' •  ,0„ : 4. . .cey . -•" -410.*" . .yvi-}•  • .. •  .  -•  AZ._ -1.  1,41ft.  a.  14.10,  • 60: .)0.4-0. . „ .   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  May 7, 1979  To:  Personnel End kir. Daniels  from:  Jess 'ebbs, 0SIM  Flew handle the attached cononeicstion from the Office of Personnel Masagement as appropriate.  At'Pchaent:  JRHobbs:dj  May 3 memo re strengthaaing capabilities of historically black collages.  Varam,47,  2? 1 • s-A/  Oited States of America  Office of Personnel Management  Washington, D.C. 20415  In Reply Refer To   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MAY  3 1979  You- Reference  MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  ent Carter urged an In his January 17, 1979, memorandum to you, Presid lities of hisincreased Federal effort to help strengthen the capabi ial Assistant to the toricaljy black collega, Louis Martin, Spec entation of this President, was assigned the job of monitoring implem ently contacted directive. In support of this directive, we have rec ation on, and urging the presidents of black colleges providing inform l Act (IPA) mobility greater use of the Intergovernmental Personne program. ary assignment of perThe IPA mobility program provides for the tempor of higher education, and sonnel between Federal agencies, institutions overnmental assignState and local governments. More than 6,000 interg with half of these ments have been made under the mobility program and educational institutions. involving exchanges between Federal agencies t's action plan responding to As part of the Office of Personnel Managemen an initiative which would osing the President's directive, we are prop black colleges in the IPA promote increased involvement of historically tiative is to facilitate mobility program. A primary aim of this ini and development capaassignments which would strengthen the research al focus will be on assignments bilities of these schools. An addition ment systems. which strengthen the schools' financial manage ral agencies and historically Other mobility assignments between Fede al benefits to them include those black colleges which could provide mutu ation of new technologies and which assist in the transfer and utiliz then administrative, manageapproaches to solving problems, and streng ition, the opportunity for uniment and teaching capabilities. In add experience in a different setting versity and Federal personnel to gain can also enhance their effectiveness which relates to their program area own program. and the effectiveness of their r managers and employees of your support First, I urge you to inform you g the capabilities of historically black for this effort at strengthenin program. This support could be made colleges under the IPA mobility ent, a memorandum or some similar vehicle. known through a policy statem to employees in your agency who might be Your statement should be sent and to officials who will be participating in the mobility program requests. The statement should solicit approving or reviewing assignment ilability of agency employees who are ininformation on the skills and ava as well as information on opportunities for ts, men ign ass such in sted tere mobility assignments within your agency. on ve ser to l onne pers ty ersi univ CON111-2.1-3 January 1979  • 2 Second, I am asking each of you to make sure that a key individual is serving as coordinator for this effort to ensure that inquiries from the historically black colleges will receive prompt and careful consideration and appropriate action. Most Federal agencies have already identified a mobility program coordinator as well as a liaison with Louis Martin's office. It is important, however, that persons within and outside your agency know who the individual is who will be able to represent the agency in facilitating assignments with the colleges. Please send me by May 31 a copy of such statement of support for this effort that you may issue, along with information on the results of your initial survey of agency employees interested in assignments, and on opportunities for assignments within your agency, and the name and title of the individual designated to coordinate your agency's efforts. We are acting to collect information from historically black colleges on their research and development needs which might be met through the temporary assignment of university or Federal employees. When the information is received, the Office of Personnel Management will work with the colleges and Federal agencies, as necessary, to help in matching employees with identified assignments. Finally, I would urge you to assure that the historically black colleges participate fully with your agencies in other personnel programs such as the cooperative education program, college summer employment program and the junior fellows program. If OPM can be of assistance to you in this important effort or in acquainting you or your managers with the benefits of the mobility program, please contact Norman Beckman, Assistant Director for Intergovernmental Personnel Programs, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC 20415, telephone, (202) 632-6830; or Ardrey Harris, (202) 632-5373.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _  •  Ltd States of America  Office of Personnel Management  Washington, D.C. 20415 '71 • 1  C_CD  MAY  In Re:in. Fie‘e• To  117  "Th  I  A  •  --.4 un --,—.Your Rater en.c. 7%1 f"-•  —‹*  MIME  .• _  -1  •  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES Subject:  ••  1979-80 Fund-Raising Bulletin  ••=•  The voluntary agencies recognized by the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, in accordance with Executive Order 10927, for on-the-job solicitation privileges in the Federal service during the coming campaign year are listed in this bulletin. Their worthwhile efforts on behalf of all Americansmerit a generous voluntary contribution from Federal personnel. The Eligibility Committee has determined that each agency meets established requirements as to program, objective, administrative integrity and financial responsibility. This list includes one organization, The Pearl S. Buck Foundation, which has been approved for the first time for Federal fund-rag privileges. The assigned periods for the 1979-80 campaigns and the locations and conditions under which solicitation privileges may be exercised are specified in the Manual on Fund Raising Within the Federal Service for Voluntary Health and Welfare Agencies. RECOGNIZED CAMPAIGNS AND AGENCIES 1  Local United Funds, Community Chests, and Other Federated Groups recognized by the United Way of America  2.  The American National Red Cross  3.  National Health Agencies (Domestic and overseas areas) American Cancer Society, Inc. American Diabetes Association, Inc. American Heart Association, Inc. Arthritis Foundation Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Muscular Dystrophy Association, Inc. National Association for Mental Health, Inc. National Association for Retarded Citizens National Association for Sickle Cell Disease, Inc. National Foundation - March of Dimes National Hemophilia Foundation  (Domestic and overseas areas)  ••••  rjr..44~ t:fcftr ,  CON li4-24-3 January 1979  •  •  • 4 .7"t  ••• '•••• •  ••  • et,"• •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7r" ••• '• • •-•,"••-. A 7 .-•••  . • •t4••• JA•  7  • "' T•I• ••:•••••••  -' • •  •  . 1  SI "-• t4.• ,-  •••  • •  ••  •  -  • •  •ey.  -"°•••••••ft-....t1...n...1-, e—,„"  •,,r  - - n•  • t  .11..• •  "  •Jt •• • • •  •  N.Der,N  !fly04  2  National Kidney Foundation National Multiple Sclerosis Society National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation, Inc. National Society for Autistic Children National Society for the Prevention of Blindness United Cerebral Palsy Associations, Inc. 4  International Service Agencies (Domestic and overseas areas) CARE, Inc. International Human Assistance Programs, Inc. (formerly the American Kor-Asian Foundation, Inc.) International Rescue Committee, Inc. Planned Parenthood-World Population Project HOPE (People to People Health Foundation, Inc.) Save the Children Federation  5.  International Service Agencies (Overseas areas only) American Social Health Association International Social Service, Inc. National Recreation and Park Association Overseas Affiliates, Girl Scouts of America Overseas Councils, Boy Scouts of America The Pearl S. Buck Foundation United Seamen's Service, Inc. United Service Organizations, Inc (USO)  n K. Campb Director  cc:  1•P'  Fund-Raising Program Coordinators Chairmen, Field Coordinating Groups  •  •••••••••  . -4-7:.4AfitiCy0   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ,  yr  0.1".••  ,  14-* " ,• '  •  '1"?.; f47•2 .71.  •. N-•  44•4";••*-t` 244;  ow . %  -So  • J.*  7••  •  ir'St  - •••fC,f•N-.4..sg. • ••• •  A.,•  •  tr •  R!31J-z,0 !IF • •  PRESIDENT EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE BUDGET OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  MAY  7 1979  It •  •' t  • I  ,  1979NnY1.6 OFFICE  Tsi .35  RECF.r.in, •;;;F:  1.1(0  AND AGENCIES MEMORAN:= FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS SUBJECT:  Financial Priorities Program  major weaknesses A series of recent disclosures has revealed control. agency systems of financial management and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ncial issues: We have already written to you about several fina s, outlay fund control, audit follow-up, unsoent grant fund We believe estimates, overtime abuse, and debt collection. issues, but good procress is being made on a number of these being given we are not satisfied that sufficient priority is to the overall improvement of financial systems. ram to resolve Therefore, we have now begun a comprehensive prog today. The the major financial issues facing the Government es listed in program will focus initially on the priority issu ultation with the attachment. The issues were selected in cons added as we the Ccmotroller General, and other issues may be with our go along. The procram will be fully integrated n work with recular budget review process. We have also begu these issues the Office of Personnel Management to assure that uation are civen ariorooriate consideration in revised eval systems under the Civil Service Reform Act. with you and Over the next several months, we will be working ormance the General Accounting Office to review agency perf with the in each cf the priority areas. We plan to meet uss heads of selected departments and agencies to disc together individual issues in detail. We also plan to put lems intensive efforts to reach solutions to longstanding prob due to and to reduce the substantial sums outstanding and over the Federal Government. • In our initial meetings, we will ually focus on overall improvement goals, examples of unus f will good progress, and any special problems. Our staf s. communicate with yours to establish dates and time  44. - McIntyre, r./ : JaMet1 Director Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Attachment  Financial Priorities Accountinc systems: a commitment to get General Accounting Office approval of all systems. Internal control: upgrade control systems to reduce the risk of fraud, abuse, waste, and inefficiency. ,•=1,  Cash management: build upon the work of the President's Cash Management T)-^-iec*  properly, -- Audit follow-up: resolve findings promptly and and hold down backlog. -- Outlay estimating: .111M MM.  mon ••••  improve accuracy and timeliness.  ve Debt collection: proper accounting, and prompt aggressi collection action. Overtime:  accurate accounting, and tighter control.  and Grant financinc: increase use of letters-of-credit s. electronic funds transfers, and recover unspent fund IWO 4110•  Grant accountability: full implementation of cost principles (Circular A-21, 74-4, etc.) and standard administrative requirements (A-102, A-110, etc.).  • EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET 4kcori_ WASHINGTON.D.C. 20503  MAY  8 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Effective Use of Information Technology  This Administration has been moving aggressively to increase the responsiveness of the Federal Government to the needs of the public. Severe restrictions on the size of the Federal workforce and our policy of budgetary restraint mean that productivity gains through technology are more important than ever. I have asked my staff to convene groups of key senior policy, program and management officials from selected agencies. It is my hope that these conferences will produce plans and specific steps that can be taken to improve the effective use of information technology within the Federal Government. The participants should focus on two particular objectives: 0  Increasing the productivity of the Federal workforce; and  0  Improving the level and quality of services delivered to the American people.  We have already made progress in the acquisition, management and use of information technology, and the work of the Federal Data Processing Reorganization Project is having significant impact. But I believe much more can be done, and I urge you to give these conferences your personal support. They will be arranged by my staff, in coordination with the Department of Commerce and the General Services Administration, in the forthcoming weeks.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ntyre, * J . es T. Mc 7 D rector  S THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON  May 10, 1979  s'4.- 44•  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  PM 3: 04  19""Y IOC•  f „  o  Within a few weeks, schools will close for the summer and many of our young people will be seeking summer jobs. To some the money earned from summer employment may affect whether they return to school in the fall or discontinue their education. For others, summer employment will enable them to help out at home or to gain experience which may assist them in making decisions regarding their future careers. This year, we are again faced with a high rate of unemployment among our youth. Many of you are already participating in the task force reviewing youth employment and training programs under the Vice President's leadership. As one of several solutions to the problem of unemployment, we as Federal managers along with managers within the private sector should increase our efforts to provide productive summer experiences for young men and women. I am again asking all of you to continue your personal support for the Federal Summer Employment Program for Youth. Federal programs should be a balanced effort to employ those who qualify through successful competition in the Summer Employment Examination as well as through agency merit staffing procedures. Additionally, we must continue to support summer employment for needy youth. To accomplish this objective, I am again setting a general goal to employ one needy youth for every 40 regular employees. We exceeded this goal on a governmentwide basis last summer. Director Alan K. Campbell and his staff at the Office of Personnel Management will continue to provide leadership to the Government's Summer Employment Program.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • . • ".1..  V  a  •••• • -  *.vt  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT  '<dv • 1•-• ,IS '..$  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET / •T 44,,,oto 1 ./  4  r,7^r^ ,, _ ,  -.•  9  WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503  • r1".• '7 - • • -  May 1,  1979  MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  / cel—trA  FROM:  James T. McIntyre,  SUBJECT:  Resources for Management Analysis  I am providing with this memorandum an analysis of Executive Branch resources which were devoted to management analysis and associated administrative management activities during fiscal year 1978. This report is one more step in OMB's continuing effort to focus attention on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of specific Executive Branch activities. It is an important aspect of the comprehensive program of management improvement and the use of evaluation recently announced in OMB Circular No. A-117. The report shows that $275.9 million in obligations and 9,485 full-time permanent staff years were used for management analysis activities during fiscal year 1978. This constitutes a significant investment of the Government's resources in a support activity. It is important that we receive full value for this investment. We in OMB will be taking a fresh look at the resources devoted to agency management activities. This will be done as part of the budget process and the various reviews under our new management improvement and evaluation circular. These reviews should be as useful to you as I expect them to be for OMB. Attachment   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A  of Arr erica Oted StatesOffic e of  Personnel Management  Washington, D.C. 20415 You Reefer.< r  In Fier* Reiff To  •  MAY  3 1979  MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  In his January 17, 1979, memorandum to you, President Carter urged an increased Federal effort to help strengthen the capabilities of historically.lalpsdallege.,4,,, Louis Martin, Special Assistant to the President, was assigned the job of monitoring implementation of this directive. In support of this directive, we have recently contacted the presidents of black colleges providing information on, and urging greater use of the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) mobility program.  himmik ;a.  The IPA mobility program provides for the temporary assignment of personnel between Federal agencies, institutions of higher education, and State and local governments. More than 6,000 intergovernmental assignments have been made under the mobility program with half of these involving exchanges between Federal agencies and educational institutions. As part of the Office of Personnel Management's action plan responding to the President's directive, we are proposing an initiative which would promote increased involvement of historically black colleges in the IPA mobility program. A primary aim of this initiative is to facilitate assignments which would strengthen the research and development capabilities of these schools. An additional focus will be on assignments which strengthen the schools' financial management systems. Other mobility assignments between Federal agencies and historically black colleges which could provide mutual benefits to them include those which assist in the transfer and utilization of new technologies and approaches to solving problems, and strengthen administrative, management and teaching capabilities. In addition, the opportunity for unig versity and Federal personnel to gain experience in a different settin s which relates to their program area can also enhance their effectivenes and the effectiveness of their own program. First, I urge you to inform your managers and employees of your support for this effort at strengthening the capabilities of historically black colleges under the IPA mobility program. This support could be made known through a policy statement, a memorandum or some similar vehicle. Your statement should be sent to employees in your agency who might be participating in the mobility program and to officials who will be approving or reviewing assignment requests. The statement should solicit ininformation on the skills and availability of agency employees who are terested in such assignments, as well as information on opportunities for university personnel to serve on mobility assignments within your agency. •  CON 114-24.3 January 1979  •  • - - — ,• „   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  -  •  •1 :. rAior:*4  ..!:!'f.<:".7-V11-'1,4:!..•:?:,•10. r  _ ,  ,  c •  •  •••  •  tfir. tv4," ("  2 Second, I am asking each of you to make sure that a key individual is serving as coordinator for this effort to ensure that inquiries from the historically black colleges will receive prompt and careful consideration and appropriate action. Most Federal agencies have already identified a mobility program coordinator as well as a liaison with Louis Martin's office. It is important, however, that persons within and outside your agency know who the individual is who will be able to represent the agency in facilitating assignments with the colleges. Please send me by May 31 a copy of such statement of support for this effort that you may issue, along with information on the results of your initial survey of agency employees interested in assignments, and on opportunities for assignments within your agency, and the name and title of the individual designated to coordinate your agency's efforts. We are acting to collect information from historically black colleges on their research and development needs which might be met through the temporary assignment of university or Federal employees. When the information is received, the Office of Personnel Management' will work with the colleges and Federal agencies, as necessary, to help in matching employees with identified assignments. Finally, I would urge you to assure that the historically black colleges participate fully with your agencies in other personnel programs such as the cooperative education program, college summer employment program and the junior fellows program. If OPM can be of assistance to you in this important effort or in acquainting you or your managers with the benefits of the mobility program, please contact Norman Beckman, Assistant Director for Intergovernmental Personnel Programs, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC 20415, telephone, (202) 632-6830; or Ardrey Harris, (202) 632-5373.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  r  Director  li  "•••419..  .; •  •  -•  .• "fililtV1•44,11.. -"5",.."'; . -•••••••7 "7„,w4i.ri• •*; r :140-4,„„A.4.,:.',  ;•;. • 46•,..,"  vv  v 8 Ac  -7   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  k.  --  s2  .F GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD 0  Dee To F rom  5/31/79  Sandy Wolfe ELEANOR J. STOCKWELL  The attached was handled by phone. No further response is necessary.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  -*  9&14,4  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  GENERAL COUNSEL  April 30, 1979  cc  Honorable G. William Miller Chairman Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Washington, D. C. 20551 Dear Mr. Chairman: In accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 11030, as amended, enclosed is a prop osed Executive order entitled "Establishing an Interagency Committee for Small Business Statistical Policy Coordination and Providing for the Collection of Data on Small Businesses." The proposed order was submitted info rmally to this office, along with the enclosed transmit tal letter, by the Small Business Administration. On behalf of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, I would appreciate receivin g any comments you may,bave —concerning—thisproposal. If you have any corFefits or objections they slv)uld be received no later thin Thursday, May 31, 1979 :, / Comments or inquiries may be submitted by telephone to Mr. Ronald A. Kienlen of this office (395-5600). Sincerely, •  7t) 0 *  747.  William M. Nichols General Counsel Enclosures  -Pitgrt  -  "  "." '  I  •a,  •  ,  J,r T•  .‘.‘,St.sb. •g  •  \,r.  4 I ! ,••••••.., •.  z 1",/, 'vs) s,c" '  U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WA5HING-70'i, D.C. 20-116  v).5Tik rs '  orrscc OF THE ADMINISTRATOR   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MEMORANDUM FOR • Honorable Stuart Eizenstat Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs and Policy  Efforts to conduct the economic research necessary to address adequately the needs, problems and concerns of small business have been hampered by the absence of a cohesive government policy for the collec— tion of data on small business. Although several agencies collect reams upon reams of potentially useful data, we have found that the collecting agency either does not break down the information for small business or that the agency uses definitions and methodologies which generate information which is only useful for that particular agency's purposes. Fot example, there is no way to link the data from the FTC or the IRS, which is based on asset size, to the data developed by the Bureau of Census, which is based on employee size or sales. A second problem is that the agencies use different definitions for the economic units from which the data is being collected. Several agencies use "establish— ment" units while others use "enterprise" units. The IRS collects data ricim tax—paying units which may be either "establishments" or enterprises." flualf—of the data on small business for economic research is 4ready ., sbeilig collected. The problem has been getting it-into a usable form. We can maximize our existing data resources by encouraging agencies to break down data by business size. However, we must establish a common et of definitions of the economic units to be measured, the appro-priate size breaks for the economic units and the appropriate variables  •••  ap e  ,t  # --1   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Page 2  Honorable Stuart Eizenstat  instances, by which to measure businesses of different sizes. In other all minor changes or additions to the data collected anyway, would make the difference. The attached Executive Order establishes an interagency conmittee, composed of the data—gathering agencies, for the purpose of developing a government—wide small business data collection policy. The Committee will develop a set of uniform guidelines, make recommendations to the various agencies for improvements in, or the development of, the small business collection process, assist in the implementation of these recoualendationsy- and identify and seek to solve problems in the exchange of the data between and among the agencies. ; •••••  A. Vernon Weaver Administrator  •••  •. .  .. •  • • • '•  -  SUGGESTED EXECUTIVE ORDER  ESTABLISHING AN INTERAGENCY C01ITTEE FOR SMALL BUSINESS STATISTICAL POLICY COORDINATION AND PROVIDING FOR THE COLLECTION OF DATA ON SNALL BUSINESSES  By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the United States,. in -' 4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  furtherance of the purposes and policies of the Small  Business Act (15 U.S.C. 631) and as President of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. (a)  There is hereby established the Interagency  Committee for Small Business Statistical Policy Coordination (hereinafter referred to as the •  "Committee") for the purposes of reviewing and establishing guidelines for the collection of data on businesses of various sizes and coordinating the efforts of the Federal Government in this area. (0)  The Committee shall be composed of the  following members, and such other heads of Executive agencies, bureaus or divisions as the President may designate: 1.  The Chief Counsel for Advocacy, who  will act as Chairman 7  • • •  s  11"  •  •  Nri  4r  (co  -26  dmai  2.  The Director of the Office of Federal  Statistical Policy and Standards, Department of Commerce - 3.  The Director of the Bureau of Economic  Analysis, Department of Commerce  4.  The Director of the Bureau of Census,  Department of Commerce  5.  Assistant Commissioner of the Internal  Revenue Service 6.  Associate Comm4 ssioner for Management  and Administration of the Social Security Administration •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7.  Commissioner of Labor Statistics, Department  of Labor 8.  Administrator of Economics, Statistics,  •  and Cooperatives Service, Department of Agriculture - 9.  Director of Division of Research and  Statistics, Federal Reserve Board is invited to attend 10. Director of the Bureau of Economics of Federal Trade Commission is invited to attend  11. Director of the Directorate of Economic and Policy Research of the Securities and Exchange Commission is invited to attend (c)  Each member of the Committee may designate an  alternate to serve whenever the regular rather is  • t  ok . • .48 6 V  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  unable to attend any meeting.  The alternate member  shall be designated from among officials of appropri_ate rank.  The Chairman may invite the heads of other  Executive agencies, bureaus or divisions or their alternates to participate in Committee deliberations whenever ratters which affect the interests of such agencies are to be considered. Section 2.  The Committee shall perfol_ii. the 'following  functions and duties: (a)  Within the framework of existing laws on.the  collection of stati'stics, study and develop rectxmmendations on the following subjects: 1.  Appropriate size breaks within small  business, and large business; EethodOlogy to link together-eaterpise-:1:_. data and establishment data; 3.  Collection of economic data on business  .fiA;lis using the appropriate size breaks;  4,  Methodologies to link the data collected  - by IRS, FTC and Census; and .5.  How to create an exact match of a sample  of small, medivm, aad large fj.rms of the administra. tve records collected by IRS, Social Security Administration, Census, and the FTC; v  IUb  y!$..  • .  •  _.4  •  f,x.  "• " e 4 46•44611.: 3imilmhs 0 143•41—'4a • "  Pt,441• " '  7,71 ' I  -4  • ••   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (b)  Advise and assist the President with respect  to the iwprovement, develop=ant and coordination of Federal and other statistical services for the collection of data on small business; Lc)  Eake recommendations to the Federal agencies  for improvements in, or the development of, collection of data on small business; (d)  Facilitate cooperation and cooperation of the  collection of data on small business among and between Executive agencies; and, • (e)  Identify and seek to solve interagency problems  which impede the effective collection of data on small business. Section 3.  Executive agencies shall, to the extent  permitted by law, institute and put into effect, as soon as  practical, recowlhendations of the Committee for the collection of data on small business. Section 4.  (a)  Each Executive agency, shall, to the extent  permitted by law, provide such information and  assistance as the Committee or the Chair2an may request to assist in carrying out the functions of the Committee.  -51•   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (b)  The Administrator of the Small Business  Administration, to the extent permitted by law, shall provide such admi-aistrative support and such funds as may be required to support the functions of the Committee. cc)  As used in this Order, the terms "executive  agencies, bureaus and divisions" means all departments, agencies and establishments of the Executive branch of Goveril=nt. Section 5.  The Co=mittee shall terminate on  December 31, 1981 unless extended prior to that date.  _  a  United States of America  Office of Government Ethics  Office of Pilionnel Management Washington, D.C. 20415  OK.  APR 26 1979  MEMORANDUM SUBJECT:  (1) Senior Employee Stesignations; (2) Failure to communicate with agency employees; (3) Financial reports of agency ethics officials  FROM:  Bernhardt K. Wruble Director  TO:  Heads of Departments, Independent Agencies and Government Corporations / Designated Agency Ethics Officials  Vov  1. ii  Procedures and standards for designation of positions at GS-17 and above and the Senior Executive Service.  As agencies become more involved in tha process of formulating their reports, due May 15, 1979, regarding the designation of Senior Employees under Title V of the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 ("the Act"), certain questions and issues will naturally arise, and we intend to address them as they do. The following are our views on certain selected issues that have arisen:  r4kes  o The standards set forth in 5 C.F.R. 737.25(b)(3) are designed to identify those individuals who have "significant decisionmaking or supervisory responsibility". It is intended that a position should be designated if it is one in which deonmaking responsibility extends regularly to major policy issues within an agency or in which supervisory responsibility extends to all of a directorate, bureau or department which has major policy or operational responsibility. It has been suggested that under the regulations a position would have to meet both of the foregoing standards in order for it to be a Senior Employee position. Such is not the case.  • -r  o In determining whether a position is one which has ficant decision-making responsibility", the mere fact that the concurrence of a supervising commission or superior may be required to effectuate a policy decision should not be taken as automatically negating an individual's possession of significant "decision-making responsibility".  •  ".•  , 1 034t, oit  o An agency may distinguish among its regional offices in respect to the designation of senior employees. The regulations refer to "major policy or operational responsibility". It is possible that one regional office of an agency would constitute a "major" operation, while another would not.  • diZAI 900 .40.", :  '416,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -.110r  ;  •:•4 • -  - •-•.1  . •  ' *  •:r^h:  rt.-co a,. ' +1-4  -  "' k ,•  *.  12":  •  ns- •4-  7  10-  o'''An agency report filed pursuant to 5 C.F.R. 737.25(b)(1) k should provide a clear and succinct pictur e of the senior positions in the agency and their relation to each other. This does not require that the agency submit a separate offici al job description for each position involved in the report (although such descriptions may be requested later as reports are audited). To the contrary, unless such job descriptions are genuinely helpful, such a procedure might delay OGE review of the agency submission. Summary descriptions or concise statements of why a position should not be designated are acceptable and desirable. The basic idea is that each agency will list all of the positions at GS-17 and above together with those in SES, and justify the exclusion of positions "that should not be designated". This will result in a list of those positions for which designation will be effective on Octobe r 1, 1979, and a list of those which will be excluded from designation. The overriding objective is to demonstrate why those in the second group should not be designated. The clarit y and completeness of an agency response will naturally have impact on whether exclusions which are arguably available to the agency become available in fact. Attempts to minimize unfairly the number of people within an agency who should properly be designated may result in the inability of the Office of Government Ethics ("OGE") to act promptly on many of the exclusions requested by that agency. o Where the head of an office is a proper subject of designation, it is likely that a deputy who Serves in an alter ego capacity should also be designated. It is less likely that deputies assigned to limited subject matter areas should be designated. A deputy should not be considered as serving as an alter ego merely because, in the absence of the principal, such deputy assumes the role of the "acting" head of the office. It is the regular activities of the deputy which are consequential. 2.  Failure to communicate with agency employees.  One of the most severe criticisms contained in the investigations conducted by the General Accounting Office of agency practices before passage of the Act was the agencies' failure to advise their employees of conflict-of-interest responsibilities. Recently, members of the staff of OGE have had the opportunity to speak with groups of employees from various agencies. It appears that while some agencies have taken affirmative and aggressive steps to educate their employees as to rights and responsibilities under the new Act, other agencies have done nothing at all in this regard. Agency employees should be told where to come for advice, assistance, information and materials. Informing the employees of an agency as to their responsibilities and helping them is an elemental obligation of the designated agency ethics official.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ••  ' 1;  • t‘,.: • ' AO' re•::  •  -  -;'‘.%  " .•  • 'VP,r•4*1.6 • .  r .r.4110'.44,  :‘,,,m,.!; -.,  '  •  ;. 4;•^1.. :111/ 1 4 ' .W' .:t.ifarA61.,‘ . .-  •  _  3 3. Review of financial reports of designated agency ethics officials. The financial report of a designated agency ethics official is required to be filed in the official's own agency and, under section 203(c) of the Act, a copy must be transmitted to OGE. Prior to the transmission of a copy to OGE, the report should be reviewed by the agency to determine compliance with any statutes and regulations specifically applicable to the agency as well as the existence of problems raised by the relation of the interests disclosed to the business of the agency. The agency ethics official's report should be reviewed either by the head of the agency or a high-level official acting on his behalf.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  14Toi.• Wilimmemm.  • 141.2•40c . .  4.0 '4117.1  "2".  11.  e  •  #r•  • .! sr•  • t  .•  •- , p6 "p•)•'•  ,. • .-• •  • .• 'M. •  •• t•-•  ine “ / "1-44.7"e42,:efb.„14•131 ,  44  •  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  April 25, 1979  nr. rtuart Litenstat assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs and Policy The White House 20500 Washington, D. C. Doar Stu:  Thanks for sending tie a copy of your mellorandum om "Youth Employment in the Eighties." It is encouragine to see that an interagency committee has been formed to review existing youth employment policies, particularly since authorization for many new initiatives under the 'Youth Employment and Demonstration Project Act will expire at the end of fiscal year 1980. Although experience under these programs has been brief, the finaings of the interagency committee can make a timely contribution to efforts to modify and extend youth programs. reith the economy operating at relatively high rates of labor utilisation, it clearly is appropriate to turn our attention to those groups of workers, inclueing youth, who still face unacceptably high rates of unemployment. Because of persistent structural barriers in the labor market, attempts to reduce youth unemployment at tnis time through expansionary demand management policies would lead to unacceptably high rates of inflation. Consequently, we must look to structural programs that provide skill training and create jobs for youth. these programs not only can irAprove the lives of the individuals who are served but also can enhance the outlook for easing inflationary pressures and raising productivity. It is my belief that, to be effective, efforts to reduce struc— tural unemploraent should be guided by several basic principles. First, programs must be aimed at increasing the supply of skilled workers for In this regard, it is the expanding sectors of the private economy. iwportant that the planning and implementation of training programs occur largely at the local level, and I hope that further efforts will be made to obtain funds for the Private Industry Councils authorize4 by (.ETA. A second, related requirement for successful programs for youth is the cooperation and commitment of local etnployers, odurators, and public officials in easing the transition from the classromi to the workplace.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Mr. Stuart Eizenstat Page 2  It has been my experience that close linkages between individual businesses and schools can improve career guidance for the studenta and produce trainees who are better prepared for the world of work. Finally. we should continue to explore ways of providing private employers with incentives to create jobs for structurally unemployed youth through tax policies such as the targeted employment tax credit. I look forward to seeing the results of the committee's review, and hope that the group will consider in its recommendations the extent to which our youth employment programs successfully have put into practice the principles stated briefly auove. I will be happy to cooperate in any way possible with the committee's work. Sincerely,  nickler/JSZeisel/Jaichline:dbm vih-41 cc:  D. Shannon  •  .\A  THE WHITE HOUSE  12,7  1(i  WASHINGTON  April 18, 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR:  FROM:  THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE THE ATTORNEY GENERAL THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE THE SECRETARY OF LABOR THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WELFARE THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT THE SECRETARY OF TRANSPORTATION THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY THE DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS THE DIRECTOR OF THE COMMUNITY SERVICES ADMINISTRATION THE DIRECTOR OF ACTION THE CHAIRPERSON OF THE EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION STUART EIZENSTAT  4a.:w  ;0.-111. 4  10911, rrIONOMPW  SUBJECT:  ISSUE DEFINITION MEMORANDUM: EMPLOYMENT IN THE EIGHTIES  YOUTH  a  r>tort  Purpose The President has directed that a review of present Federal youth employment policies be undertaken through the Domestic An interagency committee will be Policy Review System. formed to analyze existing programs and develop options and recommendations for the President's Youth Employment Decision The committee will be co-chaired by the Secretary Memorandum. of Labor, and myself. It will consist of the addressees, the Domestic Policy Staff, and the Vice President's Task Force on Youth Employment.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  o The ,President would like to receive recommendations by Octdter 15. Therefore, the work of the committee should be completed by September 15. Youth unemployment is a critical national problem. Over the last 25 years, the unemployment rate for black teenagers has risen from approximately 17% to approximately 36%. During this same 25-year period, the rate for white teenagers has remained constant at about 13%. These numbers reflect the complexity of this problem which is an outgrowth of fundamental labor market shifts over the last 40 years as well as social and political changes. The purpose of this policy review is to review the state of the art of our knowledge and our policy prescriptions to determine the appropriate course of action for the Administration. Issues The basic youth employment issues which need to be addressed include: 1. Changing Nature of Youth Unemployment - What is the relative importance of such contributing factors as the movement of job opportunities away from inner-city concentrations of young people, the extent to which young people can move with the jobs, the impact of discrimination, high job aspirations of young people and immigration. How will the changes in the demand for labor in the 1980's affect youth employment? What effect would a significant increase or decrease in aggregate adult unemployment have on the youth employment problem? What accounts for the particular difficulty faced by inner-city young people? Rural young people? Minorities? What effect will the impact of technology and the growth of the service sector have on the demand side of the youth labor market? Are any changes in private sector employment practices over the next five years likely to affect the dimensions of the problem or the parameters of the solution? Categories of Unemployed Youth - What do we know about 2. the residence, race, age, ethnicity, sec, education, skill and family income of young people in 1979 and the likely configuration in 1985? Which of these individuals are likely to be experiencing unemployment? How well does education shield against the likelihood of unemployment? How many unemployed young people are experiencing an additional   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  3  socal problem such as drug adaiction, a status offense, a criminal offense, unwanted pregnancy, dropping out of school or exclusion from school, etc.? Which categories are most in need of employment assistance? Other kinds of assistance? How many young people live within inner-city labor markets experiencing persistently high youth unemployment? In rural areas? 3. Effective, Existing Program Models and Strategies - In reviewing existing local programs including the private sector, vocational education, career education, CETA (including YEDPA, SYEP, and Job Corps), and criminal justice services, which program models and strategies have proven relatively more effective? For which ages and groups? What role do supportive services play in these programs? What combination of services have proven most effective in facilitating the school to work transition? For which ages and groups? What policy and operational elements appear to have contributed the most effective programs? Do strictly targeted programs yield the same outcomes as those which are more broadly based? 4. Implementation and Institutions - What can be done to encourage expanded private sector hiring of young people? How can young people be made more attractive to employers in terms of basic education, skills, motivation and experience? What can the Federal Government do to facilitate and encourage simplified implementation and quality programming at the local level? What are the most effective local institutions, public and private, to deliver employment, education, and training services to various age groups of young people? What type of services will be required? How can increased accountability be achieved at each level of government?  k!krt  row-  1,r  Cost Implications - Given the various program options 5. available, what are the budgetary costs, Federal, state or local, for each? Given limited resources, which options are most cost-effective for those most in need? What is the net budget cost of Federal youth employment programs, taking into account value of work accomplished? What are the multi-year Federal budget requirements for each? Structure The study will be divided into three phases:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  o  S  4  Phase One - Defining the Nature of the Dimensions of the Problem and Identification of Potential Policy Options (April-June) IL26:  Phase Two - Review of Existing Efforts (AprilJuly) o  04Wt1 Illoos4.ACA  Phase Three - Proposal for New Policy Initiatives (June-August)  Because of the tight timetable constraining the review process, some activities will have to be undertaken in parallel fashion rather than in sequence. Schedule Meeting of Agencies - April 9 Agencies' Final Reports on Program Assessments Due - August 15 Agencies' Final Recommendations on Program Modifications and Initiatives - September 15 Decision Memorandum for President - October 15  _ . 14# • •  cc:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The Chairman, Office of Personnel Management ,if? The Chairman, Federal Reserve System Board of Governors( The Chairman, Commission on Civil Rights The Chairman, National Commission on Employment Policy The Chairman, National Commission on Employment and Unemployment Statistics The Chairperson, Minimum Wage Study Commission The Federal Co-Chairperson, Appalachian Regional Commission  P.43rt.4,1,  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  U.S. DEPA l TM Jai OF LA 130R S rm.:DAM/A Dm,NIVI.)4/%11()N 0111CC of \Volker.' Compensation Pior,lams Office of the Di rek..01  r‘  Washinrton, D.C. 202 tO  1979E1P13 I 7 rt' 1: 20  APR  tk)  MEMORANDUM FOR:  REPRESENTATIVES OF ALL FEDERAL AGENCIES  FROM:  RALPH M. HARTMAN Director, Office of Workers Compensation Programs  SUBJECT:  OWCP National Medical Program Development Project  In the past, the OWCP Medical Division has been involved, almost exclusively, with providing technical and medical expertise in the claims adjudication process on a case-bycase basis. The OWCP has, however, recently initiated an ambitious effort which will greatly expand the role of the Medical Division to include policy development, analysis, ' and education. The goal of those efforts is to improve the overall equity and efficiency of the medical evaluation process; provide a mechanism for assuring the delivery of high quality medical 1' care; and controlling excess program costs relative to medical management. The activities which we feel will greatly contribute to achievement of these goals include: development of medical guidelines for evaluation of occupational disease cases; technical assistance to Agencies in health education and accident prevention efforts; the sponsorship and monitoring of relevant medical research activities; liaison with Federal health research Agencies; and the establishment of close cooperative relationships with Agencies from which our claimant population is drawn.  as.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2-  In this last context, the Medical Program intends to conduct a series of conferences with Medical Directors and other relevant representatives of client Federal Agencies to establish coimunication; to allow identification and resolution of compensation-related Agency problems; to identify problems which may exist internally in the affected Agency; and coordinate solutions to the medical aspects of workers' compensation. Obviously the planning effort necessary to develop an OWCP medical program will greatly benefit from the participation of the Agency Medical Directors. We would sincerely appreciate yonr assistance in helping us to establish these contacts. Our National Medical Program Development Project is being headed by Dr. Stephen S. Leavitt of Teknekron, Inc., who can be reached at 202-523-7497 or you could provide us with the means to cont&ct your ;,:edical Director by completing (and returning) the information below.  Agency: Medical Director: Medical Director's Address:  Medical Director's Phone Number:  Title:  •  APril 18, 1979  To:  Dick Puckett  Fro=  Joan Hobbs  The attached letter has been received in the Chairman's Office. John Denkler does not think we need to comply with this particular request but thought perhaps it was time to send an update letter to the ài1II on the progress we are making. Your review and advice will be appreciated.  Attachment  bcc:  - 4/10 memo from James T. McIntyre, Jr, Director, OMB, re: Evaluation of Executive Order 12044, Improving Government Regulations(trvi_i 3 91)  Mr. Denkler  ,  n • `-r ".• •  .  •  ,•   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE  PEPig  2: 05  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  .r.rri  .  I  APR 1 0 7979  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES IU!J.  Evaluation of Executive Order 12044, Improving Government Regulations  As you know, on March 23, 1978, the President signed Executive Is 12044 directing each agency to adopt certain requirements to improve existing and future regulations. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has responsibility for assuring effective implementation of the Order and will report to the President at least semiannually on both the effectiveness of the Order and agency compliance with its provisions. Many of the Order's provisions have been incorporated in the Administration's comprehensive regulatory reform legislation, the Regulation Reform Act of 1979. This bill was recently introduced in the Senate as S. 755 and in the House as H.R. 3263. Saching a copy of OMB's standard for evaluating agency ce with the Order. This standard will form the basis ing the President and Congress informed on progress in g regulations. We would appreciate your help in seeing information outlined in the attachment is provided to  •  James T. McIntyre, Jr. Director  Attachment  -211111111111...r _  • ft   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Evaluation Criteria for Executive Order 12044  The President has directed OMB to report semiannually on the effectiveness of Executive Order 12044, "Improving Government Regulations," and agency compliance with its provisions. The evaluation plan outlined here will focus on the five essential goals of the Order: I.  Effective senior-level policy oversight Increased public participation  III.  Better and more useful analysis  IV.  Periodic review of existing regulations  V.  Increased simplicity and clarity of regulations (plain English)  The evaluation plans outlined here give agencies an opportunity to review and critically assess their own performance in these five areas and to provide OMB with documentation of their accomplishments and shortcomings. In addition, OMB will conduct case studies, from time to time, of individual regulations to determine whether they were developed according to the letter and spirit of the Executive Order. We will also seek comments from the public on specific agency practices and the effectiveness of the Order in general. In the first report, agencies will be expected to provide critical self-appraisals in each of five areas of concern for two periods: From January 1, 1978, to implementation of the agency's 1. plan, or approval of the plan by OMB, whichever was earlier; and From implementation or OMB approval, whichever was 2. earlier, to April 1, 1979.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  Information for the first period will provide an indication of agency regulatory practices before implementation of the Executive Order. Without such a base period, changes in agency practices cannot be adequately analyzed. The second period will give us the first real indication of agency performance under the Executive Order. The first report should be sent to Wayne Granquist, Associate Director, Management and Regulatory Policy, OMB, by May 1, 1979. Subsequent reports should be sent to Mr. Granquist by August 1, 1979; November 1, 1979; February 1, 1980; and April 1, 1980. I.  Effective Policy Oversight  The Order requires heads of agencies and policy officials to exercise effective oversight of the development and implementation of agency regulations. This requirement is intended to raise the level of regulatory decisionmaking within agencies so that policy officials with broader perspectives and responsibilities can balance the other more parochial interests of technical staff. We believe that more effective policy oversight is the key to the implementation of many of the other provisions of the Executive Order, such as regulatory analysis, public involvement, and clarity. Without it, realization of the other objectives may be impossible. There are three stages at which the Executive Order requires policylevel oversight for significant and existing regulations: 1.  Approval of the semi-annual agenda of regulatory actions;  Review, before development begins, of the issues, the 2. alternatives to be explored, plans for obtaining public comment, and target dates for completion of each step in the development process; and 3.  Approval before final publication.  The most useful appraisal of agency compliance with this provision should come from case studies of selected regulations, from frank appraisals by the agency staff, and from information supplied by members of the public. Agencies are required to describe in detail several examples of how they carried out this provision of the Executive Order for their significant regulations. Agencies should also tell us, using examples, the effects of this provision of the  ,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 Order: What major recommendations were disapproved at the policy level? What improvements, if any, were made as a result of better policy oversight? If delay was a problem, agencies should describe those cases in detail, including the reasons for delay and whether or not the quality of the regulation was affected. Over the next 14 months, OMB will conduct case studies of the development of selected new regulations and the review of existing ones as a supplement to these agency reports. These case studies will enable us to make objective, informed judgments on the effect of the Order and individual agency performance. II.  Public Participation  The Executive Order requires that the public be offered an early and meaningful opportunity to participate in the development of agency regulations. In the past, regulatory proposals have not always reached the public in a timely, informative manner. The requirements of the Executive Order are intended to ensure that the people who are affected by the regulation--those who pay the costs or receive the benefits--have an opportunity to alert federal regulators to the effects and potential problems of the proposed regulation. To give the public adequate notice, the Order requires agencies to publish at least semiannually, an agenda of significant regulations under development or review. In addition, the Executive Order encourages agencies to achieve greater public participation in several ways: (1) by publishing an advance notice of proposed rulemaking; (2) by holding open conferences or public hearings; (3) by sending notices of proposed regulations to publications likely to be read by those affected; and (4) by notifying parties directly. Agencies are to give the public at least 60 days to comment on proposed significant regulations, except in certain rare instances. This requirement is intended to improve agency decisions by giving the public more time to prepare informed comlents.  1'  In their progress reports, agencies will describe, using specific examples, what methods have been used to publicize proposed agency actions and to solicit public comments. Agencies should further describe: (1) which approaches (e.g., hearings, public notices, etc.) resulted in the most useful comments, (2) which were largely unsuccessful, and (3) why.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4 Agencies should also describe whether expanded opp.)rtunities for public participation were given as a general rulE„ only occasionally, or just in certain cases, such as for proposals with major economic effects. Have efforts to increase public participation resulted in a wider variety of respondents (e.g., more individuals, businesses, State and local governments)? If public comment has increased, has this helped or hindered the agency? How? Where possible, agencies should give examples of significant actions taken in response to public conulents, such as withdrawal of a proposed regulation, major changes in the number of people or businesses affected, or significant reduction in cost. III.  Regulatory Analysis  Regulatory analysis is intended to focus agency attention on the economic consequences of regulatory decisions and to ensure that intended regulatory goals are achieved effectively at the least cost. The Executive Order requires agencies to prepare a regulatory analysis for significant regulations which are expected to have major economic consequences for the general economy, individual industries, geographic regions or levels of government. These analyses are to be made available to the public. While we will be tracking the agencies' regulatory analyses, each agency should provide its own assessment of how this provision worked. Were the analyses, as a rule, completed early in the formulation stages of a regulation? Was the least burdensome of the acceptable alternatives chosen? If not, were reasons provided to the public? Agencies should discuss and provide examples of how the analyses did or did not contribute to the formulation and design of the regulation. For example, where in the agency were the analyses prepared, by program people or by a special analytical staff? If this varied, which approach was most useful and why? Who in the agency found the analysis to be most useful --program managers? Management analysis staffs? Policy-level decisionmakers? IV.  Existinq Regulations  Agencies are required to review periodically their existing regulations to see whether each is achieving the policy goals of the Order. These reviews are subject to the same. procedural steps outlined for proposed new regulations. They are intended to help weed out unnecessary regulations and to improve essential ones. Agencies should report how effective their reviews of existing  fr   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5 - ike to know what difference their regulations were. We Kbuld : reviews made. For example, were unnecessary paperwork requirements eliminated? Was the meaning of the regulation clarified? Were better, less burdensome regulatory approaches discovered and implemented? Were any regulations recommended for outright elimination? V.  Plain English  So that individuals who must comply with regulations understand them, the President has directed agencies to write regulations as clearly and simply as possible. Although this is an extremely important requirement of the Order, plain English is difficult to define and measure. Some regulations must be written in technical language, but at a minimum, the preamble should be clear and understandable to the lay reader. We would appreciate help from the public and the agencies in identifying especially good and especially poor regulations. We will report to the President which agencies continue to issue confusing regulations as well as identify those agencies that issue exceptionally clear and well written regulations.  17   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 1975:VcrFEFTFTMAlsfrefG'SMENT AND BUDGET WASH I NGTON. D.C. 20503  APR  1 1979  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT:  Regulation Reform Act of 1979  h cTnu7t6 at h woe rori ii t oe , oAn M henet iderhtsf' hr o osed rs mppt wRtheaerf r g e r e 1 29 it" m ograht c t oncttf pcnt p rise e ei f P mr e s i d eaorn r. h os nca nessl r m n o dop r moesf eci si i ee g y g 9l st arimAy s att. ac pnt cvnao bodtfI a c i e s to d isc h a r r un er t nr e s po n dd s t nce r ns ti ht ai ze s a s esc on th e  The development of what we are confident will come to be regarded as a landmark achievement in the field of administrative law required the assistance and cooperation of many persons in the public • and private sectors. No S.lanced proposal could have been put together without the expert contributions of public servants in the Federal agencies who are most familiar with the regulatory process. The comments which we received were, in all cases, thoughtful, analytical and stimulating. The ability of fr so many agencies to respond in fashion in the limited time available was remarkable. We are especially pleased that so many agencies expressed their satisfaction with the manner in which certain of their concerns were resolved. •such  Please convey to your staffs our appreciation for their efforts in transforming various concepts and ideas into a coherent proposal which the President was able to convey to the Congress with justifiable pride. We look forward to your continued assistance in working to secure its enactment.  es T. McIntyre, ector  w   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ••r- ::41T : ;  •••%1  THE WHITE HOUSE WAS  :  197911PR /3  34  April 10, 1979  3 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES  SUBJECT:  trft't;511  Required 5% Reduction in Agency Energy Use  The U.S. has taken the lead to get the member nations of the International Energy Agency to reduce petroleum consumption. Our goal, as part of this commitment, is to reduce oil imports by a level equal and up to 5% of projected domestic consumption. This goal must be met to help reduce the upward pressure on world oil prices. The Federal Government will do its part. I am directing that Executive departments and agencies reduce energy consumption by 5% for the twelve-month period beginning April 1, 1979, as compared with the preceding twelve months. In achieving this reduction, the following specific actions are to be taken: Set thermostats in all Federally-operated buildings, except where required for health and safety or special purposes, at not more than 65 degrees during working hours and 55 degrees during non-working hours for the heating season and at not lower than 80 degrees for the cooling season. o  Reduce use of all automotive fuels by 10%.  Each agency will have to take additional steps to achieve the full 5% reduction goal. These initiatives should be selected so as to avoid adverse programmatic impacts. As directed in my February 2, 1979 memorandum, for example, heads of agencies may reduce lighting and other electrical use throughout agency activities and reduce petroleum use by eliminating unnecessary activities and vehicle trips. Credit will be given for fuel switching from oil to gas or coal.  tr  Ete   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2 Within 30 days, please submit to the Secretary of Energy a plan for achieving the reduction in energy use. Each agency that now reports quarterly energy consumption to the Secretary of Energy should identify in the quarterly status reports the actual energy savings attributable to this effort. I have directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget, to monitor compliance with the provisions of this directive. They will periodically report to me on accomplishments, problems with respect to adverse impacts on agency missions, and further actions which may be required.  .."••"•'  •, tc:,! „.Citt '.  ,  - --••••-•  4`...r • 0.•  •.•  •  :  In•••••  •  •  •  Ji I  'EXCUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  1P9RPR11 fl  :C7 )  CFFICE  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  APR 6 619  i  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT: Draft OMB Circular on Employee Parking Attached for your review is a draft circular intended to establish fees for the use of certain government parking lots. We invite your written comments and ask that they be sent to to Ms. Joyce Walker, Deputy Associate Director, Room 9202, OMB, Washington, D.C. 20503, no later than April 30, 1979. In an increasingly prudent for the employee parking. carpooling more installations have  energy-conscious era, it does not seem nation's largest employer to subsidize At the same time we should encourage actively even though some Federal large amounts of parking available.  The Federal government's historical in-house practice of subsidizing parking costs for some employees has become inconsistent with more recent national policies toward energy conservation, reliance on public transportation and a cleaner environment. Based on studies which relate automobile use to the cost of parking, the Washington Metropolitan Area Council of Governments has concluded that charging commercially equivalent fees for parking would reduce the number of cars in the core of the Washington, D.C. region. A comparative study of Federal and county employees in Los Angeles also supports the conclusion that where the user pays for parking, carpooling and transit use are increased. We generally agree with the direction and magnitude of these conclusions. While carpooling among Federal employees has always been substantial, more progess is needed. A GSA survey conducted in 1977 at OMB's request shows that government-wide carpooling regulations are not uniformly applied. In the core of the Washington, D.C. area, for example, over a third of the executive branch parking spaces were still used by single occupant vehicles, despite the regulation's objective of 90 percent utilization by carpools. The survey also shows that in suburban locations between 80 and 90 percent of Federal employees drive to work alone. About 42 percent of the Federal employees in downtown Washington, D. C., and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  INEEk   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  •  •  2  al lots and thus nearby Virginia are able to park in Feder their trip to work receive a subsidy for part of the cost of other 58 percent compared to other Federal employees. The transit or park in of the Federal employees who take with the commercial parking pay out-of-pocket costs along public at large. rs supporting This transmittal memo discusses several facto The pricing policy will primarily the proposed policy. and densely affect Federal facilities in downtown locations However, more stringent suburban locations. populated application of carpooling requirements will affect all Considerable cost savings to the taxpayer, locations. congestion, traffic less reduced energy consumption, increased transit use, greater carpooling and improved air quality are expected from this action. The circular would establish a parking fee at all Federal installations based on the fair monthly rental value of the parking space, except that in most cases no fee will be charged where the rental value is less than A10.00 per month. The intent is to set a fee high enough to recover space costs and act as an incentive to carpooling, yet not so low that administration of a fee system and parking management would totally consume the fee. Agency managers at locations which would continue to provide parking without charge will be required to develop and implement affirmative among vanpooling plans for maximizing carpooling and employees and other building tenants. In the vast majority of cases, charging a commercial rate In many for parking is not expected impose a hardship. cases employees will be able to share the costs through carpooling. In other cases, the daily use of public transit may be a more cost effective option for getting to and from The circular provides for a phase-in period to help work. employees and agencies adjust carpooling and financial arrangements as necessary.  mes T. McIntyre irector  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT  .8   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  DRAFT  APR 6 1979  CIRCULAR NO. A-  TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT:  Federal Employee Parking Facilities  1. Purpose. This Circular establishes policy governing the acquisition and allocation of parking facilities and the establishment and determination of charges to be paid for parking by Federal employees and other facility tenants. 2. Coverage. The provisions of this Circular apply to parking facilities in the United States, its territories and possessions, the commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the Canal Zone under the jurisdiction of the executive branch, excluding those operated by the Government of the District of Columbia and the United States Postal Service. The Office of Management and Budget urges elements of the Government not covered by this Circular to adopt similar poes. 3. Background. This circular is promulgated because Federal practices through 1978 regarding employee parking -particularly • in urban areas -- have had several of the following effects: a. parking private receive  Substantial public funds are being used to subsidize expenses for some Federal employees while many sector employees in the same employment areas do not similar benefits from their employers;  b. There is an inequity among Federal employees working at the same location; some receive an implicit monetary benefit through free or subsidized parking, while others must face continuing out-of-pocket costs to park in commercial parking lots or to ride public transit; .j.jj S.-. Free or low parking diminishes the effectiveness of government-wide carpooling regulations (FPMR 101-20.117); acts as a disincentive ii.— use;  DRAFT  •  2  and generally contributes to excessive automobile use which leads to increased air pollution and energy consumption; of amount d. There are wide differences in the government parking available at various Federal facilities, often at adjacent or nearby facilities; and e. Implementation and effectiveness of the Government10-20.117) varies (FPMR regulations carpooling wide considerably among agencies. In the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, where the Federal Government is the dominant employer, the policy described in this Circular will contribute to that area's compliance with the timetables for improving ambient air quality set forth in the 1977 amendments to the Clean Air Act. Free or low-cost parking biases an employee's decision on whether to drive alone, carpool or use public transit for Therefore, a basis for reimbursement for use of commuting. such facilities needs to be established which is fair to the Government, equitable among employees, and consistent with related policies. 4. Policy. It is the general policy of the executive provided at Federal facilities parking that branch installations be limited to the minimum necessary, that they be administered in full compliance with the carpooling regulations, that they be made available on equitable basis to all Federal employees in the immediate vicinity without regard to agency affiliation and that Federal employees who are provided parking in Government-owned or leased space be assessed a charge equivalent to the fair monthly rental value for the use of such space. of Acquisition 5. Acquisition of parking facilities. will be permitted consistent with facilitTs parking limitations and conditions in this circular. The amount of parking facilities to be provided, at either leased or federally constructed buildings, will be dependant upon an of the public transportation and carpooling analysis projected to he reasonably available or feasible at the This analysis will consider location or area. given Executive Order 12072 and other applicable laws, regulations or policies concerning use of public transit, air quality control and energy conservation. This analysis will include the following factors:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (A-  )  •  DRAFT  3  4.  a. Availability of existing and proposed transit other community sponsored transportation improvements; b. Availabinty matching programs;  of  agency  c. Availability parking;  of  existing  d. Impact neighborhoods;  commuter  of  or  metropolitan  or  parking  planned  on  and  carpool  off-street  residential  e. An analysis of where an agency's employees live, particularly in relationship to transportation systems; and f.  Special or unusual requirements.  The analysis will assume strict enforcement of existing carpool regulations and increasing use of public transit. The application of this policy should result in periodic reductions in the total number of Government controlled spaces within a given area, particularly at leased locations. 6. Allocation and assignment of parking facilities. The General Services Administration (GSA) or other agency in control of parking facilities at Federal buildings and on other Federal property, including leased property, shall equitably allocate such parking facilities among affected agencies. Agency heads shall be responsible for the assignment of parking spaces allocated for their control, including the assignment of spaces for employee parking. To maximize the efficient utilization of available parking spaces, assignments of spaces to Federal employees shall be principally on the basis of the carpooling regulations promulgated by GSA (FPMR 101-20.117). In urban areas, where several federally controlled facilities exist within easy walking distance of one another, the parking spaces may be pooled on a zonal allocation plan rather than on an agency by agency basis to assure that an equitable number of spaces are available to all employees and to maximize the carpooling opportunities. Such arragements already exist at several locations. Such pooled allocations shall be administered by GSA or other agency in control of the parking facilities primarily on the basis of carpool membership without regard'to agency quota and in accordance with FPMR 101-20.111 .and 101-20.117.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (A-  )  • DRAFT 7.  4  Charges for employee parking.  a. Establishment of charges. Charges for employee use of Government-owned or leased parking facilities shall be as assessed at all locations except where the rate, determined in b. below, is less than $10.00 per month. When several agencies are located in one facility, the head of the agency charged with responsibility for the building or other property with parking facilities available for employee use shall be responsible for developing procedures for collecting fees. Authority to establish charges for the use of parking spaces is contained in the Federal Property and Administrative Comptroller Services Act, as amended (400 U.S.C. 490). General file reference B-177610 dated March 7, 1976, reviews this matter. b.  Determination of rates.  (1) The Administrator of GSA shall determine the rate to be charged for Government furnished employee parking at each facility. Such rate will approximate the price of commercial property in the vicinity. The rate shall be not less than the sum of the fair rental value of such property as used in calculating Standard Level User Charges and any direct costs of parking facility management. The rates so established shall be adjusted annually by the Administrator to reflect increases or decreases in value. The head of each agency responsible for (2) assessing a charge for employee parking shall request that GSA of determine the approximate the Administrator commercial value of the parking involved. The request shall be made in accordance with regulations to be set forth by the GSA under paragraph 8 below. (3) In instances where a parking management company is engaged to operate the facility, issue permits, provide attendants, etc., the cost of such management services will be included in the fees paid by individual users for the use of such parking facilities. In such cases, the management contractor shall also collect the fees from individual users.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (A-  )   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  •  DRAFT  5  (4) All fees collected for the use of parking facilities shall be in addition to the Standard Level User Charges paid by using agencies to GSA. (5) Under 40 U.S.C. 490(k), fees collected net of management fees in 7.b.(3) above shall be credited to agency appropriations charged for parking spaces and services. Amounts recovered in excess of direct costs shall be credited to the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. 8.  Responsibilities.  regulations implementing a. GSA shall issue the provisions Circular this respect of with to the determination of rates that approximate the commercial value of Government parking. Regulations shall be issued by July 1, 1979, and all rates should be determined by September 1, 1979. b.  Heads of department and agencies shall:  (1) assess charges consistent with of this Circular,  the  provisions  (2) give full cooperation to the GSA in connection with the determination of commercial value, (3) effective October 1, 1979, provide for the collection and deposit of employee parking charges established in accordance with paragraph 7 of this Circular and the implementing regulations of GSA. For the initial period October 1, 1979, through September 30, 1981, the charges to be collected shall be 50 percent of the full rate scheduled to be collected. The full charge shall he collected after October 1, 1981; (4) issue such instructions as may be needed to implement the provisions of this Circular and regulations issued by GSA. 9. A7ency Administrative Workload. Agencies shall administer the provisions of this Circular within existing personnel resources and, after conversion to the policy in this Circular, routine administrative workload should be approximately the same as that experienced under past practice.  A-  )  •  DRAFT  •  •  of Fifteen months after the introduction 10. pseport. parking fees each agency shall submit a one-time report to OMB detailing the before and after effects of this circular. Information to be included shall address: the number of official, visitor and employee parking spaces by location, employee transportation utilization, public carpool utilization, revenues from parking fees, an assessment of any noticeable changes in private sector or commericial parking supply, demand and price of commercial parking in the vicinity of the agency, and changes in the distribution of employees mode of transportation to and from work. Copies of these reports will be made available for study to Federal and local agencies with policy responsibilities in the areas of transportation, air quality improvement and energy conservation. 11. Inquiries. For any information concerning this Circular please call the Office of Management and Budget, 395-4752.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  James T. McIntyre Director  )  -  April 5, 1979  0  R  Questions and Answers Regarding Draft OMB Circular on Parking Facilities  1.  2.  3.  4.  6   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Q.  Are any changes expected to be made before a final circular is issued?  A.  Few changes are expected. However, all reasonable proposals consistent with the objectives of the circular are welcome and will be given consideration.  Q.  How will this affect employee union contracts involving parking?  A.  It depends on the specific contract terms. Contracts should probably run their course. Upon renegotiation, the policy in this circular should apply. The circular's objective is to conserve energy, improve air quality, and reduce unneeded subsidies.  Q.  How much will parking at my agency cost?  A.  Parking values will be determined this summer by GSA.  Q.  When an agency implements fee parking, will it still be required to comply with GSA carpool regulations for parking space allocation?  A.  Yes.  The policy hopes to achieve even greater carpool use.  ._L.  Will handicapped employees and employees who frequently work hours different from an agency's normal duty day be required to pay for parking space?  A.  Under FPMR 101-20.117 up to 10% of a facility's parking may be allocated to such personnel without the requirement for carpool S. Some modification of the fee structure will be considered to handle individuals in compelling circumstances.  Q.  Does this policy apply to contractor employees at government facilities who use government-controlled parking spaces? What about government-owned, contractor-operated facilities?  A.  Yes. The objectives of energy conserva.tion and subsidy reduction • still apply.  ,-  2 L..  Q.  Does this policy ap;.; to employees of Congress and other legislative branch agf,,ncies on Capitol Hill?  A  No. However, the cognizant committees of Congress will be requested to consider a similar policy for the legislative branch.  Q.  If an agency's parking spaces are valued by GSA at less than S10.00 a month and the agency believes that passing these costs through to the user would encourage ridesharing, may the agency charge that fee?  A.  Yes. The S10.00 threchhold was selected because the policy applies nationwide. If local circumstances suggest that a lower threshhold would he effective, it may be used.  Q.  How many parking spaces will be affected?  A.  Preliminary estimates are in the 120-130,000 range. 20-257, of these are in the Washington, D.C., area.  Q.  Must an agency charge visitors for the use of government-owned or leased parking spaces?  A.  An agency may continue existing practice in setting aside certain areas so that the public may have reasonable access to the agency. The policy recognizes that one-time or occasional visitors would not have the opportunity to join a carpool for that visit, and that a one-time parking fee would not discourage the trip.  Q.  How does an agency establish a means for collecting fees from users of its parking spaces?  A.  This subject will be addressed in the implementing regulations to be issued by GSA. Agency financial management staff should be able tI provide advice on this subject.  Q.  Where can an agency ohtain information on how to set up a carpool program?  A.  The Federal Highway Administration and the GSA Public Buildings Service will he able to provide material on this subject. The Tennessee Valley Authority also has an excellent program in operation in Knoxville, Tennessee.  Q.  If an agency location has an abundance of parkiog spaces, how will employees have an incentive to form carpools?  A.  Agency facility mana(;ers will allocate spaces near work site entrances to carpools and organize carpool matching programs.  8  9.  10.  11.  12.  13.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Almost  3 Physical reductions in parking space may be considered in some circumstances if a demonstrated increase in carpooling is not realized.  400.  14.  15.  16.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Q.  If an agency does not have good transit service available, must a fee still be charged?  A.  Yes, if the facility cost exceeds the $10.00 monthly threshhold. Agencies are encouraged to deal directly with the transit authority or company which provides transit services in their city to discuss improvements to transit routes serving the government facility.  Q.  Does this policy apply to the White House and the Pentagon?  A.  The draft circular applies to those facilities.  Q.  How can I explain to my employees that this policy will be in their best interests?  A.  There are several aspects to this. First of all, we should remember that many employees already use transit or pay to park, or work at locations which have parking spaces with low economic value. These employees will not be directly affected. It is expected that a good number of attractive parking spaces now used by single occupant cars will become available for carpools. This will benefit those employees who have not been able to qualify for government parking. Also, the individual in a carpool will only face one-third or onefourth of the parking fee where a fee is in effect, and avoid the cost of driving his or her car at the same time.  •  United St4is of America  Office of Governmcnt Etracs  Office of Personnel Management Washington, D.C. 20415  MEMORANDUM  r r  6 1919  AFR  _  e tj:..) The Interim Regulations on Post Employment Conflict of Interest  Su 0,— N" 14.D  F  Tn:  Bernhardt K. Wrup Director  CY't  To:  Heads of Departments, Independent Agencies and Government Corporations/ Designated Ethics Officials  The interim regulations on Post Employment Conflict of Interest, 5 C.F.R. Part 737, published in the Federal Register on April 3, 1979, set forth a number of responsibilities which • must be met by executive agencies in the next few months. It is important that each agency, in the interest of its employees, promptly and carefully. The regulations place on agencies the responsibility for developing information necessary to decide which employees will or will not be subject to restrictions for Senior Employees under Section 207 of Title 18 U.S.C., as amended by the Ethics in Government Act of 1978, as well as for proposing "separate" statutory agencies. Therefore, any deficiencies in an agency's response may result in unnecessary restrictions on its I own employees. r•••:.:••, &e,'t  The due dates are as follows:  0'1? air  o May 15, 1979 -- Each agency shall notify the Office of Government Ethics of any subordinate statutory agency or bureau which may be designated as "separate". (see 5737.13)  M77  po o May 15, 1979 -- Each agency shall submit a rert describing all poons at GS-17 and above and in the Senior Executive Service ("SES"), together with the agency's recommendation as to those positions that should not be designated as Senior Employee positions. (see 5737.25) (The work each agency has completed for establishment of SES positions is likely to be a useful starting point.) o June 30, 1979 -- Each designated agency ethics official shall submit a report of other positions which should be designated as Senior Employee positions. (see 5737.25) For more information, contact Dave Ream at (202) 632-7642. V.4 1111101r  7 ^ 475..0.4V/*..1.-,*.'"4.. 3   • ••• https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  rA,r,L•  k••*,..f•••••v,  ••••• _  t‘. •te  ••  ••  •  , •  ,  •  •  •f•• „,•••%.;,...7•••,•• 4  ..,„•-*,  A -  ow  „N- s,.  ••••;."‘  •  •'  •  I 1*  ••••• •  ,t •  . 4. A, ••  'es'*;".*.• • A "0°No. • /..• "‘"P  ••4‘ , 1* ••  'tor  '  ,  rvc.4.•  II  r   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • Ate., C cflA.40744,44e  cc. 7-)tat4-A at_yhtinit4-0  30 .1\  11  1  ce.  ah1ihte/7  /  3.2.flotor-st A141-4.33  ;4.2) Axply it7.  4,9  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  /1  Aptelpdifv.., cc"  -  F yT c_ 6 ,1  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASH I NGTON. D.C. 20503  *7)  •  APR  2 1979  rri r  ,  rj  •  ' 7.! , 7))  MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT:  Identification of Budget Proposals for Energy Conservation and Related Investments in Federal Buildings  The National Energy Conservation Policy Act, P.L. 95-619, enacted November 9, 1978, provides that each Federal agency should identify the appropriations requested in the President's budget, and authorizations for appropriations, for energy conservation and solar or other renewable energy investments to be made in Federal buildings. This includes funds and authorizations requested for the retrofit of existing buildings and, to the maximum extent practicable, the portion of funds requested for these purposes as part of new construction or the renovation of buildings. In compliance with the Act, agencies should consult with their respective authorization and appropriations committees to determine specific Congressional needs. If you send to your Congressional committees additional information beyond the budget justification materials you have already provided, please forward to the Deputy Associate Director for Energy and Science, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, D.C. 20503, two copies of each such transmittal. Sincerely,  John F. qhite Deputy Director  •   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EPCUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PREIkET OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET!  ic79  WASHINGTON. D.C. 20503  OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  APR  12  3 1979  6)/1-33 IES MEMORANDUM-FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENC SUBJECT: Follow-up to Increasing Small and Minority Business Participation in Advertising Procurement  l On January 31, 1978, OFPP Policy Letter 73-1 was sent by the Office of Federa Procurement Policy (OFPP) to each procuring agency directing that (1) contracts with advertising agencies not exceed three years, inclusive of options, and (2) ine agencies review requirements for procurement of advertising services to determ if smaller portions can be broken out and reserved for solicitations on which minority-owned firms and other small firms can compete. compiled OFPP furnished the agencies with a source list of minority-owned firms, also by OFPP and the National Telecommunications Administration. This list was g published in the Federal Register as a source for large advertising agencies lookin for minority-owned firms with which to subcontract. President, On January 16, 1979, OFPP and Louis Martin, Special Assistant to the of their met with the major 17 advertising procuring agencies for a critical review es have progress and problems. This review revealed that while some agenci agencies substantially increased advertising awards to minority-owned firms, most still must take greater initiatives. Recent reports reveal that Federal advertising contracts to minority-owned firms, minorityhave increased 591 percent, $7,035,409, since FY 77. Approximately 100 we still owned firms have benefited from such advertising contracts. _However, have a long way to go. Total Advertising Procurement FY 77  FY 78  $122,411,800  $132,927,800  Advertising procurement for the 17 major advertising agencies is:  FY 73 Total MBE  $104,046,322 8,225,836  FY 77 $105,455,869 1,190,427  % 1.34 591.00  FY 78 $1,409,547 7,035,409  Increase or Decrease Decrease Increase   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  OFPP has taken steps to address two areas of concern raised at the January 16 meeting. First, the Minority-Owned Advertising Firms Source Directory has been expanded to include newspapers and magazines. Second, advertising has been more clearly defined-and the appropriate codes on the F PDS have been identified.  Source Directory On March 23, 1979, OFPP expanded the Minority-Owned Media Outlets, Production Companies and Advertising Agencies Directory to include newspapers and magazines. A copy is enclosed for your convenience. Each agency shall notify the listed firms every four months of the contracting requirements for the upcoming year. The firms listed will be surveyed in June, 1979 to determine whether they have been apprised of contracting opportunities, and to determine whether they have received Federal contracts. Definition of Advertising The following definition will be used for the purpose of increasing the minorityowned business share of advertising procurement. "Advertising" means (1) the action of bringing information to the attention of the public, especially by an oral/visual or written announcement, for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction (e.g., enlisting in the Army), advising potential beneficiaries of rights to which they may be eligible (e.g., pollution abatement, sale of savings bonds) and (2) the business of preparing advertisements for publication or broadcasting (including all types of media dissemination). This includes those messages for which time or space is purchased or received free of charge from broadcast or print media as well as all services which are purchased to produce, package, circulate or distribute these messages. The definition of advertising includes but is not limited to public information, public service announcements, recruitment messages, notifications of new or existing Federal services, activities, requirements or information.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3  FPDS Codes System (FPDS) are listed The advertising codes on the Federal Procurement Data as Management and Professional Services: R 401 Advertising R 410 Publications T 001 Arts Graphic T 005 Film Processing T 006 Film/Video Tape Production department and agency in In June of 1979, OFPP will evaluate the progress of each increasing advertising contracts to minority-owned firms. Sincere  Lester A. 7ettia Administr _zo   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  EXECUT 1 VE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT  4 441. , •  .•  OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET  11,  60, * 7S'i'Z4*  WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503  OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY  MAR 2 3 1979  •  MEMORANDUM TO OFPP AGENCY CONTACT POINTS SUBJECT :-%  Updated and Expanded List of Minority-Owned Media Outlets, Production Companies, Advertising Firms, and Newspaper and Magazine Publishing Companies  The attached directory is an updated and expanded list of the minority-owned media outlets, production companies, advertising firms, and newspaper and magazine publishing companies. As was stated in this Office's Policy Letter No. 78-1, increasing the minority business share of media advertising is an important part of the President's directive that purchases from minority firms be tripled. All departments and agencies shall make every effort to apprise the firms on this list of all contracting and subcontracting opportunities quarterly and report to us the progress made in increasing advertising awards to minority-owned firms.  Lester A. Fe Administrat  Attachment  •  •  MINORITY-OWNED BROADCAST PROPERTIES (COMMERCIAL) RADIO  ALABAMA WEUP-AM Jordan Lane, N.W. Huntsville, Ala. 35806  Licensee: Leroy Garrett, 2609 President and General Manager Garrett Broadcasting, Inc.  WBIL-AM Main Street, Box 666 Tuskegee, Ala. 36083  Licensee: All Channell TV Service, George Clay, General Manager  WENN-AM/FM P.O. Box 697 Birmingham, Ala. 35201  Licensee: Booker T. Washington Broadcasting Co., President: A. G. Gaston, General Manager: Larry Hayes  ALASKA K CAM (Athabascan) Glennallen, Alaska  ARIZONA KXEW-AM/FM Tucson, Arizona KCLS (Navajo) Flagstaff, Arizona KDJI (Navajo) Holbrook, Arizona KINO (Navajo and Hopi) Winslow, Arizona Licensee: Gilbert Leivas, D/B/A, BINA Broadcasting Company, Parker, Arizona  KMDX (FM) Old Tribal Jail Bldg. Parker, Arizona   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1  ARIZONA (Con't) KXEW P.O. Box 2284 Tucson, Arizona 8570,2 (602) 632-6429  CALIFORNIA Licensee: John Lamar Hill Owner and President, Rod McGrew, General Manager  KJLH-FM (Compton) 384 S. Crensha'W Blvd. Los Angeles, CA  Bill Shearer, General Manager  KACE-FM 1710 East 111th Street Los Angeles, CA 90059  KSRT-FM Stockton, CA  KBRG-FM San Francisco, CA  KRDU Dinuba, CA  KLIP Fowler, CA  Jose Molina KROQ-XPRS 6290 Sunset Blvd., Suite 1600 Los Angeles, CA 90028 (213) 461-3905 Golden Star Radio (105.3) Thomas C. Tong 846 Clay Street San Francisco, CA 94108 421-6228   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  COLORADO KVFC (Navajo and Ute) Cortex, CO Andres Neidig KAPI 2329 Lowell Avenue Pueblo, Colorado 81003 (303) 545-2883  Ed Romero KBNO 1601 West Jewell Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 (303) 922-1151 CONNECTICUT WLVH-FM Hartford, CN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Licensee: Howard University Robert Taylor, General Manager  WHUR-FM 2600 Fourth Street, N.W. Washington, D. C. 20059 (202) 265-9494   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  FLORIDA Licensee: Robert Gilder, Owner: R.A. McLeod  WTMP P.O. Box 1101 Tampa, FL 33601 (813) 626-4108  3  FLORIDA (Con't) Licensee: Amrad Corporation President: Dr. Claude Anderson General Manager: Jim Boraddus  WOWD-FM P. O. Box 6065 Tallahassee, FL 32301 (904) 386-5141  GEORGIA President: Mr. Ragan Henry Licensee: Broadcast Enterprise Network, Inc., Suite 901 1211 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107,(215) 563-5678  4., WAOK 75 Piedmont Ave., N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (404) 659-1380  Licensee: James Brown, President J13 Broadcasting Company, Al Garner, General Manager  WRDW-AM P.O. Box 1405 Augusta, Georgia 30903  Licensee: Black Communications Corporation of Georgia, Inc., Benjamin M. Tucker, Chairman and General Manager  WSOK-AM P.O. Box 1288 Savannah, Georgia 31402 (912) 232-3322  HAWAII   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  KHLO Hilo, Hawaii  KNDI Honolulu, Hawaii  KZ00 Honolulu, Hawaii  KKON Kealalekua, Hawaii  4  ILLINOIS Licensee: Johnson Publishing Company, General Manager: Marvin Dyson  W3PC-AM 820 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, Illinois 60605 At  Licensee: George Pinckard, Seaway Broadcasting Inc., General Manager, Allen Wheller  WMPP-AM 1000 Lincoln Highway E. Chicago Heights, Ill. 60611 (312) 758-1400  INDIANA WTLC-FM 2128 N. Meridian Street Indianapolis, Indiana 48604  Licensee: Dr. Frank P. Lloyd President, Community Media Corp.,(317) 934-8861  WCMX-FM 424 Reed Road Fort Wayne, Indiana 46815 (219) 422-4646  Licensee: HMH Communications, Corp., Owner: Charles Hatch, P.O. Box 6240, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 46806  KENTUCKY Licensee: Summers Broadcasting, Inc., Bill Summers, President and General Manager  WLOU-AM 2549 S. Third Street Louisville, Kentucky 40208 (502) 636-3535  Licensee: Summers Broadcasting, Inc., Don Rogan, General Manager  WSTM-FM Oxmoor Shopping Center P.O. Box 6011 Louisville, Kentucky 40206  LOUISIANA Licensee: Lonnie Murray 529 "N" St., S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 (202) 488-8257  WWIW-AM New Orleans Superdome New Orleans, Va. 70153 (504) 587-3000   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5  • MARYLAND  President Licensee: James Brown, J. B. Broadcasting General Manager, James Clark  WEBB-AM s Clifton d: Denison Street Baltimore, MD 21216 (301) 947-1245 MASSACHUSETTS  dcasting Licensee: Sheridan Broa Corp., General Manager Al Williams  WILD-AM 390 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, Mass. 02215 (617) 267-1900 MICHIGAN  ting Licensee: Bell Broadcas Corp., General Manager, Dr. Wendell Cox  WCHB-AM 32790 Henry Ruff Road Inkster, Michigan 48141 (313) 278-1440  ting Licensee: Bell Broadcas Corp., General Manager: Robert Bass  WCHB-FM 299 W. Grand Blvd. 2 Detroit, Michigan 4820 (313) 871-0590  nks Licensee: William V. Ba Manager, President and General neral WGPR, Incorporated, Ge s Manager, James Panago  WGPR-FM . 3146 E. Jefferson St 207 Detroit, Michigan 48 (313) 259-8862  oadcasting Licensee: Saginaw Br nager Company, General Ma Robert O'Bannon  WWWS-FM 4624 Dixie Highway 601 Saginaw, Michigan 48 (517) 777-8011  ting Licensee: Bell Broadcas General Manager, Robert Bass  WJZZ-FM evard 2994 E. Grand Boul 202 Detroit, Michigan 48 (313) 971-0590   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6  •  • MISSISSIPPI  Licensee: Vernon Floyd, President and General Manager, Circuit Broadcasting Company  WORV-AM 604 Gussie Avenue Hattiesburg, Miss. (601) 544-1941  General Manager and President William D. Jackson  WBAD-FM P. 0. Box 4426 7 Oaks Road Greenville, Miss-:38701  President: Charles L. Young General Manager: Len Maith  WTNK Greater Mississippi Life Bldg. Meridian, Miss. 39301 (601) 693-3242/1961  MISSOURI Andrew P. Carter, President KPRS Broadcasting Company, John E. Carter, General Manager  KPRS-AM/FM 2301 Grand Avenue Kansas City, Missouri 64108  NEBRASKA Licensee: Reconciliation, Inc., General Manager: Keith  KOWH-AM/FM 3910 Harney Street Donald Omaha, Nebraska 68131 (402) 422-1600 NEW JERSEY  Station Manager: William Donahue, Owner: Dan Robinson  WNJR 17 Union Avenue Union, New Jersey 07083 (201) 688-5000  Licensee: President, Edward Darden, General Manager: John Hickman, Atlantic Business and Community Development, Atlantic City, New Jersey  WUSS-AM 1500 Absencon Blvd. Atlantic City, N.J. 08401 (609) 344-5861 (609) 347-4200   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7  NEW MEXICO KABZ Albuquerque, New Mexico • KRDD Roswell, New Mexico  KEDE Santa Fe, New Mexico  KENN (Navajo) Farmington, New Mexico  KWYK (Navajo) Farmington, New Mexico  KGAK (Navajo) Gallup, New Mexico  KKIT (Taos Pueblo) Taos, New Mexico  Ed Gomez KABQ P.O. Box 4486 Albuquerque, N.M. 87106  NEW YORK WLIB-AM, WBLS-FM 801 Second Avenue New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 661-3344   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  8  •  • NEW YORK (Con't)  Licensee: President, Paul Sheridan Broadcasting Corp., General Manager, Don Mullins  WUFO-AM (Amherst/Buffalo) 89 La Salle Avenue Buffalo, New York 14214 (716) 834-1080  Licensee: Monroe Broadcasting, Co., Inc., President, Andrew Langston, General Manager, Bill Curtis  WDKX-FM 1337 Main Street East Rochester, N.Y.-4.14609 (716) 288-5470  October Mountain Broadcasting Co., Inc., Anthony B. Mason, President  WOKO 1450 Western Ave. Albany, N.Y. 12203 (518) 449-1460  WEVD New York, New York NORTH CAROLINA Licensee: Tod Branson, Vice President, Broadcast Enterprises Network, Inc., General Manager, Ken Goldbratt  WGIV-AM New GIV, Inc. P.O. Box 3856 Charlotte, N.C. 28203 (704) 333-0131  Licensee: Lester Moore, President, Ebony Enterprises, Inc., Stacy Newkirk, General Manager  WVOE-AM P.O. Box 328 (919) 654-3991  Licensee: Greater Asheville Ed. Radio Association, General Manager, James Robinson  WBMU-FM 90 Lookout Road Asheville, N.C. 28804 (704) 253-5381   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  9  OHIO WELX-AM P.O. Box 456 Xenia, Ohio 45385 (513) 372-7649  General Manager & President of Corporation, Harold Wright, Owner, H&H Broadcasters, VicePresident, Philip Wright  .i  H.E. Sonny Burns, Vice President and General Manager  WCIN 106 Glenwood Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 45217  Licensee: H & H Broadcasters, Inc., President, Harold Wright  WHBM-FM P.O. Box 456 Xenia, Ohio 45385 (513) 372-7649  OKLAHOMA KOLS (Cherokee) Pryor, Oklahoma PENNSYLVANIA Licensee: Ronald Davenport, Chairman, Sheridan Broadcasting, President, Paul Yates, 943 N. Sheridan Ave., Pittsburg, PA. 15219,(412) 281-6747  WA1v10-AM/FM 1811 Boulevard of Allies Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219 (412) 471-2181 SOUTH CAROLINA  Licensee: Nuance Corporation General Manager, Elliott Franks  WOIC-AM P.O. Box 565 Columbia, S.C. 29202   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10  SOUTH DAKOTA KCCR (Sioux) Pierre, South Dakota. KYNT (Sioux) Yankton, South Dakota  TENNESSEE Licensee: James Brown, President, JB Broadcasting, Ltd. General Manager, Jim Clark  WJBE-AM P.O. Box 281 Knoxville, Tennessee 37914 (615) 637-1430  President, Art Gilliams & General Manager  WLOK-AM 363 S. Second Street Memphis, Tennessee 38103 (901) 527-9565  TEXAS  KE.SS Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas  KLVL Houston, Texas  KLFB Lubbock, Texas Licensee: EGG Dallas Broadcasting, Inc., General Manager, Waynett Sobers  KNOK-AM/FM 3601 Kimbo Street Fort Worth, Texas 76111  Licensee: Call of Houston, Inc., General Manager Mike Petrizzo  KOOH-AM 5011 Almeda Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 527-7175   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  11  • TEXAS (Con't) Manuel Davila, Jr. KCCT P.O. Box 5206 Corpus Christi, Texas 78405 (512) 884-2426  Manuel Davila, Sr. KEDA 226 1/2 Doloroki Street San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 226-5254  Marcos Rodriguez KE.SS P.O. Box 6195 Fort Worth, Texas 76115 (817) 429-1037  Ed Gomez KIRT/KQXX 608 S. 10th Street McAllen, Texas 78501 (512) 682-3231 Marcelo Tafoya K1FB P.O. Box 5697 Lubbock, Texas 79417 (806) 765-8114 Roberto Villanueva KMXX 8703 Stillwood Lane Austin, Texas 78758 (512) 478-5699  Sonny Martinez KVEO-TV P.O. Box 3588 McAllen, Texas 78501   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  12  TEXAS (Con't) Licensee: Texas Southern, General Manager, Mike Petrizzo  KTSU-FM Texas Sourthern University Houston, Texas 77004 • (713) 527-7175  UTAH KUTA (Navajo) Blanding, Utah  VIRGINIA ent Licensee: L.E. Willis, Presid Metro Communications  WPCE-AM WOWI-FM 1010 Park Avenue Norfolk, VA 23504 (804) 622-4600 WASHINGTON  Licensee: Donald T. Dudley, President and General Manager, Dudley Communications, Limited  KYAC-FM 427 3rd Avenue Seattle, Washington 98119  Daniel Robles Radio Cadena 1406 Harvard Seattle, Washington 98122 WISCONSIN Licensee: Jerrel W. Jones ger, President and General Mana Courier Communications Corp.  WNOV-AM 3801 N. 20th Street Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53206 (414) 445-1986   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  13  VIRGIN ISLANDS General Manager: Julio Rahr  WVIS-FM P.O. Box 1403 s St. Crois, Virgin Island • 00840 (809) 772-0986  RADIO DISTRIBUTION NETWORK  National Black Network 1350 Avenue of the Americas New York, New York 10019   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  14  • TELEVISION  MICHIGAN Licensee: WGPR-TV, Inc., General Manager, Dr. William B. Banks  WGPR-TV, Channel 2' 3140 E. Jefferson Detroit, Michigan 48207 VIRGIN ISLANDS 4.  Licensee: Island Teleradio Service, Inc., General Manager, Ms. Shirlee, T. Haizlip  WBNB-TV, Channel 10 P.O. Box 1947 Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, 00801  Licensee: Peoples Broadcasting Corporation; General Manager, Arthur L. Swanson  WVIS-TW, Channel 8 P.O. Box 487 Christiansted, St. Croix 00820 (809) 772-2257   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  15  MINORITY ADVERTISING FIRMS  CALIFORNIA Meta 4 Productions, Inc. Terry Carter 8727 West 3rd Street Suite 293 Los Angeles, CA 90048 Cunningham, Short, Berryman and Associates 2120 W. 8th Street Los Angeles, CA 90057 Polymedia Corporation Robert W. Dockery, Jr. .5371 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 212 Lost Angeles, CA 90036 Williamson and Associates Alfred Williamson, General Partner 681 Market Street Suite 877 San Francisco, CA 94105 Carranza Associates, Inc. Jess Lopez 3055 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 830 Los Angeles, CA 90010 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Thomas Buffington Associates, Inc. 1053 31st Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 337-1750 Wilson, Baptiste 6c Associates, Inc. 4500 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Suite 206 Washington, D.C. 20015 (202) 785-2931   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  16  • DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (Con't) Ofield Dukes and Associates National Press Building, Suite 716 Washington, D.C. 20004 New Wave Communications 1612 K Street, N.W. Suite 508 Washington, D.C. 20006 Pat Toney Associates, Inc. 1025 15th Street, N.W. Suite 600 Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 737-0202 Effective Communications Corp. Darryl R. Kemp, President 4410 29th Street, N.E. Washington, D.C. 20018 (202) 387-1828 Creative Resources International Joan 0. Parrott 1029 Vermont Ave., N.W. Suite 875 Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 357-2247 America's Black Forum Productions Walker Williams, President 904 National Building Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 347-9168 Kendrick & Company Carrie L. Fair, Esq., Chairman 1037 Woodward Building 733 15th Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 638-7627   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  17  •  • DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (Cont) First Georgetown Advertising, Inc. Paul A. Wallace, President 733 15th Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 638-4602  Labero, Inc. Larry Bryant, President 535 Edgewood Sti-eet, N.W Suite 1 Washington, D.C. 20017  Plus Publications Roy Betts, Editor 2626 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20237 (202) 333-5444, Ext. 61 Creative Universal Products, Inc. Robert W. Ewell, Vice President, Operations 800 18th Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 347-2535  GEORGIA Triangle Associates, Inc. Al Anderson, President 101 Marietta Tower Suite 3001 Atlanta, GA 30303 Rutherford Associates 2700 Q Street, N.W. Wash., D. C. 20007  Rutherford Associates William A. Rutherford, President 616 Peyton, Road, S.W. Atlanta, GA 30301   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  18  ILLINOIS Burrell Advertising Thomas J. Burrell, President 625 N. Michigan Avenue' Chicago, IL 60601 (312) 266-0880 Ralph Kolonay Barbara ProctorPresident Proctor and Gardner 111 E. Wacker Drive Chicago, IL 60601 (312) 644-7950 Tilmon Productions, Inc. James Tilmon 589 Clayey Court Highland Park, IL 60035  OMAR, Inc. Dr. Marcelino Miyares, President 5525 North Broadway Chicago, IL 60640 (312) 271-1686 Proctor d: Gardner Advertising Agency Barbara Proctor, President 111 E. Wacker Drive Suite 326 Chicago, IL 60610 (312) 644-7950 Franklin T. Lett Associates Franklin T. Lett, President Suite 2720 35 East Wacker Drive Chicago, IL 60601   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • LOUISIANA Kleck, Pourciau and Carvin, Inc. Karry L. Pourciau, President 912 Louisiana Avenue New Orleans, LA 70115 (504) 897-1367  OHIO Asure Blue12429 Cedar Road Suite 28 Cleveland Heights, Ohio 44106 (216) 368-1100  One Pennsylvania Plaza Suite 2215 New York, N.Y. 10001 (212)736-4660  Burns Public Relations, Inc. 666 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 44114 Advertising Design Consultants Studio George T. Linyear, President 1266 East Broad Street Columbus, Ohio 43205 (614) 253-3868 Rogers, Thomas, Cross and Long Advertising A. R. Thomas, Vice President, Account Services 1148 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (216) 241-3998 MASSACHUSETTS Blackside, Inc. Henry Hampton 501 Shawmut Avenue Boston, Mass. 02118   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  20  MICHIGAN United Communications, Inc. Oliver Wilson, President 707 Northland Towers East Southfield, Michigan 48075 MINNESOTA Vanguard Advertising Agency, Inc.-Dr. Thomas Tipton, President 1.5 South Ninth Street Suite 485 Minneapolis, Minn. 55402 (621) 338-5386  1029 Vermont Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 737-3110  MISSOURI Inez Kaiser and Associates 906 Grand Avenue Kansas City, Missouri 64106 Effective Marketing and Advertising Company Marvin D. Mondres, President 499 S. Capitol Street, S.W. Suite 515 Washington, D.C. 20003  Effective Marketing and Advertising Company Pierre Laclede Center 7701 Forsyth, Suite 1353 Clayton, Missouri 63105  NEW YORK Uniworld Group, Inc. Byron Lewis, President Shirley Kalunda 101 Park Avenue New York, New York Frank Mingo, Carolyn Jones, and Richard Guilmenot 285 Lexington Avenue New York, New York 10017 (212) 697-4515   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  21  •  •  NEW YORK (Con't)  NEW YORK (Con't)  Rogers, Watkins & Brown Suite 519, Statler-Hilton Buffalo, New York 14202 (716) 856-5450  National Alliance of Chinese-American Media, Inc. Bordon K. D. Yen, Executive Director 401 Broadway Stuite 1907 New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 431-37.55  Ong & Associates, Inc. 485 Madison Avenue New York, N.Y. 10022  Robert Dibue' Associates, Inc. Robert Dibue', President 245 East 40th Street New York, N.Y. 10016 (212) 490-0486  Joseph A. Davis Consultants, Inc. 104 East 49th Street New York, New York 10016  Amclar Tirado Film Production Amclar Tirado 100 West 94th Street, Apt. 156 New York, N.Y. 10025  J. P. Martin Associates, Inc. Joel P. Martin, President 200 Madison Avenue Suite 1904 New York, NY 10016  The Link Advertising Corp. Castor A. Fernandez, President 101 Park Avenue, Room 204 New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 686-6048  Inner-Cities Communications, Inc. 507 5th Avenue New York, NY 10017 Minorities in Media, Inc. • 342 Madison Avenue Suite 567 New York, N.Y. 10017  Hispano American° Advertising, Inc. J. Ralph Infante, President 230 Park Avenue New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 697-6313  PENNSYVANIA Lockhart, Pettus & Hammer, Inc. Keith E. Lockhart, President 60 East 42nd Street New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 682-7898  Portfolio Associates, Inc. Dwight L. Pickard, Jr. Project Director University City Science Center 3508 Market Street Suite 202 Philadelphia, PA 19104   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  22  Ed Yardang & Associates Lionel Sosa, President One Romana Plaza San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 227-8141   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ' At  MINORITY PRODUCTION FIRMS  CALIFORNIA  CALIFORNIA (Con't)  Professional International Productions and Public Relations Ron Townson, President 6155 South Bedford Avenue Los Angeles, California 90056 (213) 611-1307'  Ruiz Productions, Inc. Jose-Luis Ruiz, President P.O. Box 27788 Los Angeles, California 90027 (213) 851-8110 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA  BCTV Benjamin A. Soria, Vice President 460 Hegenberger Road Suite 750 Oakland, California 94621 (415) 632-7474  Baker F. Morten Morbak Productions Washington, D.C. KIM Productions, Inc. Gordon G. Alexander 1411 K Street, N.W. Suite 920 Washington, D.C. 20005  La Luz Cinema Video Productions Heather Rae Howell, Executive Vice President 5380 East Whittier Blvd. Los Angeles, California 90022 (213) 728-6107  GEORGIA Image 7 Daniel A. Moore, President 2964 Peachtree Road, N.W. Suite 790 Atlanta, GA 30305 (404) 237-0777  Leroy Robinson Chocolate Chip Productions 6515 Sunset Blvd. Suite 206 Los Angeles, CA 90028  ILLINOIS Frank Clarke Meta 4 Productions 8727 W. 3rd Street Suite 203 Los Angeles, CA 90048  Lakeshore Productions Nathaniel Grant, President 360 N. Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60601 (312) 236-1890  Fuji Telecast 6c Production Co. Christopher Hirose 1731 Buchanan Street San Francisco, CA 94115 346-7173   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The Real and Realities Jarvus Grant, President 9340 South Lafayette Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60620  24  • MASSACHUSETTS  NEW YORK  Jose M. Quinters 79 Paulgore Street Jamaica Plan, MA 02130  Parrott & People Productions 132 Madison Avenue New York, N.Y. 10016  MISSISSIPPI  Sigma Sports, Inc. Dick Martin, President 50 West 96th Street New York, N4. 10025 (212) 245-3560  Spectrum Productions, Inc. Tom Alexander, President P.O. Box 3215 Jackson, Mississippi 39207  Toussant Group 420 East 51st Street New York, New York 10022  PENNSYLVANIA Mr. D. Outlaw 3627-29 Lancaster Avenue Philadelphis, PA 19104  Wm Greaves Productions 1776 Broadway New York, N.Y. 10019 James E. Hinton Entertainment 159 West 53rd Street New York, N.Y. 10019 Peconic Bay Telecommunications Antonio De Grassee P.O. Box 633 Jamesport, N.Y. 11947   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Starke-Reid Televideo Corp. 249 W. 29th Street New York, N.Y. 10001 Hinton Productions, Inc. 159 W. 53rd Street New York, N.Y. 10019  25  •  • MINORITY NEWSPAPERS/MAGAZINES  CALIFORNIA (Con't)  ALABAMA Birmingham World Marcel Hopson, Publisher 312 17th Street North Birmingham, Alabama 35203  El Bohemio Magazine Fred Rosado, Editor 2828 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94110 647-1924  Mobile Beacon Lancie M. Thomas Editor-Publisher 2311 Coastside Street Mobile, Alabama 35203  California Voice Arthur Jackson, Editor 814- 27th Street Oakland, CA 94607 465-8552  The Montgomery Times Al Dixon Editor 211 Dexter Avenue Montgomery, Alabama 36104  Central News Wave Chester L. Washington Editor-Publisher 2621 W. 54th Street Los Angeles, CA 90043  ARIZONA  L. A. Sentinel Ruth Washington Publisher 1112 E. 43rd Street Los Angeles, CA 90011  Arizona Informant Charles R. Campbell Co-Publisher 222 North 9th Street Phoenix, Arizona 85034  California Voice Carlton B. Goodlett Editor-Publisher 814 27th Street Oakland, California 94607  Asian American News Service Charles Leong, Bureau Manager 622 Washington Street San Francisco, CA 94111 986-2336  Sacramento Observer William H. Lee Editor-Publisher P. 0. Box 209 Sacramento, CA 95801  CALIFORNIA The Black Panther Intercommunal News Service David DuBois, Editor 8.501 East 14th Street Oakland, CA 94621 638-0195   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  26  FLORIDA  CALIFORNIA (Cont)  Westside Gazette Levi Henry, Jr. Editor-Publisher P.O. Box 9281 Fort lauderdale, Fla. 33301  S. F. Sun-Reporter Carlton B. Goodlett 1366 Turk Street San Francisco, CA 9!.115 Precinct-Reporter Art Townsend Owner-Publisher 1673 W. Baseline Street San Bernadino, CA 92411  Miami Times Garth C. Reeves, Sr. Editor-Publisher 6530 N. W. 15th Avenue Miami, Florida 33147  CANADA Orlando Times Norris D. Woolfork, III Publisher 2393 West Church Street Orlando, Florida 32805  Contrast Publications Limited Alfred W. Hamilton Publisher 28 Lennox Street Toronto 4, Ontario - Canada  Florida Sun James W. Macon Publisher 4020 W. Columbia Orlando, FI. 32805  CONNECTICUT The Hartford Inquirer William R. Hales Editor-Publisher P.O. Box 275 Hartford, Conn. 06101  Florida Sentinel Bulletin C. Blythe Andrews, Jr. Publisher P.O. Box 3363 Tampa, Florida 33601  DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Washington Afro-American Arther M. Carter Publisher 2002 11th St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001  Daytona Times Charles W. Cherry Publisher 429 S. Campbell Street Daytona Beach, Florida 72014  The Washington Informer Calvin Rolark Editor-Publisher 1343 H St., N.W., Suite 600 Washington, D.C. 20001   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The Pensacola Voice Les Humphrey 263 East Yonge Street Pensacola, Florida 32503  27  GEORGIA (Can't)  GEORGIA  The Macon Courier Alex C. Habersham Publisher 2661 Montpelier Avenue Macon, Georgia 31202  Atlanta Daily World C. A. Scott Editor-General Manager 145 Auburn Avenue,'N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303  ILLINOIS  Atlanta Inquirer John B. Smith Executive Vice.President 947 Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30314  Jet Magazine Robert Johnson Editor-Publisher 820 South Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60605  The News Review Mallory K. Millender Editor-Publisher P.O. Box 953 Augusta, Georgia 30901  Chicago Daily Defender John H. Sengstacke Editor-Publisher 2400 S. Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60616  The Herald of Savannah Floyd Adams, Sr. Publisher P.O. Box 41 Savannah, Georgia 31402  Chicago Metro-News Charles B. Armstrong Editor-Publisher 2600 South Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60616 Voice of the Black Community Horace G. Livingston, Jr. Publisher 3180 N. Woodford Decatur, Illinois 62521  Columbus Times Helmut Gerdes Managing Editor 1304 Midway Drive Columbus, Georgia 31902  Citizen Newspapers Agustus Savage Editor 412 E. 87th Street Chicago, Illinois 60619  The Savannah Tribune Robert E. james Publisher 916 Montgomery Street Savannah, Georgia 31401   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Pilbany Times W. L. Russell Editor-Publisher 315 Highland Avenue Albany, GA 31701 28  •  •  INDIANA ILLINOIS (Con't)  Gary Info James T. Harris, Jr. Editor-Publisher 1953 Broadway/P.O. Box M587 Cary, Indiana 46401  Chicago Independent Bulletin Hurley L. Green Editor-Publisher 728 W. 65th Street Chicago, Ill. 60621  Gary Crusader Dorothy Leave11 Publisher 1549 Broadway Gary, Indiana 46407  Chicago New Crusader Dorothy Leav'ell Publisher 6429 South King Drive Chicago, III. 60637  IOWA Observer Publications Ibn Sharrieff Publisher-General Manager 1180 E. 63rd Street Chicago, III. 60636  New Iowa Bystander Charles McCauley Editor 140 4th St. West Des Moines, Iowa 50265  East St. Louis Crusader Joe Lewis Editor-Publisher 2206 Missouri Avenue East St. Louis, Ill. 62205  KENTUCKY Louisville Defender Kenneth T. Stanley Editor-Publisher 1720 Dixie Highway Louisville, Kentucky 40210  INDIANAPOLIS   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Indianapolis Recorder Marcus C. Stewart Editor-Publisher 2901 N. Tacoma Avenue Indianapolis, Indiana 46218  LOUISIANA Community Ebony Tribune Alonzo Hodge Circulation & Advertising Director P.O. Box 38.57 Shreveport, LA 71103  Indiana Herald 0. L. Tandy Editor-Publisher 2449 Radar Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46208  The Alexandria News Weekly H. Nicholas Stull Publisher P.O. Box 608 Alexandria, LA 71301  29  • MINNESOTA  LOUISIANA (Con't)  Twin Cities Courier Mary J. Kyle Editor-Publisher 84 S. 6th Street, Suite 501 Minneapolis, Minn. 55402  Louisiana Weekly C. C. Dejoie, Jr. Editor-Publisher 640 Rampart Street • New Orleans, LA 70150  Minneapolis Spokesman Oscar H. Newman Editor 3744 4th Avenue Minneapolis, Minn. 55409  Black Data Weekly Joseph "Scoop" Jones Editor P.O. Box 51933 New Orleans, LA 70151 Black DATA Weekly 2037 Orleans Avenue P.O. Box 51933 New Orleans, LA 70151  MISSISSIPPI Mississippi Memo Digest Robert E. Williams Editor-Publisher 2511 5th Street Meridian, Miss. 39301  MARYLAND Afro-American Newspapers Raymond H. Boone Vice President and Editorial Director 623 N. Eutaw Street Baltimore, MD 21201  Jackson Advocate Charles, Tisdale Editor-Publisher 115 East Hamilton Street Jackson, Miss. 39202  Baltimore News American E. Lee Lassiter 301 East Lumbar Baltimore, MD 21203  MISSOURI Kansas City Call J. Reuben Benton Advertising Director 1715 E. 18th Street Kansas City, MO 64141  MICHIGAN Michigan Chronicle Longworth M. Quinn Editor-Publisher 479 Ledyard Street Detroit, Michigan 48201  Editorial Page Editor St Louis American 2618 N. Kings Highway St. Louis, MO 63113  Ecorse Telegram J. C. Wall Editor-Publisher 4122 10th Street Ecorse, Michigan 48229   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The Crusader William P. Russell Chairman of the Board 4371 Finney St. Louis, MO 63113 30  NORTH CAROLINA (Con't)  MISSOURI (Con't)  Carolinian P. R. Jervay Editor-Publisher 518 E. Martin Street Raleigh, N.C. 27601  St. Louis Argus Eugene Mitchell Publisher 4595 Martin Luther King Drive St. Louis, MO 63113  Wilmington Journal T. C. Jervay Editor-Publisher 412 S. 7th Street Wilmington, N.C. 20841  St. Louis Metro Sentinel Jane Woods Editor-Publisher 3338 Olive, Suite 206 St. Louis, MO 63103  Charlotte Post Bill Johnson Editor-Publisher 9139 Trinity Road Charlotte, N.C. 28216  NEBRASKA Omaha Star Mildred Brown Editor-Publisher 2216 N. 24th Street Omaha, Nebraska 68110  NEW YORK N. Y. Daily Challenge Thomas H. Watkins • Publisher 1368 Fulton Street Brooklyn, N.Y. 11207  NEVADA Las Vegas Voice Lawrence Albert Publisher-Owner P.O. Box 4684 Las Vegas, Nevada 81906  Commission News Travis L. Francis Editor te 23 297 Park Ave. South, Sui New York, N.Y. 10010  NORTH CAROLINA The Carolina Times Vivian A. Edmonds Editor-Publisher 923 Old Fayetteville Street Durham, N.C. 27702   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Westchester County Press Alger L. Adams Editor-Publisher 61 Pinecrest Drive 10706 Hastings-On-Hudson, NY  Carolina Peacemaker Culey V. Kilimanjaro Secretary-Treasurer P.O. Box 20853 Greensboro, N.C. 27420 31  • NEW YORK (Con't)  OHIO (Con't)  NY Amsterdam News John L. Procope Publisher NY Amsterdam News 2340 8th Avenue New York, N.Y. 10027  Buckeye Review Margaret Linton Editor P.O. Box 1436 Youngstown, Ohio 44501  OKLAHOMA New York Voice Jimmy L. Hicks Editor 78-36 Parsons Boulevard Flushing, N.Y. 11366  Oklahoma Eagle Robert K. Goodwin Publisher 122 N. Greenwood Tulsa, Oklahoma 74120 Black Dispatch Publishing Co. Russell Perry Co-Publisher P.O. Box 1254 Oklahoma City, Okla. 73101  OHIO The Akron Reporter William R. Ellis Editor -Publisher P.O. Box 2042 Akron, Ohio 44309  OREGON Cleveland Call and Post William 0. Walker Editor-Publisher 1949 105th Street Cleveland, Ohio 44106  The Skanner Bernard V. Foster Editor-Publisher P.O. Box 5455 Portland, Oregon 97228  Cincinnati Herald Majorie B. Parham Editor-Publisher 863 Lincoln Avenue Cincinnati, Ohio 45206  PENNSYLVANIA Philadelphia Tribune Alfred L. Morris President 520 16th Street Philadelphia, PA 19146  The Toledo Journal Myron Alfred Steward Publisher 1816 Bancroft Toledo, Ohio 43607   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  New Pittsburgh Courier James D. Lewis General Manager 315 E. Carson Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219  32  •  I SOUTH CAROLINA  TEXAS (Con't)  Black News Redfern II Publisher P.O. Box 11128 Columbia, S.C. 29403  The Texarkana Courier Elridge Robertson Publisher 504 W. 3rd Street Texarkana, Texas 75501  Low Country Star Donna D. Scott Editor-Publisher 1114 S. Ribart Road Port Royal, S.C. 29935  Great Circle News Tony Davis 3101 Forest Avenue Dallas, Texas 75215  Freedom's Journal Emerson Emory 2814 S. Beckley Dallas, Texas 75224  TENNESSEE Tri-State Defender Robert Sengstacke General Manager 124 E. Calhoun Street Memphis, Tenn. 38103  VIRGIN ISLANDS Daily News of Virgin Islands Ariel Melchior, Jr. Publisher P.O. Box 7638 St. Thornas, U.S., V.I. 00801  TEXAS Post Tribune Dickie Foster Editor 3428 Sunnyvale Dallas, Texas 72516  VIRGINIA New Journal and Guide Milton A. Reid Publisher-Editor 1017 Church Street Norfolk, VA 23501  Houston Forward Times Lenora Carter Publisher 4411 Almeda Road Houston, Texas 77004  Richmond Afro-American 301 E. Clay Street Richmond, VA 23219  Houston Informer George McElroy Editor P.O. Box 3086 Houston, Texas 77001   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  33  WASHINGTON Seattle Medium Bennett Christopher H. Editor-Publisher Street 2600 S. Jackson 122 98 Seattle, Wash. WISCONSIN r Milwaukee Courie Jerre' Jones Publisher Street 2431 W. Hopkins 53206 Milwaukee, Wis. Black Excellence h Mildred E. Parris Editor P.O. Box 26191 onsin 53266 Milwaukee, Wisc Milwaukee Star Cal Patterson Publisher reet 3811 N. 20th St 53206 Milwaukee, Wis. Racine Star Sharon Schumann Editor Street 2431 W. Hopkins 53206 Milwaukee, Wis. unity Journal Milwaukee Comm s Robert J. Thoma an of the Board m r i a h C / r e h s i l Co-Pub Washington Road 3764 N. Port 53212 Milwaukee, Wis.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  34
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102