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September 19, 1921.

General Lahager,
American Can Company,

120 3roadway,

New York, X. Uensol, .
!:.!4'

ar Sirs

Of

In order, if possible, to get a. sousehat clearer view of the

present situation as regards unemployment, I am anxious to secure some
information as to the extent to watch workers no longer reported on the
payrolls ef the industrial concerns found work in aome other lines.

Several of our directors and one or two others have volunteered

to institute a brief inquiry in their several concerns into just tais

question anti to trace out as far as practicable just einet has beoome of
the men they have had to let go, just what they are doing and what percentage of them are now definitely or nearly without mans of livelihood.

There is a great difference, of course, between this and just

counting up how Luny have :leen dropped from employment rolls.

I daoull like, especially, an idea as to what percentage of

factory employees have gene back to the farms, or to domestic service,
or returned to foreign oountriez.
This information is for the conference an unemploynent which is
to be held in Washington next weal,. and I ehould be very grateful if you
could give me sons sort of an answer Cy Friday cei. tais week.




3elieve me,

Very sincerely yours,

3ENJAMIN SMUG,

Governor.

September 19, 1921.

General kanager,

American Can Company,
120 Broadway,
New York, N.
QV 1\1'

)ear Sir:

In order, if possible, to get a somewhat clearer view of the

present situation as regards unemployment, I am anxious to secure some
information as to the extent to which workers no longer reported on the
payrolls of the industrial concerns found work in some other lines.

Several of our directors and one or two others have volunteerea

to institute a brief inquiry in their several concerns into just tais

question and to trace out as far as practicable just what has beeome of
the men tney have had to let go, just what ,they are doing and what percentage of them are now definitely or nearly without means of livelihood.

There is a great difference, of course, between this and just
counting up how Lanq have oeen dropped from employment rolls.

I should like, especially, au idea as to what percentage of
factory enployees have gums hack to the faxms or to domestic service,
or returned to foreign countries.
This information is for the conference an unemployment which is
to be held in 71ashington next weels: and I should be very grateful if you
could give me some sort of an answer ey Iridy of this week.




Believe me,

Very sincerely yours,

BLNJAIIIN

Governor.




Iiitztus

tii-14-1C'le----

Lieptember 19, 1921.

General Lanager,

American Tube & Stamping Company,

Bridgeport, 09nn.

Dear Sir:

In order, if possible, to get a somewhat clearer view of the

present situation us regards unemployment, I am anxious to secure some
information as to the extent to waidh workers no longer reported on the
payr011S of the industrial corcerne found work in some other lines.

Several of our directors and one or two others have volunteered

to institute a brief inquiry in their several concerns into just this

question and to trace out as far as practicable just what has peewee of
the men they have had to let go, just what 'they are doing and waat percentage of them are now definitely or nearly without eeans of livelihood.

There is a great difference, of course, between this and just

counting up how many dave been dropped from onployirent rolls.

I dhould like, especially, an idea as to what percentage Of
factory employees have gone eack to the farims or to domestic service,
or returned, to foreign countries.
This information is for tae conference on unemployment which is
to be neld in dashington next week and I should be very grateful if you
could give me some sort of an answer by Yridey of this week.




Believe me,

Very sincerely yours,

3ENJALI1 STRONG,

Governor.




26 BROADWAY
NEW YORK

n

CV' C. TEAG LE




0
FilLINUcer17:
bruary

Fr3P-

20 h

1920.

4-"

-

Mr. J. Herbert Case, Acting Governor,
Feddral reserve Baia,
No. 120 Broadway,
New York, N. Y.

Dear Sir:-

Referring to ele-ohone conversation of this
.
Reed!, Mr. Bedford's secretafternoon, I spoke to
ary, regarding the let ars of
nor .Strong, and. he ad.
ses me that your communications
.artr-rerpect thereto ere forwarded. to Mr. Bedford
at the Carolina, Pine urst, North Carolina some two
or three days ago.
7'

Mr. Reed. t

looking after matte

le me that 1%ir. Bedford has been

of this character at Pinehurst,

and I have no doubt s.1 u will hear from him very shortIf you do not, please let me know.
ly.

Yours very truly,

HFM-MUR

September 19, 1921.

Mr. A. C. Bedford,
President, Standard Oil Company,
26 BrowiwAy,

New York, N. Y.

Dear Sir:

In order, if possible, to get a somewhat clearer view of the

present situation as regards unemployment, I am anxious to secare some
information as to the extent to which workers no longer reported on the
payrolls of the inslustrial concerns found work iu some other lines.

Several of our directors and one or two others have volunteered

to institute a brief inquiry In their several concerns into just this

question and to truce out as far as practicable just what has become of
the men they have had to let go, just at they are doing and what percentage of them are now definitely or nearly without means of livelihood.

There is a great difference, of course, between this and just

counting up how many have been dropped from employuent rolls.

I should like, especially, an idea as to what percentage of
factory employees have gone back to the farms, or to domestic service, or
returned to foreign countries.
This information is for the conference an unemployment which is
to be held in lashington next week. and I should as very grateful' if you
could give me some sort of an answer oy Friday of this week.




Believe me,

Very sincerely yours,

BENJAKIN STRONG,

Governor.,

STANDARD OIL COMPANY
INCORPORATED IN NEWJERSEY

NEW YORK
A

3EDFORD

CHAIRMAN or THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS




September 20th, 1921.

Honorable Benjamin Strong,

Governor, Federal Reserve Bank,
16 Wall Street, New York, N. Y.

My dear Governor Strong:

-Acknowledging your favor of the nineteenth
instant, I regret very much that it is impossible from the information on hand for me to give you the data you ask for the Conference
I would
on Unemployment which is to be held in Washington next week.
be glad to institute inquiries a lpng the line of the desired information, but time does not permit of getting data that would be of
real use.

As of possible information, I might say that
stadics of our August employment figures which we have jut completed
indicate that there has been about a 21% decrease in the employed forces
in all departments of this Company (not including subsidiaries) since
January, 1921, when the total employees in all departments was 22,523.

As stated above, in all cases where the employees
were prmanently laid off, relationship of the employee to our Company
was terminated, and we have no record or even estimate showing how many
of them have, as yet, been unable to obtain employment elsewhere.
A further study of the August record, above
referred to, shows that of the employees in good standing at the six
refineries of the Standard Oil Company (New Jersey), 50.8% had less
than normal full time employment, and the employees as a Whole had 79.6%
normal employment.

Regretting I cannot give you the exact information
you desire and hoping the above data may be of some possible use, I am
Very sincerely yours,




FILES

1'0510

ttig

flia

192.5

kt

are cordially invited to participate in the Annual Dinner of the

yOU

American Committee of the International Chamber of Commerce to be
held in the Ballroom of the Mayflower,
Washington, on Tuesday evening, May

nineteenth, at seven-thirty for eight
o'clock.
A. C. BEDFORD
Chairman, cilmerican Committee

Kindly make reservations on the enclosed card

P




0

0

0
AMERICAN COMMITTEE
111111111111

A. C. BEDFORD, Chairman
JAMES S. ALEXANDER

JACKSON JOHNSON

JULIUS H. BARNES
HARRY A. BLACK
WILLIS H. BOOTH
0. E. BRADFUTE
W. IRVING BULLARD
J. H. BURTON

C. F. KELLEY
FRED I. KENT
FREDERICK P. KE PPE L

Ivy L. LEE
ALEXANDER LEGGE

JAMES R. MACCOLL

WILLIAM BUTTE RW ORTH
NEWCOMB CARLTON

GEORGE M CFADDEN

ROY D. CHAPIN
F. W. CLIFFORD

E. T. MEREDITH
E. G. MINER

STUART W. CRAMER
GEORGE S. DAVISON
JOSEPH H. DE FREES
ROBERT DOLLAR
CRAWFORD H. ELLIS
JOHN- H. FAHEY
SAMUEL M. FELTON
EDWARD A. FILENE
E. STANLEY GLINES

E. R. GRASSELLI
CARL R. GRAY
W. A. HARRIMAN

DWIGHT W. MORROW
THOMAS A. 0' DONNELL
EDWIN B. PARKER
REGINALD H. PARSONS
LEWIS E. PIERSON
JOHN J. RASKOB
WILLIAM C. REDFIELD
FRANKLIN REMINGTON
GEORGE M. REYNOLDS
HENRY M. ROBINSON
L. K. SALSBURY
CHARLES M. SCHWAB

E. M. HERR

H. A. SMITH

NOBLE F. HO GGSON
HERBERT C. HOOVER
HERBERT S. HOUSTON
EDWARD N. HURLEY
S. PEMBERTON HUTCHINSON
NELSON DEAN JAY
ALB A B. JOHNSON

CHARLES A. STONE
GERARD SWOPE
HARRY B. THAYE R

S. CRISTY MEAD

E. P. THOMAS
HARRY A. WHEELER
J. M. WHITSITT
OWEN D. YOUNG




4,4

..tt (4e

141.1-t4:4-

OTIS H. CUTLER
THIRTY CHURCH STREET
NEW YORK




Wtootober

9 1913.

OCT 16 1913
PER

Mr Benjamin Strong Jr
Gio Bankers Trust Co
26 Wall Street
New York

My dear Ben:

Many thanks for your kind

nese in allowing me the privilege of
looking over your file on the currency
bill, which I am returning herewith.
My own, mind is so obtuse that it is
rather difficult for me to comprehend
some of the features of this proposed
legislation, but I think I may safely
say that to-day I know more about it
than I did before.
Grate lly and Sincerely yours,
Enclosures.




ee)

/917

)21

Denver, Colorado,
May 17, 1917.

Dear Mr. Herrington:

The enclosed letter from Professor Irving Fisher and the pages
from the Congressional Record which accompany it oxplain themselves.

I

have been a good deal concerned to observe the development by Senator Thomas
and some others of his associates in Washington of a revival of the greenback idea.

There could be no more serious menace to the financial stability

of this country at the present time than proposals for indulgence in such
financial dissipation as that of issues of fiat money, which, ;nit° contrary
to the view expressed by Senator Thomas. wrecked the nation's credit and
plunged it into the throes of financial disorders

which lasted

for more than

a dozen years after the Civil war was ended.

This question of sound finance in the United States is no longer
a domestic question, as it was in Civil war days, but is one affecting the
financial welfare of the civilized world.

This market in

the United States

is the only one left which the ravages of war finance have not imperiled the
nation's financial stability.

It is our :surplus capital :And wealth which

must be relied upon when the war is over for the groat work of reconstruction.
j have now a banking system which is capable under skillful management of
meeting the great strain which is about to develop.

By good fortune, President

Ilson's administration and I think the great majority in Congress appreciate
that a liberal share of the costs of war must be borne by taxation and not entirely by bond issues and issues of fiat money.




The one menace to the carrying

To - 2r. Herrington.

May 17, 1917.

out of a conservative plan of finance by the government is that exposed
by such proposals as the one rade by the Senator front Colorado.

not something that can be

Is there

done by the people of this state to convince its

representatives in Washington that such proposals do not represent the

sentiment of the people of the state, either employers of labor or the laboring men themselves?

am taking the liberty of writing this letter to you personally
and confidentially, with the thought that you as the heat of the greatest
business organization

ia

Colorado may consider that the matter is of suf-

ficient importance to justify attention by that organization.
you to return the enclosures?
Very sincerely yours,

Cass Herrington, Esq.,
Colorado Fuel t- Iron Co.,
Denver, Colorado.

BS/CC




-

Liay I trouble

Denver, Colorado,
March 19, 1927.

Dear Mr. Herrington;
to non-resident

I am just in receipt of notice of
membership in the Denver Country Club

believe that

am indebted

to you as one of oy sponsors.

WoUtt you please accept my warmest thanks for yo
and this further evidence of
of the Club?

Cass E. Herrington, Esq
680 Emerson St.,
Denver, Colorado.

BS /CC




ospitali

courtesy

the members

0

INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

#C)

ACKNOWLEDGED
JUN

AMERICAN SECTION

3 1922

MILLS BUILDING -WASHINGTON, D. C.
F-1

OFFICE OF THE Otteutausr

June 9, 1922.

My dear Mr. Strong:

I am writing to you personally to urge you to become a
member of the International Chamber of Commerce. Having watched
it grow since its inception, I am convinced that it deserves the
support of men of your standing. As Vice President and also as
Chairman of the American Committee, I have given a great deal of
attention to the affairs of this organization and I feel that my
time has been well spent.
You are aware, no doubt, that the idea upon which the International Chamber is founded is basically American. The enclosed
pamphlet summarizes briefly the facts about the organization. The
Chamber is a potent factor in the solution of many of the vital problems which are retarding world progress and reacting so seriously
There is no other regular medupon business in the United States.
ium through which the business men of this country may have a voice
in international affairs.
The next meeting of the Board of Directors of the International Chamber will be held early in July and .I want to make my report of membership commensurate with America's commercial importance.
May I include your name among those whose support is assured?
I hope to hear from you at an early date, and will welcome
any request you make for such further information as you may desire.
Very truly yours,

)6_e_
Honorable Benjamin Strong, Junior, Governor,
Federal Reserve Bank of New York,
15 Nassau Street,
New York, New York.







f-t-1

June 13,

Dear Mr. Bedford:

Thank you for your letter of June P.

I .vih I might send

you a ravora.bta reply, but, I am no a ',e-pber of so many ,,rganizations

of one sort or another to 4 hose afire I vitt unable to give the slight-

est attention, that I have just made it an invariable rule to
joining new u)11S8.

F top

Ac yu knos I az a membr of the Chamber of Com-erce

of the United States.

I hope you sill understand that my liskility to p.ccept the

invitation is not due to any lack ..)f interest in the sork f the
organization.

Very truly yours,

A. C. Bedford, Ebrt.,
c/o Internatir.nal Chamber of Coumerce,
Mills

Neshington, D. C.
BS.M.111




AMERICAN

DIRECTORS AND ALTERNATES

INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

FRANCE

wrI,LIS H. BOOTH
M BUTTERWORTH

VICE PRESIDENTS

AMERICAN SECTION

A. C. BEDFORD

LACEY C. ZAPF, SECRETARY

,PH H. DEFREES

JOHN H. FAHEY
NELSON DEAN JAY
OWEN D. YOUNG

MAURICE DESPRET

UNITED STATES
BELGIUM

SIR ALBERT J. HOBSON

MILLS BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C.

ENGLAND

MARCO CASSIN

ICAN COMMITTEE
A. C. BEDFORD, CHAIRMAN
AP

ITALY
GENERAL SECRETARY

NEW YORK

EDOUARD DOLLEANS

JAMES S. ALEXANDER
NEW YORK
HARRY A. BLACK
GALVESTON
GEORGE P. BLOW
LASALLE
WILLIS H. BOOTH
NEW YORK
J. H. BURTON
NEW YORK
WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH
MOLINE
NEWCOMB CARLTON
NEW YORK
ROY D. CHAPIN

E A s CLARKE

CHICAGO

NEW ORLEANS

JOHN H. FAHEY
EDWARD A. FILENE.
L. S. GILLETTE

BASIL MILES
PARIS

December 30, 1922.
Honorable Benjamin Strong, Govenor,
Federal Reserve Bank of New York,
15 Nassau Street,
New York, N.Y.

BOSTON
BOSTON

MTENEAsoms

THOMAS S. GRASSELLI
CLEVELAND
CARL R. GRAY
OMAHA
W. A. HARRIMAN

NEW YORK

EAST PITTSBURGH

NOBLE F. HOGGSON
NEw YORK
HERBERT C. HOOVER
PALO ALTO
HERBERT S. HOUSTON
GARDEN CITY
J. R. HOWARD
CHICAGO
ALFRED HUGER
CHARLESTON
EDWARD N. HURLEY
CHICAGO
NELSON DEAN JAY
PARIS
ALBA B. JOHNSON
PHILADELPHIA
JACKSON JOHNSON
ST. LOUIS

ANACONDA

Nsw YORK

FREDERICK P. KEPPEL
NEW YORK
DARWIN P. KINGSLEY
NEW YORK
IVY L. LEE
NEW YORE

ALEXANDER LEGGE
CHICAGO
JAMES R. MAcCOLL
PAWTUCKET
ROBERT F. MADDOX
ATLANTA
GEORGE McFADDEN
PHILADELPH/A
AUSTIN McLANAHAN
BALTIMORE
S. CRISTY MEAD

E. G. MINER

COMMISSIONER

DETROIT

ROBERT DOLLAR
SAN FRANCISCO
JOHN S. DRUM
SAN FRANCISCOH.
ELLIS
CRAWFORD

C F KELLEY
FRED I. KENT

PARIS

AMERICAN ADMINISTRATIVE

NEW YORK

F. W. CLIFFORD
MIENEAsoLis
JOSEPH H. DEFREES

E. M. HERR

PRESIDENT

ETIENNE CLEMENTEL

NEW YORK

RocIlEssEit

WM. FELLOWES MORGAN
Nuw YORK
DWIGHT W. MORROW
NEW YORK

J. D. A. MORROW
WASHINGTON
S. T. NASH

CLEVELAND

THOMAS A. O'DONNELL
Los ANGELES
EDWIN B. PARKER

Dear Sir:

On behalf of the Council and the American
Committee of the International Chamber of Commerce,
I take pleasure in inviting you to participate in
the Second General Meeting of the Chamber which will
be held in Rome, Italy, March 18 to 24, 1923.
If you
cannot attend personally, the Committee would be pleased
to have you select someone to represent your interest.
The topics for consideration are not only timely,
they involve problems of vital importance to every business man.
The enclosed provisional program indicates
that opportunity will be given for a thorough exchange
of thought on questions which the business men must endeavor to reach some common conclusion as to the proper
method of solution.
I need not attempt to impress upon you the need
for America to be represented in these conferences by our
most able business men and bankers.
Leaders of business
in practically every country of the world will participate
in the deliberations at Rome.
Very truly yours,

HOUSTON

LEWIS E PIERSON
NEW YORK
JOHN J. RASKOB
WILMINGTON
WILLIAM C. REDFIELD
NEW YosE
FRANKLIN REMINGTON
NEW YORK

GEORGE M. REYNOLDS
CHICAGO
HENRY M. ROBINSON
Los ANGELES
L. K. SALSBURY
MEMPHIS
CHARLES M. SCHWAB
NEW YORK
CHARLES A. STONE
NEW YORK
GERARD SWOPE
NEW YORK
GEORGE C. TAYLOR
NEW YORE
HARRY B. THAYER
NEW YORK
E. P. THOMAS
NEW YORK
DANIEL WARREN
NEW YORK
HARRY A. WHEELER

CHICAGO
OWEN D. YOUNG

http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ NEW YORE
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

T.

1IT

1

January 4, 1923.

My dear Mr. Bedford:
I have just received a form letter from you dated.

December 30, and another similar letter from Mr. Barnes, in which
you are good enough to invite me to attend the second general

meeting of the International Chamber of Commerce, which is to be
held in Rome in March.
is a very remote one indeed.
in Europe

to thank

on other matters,

I fear the possibili
It would only be in case I were
which is most unlikely;

you most cordially Tor wishing me to be there.
YLure very truly,

Mr. A. C. Bedford,
Pe droadway,

New iork City.

RS .04




but I want

AMERICAN

DIREC

AND ALTERNATES

3UTTERWORTH

SEPH H. DEFREES
JOHN H. FAHEY
NELSON DEAN JAY
HENRY M. ROBINSON

INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
WILLIS H. BOOTH
ACT<NOWf EDGFC- "AM'
AMERICAN SECTION
PRESIDENT

IDENT FONDATEUR

ETIENNE CLEMENTEL

LACEY C. ZAPF

JUL 1 1 1924

-,EN D. YOUNG

SECRETARY

AMERICAN COMMITTEE

MILLS BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C.

A. C. BEDFORD. CHAIRMAN
Nxw YORE

JAMES S ALEXANDER
NEW YORK
JULIUS H. BARNES
DULUTH
HARRY A. BLACK
GALVESTON
WILLIS H BOOTH
NEW YORK
0. E. BRADF1TTE
CmcAoo
W. IRVING BULLARD
BOSTON
J. H. BURTON
NEW YomE
WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH
MOLINE

NEWCOMB CARLTON
NEW YORK
ROY D. CHAPIN

DETROIT

F. W. CLIFFORD
MINNEAPOLIS
STUART W. CRAMER
CRAMERTON
GEORGE S. DAVISON
PITTSBURGH
JOSEPH H. DEFREES
CHICAGO
ROBERT DOLLAR
SAN FRANCISCO

CRAWFORD H. ELLIS

NEW ORLEANS

JOHN H. FAHEY
NEW YORE
SAMUEL M. FELTON
EDWARD A. FILENE
BOSTON
THOMAS S. GRASSELLI
CLEVELAND
CARL R. GRAY
OMAHA
W. A. HARRIMAN

E M HERR

NEW YORK

EAST PITTSBURGH

NOBLE F. HOGGSON
NEW YORK
HERBERT C. HOOVER
PALO ALTO
HERBERT S. HOUSTON
NEW YORK
EDWARD N. HURLEY
CHICAGO
PEMBERTON HUTCHINSON
PHILADELPHIA
NELSON DEAN JAY
PARIS
ALBA B. JOHNSON
PHILADELPH/A
JACKSON JOHNSON
ST. LOUIS

C. F. KELLEY
ANACONDA
FRED I. KENT
NEW 'Vow(
FREDERICK P. %EPPEL
NEW YORK
IVY L. LEE
NEW YORK

ALEXANDER LEG GE
CHICAGO
JAMES R. MAcCOLL
PA,rucilcx
GEORGE McFADDEN
PHILADELPHIA
S. CRISTY MEAD

E. G. MINER

NEW YORE

ROCHESTER

WM. FELLOWES MORGAN
NEW YORK
DWIGHT W. MORROW
NEW YORE
S. T. NASH
CLEVELAND
THOMAS A. O'DONNELL
Lo, ANGELES
EDWIN B. PARKER
HousToN
REGINALD H. PARSONS
SEATTLE
LEWIS E. PIERSON
NEW YORE
JOHN J. RASKOB
WILMINGTON
WILLIAM C. REDFIELD
YORK

FRANKLIN REMINNEWGTON
NEW YORK

GEORGE M. REYNOLDS
CHICAGO
HENRY M. ROBINSON
LO9 ANGELES
L. K. SALSBURY
MEMPHIS
CHARLES M. SCHWAB
NEW YORE
CHARLES A. STONE
NEW YORK
GERARD SWOPE
NEW YORE
HARRY B. THAYER
NEW YORK
E. P. THOMAS
NEw Yoax
HARRY A. WHEELER

J. M. WHITSITT
OWEN D. YOUNG

CHICAGO

CHARLESTON

NEW YORK




R.

FRANCE

VICE PRESIDENT POE THE
UNITED STATES

A. C. BEDFORD
GENERAL SECRET..

EDOUARD DOLLEANS
PARIS

AMERICAN ADMINISTRAT/.

July 1, 1924.

COMMISSIONER

BASIL MILES
PAAis

Honorable Benjamin Strong, Governor,
Federal Reserve Bank of New York,
New York, N. Y.
My dear Mr. Strong:

The officers and directors of the American
Section, International Chamber of Commerce, have noticed with
great interest the statement which the Advisory Council made
to the FederalReserve Board with respect to the Dawes report.
Through the International Chamber, the business
men of the world have been pressing for a solution of the reparations problem on a business basis. W e believe that if the
Dawes plan can now be put into operation it will do much to
hasten a condition of affairs that will make it possible to
take up some of the other problems which must, we believe, be
solved on a basis of business principles before there can be a
full measure of economic restoration.
As an indication of what the International Chamber
is doing in an effort to assure a fair opportunity for the application of the Dawes plan, I wish to call your attention to a
resolution which the Chamber of Commerce of the United States
passed at its last annual meeting, upon the recommendation of
the American Section of the International Chamber. A copy of
the resolution is attached.
Similar action has been taken by
many of the most important commercial and trade organizations
in this country, upon the special request of the American Section.
1 ith the thought that you might be interested
in reading the set of principles that have been advanced by the
International Chamber for economic restoration, I am attaching a
copy of a resolution passed at a meeting of the Chamber in Rome
last year. We have particular pride in this resolution because
it was drafted and proposed by American delegates at the Rome
meeting.
We likewise have much pride in the fact that an
American, Mr. Fred I. Kent, Vice-President of the Bankers Trust
Company of New York, is Chairman of the Committee of the-International Chamber of Commerce that did much to crystallize public
opinion, and particularly governmental opinion, in favor of a
commission of business experts to suggest a plan for settling
the reparations problem. It is significant of this organized
effort to aid in world restoration that three directors of the

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- 2 -

International Chamber, Mr. Owen D. Young, and Mr. Henry
M. Robinson, of the United States, and M. Pirelli, of
should have been important members of the Committee
of Experts.

Italy,

Very truly yours,

387/380.

2 enclosures

July 11, 194.

PEeS0bAL

Dear Mr. Bedford:

Thank you for your kind letter of July let. I cannot help

but reel that we will sale better progress in developing an enittened public opinion in regard to inter-allied debts if there is less
talk about cancellation ?nd more diecuesion of their adjustment alone

the line of the principle stated in the circular which you sent me, i.e.,
that these eettlemente shall be made upon's. basis of a fair measure

of the ability of the debtor to pay.
Youre very truly,

Mr. A. 0. bedford,
International Chamber of Commerce,

Mille Wilding,

Washington, D. C.

BS.MtM




---------- ---

INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

AMERICAN

DIRECTORS AND ALTERNATES

WILT

Nt-BUTTERWORTH

PRESIDENT

WILLIS H BOOTH
UNITED STATES

DEFREES
..,O1I4 H. FAHEY
NE,LSON DEAN JAY
HENRY M. ROBINSON
OWEN D. YOUNG

PRESIDENT FONDATEUR

AMERICAN SECTION

ETIENNE CLEMENTEL
FRANCE

LACEY C. ZAPF

VICE PRESIDENT FOR THE

SECRETARY

UNITED STATES

A. C. BEDFORD

MILLS BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C.

GENERAL EIECRETART

EDOUARD DOLLEANS

A. d ABEDFORD,:CA')'mCEIET:II7IMAN

if

NEW YORK

JAMS S. ALEXANDER

NEW YORK

JULIUS H. BARNES
HARRY A. BLACK" '..PWL7V
GAL vEgi*IEL.
WILLIS H BOOTH
NEW YORK
0. E. EMADFUTE
CHICAGO
W. IRVING BULLARD
BOSTON
J. H. BURTON
NEW YORK
WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH

PARIS
AMERICAN ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSIONER

September 29, 1924

BASIL MILE§
PARIS

He

OZ:enjamin Strong,
Federal Reserve Bank of New Lork,

NEWCOMB CARLTONM°LINK
NEW YORK

ROY D. CHAPIN
F. W. CLIFFORD

DETROIT

STUART W. CRAMETAR"'

New York

New York.

Dear Mr.

trong:

GEORGE S. DAVISOVERT°R
JOSEPH H. DEFREPES 'HIGH
CHICAGO
ROBERT DOLLAR
SAN FRANCISCO
CRAWFORD U. ELLIS

Recent European developments and their
probable effect on American economic life will be discussed
by men prominent in international affairs at a luncheon to
JOHN H. FAHErw 'MK"' be held by the American Section of the International Chamber
SAMUEL M. FELTONNEw YORK
EDWARD A. VILENE CHICAGO of Commerce at Rauscher's, Connecticut Avenue and"L" Street,
THOMAS S. GRASSELIrr°R Washington, at 12:45 P. M. on October 23.
CARL R. GRAY
W. A. HARRIMAN

E. M HERR

CLEVELAND

OMAHA

NEW YORK

avISTEDDEDD

NOBLE F.
NEW YORK
HERBERT C. HOOVER
PALO ALTO

HERBERT S. HOUSLOWNYORE

EDWARD N. HURLEY
CHICAGO
PEMBERTON HUTCHINSON
PHILADELPHIA
NELSON DEAN JAY
PARIS
ALBA B. JOHNSON
PHILADELPHIA
JACKSON JOHNSON
ST. LOUIS
C. F. KELLEY

The luncheon will be held coincident with
the midyear meeting of the Eastern Division of the United States
Chamber of Commerce, which you undoubtedly are planning to
attend. It is felt that this occasion offers the opportunity
for bringing together a considerable group whose judgment will be
invaluable in considering the part which American business will
take in European restoration.

On behalf of the Officers and Directors
of the American Section, I take pleasure in inviting you to
In order that provision may be made for you,
NEW YORK attend the luncheon.
ALEXANDER LEGGE
please sign and return the enclosed card at your earliest conCHICAGO
JAMES R. MAcCOLL
Details of the program will be sent to you in advance
GEORGE McFADDIarReKKT venience.
The price of the luncheon will be $1.50 per person.
S. CRISTY MEArij'ELRRii of the meeting.
ANACONDA

FRED I. KENT
NEW YORK
FREDERICK P. KEPPEL
NEW YORK
IVY L. LEE

E. T. MEREDITH

E. G. MINER

NEW YORK

DES MOINES
ROCHESTER

WM. FELLOWES MORGAN
NEW Yoloc
DWIGHT W. MORROW
NEW YORK
THOMAS A. O'DONNELL
Los ANGEL.

Emnbr B. PARKER

Very truly yours,

HOUSTON

REGINALD H. PARSONS

LEWIS E PMRMW

JOHN J. rumaa

SEATTLE

NEW YORK

Chairman

WILMINGTON

WMMANI C. REDFIELD
NEW YORK
FRANKLIN REMINGTON
NEW To.
GEORGE M. REYNOLDS
CHICAGO
HENRY M. ROBINSON
Los ANGELES
L. K. SALSBURY
MEMPHIS
CHARLES M. SCHWAB
NEW YORE
H. A. SMITH
HARTFORD
CHARLES A. STONE
NEW YORK

GERAWD SWOPE
NEW YORE
HARRY B. THAMER

E. P. nicmus

NEW YORK

NEW Yoga

HARRY A. WHEELER

J. M. wriumrr

CHICAGO

om..wm
OWEN D. YOUNG

NEW Yoga



THIRD GENERAL MEETING, BRUSSELS BELGIUM. JUNF 21-9R 109C

AMERICAN

DIRECTORS AND ALTERNATEB

INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

WILLLA M BUTTERWORTH

UNITED STATES

H H. DEFREES
OilN H. FAHEY
NELSON DEAN JAY
HENRY M. ROBINSON
OWEN D. YOUNG

UNITED STATES

A. C. BEDFORD

WASHINGTON, D. C.

GENERAL SECRETARY

EDOUARD DOLLEANS

MOLINE

PARIS

October 8, 1924.

AMERICAN ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSIONER

AC(

NEW YORK

NEWCOMB CARLTOTT,,,

ROY D. CHAPIN
F. W. CLIFFORD

FRANCE

VICE PRESIDENT FOR TUE

SECBETAB Y

A. C. BEDFORD, CHAIRMAN
NEW YORE

CHICAGO

ETIENNE CLEMENTEL

LACEY C. ZAPF

JAMES S. ALEXANDER
NEW YORE
JULIUS H. BARNES
DULUTH
HARRY A. BLACK
GALVESTON
WILLIS H. BOOTH

W. IRVING BULLARD
BosToz
J. H. BURTON
WILLIAM BUTTERWRITIRE

PRESIDENT FONDATEUR

AMERICAN SECTION

AMEMCANCOMMMME

0. E. BRADFUTE

PRESIDENT

WILLIS H. BOOTH

Honorable Benjamin Strong, Governor,
Federal Reserve Bank of New York,
15 Nassau Street,
New York, N. Y.

BASIL MILES

ED

OCT 2 9 1q24

DETROIT
MINNEAPOLIS

STUART W. CRANR

Dear Governor Strong:

CRAMERTON

GEORGE S. DAVISON

PITTSBURGH

JOSEPH H. DEFREES
DOLLAR

CHICAGOROBERT

SAN FRANCISCO

The Third General Meeting of the International Chamber
of Commerce will be held in Brussels, Belgium, June 21-28, 1925.

CRAWFORD H. ELLIS
NEW OaLzAzz
JOHN H. FAHEY
NEW YORK
In preparation for that meeting, the American Program
SAMUEL M. FELTON
CHICAGO
EDWARD A. FILENE
Committee is desirous of obtaining from members of the Chamer
BOSTON
THOMAS S. GRASSRELLAND
suggestions of appropriate topics for discussion. Attached, you
CARL R. GRAY
OMAHA Will find a list of some of the topics that are now on the Chamber's
W. A. HARRIMAN
NEW YORE
E. M. HERR
EAST PITTSBURGH
NOBLE F. HOGGS0A,

HERBERT C. 1100V412.
HERBERT S. HOUSTON
NEW YORE
EDWARD N. HURLEY
CHICAGO
PEMBERTON HUTCHINSON
PHILADELPHIA
NELSON DEAN JAY
PARIS
ALBA B. JOHNSON
PHILADELPHIA
JACKSON JOHNSON
ST. Lou/s
C. F. KELLEY
ANACONDA

FRED I. KENT
NEW YORK
FREDERICK P. KEisygLy...
IVY L. LEE

calendar.
Some of these subjects will necessarily be given further
consideration at the meeting next year because committees in the
different countries have been carrying on investigations since the
meeting in Rome last year.

One of the American Directors of the International Chamber,
who was also a member of the Dawes Committee, has expressed the
opinion that if the Dawes Plan is to be productive of the desired
results business men must exert their influence to make possible a
profitable exchange of the products of the world.

NEW YORK

ALEXANDER LEGGE
CHICAGO
JAMES R. MAcCOLL
PAWTUCKET
GEORGE McFADDEN
PHILADELPHIA
S. CRISTY MEAD
NEW YORK
E. T. MEREDITH

Since the big problem in the world's restoration seems
clearly to be the condition in Europe, the key note of the Brussels
Meeting will perhaps necessarily be a continuation of the efforts of
the Chamber to bring about a solution of the European situation.
DES MOINES
The
E. G. MINER
Wm. nmmycirEs D, M3Tgie Dawes Plan is the first step contemplated by the set of principles
DWIGHT WMOR.IMV YORE
enunciated in the Chamber's resolution on "World Restoration". The
THOMAS A. upoAFIPRK
1,0 ANGELES
Program Committee would like to have the benefit of your judgment as
EDWIN B. PARKER
REGINALD H. PARSeITT'N to whether the Chamber should discuss at its Brussels Meeting plans
SEATTLE
LEWIS E. PIERSON
for further developing the principles set forth in its Rome resolution,
NEW YORE
JOHN J. RASKOBWIL,,,,N copy of which is enclosed.
The Committee will appreciate any suggestions
WILLIAM C. REDFIELD
NEW YORK
you may have for making the Brussels Meeting an economic conference of the
FRANKLIN REMIN Tag
GEORGE
CHICAGO
HENRY M. ROBINSON
U. ANGELES
L. K. SALSBURY
MEMPHIS
CHARLES M. SCHWAB
NEW YORE
H. A. SMITH
HARTFORD
CHARLES A. STONE
NEW YORK
GERARD SWOPE
NEW YORK
HARRY B. THAYER
NEW YORE
E. P. THOMAS
NEW Yozz
HARRY A. WHEELER

J. M. WHITSITT
OWEN D. YOUNG

first order.

Trusting you will give this matter your very earnest thought
and let us have your contribution at an early date, I beg to remain
Very sincerely yours,

CHICAGO

CHARLESTON


NEW YORK


Chairman

B 1 2.4

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CII.Crf

531

October 8, 1924

Mr. A. C. Bedford,
Chairman, internetional Chamber of Commerce,
Washington, D. C.

Dear Sir:
an

In the absence of Governor Str.,rig, I rant to acknowledge
thank you for your letter of October 6, enviainti.: that the

Third General Meeting of the International Chamber of Commerce
will
in :Brussels, 3e1gium, in June next year, end enclosing

a tentative program of topics for discussion.

On hie return, to the bank the latter part of this month,
your letter and the iA.ogrrim will be brought to Mr. Strongie attention.




Very truly yours,
Secretery to the Governor.

(

44-ii,k44"

October

Lora Mx. Boofordl

I have to thank you for your favor of the 6th instant, to
which I have Lot sooner ropiiod because of ay absence from the city.

Much of the progrtx is rather outside of thu line of our
ctivitie,Lna I truly fuel oapable of conGLenting upon them, or
indeed ehouid I do so when I

unAble to attend the. meeting to be held

next year in Brussels.
I confess to be somewhat surprised that the proeram under the

heaLing "Pinuncen is 60 limited in its ecoe, but probably suggestions
receivea.. from othr members kali result in somewhat enlu.rging it.
Very truly yours,

BENJ. 'STRONG

Governor.

A. C. Bedford, Esq..,
Chairmn, International Chamber of GolJerce,
Washington, D. C.
EVLS




AMERICAN

DIRECTO, AND ALTERNATES

IUTTERWORTH
H. DEFREES
H. FAHEY
NELSON DEAN JAY
HENRY M. ROBINSON
OWEN D. YOUNG
tICAN COMMITTEE

INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PRESIDENT

WILLIS H. BOOTH
UNITED STATES
PRESIDENT FONDATEUR

AMERICAN SECTION

ETIENNE CLEMENTE',
FRANCE

LACEY C. ZAPF

VICE PRESIDENT FOR THE

SECRETARY

UNITED STATES

A. C. BEDFORD

WASHINGTON, D. C.

GENERAL SECRETARY

EDOUARD DOLLEANS

A. C. BEDFORD, CHAIRMAN

NEW YORK

JAMES S. ALEXANDER
NEW YORK
JULIUS H. BARNES
DULUTH
HARRY A. BLACK
GALVESTON
WILLIS H. BOOTH
NEW YORK
0. E. BRADFUTE
ClueEao
W. IRVING BULLARD
BOSTON
J. H. BURTON
NEW YORK
WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH
Mous'.
NEWCOMB CARLTON
NEW YORE
ROY D. CHAPIN
DETROIT
F. W. CLIFFORD
MINNEAPOLIS
STUART W. CRAMER
CRAMERTON
GEORGE S. DAVISON
Pnyrssusan
JOSEPH H. DEFREES
CHICAGO
ROBERT DOLLAR
Sex FEsEcisco
CRAWFORD H. ELLIS
NEW ORLEANS
JOHN H. FAHEY
NEw YORK
SAMUEL M. FELTON
CHICAGO
EDWARD A. FILENE
BOSTON
THOMAS S. GRASSELLI
CLEVELAND
CARL R. GRAY
OMAHA
W. A. HARRIMAN

E. M. HERR

NEW YORK

EEET PITTSBURGH

NOBLE F. HOGGSON
NEW YORK
HERBERT C. HOOVER
PALO ALTO
HERBERT S. HOUSTON
NEW YORK
EDWARD N. HURLEY
CHICAGO
PEMBERTON HUTCHINSON
PH/LADELPHIA
NELSON DEAN JAY
PARIS
ALBA B. JOHNSON
PHILADELPHIA
JACKSON JOHNSON
ST. Louis

PARIS
AMERICAN ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSIONER

BASIL MILES

November 3, 1924.

Mr. Benjamin Strong, Governor,
Federal Reserve Bank of New York,
New York, New York.

ALEXANDER LEGGE
CHICAGO
JAMES R. MEcCOLL
PAWTUCKET
GEORGE McFADDEN
PHILADELPHIA
S. CRISTY MEAD
NEW YORK
E. T. MEREDITH
DES MOINES

E. G. MINER

ROCHESTER

WM. FELLOWES MORGAN
NEW YORK
DWIGHT W. MORROW
NEW YORK
THOMAS A. O'DONNELL
Los

ANGELES

EDWIN B. PARKER
HOUSTON
REGINALD H. PARSONS
SEATTLE
LEWIS E. PIERSON
NEW YORE
JOHN J. RASKOB
WILMINGTON
WILLIAM C. REDFIELD
NEW YORK
FRANKLIN REMINGTON
NEW YORK
GEORGE M. REYNOLDS
CHICAGO
HENRY M. ROBINSON

Los ANGELES
L. K. SALSBURY
MEMPHIS
CHARLES M. SCHWAB
NEW YORK
H. A. SMITH
HARTFORD
CHARLES A. STONE
NEW YORK
GERAR.D SWOPE
NEw YORK
HARRY B. THAYER
NEW YORK
E. P. THOMAS
NE W YORK
HARRY A. WHEELER

J. M. WHITSITT
OWEN D. YOUNG

CHICAGO

CHARLESTON

NEW YORE



/(14:

My dear Mr. Strong:

Thank you for your letter orrOct6b42i9th,
regarding the Program for the meeting of the International
Chamber in Brussels next year.
I do not doubt that by the time the agenda
is in its final form the Finance Section will be considerably
enlarged, particularly as we plan a thorough consideration of
the problems which will have to be met if the Dawes plan is to
be fully effective, and world production and consumption is to
be completely restored.
Very truly yours,

C. F. KELLEY
ANACONDA
FRED I. KENT
NEW Yona
FREDERICK P. KEPPEL
NEW YORK
IVY L. LEE
NEw YORE

PARIS

A
CHAIRMAN.

INTERNATIONAI, CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
AMERICAN SECTION

WASHINGTON

December 1, 1924.

OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN

My dear Mr. Strong:

I think you will agree with me that the members
of the International Chamber of Commerce have a right to be proud
of its record of accomplishment during the past year.

It is not an unwarranted statement that the foundation of the Dawes Plan for the solution of the reparations problem was laid by the Rome Congress of the international Chamber. If
the Chamber had done no more than make possible this conference of

business men, and if it had done no =re than this help create a

public opinion which made possible the summoning of the Committee

of Experts and the effectuation of their work, the Chamber, in my
opinion, would have amply justified its existence.
I shall not enumerate all tne an hi evement s of the
Chamber, the outstanding saccess of its commercial arbitration mach-

inery, its work in the protection of industrial property which is of
vital interest to Lmerican business, the unification of trade terms,
the elimination of customs difficulties and the long list of other
practical improvements in international trade relations which it has
made possible.

It is only by nutual cooperation of the business
men of the world that the difficult problems of international commercial relat ions can be solved. The International Chamber of Commerce is, in my opinion, the most effective orgqiization which has yet
been devised to carry on this work.
I sincerely hope you will indicate your endorsemelt of the efforts we have made and lend your encouragement to the
continuation of the work we have undertaken by renewing your membership for the coming year.
Very truly yours,

73,
Chairman

Honorable Benjamin 3trong, Governor,
Federal Reserve Bank of New York,

15 Nassau Street,

New York, N. Y.




(7%f7q-lA

Ntie."4.)

Flm-LD

INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

ARR 20 1925
t

Am E RI CAN SECTION

WASHINGTON
April 18, 1925.

OFFICE or Tlie GRA iltItAN




My dear Ir. strong:
I believe the international Chamber's quick rise
to influence in world economic affairs is one of the
striking signs of the times. Our chief duty is to keep
its American membership in step with its growing international significance.
This authority and prestige of the American 'Section
both in this country and abroad depends on our ability to
enlist the support of a large ,:merican representation.
Thus from both a national and an international point of
view increased membership is the emphatic need of the moment. We are particularly anxious to go to the Brussels
Congress in June with a mandate of doubled membership.

Will you not make an effort to bring in at least
one new member and will you not, in addition, send us a
list of other business men who should be approached regarding membership in the Chamber?
As of possible aid to you I am asking our Washington
office to send you a list of the present membership, segregated geographically, as well as application blanks and literature which may aid you in getting new members.
The moral and financial support you have given us
through your participation in the International Chamber has
been a source of great satisfaction to me and to my associates
in the American Committee and an inspiration in our efforts
to make the accomplishments of the Chamber a realisation of
its potentialities. Will you not please let me know, at your
early convenience, if we may count on your further cooperation
in this important task of increasing our membership?

Very sincerely yours,

Honorable Benjamin Strong, Governor,
Federal Reserve Bark of New York,
New York, N. Y.




30VERNOR'S OFFICE

RECEIVED

--c) 1925 0
mAtz

EDE_




April 40, 1925.

My dear Mr. Bedford:

Your favor of the 18th instant has jut reached
ma.

If I c6n aecure a memdar tor the Internadonal Chamber

of Coloe, I certainly &hall be glad to do so.
tLe moilient, no one occurs to AO, and I ex?ect

I am a poor one to aak, a I a4 so iaoiated from tho general
duolneoa comaunity.

3iacerd1y your,

C. ledfor, 4o,.,

Chairman, Internt,tional Chamber of Cone roe,
laz.hington, D. C.

T.. E COLORADO FUEL AND IRON COMPANY
DENVER , COLORADO
:ASS E.HEFtRINGTON,
FRED HERRINGTON,
GENERAL COUNSEL
RICHARD H.FIART,
ATTORNEY

May 25, 1917.

My dear Mr. Strong:

I have yours of the 17th inst.

You already know that

I did not return to Denver until Tuesday afternoon, which
is my excuse for not replying at an earlier date.

I will bring the matter to the attention of the Board
of Directors of our Association at its meeting next week.

In the meantime, I have written Senator Thomas.

I return

the enclosures which you were kind enough to send me.
I may not see you again before you return to New York.
It has been a pleasure to know you even slightly.

I hope

your health is so completely restored that you will not be
obliged to visit Denver again, but do hope that you will
come and see us sometime for pleasure.
Sincerely yours,

Yr. Benj. Strong,
#4100 Montview Blvd.,
Denver, Colorado.

CEH'S







September 19, 1921.

General Lanagsr
Endicott Johnson Shoe Conpany,
Endicott, N. Y.

Dear Sir:

In order, if possible, to get a somewhat clearer view of the
present situation as regards unemployment, I am anxious to secure sote
inforaation as to the extent to which ,verkers La longer reported on the
payrolls of tae Lui'ustrial cencerna found -Tork in so4:e other lines.
Several of our directors and one or two others have volunteered

to institute a brief inquiry In their several conoerns into just this

question and to trace, out as far as practioable just mlat has become of
the men they have had to let go, just what' they are doing and what pereentaze of them aro now definitely or nearly 'without means of livelihood.

There is a great difference, of course, bet4een this and just

counting up how many have been dropped from emoloyment rolls.

I should like, especially, an idea as to what percentage of
factory employees have gone back to the farms, or to domestic service,
or returned to foreign countries.
This information is for the conference on unemp/eyment which is
to be held in qashingtun next week and I Should ee very grateful if you
could give me some sort of an answer by 1riday of this week..




Believe me,

Very sincerely yours,

BENJANUN RRONG,

Governor.




ENDICOTT JOHNSON CORPORATION
MAKERS OF LEATHER
AND

LEATHER SHOES
JOHNSON CITY, N.Y.

September 22, 1921.

Mr. George W. Johnson,
Endicott, N. Y.
Dear Sir:

Enclosed is statement regarding the number laid
off from January 1, until June 30, when the period of reduction practically ceased.
All of the workers who were
laid off, and desired to come back have been taken care
of.

It is impossible to say what became of the very
few who did not return. The total number would not exceed
75.
Te can give you the reason for any one person leaving
our employ of their own free will, as the enclosed Labor
Report shows. Among these voluntary quits are 55 to Europe,
58 to Farm, and 67 women to Stay Home.
Te had no occasion to lay off female help as there
has been shortage since the first of the year.
Very truly yours,

ENDICOTT JOHNSON CORPORATION

TJR:SL
INCL.

ENDICOTT JOHNSON CORPORATION
MAKERS OF

LEATHER AND LEATHER SHOES
ENDICOTT, N. Y.
FILE

Sept. 23

1921

G`,11J MS W

TANNERY DEPT.

Federal Re serve Bank
of New York

Attention: Mr. *tong ;
Dear Sir;
Dictated by Ge o tV Johnson: Answering your

letter of the 19th please find enclosed information in
reference to the movement of our Labor from the first of
the year ar to date.

If the re is any other assistance we can
give, please advise.
Very trul yours




ENDICOTT JOHNSON

421//1/1 I 'It'

\41-1

$iS

.




'

EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR REPORT FOR

Orr

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ROOMS

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TOTAL
MONTH

EXP.

II

110444-11"eni

/f

i*...2.1

REINSTATED TRANSFERED

HIRED

FACTORY-4

701 6-

TOTAL
YEAR

i..ac 2ka,v_alt.

THIS
MONTH

THIS
INEX.

THIS
YEAR

YEAR

19 02
DISIVIdED

QUIT THIS
MONTH

OUT
THIS
YEAR

THIS
MONTH

THIS
YEAR

4,
ay 1,...

GOING
AWAY

QUIT THIS
YEAR

DISSATISFIED

GOING
AWAY

/4.

an

DISSAT!SPIED

/

s s--473 667;

a 97 70.3? 6t/0 ,4s-ll

I`

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II

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ply

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ro
.

W_.

.

THIS
YEAR

TURN-

LAID

OVER




-44

It

beptetber 19, 1921.

Ur. C. K. Lassiter,

Vice-President, Ameriean Locomotive Company,

30 Church Street,

New York, V. Y.

Dear sir:

In order, if possible, to get a somewhat clearer view of the

present situation as regards unemployment, 1 am anxious to secure some
iniomation as to the extent to whioh workers no longer reported on the
-payrolls of the industrial concerns found work in some other lines.

8everal of our directors and one or two others have volunteered

to institute a brief inquiry In their several concerns into just this

question and to trace out 4s far us praotioaele just what has become of
the men they have had to let go, just at they are doing and What pereentage of them are now definitely or nearly without reans of liveliheod.

There i.e a great differenee, of course, between this and just

counting up how many have been dropped from employment rolls.

I ihould like, especially, au Lies an to what percentage of
factory empleyees have gone aack to the farms, or to dorestic service,
or returned to foreign countries.
This inforuation is for the conference on unemoloyment which is
to be held in Washington next week and I should be very grateful if you
could give nn some sort of an answer by Friday of this week.




3elieve me,

Very sincerely yours,

thiVJAMEN STRONG,

Governor.

American Locomotive Company
30 Church Street
Columbus K. Lassiter
Vice President




NewYork

September 20, 1921.

Mr. Benj. Strong, Governor,
Federal Reserve Bank of New York,
15 Nassau Street,
New York City.
Dear Sir:

Replying to your inquiry of September 19th;
We estimate that not over 5% of our employes have
gone back to the farm or to domestic service, and as far
as we know, practically none of our employes has returned
to foreign countries. We believe that about 45% of our men
are temporarily employed, which employment consists of
gardening, repairing fences, looking after shrubbery, painting houses, cleaning and repairing automobiles and day work
of this nature wherever it can be picked up.
50% of our men are doing nothing, simply waiting
for re-employment in the shop and working one or two days
a week as the shop may need their services for such little
work as we have to do.
I might say that the condition of the 45% of our
men who are temporarily employed is becoming more serious
as the weather grows colder, and the number of outside jobs
which they can pick up are fewer. The 50% of our older employes who are working only as we need them are not in such
bad circumstances due to the long period of time they have
been employed by the Company and the money they have been
able to save. The majority of these men own their own
homes and can get along for a time with comparatively small
earnings.
If there is any other information we can give you,
we will be very glad to do so upon reques .
Yours very truly,

V ce

'I;




F.-410111(00.1 11133i19,111F,
190Ly8

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1,4at,::

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6




1

,

September 19, 1921.

Colonel George W. Mixter,
?resident, Pierce-Arrow Company,

Buffalo, N.Y.
Dear Sir:

In order, if possible, to get a somewhat clearer view of the
present situation as regards unemployment, I am anxious to secure some information as to the extent to which workers no longer reported on -Lie )ayrolls of the industrial =acmes found work in some other lines.
Several of our directors and one

or two others have volunteered
just this question

to institute a brief inquiry in their several concerns into

and to trace out as for as oracticable just what has became of the men they
have had to let go, just what they are doing and that percentage of them are
now definitely or nearly without means of livelihood.

There is a great difference, of course," between this and
ing up how many have

just count-

been dropped from amploylent rolls.

I should like, especially, an idea as to what percentage of factory
oloyees have gone back to the farms, or to domestic service, or returned to
foreign countries.
This information is for the conference on unemployment which is to
be held in Washington next week and I should be very grateful if you could give
me some sort of an answer by Friday of this week.




Believe me,

Very sincerely yours,

BENJAilIN STRONG,

Governor.

THE PIERCE-ARROW MOTOR CAR COMPANY
1695 ELMWOOD AVENUE

BU FFALO. N. Y.

September 26, 1921.

OFFICE OF THE

PRESIDENT

Mr. Benjamin Strong,
Governor, Federal Reserve Bank of New York,
New York City.
Dear Sir:

This is a tardy acknowledgment of your letter
of the 19th asking for certain facts concerning to what
degree men laid off at one point have been employed
elsewhere.

Absence from Buffalo has prevented a prompt anI am enclosing a memorandum On the subject from
our industrial man, Mr.Coleman,, which is all we can offer.
swer.

Accept my apologies for delay in answer, and
perhaps lack of detailed figures which you would like.

VITAL PLACE OF THE MOTOR CAR
"The motor car has become an indispensable instrument in our

POLITICAL. SOCIAL and INDUSTRIAL life."
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
From President Harding's Message to Congress, April 12, 1921.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Yours truly,

GEORGE W. MIXTER,
President.

Per

Secy. to the Pr sident.

/

PIERCE-ARROW MOTOR CAR COMPANY
BUFFALO, N. Y.
ADMINISTRATION OFFICES
MEMORANDUM TO MR.
FROM




Mixter, President.

Robt..F. Coleman.

September 22nd, 1921.

Referring to the attached letter from the Federal
Reserve Bank.
I do not know of any possible way that this information can be given without making a personal investigation of one hundred typical cases and assume
that the reuult would represent a fair proportion
of the total.
Such an investigation wouldi necessitate several days
I have no one available for the job
outside work.
and there would be no certainty that the ratio would
hold.

Our observation is that there is no great amount of
unemployment in Buffalo. It seems to be difficult
rst class mecha
to get
econd, because of the
are working o other Jo s.
fact that we have had a number of lay-offs and old
employees who really prefer to work here will not
leave other jobs unless we are in a position to guarrantee them steady employment.
Laborers and poorer class of mechanics have been employed on country road and street improvements during
the summer and at present a good many of them are employed in the country as fruit pickers. This class
of men will return to the city wihtout employment
during the next three or four weeks.
From our observation here at the plant, and from'
definate knowledge of one farming section in the center,
of the State, and one about thirty miles from this city
I am greatly surprised that no larger number of men
have returned to the farm. Those who have gone back
have to a very large extent left their families in the
city apparentlt beleiving that shop work will pick up
and the high wages of the past few years will be restored.,




6-1

September 19, 1921.

General tanager,
General Electric Comoany,
120 Broadway, h.Y. City.
Dear Sir:

In order, if possible, to get a somewhat clearer view of the
present situation as regards unemployment, I am anxious to secure some information as to the extent to which workers no longer reported on the payrolls of the industrial concerns found work in some other lines.
Several of our directors and one or two others have volunteered
to institute a brief inquiry in their several concerns into just this question
and to trace out as far as practicable just what has become of ttle men they
have had to let go, just what they are doing and what percentage of them are
now definitely or nearly without means of livelihood.
There is a great difference, of course, between this and
ing up how many have been dropped from employment rolls.

just count-

I should like, especially, an idea as to what percentage of factory
employees have gone back to the farms, or to domestic service, or returned to
foreign countries.

This information is for the conference on unemployment which is to
Washington next week and I should be very grateful if you could give
sort of an answer by Friday of this week.

be held in
me some

Believe me,
Very sincerely yours,

,




BENJAMIN STRONG,
Governor.

./

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
120 BROADWAY, NEW YORK

Septeaber 22, 1921.
CE _ PATTERSON
VICE PRESIDENT

Mr. W. Randolph Burgess,
Statistics Department,
Federal Reserve Dank of New York,
New York, N. Y.

Dear Mr. Alrge8s:7.,
I was out of town when your letter of the 19th was
received but it has finally reached me.

Of course we are

most anXiMIS to co-operate with Governor Strong in every

possi...

ble way but I fear it would be impossible to give him any concrete information as to the present whereabouts and activities
of the former employees of our 50 factories and nearly 100
large offices.

They are scattered all over the United States;

employ all grades of labor and salary help and the conditions

at the different factories and offices vary a great deal in
the matter of volume of work, etc.

The labor turnover in

our many places of employment also varies a good deal.

In

other words, certain classes are always coming and going.
to
While I cannot give you any definite information as

off in our business has
how much real unemployment the falling
the Washingoccasioned, there is one suggestion which I think
and that is the
ton conference would do well to emphasize,
during-and since
relativity of the whole matter of employuent,
the war period.




For instance, suppose a company had 5000

2--

employees in December 1916.
December 1920.

Suppose its peak number was 9000 in
Suppose again that in September 1921 the number

on its payrolls has deceased to 6000. That company will be
vociferously charged with having created unemployment to the extent
of 3000 pecple, without, however, being given credit for the
creation of employment to the extent of 4000 during this period
of prosperity.
In all the articles on uneaployment and the

tirade against "the existing social order" I have seen there has
been practically no emphasis of the foregoing point.
Yours very truly,

g
Vice President.
012P:MH







I 902,0

0




/9O

,rf«4-4(fic442*)
26 BROADWAY,

1,11\yi _rt
Februarr
AffA

%RAI

Mr. J. H. Case,
Acting

Governor, Federal Reserve Bank,

atildalre

c

ANis wD
VE Afkihe

3'. E. C.

Nassau St., New York City.
My dear Mr. Case:
My let'Ler to

speaks for

Ben Strong, which I should




be glad to have you read,

itself, and it is really an acknowledgement of yours to Mr. Bed-

ford of February 16th.
v7

Very truly

yours,

1920 -

/e/c442- /Z
26 BROADWAY,

February 28th, 1920

Governor Benjamin Strong,
Federal Reserve Bank,
Nassau St., New York.
Dear Ben:

Here are the letters of introduction to some of our people in the Far
East, the requests for which came around through your associate, Mr. J. H. Case.
Mr. Case I guess thoughCthere was only one Standard Oil Company and that the
Standard Oil Company (New Jersey),f for he dropped his line to Mr. A. C. Bedford;
but you just take it from me there are at least two Standard Oil Companies, and
this one of mine is one of them; and don't you forget, when you get the the Far
East, that it is the Standard Oil Co. of New York that is the real company and
that it is the one doing business "out-that-a-way".

I am glad you are going to take the trip, for I know how much you need
a change of scene after all the strenuous times you have been through the last
few years.

Of course I expect to see you before you sail, but if there should

be any slip-up whereby I shouldn't, have a good time and personally remember me
to all of our representatives with whom you come in contact.
With very best wishes,
Sincerely yours,

Enclosures.




Al>6/0-61.4

,V4,(46/6)4,-,047
26' *,ocirdepee,
.40

6To&

cAze

f/yOr

Februar7 26, 1920..
SUBJECT

ROOM 1306

2. H. L. Pratt,
Building.
Dear Mr. Pratt:
Complying rrith your request, I take pleasure in
enclosing letters of introduction for Governor Benjamin Strong and
his party, to the following gentlemen:

Mr. H. A. Ensworth, General Manager, with headquarters at
Yokohama, in charge of our business in Japan and Korea.
In case of Er. Ensworth's absence, the letter may be
presented to Mr. A. E. McGlewsat Yokohama, Assistant
General Manager.

2. W. 0. Sprague, General Manager, Standard Oil Compmy Of
New York, Shan-hai, for North China Division which incip(les
Hankow, Tientsin, Peking and all of Manchuria.
In the absence of Mr. Sprague, the letter should be presented to either Mr. C. W. Atkinson or La'. V. G. Lyman.

Mr. W. B. Walker, with headquarters at Hong Kong, General
Manager of South China Division, which includes the Philippines, Indo China and Siam.
In Mr. Walker's absence, the letter should be presented to
either Mr. D. C. Cameron or Mr. P. W. Parker.

Mr. E. H. Rankin, Manager at Singapore, who is under the jurisdiction,of our Batavia office.
Mr. C. D. Campbell, General Manager at Batavia, Java, who is
in charge of our business in all of Netherlands Indies,'
Straits Settlements and Singapore.
In Mr. Campbell's absence, the letter should be prebented to
Mr. P. D. Tracey, Assistant Manager.
Mr. E. R. Rich, General Manager for India, including Rangoon and
Ceylon with headquarters at Calcutta.
In the absence of Mr. Rich from Calcutta, the letter should be
Presented to Mr. W. F. Guthrie.



Yours v

/7

truly,




Herbert L. ?ratt, Esq.,

Vice-President, Standard Oil Couvany of New York,
28 Broadway, New York, N. Y.

dear Mr. Pratt:
Thank you for your letter of February 28,

enclosing co2y of your letter to Governor Strong, together

with letters of introduction for him and his party to your

Manages in the Fr East.

I at sure the Governor will

greatly a?reciate your courtesy fn this matter.
Very truly yours,

Case,
Actin governor.

Phoenix, Arizona, March 29, 1920.

Mr. Merbert L. Pratt,

c/o Standard Oil Co. of New York,

26 Broadway, New York City.

Dear Bert:

You letter of February 28th hoz juit_reached
me, accompanied by letters of introduction which you are
good enough to send, and which I assure you will be a
great help in.givigg uc an interesting trip, and are much
appreciated.
You will, I hope, overlook the slip in sending
the request to the wrong Standard Oil Company. It is a
sure thing that ours ie the only bank in Now York City where
ouch a mistake would be likely to happen. Had I been in
New York myself, I w7!u1dihave telephonediyou and gotten my-

self str ight.

As we shall sail from'San Franciseo, I can*.t hope
to see you before going, bUt when I get back I-will promise
to give you an account of our doings and tell you iust how
the Standard Oil Company of New York is behaving 'out-that.-a-

way *.

My best regards to all the boys at the club and
to yournelf.




Sincerely yours,




4.

0
DANIEL G. RE ID
BANKER TRUST COMPANY BUILDING
FOURTEEN WALL STREET
NEW YORK

Mr. Benjamin Strong,
4100 Montview Boulevaed,

Denver, Ooloradolo,_

January 15, 1917.

aI.fr
JAN 1 9

Dear Mr. Strong:

I have intended dropping you a line for several
I saw Mr. Mudge here about two weeks asp.
were

in Denver and looked fine.

He told

weeks.

me that you

He spoke about being

present at a

dinner given in your honor and said that you seemed to enjoy the
evening very much.

This is just

a line to say that I am glad to

hear that you are coming along and that the mountain air is doing
you great good.




With my kindest regards and beet wishes,
'Tours s

ely,

Denver, Colorado,
January 19, 1917.

Dear Mr. Reid:

This is no place for clams. i never knew sc a town for dragging people out to make speeches and I

the news of my

a

having been victimized in that regard has drifted Eas
Mudge referred to was supposed t

e dinner Mr.

is informal af ir of six

or eight men and it was When

lub that I was told there

were thirty-six guests and I

to make an address. However,

I have been able to duck

/v- since then.

It was mighty

would be glad to sway

news with you if th

interest that I could send from

here. My time is d

tie work and a lot of loafing and

reading, mo

and 1 am really benefitting a

great d

by the rest and climate. Some day I hope to be back in bar-

ness.
many thanks f

your letter and warmest regards, I am,
Sincerely yours,

Daniel G. Reid,
14 Wall St.,
New York City.

BS/CC




DANIEL G. R1-13
BANKERS TRUST COMPANY BUILDING
FOURTEEN WALL STREET
NEW YORK

January 24, 1917.

Mr. Benjamin Strong,
4100 Mountview Boulevard,
Denver, Colorado.

JAN271917

Dear Mr. Strong:

I am just in receipt of your favor of January the 19th.

Very glad indeed to hear from you and also to know that you are
feeling so well.

You are in a mighty good climAte, and I hope

that you will keep out of doors as much as possible.
out of doors life is the real thing.

I wish I could get more of it.

Matters are going along here about as usual.
business is very good.

General

Most of the high class industrial companies

have more business than they can handle.
night and day.

After all the

Some of them are working

The steel business never has been so good.

The

output of the Corporation has been sold, as I understand it, up
full for the year 1917 and they are now selling goods into next
year, particularly rails.

Inasmuch as the price is W. a ton as

against $28. - the old price - this is good business.

Bars or,

in other words, plates which used to @ell for $15., and during the
past few years for about $18., are now quoted at about t65. per ton.
Tin plate which last year was purchasable at $3.40 per hundred
pounds, this being the open price, is for the first half of 1917,

$5.75 per hundred pounds, and $7, per hundred pounds for the last



0
-2-

half.

A pretty good advance, don't you think?

And the stock is

all sold out and, in my opinion, there will be a big shortage of tin
plate for this year.

Locomotives which sold eighteen months ago

at about $26,000. are now $52,000.

Cars which two years ago could

be bought at $950. each, they are now getting $2100. for.
are freight cars, of course.
a year ago.

These

Steel cars are double what they were

Everything else in the steel line in proportion.

However, I am just in receipt of a letter from Paris, France, in
which the writer says they are paying i80 francs a ton for coal.
Railroads have reduced their train service 25 per cent, and they are
using coal oil lamps in the banks over there; cannot get electricity
on account of the cost and scarcity of coal.
I see some of our old-time friends every day.

They are

all on the job here now with the exception of Mr. Davison, who is
south quail shooting, and Mr. Wiggin, who is away on a vacation.
The ones in town all seem to be well and in good spirits.

There is,

of course, as you know, quite a little doing in the way of politics.
The New York papers are filled with new and sensational stuff every
morning and evening.

You get all of this, of course.

If it keeps

up it will be hard for some of aur union fellows to keep to the hours
and get full pay.



I hope that you may continue to improve and feel better

day by day.

Why don't you run down to Phoenix, Arizona, for a month

or so during the winter months.

I know you would like the climate.

I have been there, and it is fine.




With my very best wishes ad kindest reg4rds,
Yours

Jef

Denver, Colorado,
January 27, 1917.

Dear Lr. Reid:

As my friend Keine of San Francisco says

was like "dew

on Gideon's fleece" to get your letter of the f4t
ing the advice contained in yorr lEtter

j1.iost of every day

out of doors and sleep outdoors every night, evel, t-o

temperatures as low as 10 below

I am really follow-

we have had

ttle later When

z

improves 1-,am exepcting to pla

he weather

friends from the East have

been visiting me lately and

a couple of chaps On Sunday

and we had all expected t,

in Irizona, but linfortunately

the hotels there are
out

in

enix as we malted to

get

the country,

et we may decide to go after all.

rho change in

is phenomenal. A little Company

thc South

Taon

and which was regarded at one

time as

lately dead is

do with

and I judge a

allied

'ustries.

' rls I understand is also true in Russia.

room a friend said that food was very scarce and expensive,

a pint of wine cost

2O and an overcoat

transportation as anythin

a

omplote revolution has taken place in all

i

Wha. 41141.00000,usayab

A recent letter

so mush mone7q they don't know what to

1000.

This is due as much to

else.

reading- the accounts of the lea. .c. investigation with keen

interest; it has somewhat the appearance of drawing a red herring_across
the trail.




2.

ToMr. Reid.

January 27, 1917.

The real question is whether an Etheopian was really cm-

cooled in that woodpile and whether the present effort is honestly
to discover him and make known his identity, or

lead the hunt in

some other direction. Personally, I think the -

e thing is a lot

of sensational nonsense.

I susnect most of the old crowd are overworkin

d getting

too rich.
Is there any chance of yo

I may go over in June, if ha

od this summon

but this is for your own

information only.

With best rega
when you see him.

Daniel G.

id, Esq.,

t Company Bldg.,
14 Wall t.. New York Ci .
1.71kers

BS/CC




nvey to Judge Moore




6-44",1

ff,ete

/

JOHN D. RYAN
42 BROADWAY
NEW YORK

September 3rd, 1914.

Benjamin Strong, Jr., Esq.,
16 Wall Street,
New York.
Dear Sir:-

I beg to hand you herew th Mr. Ryan's check for
$50.22, in accordance with your lett r of September 1st, prorating expense of trip to Washingt
Very t

CRM/JB.




ly yours,




)
!
ell

tttirtfri

CHARLES M. SCHWAB
25 BROADWAY
NEW YORK

fO

December 17, 1923.

CkINIO
Mr. Benjamin Strong, Governor,
iederal . teserve Bank,
Jew York City.

WIED%D

DEC 2 8

-1923

c-4

My dear Mr. Strong:-I have been appointed Chairman of the Special Gifts
Committee of the ftarding Aemorial Association in Jew York City.
At a meeting of this Committee last week, we distributed the
burden of our e250,000. allotment among the various important
interest of the city. These, with the exception of the
banking interests, have already been asked to contribute collectively
The iron and steel industry aloae
and have all responded generously.
headed by Judge Gary, gave us 45,000. The oil, tobacco,
textile, moving picture and other interest have also give their
full quota.
May I appeal to you individually to he one of the
banking fraternity to make a contribution to this fund'? We
have allotted to the whole of the News York banking interests the
sum of 20,000. which I hope we shall have no difficulty in
securing, and I respectfully ask that you share in this
President Coolidge and Secretary Mellon, who
subscription.
are heading this fund, are most anxious for its complete success
and I am sure you will feel, as I do, that it is a worthy and
patriotic cause.
Checks may be drawn to the order of the Harding
Of course,
Memorial Association and sent to me at this office.
you know that contributions to this fund are an allowable deduction on income tax returns.
May I have the pleasure of hearing promptly from you,
as we should like to close up the whole matter this year.




Sincerely yours,

-

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W c;8

,

D(,nember 28, 1923.

My dear Mr. Schwab:

tith this I am enclosing my check for $100.00, in response
to your letter of December 17, as a contribution toward the Farding
Memoris1 Fund.

I wish I could send you a larger amount, but I shall

make a subscription also in Washington through the committee there.

I am very sure that there will be no difficulty in raising an Edequate
'amount to carry out the committee's plans.
Rith kindest regards, believe me,

s

Sincerely yours,

Mr. Chrles V. Schwab,
25 Broadway,
New York, N. Y.
BS.W

enc.




HAR LES M. SC HINIA.B
25 B ROAD WAYSTEW YORK




December 31, 1923

14. dear Er. Strong:-

Your favor of the twenty-eighth received,

enclosing check for

100. toward the Harding Memorial Fund.

it is good of you to give me a share of your contribution to
this wcTthy cause, and i appreciate it very much.
With regards and best wishes for the
New Year,

Sincerely yours,

Er. Benjamin Strong,
15 Nassau Street,

New York City.




0
C6F1A_vd 7 13..) ;.?. M

1".0,- ,T'r".

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102