View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

F.D. 12A.3 '

9

o/p. 9

No

Federal Reserve Bank

S-rPo/u

District No. 2
Correspondence Files Division

PiziP'`R.-S-

SUBJECT




rRENs DEor - Li8 efirr/ I-'

/7/7

/y/,

co men .77




December 3rd, 1917.

Dear Sir:

In .Mr. Strong's absence, I am taking the liberty f replying to your letter of necember 1st.
Upon inquiry I find that the information desired by you
could only be obtained through the Treasury Department in Washing-

ton and the Department would in turn have to make a special request

of the Trenton banks before it would be posSible to obtain such records.

It is my understanding that such information is held by the

banks as confidential and owing to the difficulty of securing it,
assume that you will not care to pursue the matter further even though

your patriotic zeal might impel you to de so.
Your letter will be held pending Mr. Strong's return and

will be called to his attention at that time.
Very truly yours,

Secretary to Mr. Strong.
Sohn

an,Tdberty-,oan Committee,

Chestertown, New York.
VCV







LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE I

:IFIYIVoPWT

New York

April 11, 1918.

t

191

Dear Sir:

meeting of the LIBERTY LOAN

COMMITTEE will be held in Room 548,
Equitable Building, New York City, on
Monday, April 15, 1918, at 11:30 o'clock A.M.




Very truly yours,
E. C. GREY,
,Arsistaat Secretary

P. 0. BOX 46

TELEPHONE RECTOR 4901 TO 4919

LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE
TH.. LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE

120 BROADWAY

BENJAMIN STRONG, Chairman
JAMES S. ALEXANDER
GEORGE F. BAKER

NEW YORK

ALLEN B. FORBES
WALTER E. FREW

GATES W. McGARRAH
J. P. MORGAN
SEWARD PROSSER
CHARLES H. SABIN
JACOB H. SCHIFF
FRANK A. VANDERLIP
MARTIN VOGEL
JAMES N. WALLACE
ALBERT H. WIGGIN
WILLIAM WOODWARD

June 24,1918

JAMES E. CURTIS,
Secretary
ELLSWORTH C. GREY,
Assistant Secretary

HE ALSO SERVES WHO HELPS A IGHTER FIGHT BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Benjamin Strong, Esq.,
19 Nassau Street,
New York City.
Dear Er. Strong:

'

At the meeting of the Committee on Friday last, a
memorandum was presented of certain expenses, amounting to ,1404.75,
incurred during the last campaign by the Publicity Department. This
amount represented cigars and cigarettes used in the entertainment
of the "Blue Devils", Pershing's i_en and newspaper reporters at
Liberty Land, the luncheon at the Plaza Hotel, etc.; flowers sent
to the funeral of Mrs. Mullally; part of the expenses of a trip to
Colonel Roosevelt's home at Oyster Bay by the Liberty Loan Workers
etc.

As this expense is not chargeable against the Government
and as the item is a small one, it was decided to divide this sum
equally among the members of the Committee, making the amount due
from each member 26.98, for which you may send me your check in
care of the Guaranty Trust Company, 140 Broadway, NOW York City.




Very truly yours,

Assistant Secret

June 25, 191e.

Dear Sir:

Vr. Strong has directed me to send you the enclosed

check for t26.93 as his pro rata share of the expenses Inourred by the Publicity Department of the Liberty Loan Committee.

Very tray your%

Secretary to Mr. Strong.

E. C. Grey, Esq., Assistant Secretary,
lgb Broad's:4/, New York.

GB

ECci.




MISC. 38.2

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
OF NEW YORK

41s7

OFFICE CORRESPONDENCE
DATE

To
FROM




SUBJECT.

,\.. S.88 .D810a

;ii4Aa avRaezin JA51:3031
NilOY W311 'JO
ft




301113431409E391530D 3DIR90
TAQ

ue

oT
0111010

C.F

(copy)

Equitable Building
New York
Washington, May 22/18.

Dear Emerson -

I have been seeking the right time to send you a
few lines about the loan; and this is the first spare moment.

No one could take greater pride and satisfaction
in having a part in a great tas1; than I do in my association

with you and the Liberty Loan Staff.

Work for one's Country is

usually impersonal, - and too often perfunctory.

For me this

is a work of real blood affection, - of course on account of that

boy of mine - and I feel that you are all striving with me, to
insure his safe and speedy return.

There are no reservations or doubts in my mind as

to the spirit, ability or affection of the organization, - it is
a very great thing that it is doing, - but the credit for the results

belongs to you and the others, - and of that I get much too large
a share.

I am writing to congratulate you and express my admiration

itif your ability, patriotism and of the success which thosetwo

always insure.




Yours,

BENJ. STRONG

Telephone
.

1P101
P.O.

Rector 4901 to 4919

Box 46
LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE
.PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT

Liberty Loan Committee
EQUITABLE BUILDING - 24th FLOOR
Benjamin Strong, Chairman
James S. Alexander
George F. Baker
Allen B. Forbes
Walter E. Frew
Gates W. McGarrah
J. P. Morgan
Seward Prosser
Charles H. Sabin
Jacob H. Schiff
Frank A. Vanderlip
Martin Vogel
James N. Wallace
Albert H. Wiggin
William Woodward

Guy Emerson
Director of Publicit,
James I. Clarke
Assistant Director
in Chg., Advertising Bureau
John Price Jones
Assistant Director
In Charge, Pre s Bureau
C. F. Pritchard
Manager, Office Bureau
Grosvenor Farwell
Manager, Service Bureau

June 3, 1918.

Mr. C. F. Pritchard,
120 Broadway,
New York, New York.
Dear Mr. Pritchard:




I am attaching hereto a copy of a letter received from Governor
Strong which concerns the work that the Publicity Department did in the
Third Liberty Loan and it is, therefore, directed to you.

We are not

doing this work for any recognition, direct or indirect, but it is pleas-

ant to feelthat this Department has the backing of the man at the head
of it.

I feel sure that you realize fully that in everything you have

done you have had the complete backing of the head of theDepartment
as well as the head of the Liberty Loan Committee.

This backing has

been evidenced by giving you as far as possible a clear hand in develo p-

ing your on organization and relying upon your unquestioned loyalty
to do everything exactly in the manner that you would do it if you knew
that Mr. Strong were always at your hand.

During the next loan the

same policy will be in effect as far as possible and I believe that
difficult as it may be the next loan will be more of a success than the
third.

- 2 -

You haft doubtless seen the statement of the President's message to Congress of may 28, 1918, in which he stated that "In the
autumn a much larger sale of long time bonds must be effected than
has yet been attempted".

No one

knows how much this means in dollars.

It seems probable, however, that it means not less than five billion.
It may mean six or seven.

What this means in our work is obvious.

I am back at my desk ready to take up any problems you may
have.

I feel that the time between now and the beginning of the next

loan is not too long to accomplish the work which we have before us.
Thanking you again for your tireless and helpful work in the
past,




Sincerely yours,

/s/

GE

COPY




RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR LIBERTY LOAN WORKERS
BY BENJAMIN STRONG

All letters sent out from this organization shall
be signed by me personally.
Every day during a Liberty Loan Campaign an advertise-

ment must appear on the financial page signed by me personally,
Between campaigns a general advertisement must appear every day signed by me personally.

At least three news releases must be sent out daily
during the entire period of existence of this organization quoting
me personally.

No bonds shall be sold to any individual in this
District without my personal 0. K.
Every piece of advertising copy, press material,

pamphlet, outdoor sign, painting, cartoon, sales letter, coupon
book, bookkeeping form, mimeographed letter, sign on Brooklyn
bridge, poster, copy for book matches, milk bottle top, pictorial
news, honor flag, pay envelope insert, factory sign, boiler
plate, or telephone 'conversation shall be personally 0.K'd by
me.

I desire personally to pass on every office boy,
secretary, executive, stenographer, mimeograph operator, stencil

cutter, typist, space solicitor, reporter, copy reader, salesman, moving picture actor, General, doughboy, President, cabinmt
officer, Admiral, bank president and gob that works for this
committee.




-2All unimportant and routine matters must be taken
up personally in my office.
All matters connected with the money committee,
stabilization of American finance, advising the President and

Secretary of the Treasury on financiil matters, matters pertaining to the Bank of .England, Bank of France and the Bank

of Monte Carlo, handling the Liberty Loan and the Stock
Exchange, handling distinguished guests and all other details
of this kind will be left to Mr. Beyer.

All department heads are prohibited from consulting
with one another and no conferences, meetings, breakfasts,
luncheons, dinners or any other cooperative movements shall be
held without my presence.
I am not interested in the spending of money.

It is

important that no plans for spending money shall at any time
be submitted to Washington or to me.

Every department head,

bureau manager, division chief, and all others connected with
the organization can spend all monies at any time and for any
purpose according to their best judgment.

We want results!

GUY EMERSON
31 Nassau Street
New York

0




February 4, 1921.

Mr. C. F. Pritchard,
31 Nassau Street,
New York City.
Dear Mr. Pritchard:

Our honorable and perpetral president of the Ben Club,
Govern ol' Strong, has returned from the Far East and other points of
interest in the circumference of the Globe and my writing to him in
broken Japanese4 in order to make him feel at home, brought forth a
reply indicating his willingness to dine with the Ben Club at such
time as might be agreeable to them. He mentions the week of the 14th
of February, and I. have roughly picked on the 15th, to see if it would
meet with the favor of the members. The exact time and place will be
settled when we ascertain whether the majority can attend.
I enclose a facsimile of Governor Strong's acceptance of
Of course in these days of consortiums and other Far
our invitation.
For
Eastern interetts, you will doubtless be able to read this fluently.
the benefit of those who cannot, I will say that a Japanese friend has
expressed the belief that the communication in question indicates in a
humorous and pointed manner that the Governor accepts our greetings with
enthusiasm and will confirm in person on the night of the dinner, on which
occasion we will tey to get him in the mood to talk Japanese fluently.
Sincerely yours,

/8/

GUY EVERSON

TREASURY DEPARTMENT
WAR SAVINGS STAFF
OFFICE OF STATE ADMINISTRATOR

1270 Sixth Avenue,
New York, New York,
September 30, 1942.

Mr. Benjamin Strong,
United States Trust Company,
45 Wall Street,
New York, New York.
Dear Ben:

It was good to see you last week. If we had been
equipped with overcoats and more time we could have covered
more ground - such, for instance, as your adding machine
days at 23.
I told you I would send to you a copy of a letter.
I am enclosing that and a few other items relating to your
father.
I'm sure you'll be amused at the "rules and regulations", which some gag man in the office got up to distribute at a dinner your father gave us at the Metropolitan
Club.

If you are in this neighborhood during working hours,
I hope you will come in to see us.
Sincerely,

Encl.

BUY
STATE S

WAR

BONDS
STAMPS




Cl

1

04/AfeL

n e F. or

ARTICLE IN JOURNAL OF COMMERCE - 5/29/19

GOV. STRONG DINED BY LOAN WORKERS

EX-SEC'Y M'ADOO PRAISES THE FEDERAL RESERVE
HEAD.

Many Bankers Present at Victory Dinner
In the Waldorf-Astoria Secretary Glass Unable to Attend

Members of the Liberty Loan Organization gave a dinner in honor of Governor
Benjamin Strong of the Second Federal Reserve District and the General Liberty
Loan Committee at the Waldorf-Astoria last night. The dinner was held in recognition of Governor Strong's services during the war loans, and he was given an
enthusiastic reception.
Secretary of the Treasury Carter Glass, who was to have been one of the speakers, was unable to attend, and he was represented by Assistant Secretary of the
Treasury Russell Leffingwell. The guests were Shepard Margan, James N. Wallace,
Pierre Jay, Albert H. Wiggin, Mrs. John T. Pratt, Seward Prosser, Guy gmerson,
George Foster Peabody, James S. Alexander, A. M. Anderson, who WAS toastmaster;
William G. McAdoo, Allen B. Forbes, George W. Hodges, Jacob H. Schiff, Mrs.
Courtlandt D. Barnes, Charles H. Sabine, Gates W. McGarragh, Frank R. Wilson,
Walter E. Frew and Martin Vogel.

After the dinner there was an entertainment on a platform that had been
improvised, and the diners were particularly pleased with the work of Miss
Cecil Arden, of the Metropolitan Opera Company.
The principal address of the evening was made by ex-Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo, who not only complimented the Liberty Loan workers whom he commanded
during four campaigns, but paid high tribute to Governor Strong. He said
New York had been called on to raise the largest amount of any locality because
of its large population and vast financial resources.

Mr. Mckdoo said that the occasion brought to his mind the recollection of the
manner in which the idea of financing the war was conceived.
He said that it was
due to the fact that at one time he read a history of this country very carefully.
"When I read of the Civil War period, I was particularly interested in the way
that the war was financed, and while I do not wish to criticise Mr. Chase, who
was Secretary of the Treasury under President Lincoln, yet I always felt that he
could have been more successful in financing the cause of the North, if he had made
his appeal direct to the people.
"So when it appeared that war between this country and Germany was inevitable,
I thought of what I had read in that history, and we decided to go to the
people to raise the monebr that was to go toward equipping and maintaining the
armies to fight the Kaiser.
History will show that we were successful, and at
this time I want to pay a tribute to the small investor and to the men and women
who had to draw on their hard earnest savings in order to loan the funds to their
Government."




-2 Mr. Leffingwell praised the work of Governor Strong as well as the
members of the cominittee.
Gov. Strong in responding referred to the co-operation
that had been given to him by all the volunteer workers.




FIFTEEN NASSAU STREET
NEW YORK

0




April 29, 1919

Dear Mr. Pritchard:

Your note gave me a great deal of pleasure, and I

wish I might make known to you and to all of my associates in
this fine organization what a pleasure and an honor it has
been for me to be associated with them.
In my opinion there never was such an organization

made up of such a splendid lot of people, and I wish we might
keep it together and use it for some Government service permanently.

None of you enjoyed that dinner so much as I did.

Sincerely yours,

/s/

Clarence F. Pritchard, Esq.,

Liberty Loan Committee,
120 Broadway, New York.

BS/MSB

BENJ. STRONG

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
OF NEW YORK

June 6, 1919.

Dear Mr. Pritchard:

The successful conclusion of the Fifth Liberty Loan, more
successful in this district than in any other, means the disbanding of our
great Liberty Loan

Organization.

There are certain members of the organi-

zation to whom I am addressing this personal letter, although unable to do
so to all of them, as I would most prefer.

The work which you and your associates have performed has been
an accomplishment of the very first order in finance and in patriotism.

The

pride which I have personally felt in this organization is justified by the
character of the men and women in it even more than by the results which
they have accomplished.

I know how difficult some of the work has been

what a tremendous strain it has imposed upon all the members of the organization; and what sacrifices in many cases the work has required, and by
men and women who were little able to afford them.

This letter is to express to you my gratitude for the loyalty
which you have all shown to me as the nominal head of the organization, and
particularly for your loyalty to a great undertaking, as that Was chiefly
responsible for an equally great success.
With many good wishes, I am,
Faithfully yours,

/s/
C. F. Pritchard, Esq.,
Long Beach, N. Y.


BS/MSB


BENJ. STRONG

MEMORANDUM

June 13, 1919

To: Governor Strong
From:

Mr. Emerson

I should like to leave with you a few suggestions in
regard to the New York sttuation.
In the first place, let me state that the existing War
Sav:ngs Organization in New York was built up partly to continue
the existing War Savings Societies and similar work, which has been
started furing the past year and a half.
It was also intended to meet the directions contained in
a letter from Mr. Leffingwell received about six weeks ago, which was
transmitted to me by Mr. Sailer, which directed that a nucleus of a
continuous sales force be established in anticipation of a possible
future plan of the Treasury Department.
It should also be noted that a considerable amount of the
War Savings work, which has been done since the first of January, has
been carried by bureaus of the Liberty Loan Committee and that with
the disbanding of that organization it was necessary to place essential
men on the War Savings pay roll.

Ovbiously, we are now spending too much money in New York
on War Savings alone in proportion to sales. Following the remarks
of Mr. Leffingwell in the meeting yesterday, the War Savings Conference
directed itself to this problem and it became obvious that there were
only two ways to meet this situation, either by reducing expenses or
by increasing sales.
It is, of course, easy to make some cuts in the present pay
roll and thus reduce expenses, but with the present security I do not
believe that a reduction of the working force will result in a proportionate and relative increase in sales.
In other words, if nothing is to be available except the
War Savings Stamps I think it is very doubtful if we can ever meet
the very reasonable requirement of the Treasury Department to the
effect that expenses should be in a very modest ratio to sales.
It seems to me, however, that thrift applies to the whole
body of our people and not simply to those of small means. We have
a very real responsibility toward those people to whom we have sold
Government bonds during the past two years and Mr. Leffingwell stated
this morning that he considered it part of his responsibility to keep
in touch with these people, not only as future buyers of Government




securities, but also from the standpoint of protecting the interests
of those who came to the aid of the Government in its time of need.
He stated this morning to a Committee of the Xar Savings
Organization, of which I was a member, in a conference lasting about
an hour, that if the organization could be worked out with you so as to
be considered a unit, with its publicity directed not only to thrift
propaganda amongst possible War Savings Stamp buyers, but, also, to
thrift propaganda to people of larger means leading to the purchase of
new Treasury securities and the purchase of outstanding securities on
the market and tending also to reduce the activities of swindlers, that
he would feel that the Treasury money was being properly expended even
though it was out of proportion to the actual sale of War Savings Stamps.
I know this idea has occurred to you and I think it may be a
solution of our local problem if properly supplemented by a very careful
re-consideration of our present salary roll and of expenditures which
are in contemplation for the plans of this year.

One of my principal reasons for leaving this memorandum with
you is to call attention to the fact that if anything at all is to be
done it must be done with enthusiasm. Otherwise, we cannot maintain
any organization in New York which will live up to the traditions of
Government financing under your supervision. If the organization is
cut down so low as to be really insignificant it will make no impression
on the situation in the Second Federal Reserve District and might as well
be disbanded entirely.
We cannot hold men who have gone through the
enthusiasm of liberty loan campaigns with their tradition of success
unless we give them a job that they consider worth fighting for and a
job which they realize is considered vital not only by the Treasury
Department but by you personally who are their Chief.
I am willing to state without qualification that I believe
there is a big job to be done in our District and that we have an organization which can do this job without undue expense.
I do not believe that they have had a fair chance to demonstrate
a sales ability up to this time.
The first half of the year has been
heavily loaded with expenses that will not be repeated during the balance
of the year and all sales activities have been restricted because of the
Victory Loan.
I sincerely hope that sGme plan will be worked out which meets
the necessary condition of thriftiness in our own organization which at
the same time will not abandon the tremendously important steps in popular
financing and in national thrift wnich have been started during the past
two years.
GE/MHP




October

15, 1942

Dear Pritch:

Please accept my apologies for being so
late in acknowledging your letter of September 30th
enclosing copies of correspondence and memoranda
regarding Liberty Loan campaigns.

I am delighted

to have these, as it is all new material that I
have never seen.

I have quite a historical file

on these things and am always anxious to build it

Up.
It was very nice indeed to see you the
other morning, and I hope that our paths will
cross more often in the future.
With best regards,

Sincerely

Mr. Clarence F. Pritchard
Treasury Department
1270 Sixth Avenue
New York City







FY,.1"S'q nSSMT STREET
1`.,Ti7 YORK

April 29, 1919

Dear Mr. Pritchard:

Your note gave me a great deal of pleasure, and I
wish I might make known to you and to all of my associates in

this fine or7anization what a pleasure and an honor it has
been for me to be associated with them.
In my o,iinion there never was such an organization
made up 0f7 such a splendid lot of .people, and T wish we might

keep it together and use it for some Tovernment service permanent-

ly.
7one .nf you enjoyed that dinner so much as I did.
Sincerely yours,

/s/
Clarence F. Pritchard, Esq.,
Liberty Lonn Co=ittee,
120roa:._.:way, ,few York.

BSA.7.S?:

FEDERAL RESERVE BP,..,JK
OF 7.,TE,7 YORK

June 5, 1919.

Dear Mr. Pritchard:
The successful conclusion of the Fifth Li'berty Loan, more

successful in this district than in any other, means the disbanding of our
great Liberty Loan

Organization.

There are

certain

members of the organi-

zation to 'whom I am addressing tnis personal letter, although unable to do
so to all of them, as .I would most prefer.

The work which you and your associates have performed has been
an accomplishment of the very first order in finance and in patriotism.

pride which I have personally felt in

this

The

organization is justified by the

character of the men and women in it even more than by the results which

they have accomplished.

T

know how difficult some of the work has been;

what a tremendous strain it has imposed upon all the members of the organization; and what sacrifices in many cases the work has reluired, and by
men and women who were little able to afford them.

This letter is to exnress to you my uatitude for the

loyalt:7

which you have all sho:na to me as the nominal head of the organization, and
.

particularly for your loyalty to a c,reat i.nertaking, as that was chiefly

responsible for an equally groat success.
7-iith 'many good wishes, I am,

Faithfully yours,

.s.

/,/
C. F. Pritchard,
Long Beach,
Y.

BSA:,S3



PENJ.

AL...Y.....1.rr.




ci-v1

Iterch 10 1919.

Lr. George R. Van Namee

irr,rtymtemp.r.

New York City.

Dear Dr. Van 7amee:

The enclosed letter from Mr. Charlos U. Imhoff cf.3.me to
hand this morning in the absence of Governor 3trong.

Knowing the maw requests made for tiekots, I shall
appreCi_te it if you 7111 give 1r. Imhoff letter your kind oonsi,keratiOrio




Very truly yom-s,

secretary to the Governor.




Mr. Imhoff:

Replyirk; to your letter of February 28th, received

in mr. Stron's abt-:ence, I have tffmn the liberty of referring
your better to Li-. George R. VonNamee, 'lecretLry of the Tatizen'

Commitiee in dsnrge of the meeting to be held at the Yetropolitrm
Opera House on the evenin6' of :larch 4th.

Prom That I read in the newsyjamrs, I understand

tht the seating capacity of the Metropolitn house is a little
over 3300, and the wrItten roqueets for ticRets so fnr reoeved
by the Committee winter close to fifty thousand.

Yev)ever, I

have sent a personal note to ir. Van MT-late asking htm to kindly

give your letter consideration.
Trusting you will have the plersure of bearing the
President speak an the occasion mentioned, believe me,
Very trui47 yours,

'6ecrotary to flr. : trong.




tj..;*".--esie

March 3, 1919.

George R. Van Name.19,&,
TWer2U00,,111 droadway,
New York, N. Y.

Dear Sir:

I am writing to express my appreciation of

your note of the first instant notifying me of my
appointment as t member of the committee in charge of
the moetinc at the Metropolitan Opera House and enclos-

ing a stage entrance ticket.
beg to remain,

Very truly.yours,

Governor.
BSALS

Room 2000,
111 Broadway,

New York City.

FILING DEPT.
March 1, 1919

Dear Sir:

51913

1,14,7,,

You haVEDBliith Parp.WiTiitlalli member of the Committee in

charge of the meeting at the Metropolitan Opera House, on
Tuesday, March 4, at 8 P. M., at which President Wilson and
former President Taft will speak.
Herewith enclosed is your Committee pass entitling

you to a seat upon the stage. This pass is issued to you
personally and is not transferable to any other person.
If you cannot attend please return the ticket as soon as
possible to the undersigned, 111 Broadway, Room 2000.

If this pass is presented by anyone other than
yourself, admission will be refused. This ticket must be
surrendered at the entrance. Please be in yoar seat at
eight P. M.




-

Very truly yours,

614247 /frihice-e
Secretary to the Committee.
-"Stir

LIB
JUN 3

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR LIBERTY LOAN

.1C/13

Wg,i/R10,1,-R11.-;ii?:".7

BY BENJAMIN STRONG
All letters sent out from this organization shall
'be signed by me personally.
Every day during a Liberty Loan Campaign an advertisement must appear on the financial page signed by me personally.
Between campaigns a general advertisement must appear every day signed by me personally.
At least three news releases must be sent out daily
during the entire period of existence of this organization
quoting me personally.

No bonds shall be sold to any individual in this
District without my personal 0. X.
Every piece of advertising copy, press material,

pamphlet, outdoor sign, painting, cartoon, sales letter, coupon
book, bookkeeping form, mimeographed letter, sign on Brooklyn
bridge, poster, copy for book matches, milk bottle top, pictorial

news, honor flag, pay envelope insert, factory sign, boiler
plate, or telephone conversation shall be personally 0.10d by
me,

I desire personally to pass on every office boy,

secretary, executive, stenographer, mimeograph operator, stencil
cutter, typist, space solicitor, reporter, copy reader, salesman, moving picture actor, General, doughboy, President, cabinet
officer, Admiral, bank president and gob that works for this
committee.



8., All unimportant and routine matters must be taken
up personally in my office.
9.

All matters connected with the money committee,

stabilization of American finance, advising the President and
Secretary of the Treasury on financial matters, matters pertaining to the Bank of England, Bank of France and the Bank
of Monte Carlo, handling the Liberty Loan and the Stock
Exchange, handling distinguished guests and all other details
of this kind will be left to Mr. Beyer.
All department heads are prohibited from consulting
with one another and no conferences, meetings, breakfasts,
luncheons, dinners or any other cooperative movements shall be
held without my presence.
I am not interested in the spending of money.

It is

important that no plans for spending money shall at any time

be submitted to Washington or to me.

Every department head,

bureau manager, diVision chief, and all others connected with
the organization can spend all monies at any time and for any
purpose according to their best judgment.




We want results!




"'TT)"

t

1

PICTURES OF MEIBERS OF CENTRAL LIBERTY WAN COXIITTEE
OF THE SECOND FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT

James S. Alexander,
President, National Bank of Commerce.
George F. Baker,
President, First

National Bank.

Allen B. Forbes,
Harris, Forbes & Co-kw:7.

Walter E. Frew,
President, Corn Exchange Bank.
Gates W. UOGurrah,
President, leohanics & letals National Bank.
J. P. Morgan,
Seward Prosser,
President, Bankers Trust Company.

Charles H. Sabin,
President, Guaranty Trust Company.
* Jacob Schiff,
Messrs. Kahn, Loeb & Company.

Frank A. Vanderlip,

Martin Vogel,
Subtreasury, New York.
x * James N. Wallace,
President, Central Trust Company.
Albert H.

tAggin,
President, Chase National Bank.

x William Woodward,
President, Hanover National Bank.

Deceased

x Photograph missing







IISCELLANEOUS PHOTOGRAPHS

E. G. Spaulding
Captain R. A. Cluzeau

Carter Glass and group
Benjamin Strong and members of
Liberty Loan Committee

Eigo Takai

Liberty Loan Dinner
(stay 28, 1918)

I

Brewster, Mrs. M. S.
Butler, Mrs. E. H.
Baker, Munford
Boody, Charles A.
Breese, James _C.

Burr, Miss H. M.

12
3
14
17
18
19

Bailey, Harry
Beam, H. C.

41
49

Conway, C. C.
Collins, J. D.
Cruse, George E.
Cohen, Jacques
Cummings, Thomas P.
Clayberger, R. P.

48
44

Curtis, James H.
Case, J. Herbert
Connolly, E. V.
Curtis, Mrs. James F.

Chapin, Gilbert E.
Coffin, Foster M.
Crofts, George D.
Campbell, Capt. Douglas
Clark, Thomas

Caruthers, Frank
Carlson, Miss A. L.
Chambers, Albert M.
Crane, Jules
Crewe, Mrs. Nora

Casey, Miss M.
Crane, Irving
Cummings, David
Campbell, H. D.
Corsaut, L.
Cukor, Morris
Creighton, Mrs. John
D

Del Billar, Pedro

Donner, M.
De Noronha, C.
De Noronha, Miss M.

Deane, F. H.
Duryea, Peter S.
Doubel, J. A.
Davis, H. W.
Daws, Mrs. David
Davis, Mrs. J. E.

Dickey, Miss
Dixon, Miss Louise M.
Davis, Miss Annette
Dawnes, H. S.

Dykes, A. H.
Dearduff, F. S.
Driscoll, Miss E. L.
Daunahae, Miss J. H.
Delafield, E. C.
Dulin, Mrs. Francis
Dison, Miss Augusta
Doying, F. W.
Dixon, Miss Eileen
Dressler, George
Dattner, S.
Donnelly, Ross
E

Edwards, Miss Florence
Eidlitz, Otto M.
Ernst, A.
Edminster, N. E.
Evans, S. H.
Ellis, Ellwood C.
Elsworth, J. E.
Einstein, W. E.
Einstein, H. G.
Furman, Miss Virginia
Furguson, Marshall W.
Ferber, J. B.
Fancher, B. F.
Farwell, Grosvenor
Fisk, Harvey, Jr.
Farnum, L. V.
Ferris, T. Harvey
Fougner, G. Selmer
Foye, Andrew E.
Frazier, J. H.
Frank, Miss R.




44
44
47
16
2
2
2
3
11

13
13
13
21

23
23

26
29
33

34
37
37
43
49
41

48
35
35
35
35
38
43

45
5
12
12
48
12
12
14
15
16
16
16
17
18
19

20
21
25
28
33
3

22
23
25
38
40
44
49
49
3

6

6
9
10

14
16
20

Florea, Morris
Fein, Charles E.
Henry, G. A.

40
43
49

Gilbert, Arthur W.
Grant, B. M.
Gahan, Mrs. A. R.
Griffith, W. M.
Greene, George DeB.
Graham, George A.
Granbery, E. C.
Gallagher, Joseph
Grannis, J. H. D.
Gehrung, A. E.
Glidden, N. F., Jr.
Gardner, Charles E.
Goldman, William
Greenwood, Murray
Grant, L. F.
Gearing, Elmer
Guion, F. S.
Goldberg, Martin
Gretchen, Henri
Gross, Dr. R. H.
Gay, David N.
Gibbs, E. S.
Gage, D. M.
Goldbach, Arthur
Gavin, John

11
11
13
14
15
15
17
24
24
26
30
30
31
32
32
36
39
39
40
43
45
46
46
47
47

Hornor, J. W., Jr.
1
Hendricks, Lawrence H. 2
Holsapple, E. T.
7
Hildt, Thomas
8
8
Hetzler, Theodore
Hutchins, R. G., Jr.
9
Hanley, Parke F.
10
10
Hoysradt, W. J.
11
Hamilton, W. A.
Hopf, Harry A.
11
Huber, Edw. E.
15
15
Harrington, Frank T.
Holden, Arthur B.
22
Herzberg, Joseph
22
22
Higgins, Edgar
Hurley, John P.
46
Hartigan, Joseph
28
33
Hodson, A. J.
Holch, N. F.
34
Hutchinson, M is,s Rita
Hare, M. S.

Hundley, Miss F. J.
Hogan, Miss A.
Henkel, Paul
Henkel, Mrs. Paul
Henkel, Miss Pauline

Hannon, Capt. Maurice

Humphrey, W. J.
Humphrey, F. J.
Hawley, John H.
Hollister, G. C.
Hadden, J. M.
Henkel, George

Ijams, J. Horton
Isaacs, Mrs. E. J. R.

Isaef, J. M.

Jones, J. W.
Jay, Mrs. Pierre
Jones, John Price
Johnston, Percy
Johnston, L. H.
Jefferson, Howard M.
James, Mrs. Bessie
Johnson, F. H.
Jonas, Nathan S.
Jarvis, C. D.

Jones, Walter H.
James, L.
Johnson, A. H.
Julian, Miss I.

34
36
36
37

38
38
38
40
45
46
46
47
47
41
18
21

28
2
3

4
8

9

11
12
16
17
37
39
43

49
48

21

26
32
36

Kensel, Edwin R.
Krusen, Miss M.
Kinnicutt, G. H.

2
3

7

Kingsley, Darwin P.
Kerr, Donald C.
Kessler, Philip F.
Kaufman, Frederick
Kelly, F. B.
Keshishian, A.
Kley, M.
Kuehnele, Major F. C.
King, Jacob E.

15
20
22
31

32
35
37
39
43

L

Lins, Adolph J.
Lipper, Milton
Lee, Gerald Stanley
Lawson, Miss
La Monte, George
Lehman, Arthur
Li Bue, William
Lok, Lee B.
Lee, E. W.
Lawler, Miss Agnes

11
18
20
24
29
31

40
40
43

49

M

MacCormack
Moorhead, R. B.
Moss, D. C.

Marcus, J. S.
Magonigle, H. V. B.
Myers, J. L.
Mosessohn, David N.
Mosessohn, M.
Morris, Ray
MacDonald, R. H., Jr.
McHugh, John
Morris, R. L.
Miller, R. V. V.
Matteson, Walter B.
Maynard, Edward. P.
McDonald, Willis, Jr.
Muller, Herbert
Myers, J. A.
Morgenthau, M. L.
Mahr, Julius D.
Munroe, Vernon
Mullally, William T.
Marcus, Mrs. Bernard K.
Marsh, W. B.
Meyer, Charles G.
McCarthy, M. J.
Mellor, S.

41

49
1
1

4
5
6

6
7

8
9
9

10
11
17
17
17
18
22
22
29
32
33
38
45
41
41

N

Nichols, Acosta
Norris, Ambrose
Nichols, H. S.
Nelson, Walter H.
Nusbaum, David
Newcombe, R. S.
Newman, V. L.
Nissen, Ludwig
Nix, John W.

0

7

18

24
25
25
29
32
34
41

Ogilby, Charles
O'Reilly, Miss

30
34

Pritchard, C. F.
Potter, Miss Virginia
Potter, E. N.
Page, Gregory

13

P

Pratt, Mrs. Harold I.
Parker, Morris K.
Pratt, Miss

Pierce, Arthur S.
Perera, Lionello
Petty, C. W.
Post, Regis H.
Perry, James A.
Pople, George W.
Q

Quintella, J. D.
R
Rogers, Elmer
Robertson, A. L.
Rudd, Channing
Ryan, William F.
Rosenthal, Arthur J.
Rosenblum, William
Routh, Robert
Richmond, H. E.
Rock, Miss Anna

3
7

8

12
15
24
25
28
30
38

44
23

35

4
4
5
5
6

6
10
10
16

Russell, Mrs. J., Jr.
Riis, Mrs. Jacob
Regan, Frank
Roberts, G. S.
Robertson, Charles E.
Rodney, S. S.
Rosenwald, Max
Rheims, Harry L.

Sailer, Louis F.
Sidenberg, Joseph W.
Shaw, Stanley N.
Semenoff sky, A. D.
Smith, John Cotton
Strong, Samuel L.
Sweezy, E. B.
Sturtevant, Paul
Shepherd, George M.

Stitt, Dr. Edw. W.

Stoddard, Miss
Sniffen, William T.
Stanley, Walter N.
Switzler, Thomas W.
Sheperd, George B.
Sylvester, H. C., Jr.
Stephens, Olin J.
Short, Miss Ella
Snell, Mrs. M. L.
Stewart, Lewis
Smith, R. A. C.

Sykes, Walter H., Jr.
Schumann, J. J.
Simpson, Malcom D.
Sheldon, James

Stauffer, Ernest, Jr.
Strauss, Manny
Sage, Mrs. H. W.
Snow, Eldridge G.
Scott, John H.
Stripe, Frank
Stillman, Mrs. L.
Saner, V. Edna
Slagel, J. G.
T

Treman, Robert H.
Tamboer, M. C.
Telleen, S. F.

Therkildsen, Miss Eva
Tailby, C. B.

Turner, Fred J.

Tanham, Miss M. E.
Turner, Chester H.
Thurber, H. M.
Tatanis, Petros
Tomlinson, E. T.
Thomson, Miss Jane
Terry, I. L.
Thompson, C. L.
Towner, R. H.
Towle, Capt. L. H.

19

19

40
47
49

2
41
24
28
29
30

30
30
32
33
34
39
40
44
44
45
46
48
48
41
4

4
5
5
7

8
10
12
15

TABLE ARRANGEMENT

VICTORY DINNER
LIBERTY LOAN ORGANIZATION
TO

BENJAMIN STRONG
AND THE
CENTRAL LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE

17
18
19

19
23

2
5
9
13
16
21

25
26
32
35
36

36
37

38
46
47

V

Vaughan, Miss Dorothy B.
Vogel, Mrs. Martin

13
19

Williams, Mrs. Percy H.
West, James E.
Wood, Miss Mary
Williamson, E. H.
Whitney, H. F.
Wilson, George T.
Wolf, Arthur D.

12

White, N. Edward
Wazetter, L.
Witsell, Fred

20
28
29
31
31
31
33
34
35
39

Welch, John
Westervelt, A. B.
Wood, Chalmers, Jr.
Wardwell, Miss Florence

Weinberger, Jacques

Willard, L. S.
Warner, Truly
Wronker, Dr. L. J.
Wilhelm, Carl
Wright, Milton
Willard, John M.
Whitney, George H.
Wallis, F. A.

20
24
49
1

4
6
14
14
18
19

39
1

Waldorf-Astoria
May Twenty-Eighth
Nineteen-Nineteen

Table No. 28
Mr. Joseph Hartigan
Mr. S. Dattner
Mr. Lionello Perera
Mr. A. A. Bonblikoff
Mr. L. Wazeter
Mr. J. M. Isaef
Mr. A. D. Semonoffsky

Table No. 21
G. Selmer Fougner
Frank Regan
Mr. Ned Brown

<4

Mr. Fred J. Turner
Mr. E. P. Beach

V
0

Mr. Thomas Clark

0

Mrs. E. J. R. Isaacs
Miss Eileen Dixon
Table No. 22
Mr. Arthur B. Holden
Mr. M. L. Morgenthau
Mr. Julius D. Mahr
Mr. Philip F. Kessler
Mr. Joseph Herzberg
Mr. Otto M. Eidlitz
Mr. Edgar Higgins

CS

Mrs. Florence Blackstone

Table No. 29
Mr. Vernon Munroe
Mr. George LaMonte
Mr. Peter J. Brady
Mr. R. S. Newcombe
Mr. G. S. Roberts
Mr. Jules Crane
Mr. John Cotton Smith
Mr. Fred Witsell

Table No. 1
Mr. J. W. Hornor, Jr.
Mr. H. F. Whitney
Mr. Powhatan Bolling
Mr. D. C. Moss

Mr. J. S. Marcus
Mr. E. H. Barker
Mr. George F. Breen
Mr. D. H. Barrows

Table No. 2
Mr. James H. Curtis
Mr. Robert H. Treman
Mr. J. Herbert Case
Mr. Louis F. Sailer
Mr. Lawrence H. Hendricks
Mr. Edwin R. Kensel
Mr. E. V. Connolly

Mr. J. W. Jones

Table No. 3
Mrs. L. Blagden
Miss Virginia Furman
Miss Virginia Potter
Mrs. George F. Baker, Jr.
Miss Florence Edwards
Mrs. James F. Curtis
Mrs. Pierre Jay
Miss M. Krusen
Mrs. Edward H. Butler

Table No. 4
Mr. R. A. C. Smith
Mr. George T. Wilson

Mr. E. F. Albee
Mr. H. V. B. Macgonigle
Mr. John Price Jones
Mr. Elmer Rogers
Mr. Walter H. Sykes, Jr.
Mr. A. L. Robertson

Table No. 5
Mr. Gilbert B. Bogart
Mr. J. J. Schumann
Mr. Malcolm D. Simpson
Mr. H. W. Davis
Mr. M. C. Tamboer
Mr. Charming Rudd

Mr. J. L. Myers
Mr. William F. Ryan




Table No. 6
Mr. Arthur J. Rosenthal
Mr. Bertram H. Borden
Mr. Arthur D. Wolf
Mr. William Rosenblum
Mr. David N. Mosessohn
Mr. M. Mosessohn
Mr. Marshall W. Ferguson

Mr. J. B. Ferber

Table No. 7
Mr. Ray Morris
Mr. Acosta Nichols
Mr. James Sheldon
Mr. G. H. Kinnicutt

Mr. E. N. Potter
Mr. Franklin Q. Brown
Mr. E. T. Holsapple

Table No. 8
Mr. Thomas FEldt
Mr. Percy Johnston

Mr. Ernest Stauffer, Jr.
Mr. F. D. Bartow

Mr. Theodore Hetzler
Mr. Allen W. Ames
Mr. Gregory Page
Mr. R. H. MacDonald, Jr.

Table No. 9
Mr. J. G. Blaine
Mr. S. F. Telleen

Mr. B. H. Fancher
Mr. R. D. Brown
Mr. L. H. Johnston

Mr. R. G. Hutchins, Jr.

Mr. John McHugh
Mr. Morris

Table No. 10
Mr. Parke F. Hanley
Mr. Manny Strauss
Mr. W. J. Hoysradt
Mr. Grosvenor Farwell
Mr. R. N. Barnum
Mr. Robert Routh
Mr. H. E. Richmond
Mr: R. V. V. Miller

Table No. 11
Mr. William A. Hamilton
Mr. Gilbert E. Chapin
Mr. Arthur W. Gilbert
Mr. Adolph J. Lins
Mr. Howard M. Jefferson
Mr. Walter B. Matteson
Mr. Harry A. Hopf
Mr. B. M. Grant

Table No. 16
Mr. C. B. Tailby

Table No. 12
Mrs. H. W. Sage
Mrs. Harold I. Pratt
Mrs. David Dows
Mrs. J. E. Davis
Miss Louise M. Dixon
Miss Annette Davis
Miss W. S. Brewster
Miss Bessie James
Mrs. Percy H. Williams

Table No. 17
Mr. Edwin P. Maynard
Mr. Willis McDonald, Jr.
Mr. E. C. Granbery
Mr. Nathan S. Jonas
Mr. Charles A. Boody
Mr. John H. Scott
Mr. E. C. Delafield
Mr. Herbert Muller

Table No. 13
Mr. Foster M. Coffin

Mr. George D. Crofts
Miss Eva Thirkeldsen
Miss Dorothy Vaughan
Capt. Douglas Campbell
Mrs. A. R. Gahan
Mr. C. F. Pritchard
Table No. 14

Mr. H. S. Downs
Mr. W. M. Griffith
Mr. H. F. Atwater
Mr. Philip D. Atwater
Mr. Munford Baker
Mr. John Welch
Mr. Harvey Fisk, Jr.
Mr. A. B. Westervelt
Table No. 15
Mr. George DeB. Greene
Mr. Morris K. Parker
Mr. George A. Graham
Mr. Darwin P. Kingsley
Mr. Eldridge G. Snow
Mr. A. H. Dykes

Mr. Edward E. Huber
Mr. Frank T. Harrington

Mr. F. H. Johnson
Mr. F. S. Dearduff
Mr. L. V. Farnum
Miss E. L. Driscoll

Miss Anna Rock
Miss J. H. Dannahae
Mr. R. P. Clayberger

Table No. 18
Mr. Chalmers Wood, Jr.
Mr. James C. Breese
Mr. J. Horton Ijams
Mr. Milton Lipper
Mr. Ambrose Norris
Mr. Frank Stripe
Mr. J. A. Myers
Mrs. Francis Dulin
Table No. 19
Mrs. L. Stillman
Miss Florence Wardwell
Miss H. M. Burr
Miss Augusta Dixon
Miss V. Edna Sauer
Mrs. Martin Vogel
Mrs. J. Russell, Jr.
Mrs. Jacob Riis
Table No. 20
Mr. J. E. Allen
Mr. F. W. Doying
Mr. Gerald Stanley Lee
Mr. Donald C. Kerr
Mr. N. Edward White
Mr. T. Harvey Ferris
Mr. E. M. Ashe
Mr. James E. West

Mr. M. Kley
Miss A. Hogan

Mr. I. L. Terry
Mr. J. N. Braden

Table No. 31
Mr. Jacques Weinberger
Mr. William Goldman
Mr. L. S. Willard
Mr. Fred'k Kaufman
Mr. Alfred Bamberger
Mr. Truly Warner
Mr. Arthur Lehman
Mr. Charles E. Robertson

Table No. 26
Mr. Albert M. Chambers
Mr. George Beyer
Mr. Andrew E. Foye
Mr. Graham Ashmead
Mr. H. G. Werner
Mr. A. E. Gehrung
Mr. Chester H. Turner
Mr. Arthur Batty
Table No. 27
REPORTERS

Miss Martha Coman, Herald
R. A. Wilson, Sun
Leonard Smith, Times
N. S. Rukeyser, Trilmne
j. W. Denahy, American
E. H. Bisbee, American
Ted Lynes, Er. Post

Frank O'Neill, Ev. Sun
Wheeler Soper, Er. Mail
Harry Acton. Er. Mail

Table No. 39
Major F. C. Kitehnele
Mr. John M. Willard
Mr. William T. Sniffin
Mr. George H. Whitney
Mr. F. S. Guion
Mr. Walter H. Jones

Table No. 33
Dr. Edward W. Stitt
Mr. Bernard K. Marcus
Mr. R. R. Brown
Mr. A. J. Hodson
Mr. L. S. Bruenn
Mr. Ross Donnelly
Dr. L. J. Wronker
Mrs. Nora Crewe

Miss M. E. Tanham

Table No. 40
Mr. S. S. Rodney
Mr. William Li Bue
.Mr. Lee B. Lok
Mr. Walter N. Stanley
Mr. FTenri Grechen
Mr. Ellwood C. Ellis
Capt. Maurice Hannon
Capt. Morris Florea

Table No. 34
Mr. Ludwig Nissen
Mr. Carl Wilhelm
Mr. N. F. Holch
Mr. John Aspegren
Miss Rita Hutchinson
Miss O'Reilly
Miss Stoddard
Miss M. Casey

Mr. Boules

Table No. 38
Mr. S. H. Evans
Mr. W. B. Marsh
Mr. Regis H. Post
Mr. F. H. Deane
Mr. Paul Henkel
Mr. C. L. Thompson
Mrs. Paul Henkel
Miss Pauline Henkel

Table No. 32
Mr. George M. Shepherd
Mr. J. H. Frazier
Mr. H. M. Thurber
Mr. F. B. Kelly
Mr. V. L. Newman
Mr. Murray Greenwood
Mr. W. T. Mullally
Mr. L. F. Grant

Table No. 25
Mr. W. E. Edminster
Mr. Walter C. Burton
Mr. D. M. Balsam
Mr. Walter H. Nelson
Mr. David Nusbaum
Mr. George Dressler
Mr. Arthur S. Pierce

Mr. John D. Collins
Mr. Thomas W. Switzler
Mr. James A. Perry
Mr. George E. Cruse
Mr. G. A. P. Burns
Mr. George B. Sheperd
Mr. Jacques Cohen
Table No. 45
Mr. J. A. Daubel
Mr. Frank L. Bartlett
Mr. W. J. Humphrey
Mr. H. C. Sylvester, Jr.
Mr. David N. Gay
.Mr. Charles G. Meyer
Mr. Charles H. Adams

Miss F. I. Hundley
Mrs. E. I. Galland
Mr. Elmer Gearing
Miss R. Frank

Mr. N. F. Glidden, Jr.

Miss A. L. Carlson
Mr. George W. Pople
Table No. 24
Mr. Grover C. Barnum
Mr. Joseph Gallagher
Mr. H. S. Nichols
Mr. Stanley N. Shaw
Mr. Grannis
Miss Lawson
Miss Pratt
Miss Mary Wood

Mr. E. W. Lee
Mr. Charles E. Fein
Table No. 44
Mr. J. E. Elsworth

Table No. 37
Mr. L. C. Boochever
Mr. Irving Crane
Mr. C. D. Jarvis
Mr. David Cummings

Mr. Charles E. Gardner
Mr. Paul Sturtevant

Mr. H. L. Adams
Mr. A. Ernst
Mr. J. G. Slagel
Mr. A. E. Briggs
Mr. Frank Caruthers
Miss M. R. Boardman

Table No. 42
Table No. 43
Dr. R. H. Gross
Mr. Jacob E. King
Mr. Peter S. Duryea
Mr. E. E. Bennett
Mr. H. D. Campbell
Mr. L. James

Table No. 36
Mr. E. T. Tomlinson
Mr. M. S. Hare
Mr. Murray Breese
Miss Jane Thomson

Table No. 30
Mr. Samuel M. Strong
Mr. G. A. Alexisson
Mr. C. W. Petty
Mr. E. B. Sweezy
Mr. Charles Ogilby

Mr. Sidney Blumenthal
Table No. 23

GUESTS' TABLE

Table No. 55
Mr. Petros Tatanis
Mr. Pedro Del Villar
Mr. A. Keshishian
Mr. J. D. Quintella
Mr. Milton Wright
Mr. M. Donner
Mr. C. de Noronha
Miss M. de Noronha

Table No. 41
Mr. John W. Nix
Mr. Lewis Stewart
Mr. Harry Bailey

Table No. 46
Mr. R. J. Buck
Mr. F. J. Humpfrey
Mr. Olin J. Stephens
Mr. John H. Hawley
Mr. E. S. Gibbs
Mr. D. M. Gage
Mr. R. H. Towner
Mr. J. P. Hurley
Table No. 47 Mr. G. C. Hollister
Mr. Max Rosenwald
Mr. Oscar Armes
Mr. Arthur Goldbach
Mr. John Gavin
Mr. J. M. Hadden
Mr. Thomas P. Cummings
Capt. L. H. Towle
Table No. 48
Miss Julian

Mr. dartin Goldberg
Mrs. M. K. Belden

Miss Dickie
Miss Lawler
Miss Short

Mr. John Creighton
Mr. Charles Rutland
Mr. C. C. Conway
Mrs. M. L. Snell
Table No. 49
Mr. G. A. Fleury
Mr. L. Corsaut
Mr. H. G. Einstein
Mr. W. E. Einstein
Mr. A. H. Johnson
Mr. H. C. Beam
Mr. E. A. Williamson
Mr. R. B. Moorhead

Mr. MacCormack
Mr. George Henckel

Mr. M. J. McCarthy
Mr. S. Mellor
Mr. Morris Cukor

ALPHABETICAL TABLE ARRANGEMENT
A

Albee, E. F.
Ames, Allen W.
Atwater, H. F.
Atwater, Philip D.
Allen, J. E.
Ashe, E. M.
Adams, H. L.
Ashmead, Graham
Alexisson, G. A.
Aspergren, John
Adams, Charles H.
Armes, Oscar

4
8
14
14

20
20
23
26
30
34
45
47

Braden, J. N.
Belden, Mrs. M. K.
Bennett, D. E.
Burns, G. A. P.
Bartlett, Frank L.

37
39
43
44
45

Boules

45
46

Buck, R. J.
Barrows, D. H.
Brown, Ned
Beach, E. P.

Blumenthal, Sidney

Briggs, A. E.

1

21
21
22
22

Boardman, Miss Mildred R. 23
24
Barnum, Grover C.
25
Burton, Walter C.
25
Balsam, D. M.
26
Beyer, George
26
Batty, Arthur
28
Boublikoff, A. A.
Blackstone, Mrs. Florence 28

Brady, Peter J.

,Bamberger, Alfred
Brown, R. R.
Bruenn, L. S.
Breese, Murray

29
31
33
33
36

37
Boochever, L. C.
Bolling, Powhatan
1
Barker, E. H.
1
Breen, George F.
3
Blagden, Mrs. L.
Baker, Jr., Mrs. George F. 3
5
Bogart, Gilbert B.
6
Borden, Bertram H.
7
Brown, Franklyn Q.
8
Bartow, F. D.
9
Blaine, J. G.
9
Brown, R. D.
10
Barnum, R. W.
1

N.

t

. ;

illiaa

,

111

'17

11.11---__

I/ h. \\\

a

Jr

.

r=?I
.

,
'

11
4

-

r 1 1\/v4

Ix,

AA./

117-1

Ckf4







-a-

VICTORY DINNER
AT THE WALDORF ASTORIA
NEW YORK
MAY TWENTY-EIGHTH

NINETEEN-NINETEEN

Given by Liberty Loan Organization to Governor Strong and the
Members of the Central Liberty Loan 'Committee
Second Federal Reserve District

Designed and arranged by the Advertising Bureau of the
Qovernment Loan Organization
Thirteenth Century Cover Stock front the Japan Paper Co.
Warren's Sepia Cameo Stock from Henry Lindenmeyr &Sons
Printed by John C. Rankin Co.

4111111.16




*

:,

tfr-

MENU
GRAPE FRUIT
WESTMORELAND SOUP

1

MEDAILLON OF SOLE

WHITE WINE SAUCE

POTATOES PARISIENNE

I

OLIVES

RADISHES

CELERY

...

BREAST OF CHICKEN STUFFED

RISSOLEES
A LA TYROLIENNE

GREEN PEAS SAUTE IN BUTTER
I

HEARTS OF LETTUCE

RUSSIAN DRESSING

FANCY ICE CREAMS
ASSORTED CAKES
COFFEE

.

Ale"--

,'. --'-=,

,

(;)

-..'-'

----- --. `N

\

-

\I'\IIII/IIY"

,

I.

1

\

''''

t.

;I' DEEE,,NFPEAT;iiii.I.Lni

1

T.;

) il .11b5?, tiZGAN I ZATI 1N
)

II

1

11" i

il

1l
i1

ilig

liii4i\ \\

1,!

Pi"

44.

FIRST LOAN MAY 157T0JuNE 141-1! 1917
OUR QUOTA

4600,000,000

7

1

OUR SUBSCRIPTION

T1,186 ,788,400

AM New York: all men know my fame and outward
aspect, but few there are who know my heart.
SECOND LoAnt OCTOBER 15.! TO 27T!! 1917
OUR SUBSCRIPTION
OUR QUOTA

Not out of my own loins have my people come.
They make their way to me from the East, across the

I .900,000,000

01 550,453,450

ocean, where the Statue in my harbor lights their spirits
with fresh hopes.
THIRD LOAN APRIL 6."-rorlAY4T.'! 1918

From the West, and South, and North, from every farm
and village, where clean-hearted, clear-eyed boys and girls

OURQUOTA

*900,000,000

OUR SUBSCRIPTION

*1,114,930,700

have turned their faces toward meas the home of opportunity.

They are the builders who have made me great; and on
what foundation-stones, think you, have they built?

On money? On commerce? On trade?
They have wrought with materials more eternal.

I PTH LOAN APRIL19T.'!TO MAY10T.N919
OUR SUBSCRIPTION

I !OUR QUOTA

They have laid my foundations on Faith, and fashioned
my greatness with Honor and the Plighted Word.

* 1 350,000,000

:11.760,963,900

In my markets millions in gold pass back and forth

oft

upon the firm security of men's trust in one another.
When I give my word I do not falter. From every
corner of the nation men have gone forth, relying on the

promise of that word, to stretch great railroads across
the continent, to open mines and rear new cities on the
unbroken plains.

Because the war was fought for Right, I gave unsparingly my sons and my resources.
And not until the last dollar of the cost of Victory is paid
shall I call my task complete.

The Victory Loan is an Honor Loan to me;it shall

-,3;;.,
TT

not fail.
For I am New York, the dwelling-place of Honor

7

"A city that hath foundations" whose corner-stone is

(ry

Faith.

4

KEEP THE FAITH

f-s-)k-,

F
i q?..1-11

New York will see it through!

.11JWCA-adOit$10.

17=frIPI4

711




GOVERNMENT LOAN ORGANIZATION

Second

Fedensi

Reserve

District

LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE
120 Brodvov

Nen York

el=

/
0

lintrw :42,4,4141;10/MK*Va,

1

ALL ABOUT LIBERTY BONDS
WHAT
Are They?

WHY
Should I
Buy Them?

Because we are at war. Because we must have dollars
as well as men in the fight for freedom. Because they
are the safest investment in the world today.
Each $100 bond has 60 coupons attached. You can cut
off one of these every six months and get $1.75 in cash
at any bank, without expense.

HOW

For each $50 subscribed pay:
$10 on July 30, 1917
$1 down
$9 on June 28, 1917 $15 on August 15, 1917
$15 on August 30, 1917
Pay in cash if you prefer.
You don't need a bank account to buy a Liberty Bond.

Can I Buy
Them?

1 Subscriptions Received He




Liberty Bonds are engraved certificates bearing the guarantee of the Government and People of the United States
to repay in gold the full amount loaned, with interest.
Liberty Bonds are as safe as the United States.

WHERE
Can I Buy
Them?
WHEN
Shall I Buy
Them?

LIBERT
LEST I PERISH

At any Bank, Trust Company, Bond House, Post Office,
Department Store, Express Company, etc.
Every dollar you pay goes to the Government. No commissions are charged to you or paid to anyone.

Buy them NOW. Subscriptions close June 15, 1917.

Our soldiers and sailors will give their lives. You are asked only
to lend your money. If you can't fight, your money can. A bond
may save a life. A bond will help to end the war.

Buy Your Bonds Today
Reproduction of posters and button
of the First Liberty Loan

Reproduction of a full page newspaper advertisement
of the First Liberty Loan




e-

GOVERNMENT T ME LOAN
TREASURY 0 E PAR
NT
LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE
HEADQUARTERS

ISRGANIZAT ION

sE cow, FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT

WAR SAVINGS COMMITTEE
i 20 BROADWAY NEW YORK

FEDERAL RESERVE RANA

,,

SE

4

M MUNI MIS TERVOTI

I

NATION

Yawn

I

1111111! LOAN COMMITTEE

=-.0=

=aoLi
I

1-12-1

I

nr7=

GOVERNMENT
I

LOAN

1

RGANIESTION

1±7=1
Yr..= ,I...1.11

0 MTNS

-

ELI

H

I

I

I

-- I

-1-1-1-

HI
H

-I

-- I

Eiji

SM. I

-

1-

H --

I

H

I

.= I I --- H rzr I
-I-

I

1±]

H

I-

I ---

H:]

.0443

-- I

-I =,-.`.1

".=

-177-71-

I

111111:11

I

KOGG
1

-1-rtz I

,u,e5MaLees

-- I

.44saTN

,TOTe4

p

1

1

=

I

H.I

-1=-1

-- I
-1' Tr-- I

--

=1, I

1

:1';'L' =747:: I

121:21 nr.V.

EMI Ella

T411.7'

1E31

Ella MIN

EEH

RiEl

IEEE IRE C=I MNI

1

IEE

H

MI MEI
1=1

SEE

NEM =I

iliEESI

111=1

H=

=II ESN
111:11

1E91

III= MIN

EEO =I

ESE

11=1

1E9/ MI

H "`"7:'

--- I

---

I

-=-1

I

H

=

MIN EMI

" That Government
ot the People, by the

People and for the

1Deop1e Shall Not

)E-C aDN

Perish from the Earth"

In
THE TIME HAS COME TO
CONQUER OR SUBMIT.FOR US THERE IS BUT ONE
CHOICE. WE HAVE MADE IT:
PRESIDENT W1LSOR

BUYA BOND OF THE

"Shall we be more

tender with our
dollars than with

22LIBERTY LOAN
AND

the Ltves of oar sons"

HELP WIN THE WAR

Secretary of ...Treasury

Buy a United States Government Bond of the

A LIBERTY BOND IS A UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT BONG

2rALI
mberYour First Thrill of

RICAN LIBERTY

.

a,

mautnee con ette

ore Bonds and Less
DURING the first year of the war the taking of a German
trench cost endless lives. The fields of France were soaked
with the blood of French and British soldiers.
Last week a wounded officer in New York described his

Our Daddy is fighting

at the Front for You
him UP- Buy a

HELP AMERICAS SONS

YOUR DUTYBgy

WIN THE WAR

United S t a tcsGover anent Bonds

libetad0 ail 011917

United States Covt B 'do! the

A
ot
0Dotot, oci 4.4

without losing a single life. The German trench was demolished.

Not a German soldier in it was left alive.
These are simple facts. Yet they are facts which go straight
to the hearts of the men and women of the United States whose
boys are going into the trenches during the next few months.
These facts do not constitute an appeal. They simply
express the deepest, strongest, most lasting emotion of the
human heartthe love of Eons and husbands and brothers.
The bravery of men, the offer of their livesis the great

drop of blood to be shed by our boys in Francewhen it is
bonds or bloodwho will deny we will take three, five, yes.
fifty billions of bonds if necessary?
Go to your bank today and put every dollar you can spare
at work saving lives and bringing those boys home alive and
victorious.

Liberty Loan Committee New York
120 Broadway,

.400°-




part in Haig's advance. His regiment took a German trench

glory of manhood today. But the saving of these men from
unnecessary risk is the triumph of modern science and invention.
This is the whole story. Let us give our men the most
wonderfully complete protection that the genius and power of
united America can device. Guns and shells save lives. Liberty
Bends proviae the guns and shells. Is there anywhere in this
great, young nation a man or woman or child with heart so
cold as to hesitate? Where the choice is clear between lending
our money to our Government and permitting one unnecessary

Second Federal Reserve District

This space contributed by

Reproduction of posters and button
of the Second Liberty Loan

Reproduction of a full page newspaper advertisement
of the Second Liberty Loan

EaMmesaiemegmes_

"Good ByeDad. I'm Off
To Fight For Old Glory.

You Buy U.S. GOVT

BONDS"

BUY U.S. GOVERNMENT BONDS

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN

"

VS0
10,"" WO"

PING IT

-9016

AGAIN

Lend Him A Hand
Toar handmy hand
Every hand in the land stretched out
to help him to VICTORY! That is the

way that America is going to win this war. It
is the only way she can win it.

Third Liberty Loan

We are fighting a united German people.
Until every American is backing the boys in
the trenches, until every hand in the land is
stretched out to help, we cannot expect our

fr V

army to defeat the German armies strenghtened
by the toil and sacrifice of the one hundred and
fifty million people of Germany and her allies.

This is a war of national resources, and
everyone must add his share to America's fighting strength if we are to make our superior resources count. Every hand in the land must
be stretched out to help our boys if we would

send them over the top to early and certain
VICTORY.

Save for the Third Liberty Loan. Invest in the Third

VP'

E

Liberty Loan. That is the way to lend a hand. That is
the way to make a nation invincible for freedom and justice.
Every bond bought now is a direct fighting aid to this boy in the trenches in France.

ORIL3)

L6I5g NT
/r)ci1r

@). [1:11WCOO
ITo.','@C21:2:31=a;',JV 'ff30,1331.0@




`-i(

RTY 1C)aM

ior
1

,

1 IBF1.!

ii0.1",02S

\\\T

Lend Him a Hand!
LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE

Reproduction of posters and button
of the Third Liberty Loan

Second Federal Reserve District
120 BROADWAY. NEW YORK CITY

Reproduction of a full page newspaper advertisement
of the Third Liberty Loan

Left&
w

CAN

they

WHAT WE DO NOW
WE DO FOREVER!

ONE?

aithtthe

IN A MINUTE IT IS GOING TO
STRIKE TWELVE ON THE CLOCK
OF THE WORLD.

German people with guns and airplanes

that no little theatrical peace-strut by
a Kaiser up and down before twenty nations half hung on their crosses, will be
of any avail!

What we do now, we do forever.
What we say now, we say forever!

Are we spending in America four

What we say now shall be written in
letters of fire upon the sky, shall be written in iron and thunder on the hills and

( to)Zirtrti---

million men and seventy billion dollars
to get out of the Germans thirty cents'

worth of peaceto get cut of the Germans a dummy peace, with a dummy

plains of Germany, shall be signed by
God across the face of Essen, Cologne

peace chancellor, with a dummy victory
over a dummy democracy?

and Berlin!

FORVICTORY, BUY BONDS

We speak the heart of a hundred

Shall a hundred million Americans
stand on the graves of four million dead

thousand cities!

CLEAR THE-WAY- 11 -

J

men and tell them that they have died

Why do the newsboys cry in the

for nothing?

streets that there is a new Peace Chancellor appointed by the Kaiser?

RUYBEINEIS
FOURTH

We have sent over our own two million sons to face death for victory. Shall
we snatch victory away from them be-

LIBERTY LOAN

What of it? What is it to us? Who
cares? As long as there is a Kaiser?

fore their own eyes, before their faces
while they are holding it in their hands?
Shall we send word to them to come

War with the Kaiser is Heaven, four

years of Heaven as compared with
Peace with him.

t hekeps
I

Come
NOT
SHALL
THE EARTH
FROM
THAT LIBERTYT BONDS
C,
PERISH

Ore

little boys over presently to do what
they have tried to do all over again?
We ask this week for six billion dol-

lars to save four million soldier boys
from being made fools of before the

What are two million people going
around and taking up a national collec-

&,Trizi4vrectyps

On!

What do the American people want
their six billion dollars for?

world.

tion for this week?

Buy
4Iemore

BUY-LIBERY
,

home and that we are going to send their

Who wants to belong to the kind of
human race or be locked up in the kind
of nation that can make peace with the
Kaiser?

We throw this week a hundred million pocketbooks at the Kaiser!
To a world bound for Berlin one hundred million Americans say

1-t




We want six billion dollars to tell the

GO, GO, KEEP TO THE RIGHT!

A

This space donated to

Double
the

winning the war by

Third!

LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE

Federal
Reserve
District
120 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY
Second

Reproduction of a full page newspaper advertisement
of the Fnurth T Own/ I

Reproduction of posters and button
I a,

L

,

STRAIGHT FROM GERMANY
An advertisement originated and produced
for the Victory Liberty Loan by members of
the American Expeditionary Force.

VJC
036,5A
So1th
(511rIen

Cel"

V11otto

GOrti

, BACon"




AND THEy

d

C. Li R,,713,4{,i 4r

THOUGHT WE

GOVERNMENT LOAN ORGANIZATION

COULDN'T

5,0nd PedNal RevTve DArtin
LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE

PAIGH

110 Bre0dway

New YON

1.

Nictory Liberty Loan
Th.

Reproduction of posters and button
of the Fifth Liberty Loan

coarsbnle1 by

Reproduction of a full page newspaper advertisement
of the Fifth Liberty Loan




Carry On!
Buy Liberty
toYourUTMOST
New York Fourth Loan Poster
from the famous painting now in the Metropolitan Museum
by Edwin Howland Blashfield




LIBERTY ANTHEM
words by

Clarks

Cif awn

music by

tatberine

orbon 5=0

arrangement for chorus
by

I.Orrtias Nubir
ORGANIST, ST. THOMAS' CHURCH
New York City

Price 10 Cents.

2

For Liberty
KATHERINE GORDON

Broadly

7r

;

FREN1
3.0ur watch-word

simile

Immo

J

shall be

still

=

Our fa -thers
Our sons march

-

trust,"

011111PINIMIll

11=

ar:

=

mi

.19-1-7

PIANO

we

o

_

I

Lib - er - ty, Our na-tion ride
Now in our Al - lies' land,Breast-ing war's tide,

God

"In

a

_

MI=

GiN=1

Heav- Cn sent

VOICE

Broadly

Music by

Words by
CHARLES W GORDON

may that
see

Stri - ving

....,.

=

Our

cause

.

.

.

.

-0.

.

just

is

4.,

sempre pesante
fought
hand

for thee, Fought, bled and
in hand, God is their

died_

guide

When with our Flag
Once more we hear

en-furled

the call,
45

41-

We

fight for

Lib

11,

They brought us

Our fa-thers gave

peace,

"Keep the world free "




Riseate!And give

er

-

-

And shall not

ty,

cease

-AL

..r

ft:

the world Man-kind's re
For Lib-er

your all,

Till

Free - dom's

vie

-

ry

Brings last - ing

Peace.

iy
-4-

1.
191R hv Katherine Gordon French

-0"*1

77.





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102