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APPEAL TO THE FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD IN THE
MATTER OF DESIGNATING THE FEDERAL RESERVE
CITY IN THE FOURTH FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT

BRIEF OF APPELLANTS.
Section 2 of the Federal Reserve Act provides, among
other things, that the Reserve Bank Organization Committee
“ shall designate not less than eight nor more than twelve
cities to be known as Federal Reserve Cities, and shall divide
the continental United States, excluding Alaska, into dis­
tricts, each district to contain only one of such Federal Re­
serve Cities. The determination of said Organization Com­
mittee shall not be subject to review except by the Federal
Reserve Board when organized: Provided, That the districts
shall be apportioned with due regard to the convenience and
customary course o f business, and shall not necessarily be
coterminous with any State or States. The districts thus
created may be readjusted and new districts may from time
to time be created by the Federal Reserve Board, not to
exceed twelve in all.”
It will be observed that the Act distinctly gives this Board
the right to review the action of the Organization Committee.
It will also be noted that in carrying out the high powers
vested in this Board it is intended that regard should be had
to “ the convenience and customary course of business.”
Applying the standard provided by the Act itself, namely, the
convenience and customary course of business, we shall, with
your permission, give some of the reasons why Pittsburgh
should be selected as the Federal Reserve City of the Fourth
District.
Let us then, briefly, compare Pittsburgh with Cleveland.




I.
THE FINANCIAL SUPREMACY OF PITTSBURGH.
While a few State institutions have signified their willing­
ness to join the system, it is now apparent that the resources
of the Federal Reserve Banks must be principally drawn from
the National Banks, consequently we confine the comparison
to the National Banks, although to include the State institu­
tions would emphasize Pittsburgh’s overwhelming advantage.
The figures for the two cities are as follows:
P ittsb u rg h — 27 M e m b e r B a n k s .
Capital and Surplus......................... $ 53,604,000.00
Individual Deposits.......................... 130,805,360.00
C levelan d — 7 M em b e r B a n k s .

Capital and Surplus........................... $14,400,000.00
Individual Deposits............................ 40,500,000.00
(The above figures are taken from published reports of con­
dition made to the Comptroller of the Currency— for Pitts­
burgh as of June 30, 1914; for Cleveland as of March 4,
1914— the latest figures to which we have had access.)
The contrast between the two cities is great, but when the
comparison is extended to the surrounding territory it is still
greater. There is not a single National Bank in Cuyahoga
County, Ohio, outside of the City of Cleveland. In Alle­
gheny County, Pennsylvania, outside of the limits of the City
of Pittsburgh, there are 37 National Banks. That is to say,
in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, there are 64 member
banks as compared with seven member banks in Cuyahoga
County, Ohio.
Over 50 per cent, of the National Banking capital of this
large district is found within a seventy-five mile radius, cen­
tering in Pittsburgh.
The aggregate capital and surplus of the National Banks
of the six largest cities in the State of Ohio is less than that
of the National Banks of the City of Pittsburgh, as shown
by the following table:




2

Name of City

No. of Banks

Cincinnati.............. ..........
Cleveland...........................
Columbus............... ..........
Dayton.................... ..........
Toledo................................
Youngstown.......... ..........

8
7
8
7
4
3
37
Pittsburgh.............. .......... 27

Capital and Surplus

$20,350,000.00
14,400,000.00
4,673,000.00
3,365,000.00
6,050,000.00
3,050,000.00
$51,888,000.00
53,604,000.00

The figures for the Ohio cities are taken from the report of
the Comptroller of the Currency for the year 1913, as of
August 9, 1913; the figures for the City of Pittsburgh are
taken from the reports of condition made to the Comptroller
of the Currency as of June 30, 1914, in order that they may
be brought up to date.
A comparison of the State Banks, Savings Institutions and
Trust Companies of the same cities with those of Pittsburgh
is even more favorable to Pittsburgh, as shown by the follow­
ing table:
Name of City

No. of Banks

Cincinnati.............. .......... 28
Cleveland................ .......... 23
Columbus........................... 11
Dayton.................... .......... 6
Toledo.................... .......... 13
Youngstown........... .......... 4
85
Pittsburgh.............. .......... 63

Capital and Surplus

$10,407,000.00
24,045,500.00
1,989,000.00
825,000.00
4,500,100.00
2,335,000.00
$44,101,600.00
84,959,010.00

The statistics for the Ohio State Banks, Savings Institutions
and Trust Companies are taken from the Fifth Annual Report
of the Department of Banks and Banking of the State of
Ohio, 1912, as of September 4, 1912, being the last report
issued; and the statistics for the Pittsburgh State Banks, Sav­
ings Institutions and Trust Companies are taken from the
report of the Commissioner of Banking of Pennsylvania,
1913, Part 1, which is the latest report issued.
The conditions reflecting Clearing House relations in Cleve­
land and Pittsburgh are identical, and these show the volume
of business in Pittsburgh to be two and one-half times that
of Cleveland, the clearings for the year ending September 30,




3

1913, being as follows (Report of Comptroller of the Cur­
rency for 1913, page 788):
Pittsburgh..................................... $2,951,861,000 00
Cleveland........................................ 1,271,232 000.00
Since one of the principal functions of the Reserve Bank
is to furnish currency in times of stress the figures below are
an index as to the relative requirements of these two centers
for pay roll money.
As shown by the latest reports to the Comptroller of the
Currency to which we have had access, the cash on hand in
the National Banks of Pittsburgh and Cleveland was,—
Pittsburgh, (Call of June 30, 1914).....$26,338,570.00
Cleveland, (Call of March 4, 1914)..... 9,811,000.00
During the calendar year 1913 the Pittsburgh banks paid
out in cash over their counters $333,000,000.00, which we
confidently believe to be more than three times the amount
paid out in the same period by Cleveland.
During the month of April, 1914, the Pittsburgh banks re­
ceived from Cleveland exchanges amounting in the aggregate
to $18,108,000.00, and during the same period sent to Cleve­
land exchanges amounting to $10,320,000.00.
The volume of business from Cleveland to Pittsburgh is
nearly twice that from Pittsburgh to Cleveland.
If a comparatively narrow zone be traced on the map from
the Atlantic to the Pacific it will be found to contain the
only seven cities in the country that have a national banking
capital and surplus of over $25,000,000.00. These cities are
Boston ($48,081,000,00), New York ($249,305,000.00), Phil­
adelphia ($62,065,000), Pittsburgh ($53,604,000.00), Chicago
($69,050,000.00), St. I<ouis ($29,140,000.00), and San Fran­
cisco ($44,880,000.00). Pittsburgh ranks fourth in this dis­
tinguished list, yet Pittsburgh is the only one of the list
which has not been designated as a Federal Reserve city.
(These figures— except for Pittsburgh, which are brought
down to date— are as of August 9, 1913, shown in the Report
of the Comptroller of the Currency for 1913, Table No. 63,
pages 407, 423, 431, 393, 413 and 385.)




At the hearings before the Organization Committee it was
charged that Pittsburgh offered high interest rates or expen­
sive facilities to attract deposits. If, for the sake of the argu­
ment, this is admitted to be true, it is certainly no more true
of Pittsburgh than it is of Cleveland. We request your
Honorable Body particularly to note, however, that while
artificial methods sometimes attract deposits, they never attract
banking capital and surplus. Pittsburgh’s banks have larger
capital and surplus in proportion to deposits than the banks
of any other city in the United States. The charge that
Pittsburgh offers high interest rates or unusual facilities cer­
tainly did not originate with the patrons of the Pittsburgh
banks, for our bankers have great difficulty in persuading
their patrons that our terms are as liberal as those offered by
our competitors. The fact is, Pittsburgh accumulates these
deposits because she is the industrial and financial center and
the natural clearing house for all this section of the country.

II.
THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL SUPREMACY
OF PITTSBURGH.
The following table of figures is taken from the 13th census
of the United States, made in 1910, Vol. 10— Title, “Manu­
factures”— for Pittsburgh, Table 19, page 930; for Cleveland,
Table 34, page 945, being a comparison of the Pittsburgh
and Cleveland Metropolitan Districts.
Pittsburg

Population......................................
1,044,743
2,369
Number o f Establishments..........
Persons engaged in Manufactures
163,258
Proprietors and Partners.............
2,102
Salaried Employes............ ...........
20,692
Wage Earners (Average Number)
140,464
Primary Horsepower.....................
791,047
Capital.......................................... $642,527,046
Expenses........................................ 519,820,653
Services....................................... 115,049,924
(Salaries........................ ......
24,934,082
\ Wages...................................
90,115,842
Materials..................................... 366,892,433
Miscellaneous............................
37,878.296
Value of Products.......................... 578,815,493
Value added by Manufacture...... 211,923,060




5

, .
Cleveland

Difference in favor
o{ Pittstarfh

613,270
431,473
2,230
139
103,709
59,549
1,771
331
12,850
7,842
89,088
51,376
216,166
574,881
$236,911,140 $405,615,906
254,566,810
265,253,846
66,805,430
48,244,494
16,150,153
8,783,929
50,655,277
39,460,565
159,896,454
206,995,979
27,864,926
10,013,370
281,992,131
296,823,362
122,095,677
89,827,383

(Metropolitan District is defined in said Vol. 10, “Manu­
factures,” at page 903).
The foregoing table shows the population of the metropol­
itan districts of the two cities within a ten mile radius. The
fact that some of Pittsburgh’s population is included within
contiguous municipalities under separate municipal govern­
ments, whereas Cleveland has annexed everything in sight,
cannot affect the question. In determining the real size of a
metropolis, who ever heard of omitting the suburbs, physic­
ally connected with the city and built up so closely that there
is no indication on the ground to show where the city ends
and the suburbs begin? Yet that is the specious argument
advanced by those who say that the real Cleveland is larger
than the real Pittsburgh. The fact is that Cleveland has
little more than half the population of Pittsburgh. But
Pittsburgh’s larger population by no means indicates the full
extent of her supremacy.
Cleveland and her business are localized.
Pittsburgh’s market is world-wide. Every well-informed
man in the country knows that Pittsburgh is the iron and
steel center of the world.
The Pittsburgh district produces one-third of the bitumin­
ous coal mined in the United States.
Pittsburgh stands third in the country in the distribution
of produce and vegetables. 35,000 cars were received and
sold in 1912.
Pittsburgh is the home of the oil and gas business. Go
where you will throughout the United States, or in foreign
countries, and wherever you find oil and gas industries you
will find they are being financed very largely by Pittsburgh
capital. The reason is that the bankers of Pittsburgh are
familiar with this industry so that those interested in it natu­
rally turn to this city for financial accommodations.
In addition to the foregoing, Pittsburgh has a commanding
position in the following manufactures, in some of them
leading the world:
Air brakes,
Aluminum products,
Cables and accessories,




Corks and cork products,
Electrical apparatus,
Fire proofing and clay products,
Glass,
Pickles and preserves,
Pipe and tubing,
Railroad signaling devices,
Rolling mill machinery,
Steel cars,
Tin plate,
Turbines and condensers.
Pages could be consumed in discussing the many and
diversified industries which are being carried on in Pitts­
burgh, producing a yearly tonnage of over 177,000,000 tons,
to move which it would require a train of freight cars of
modern construction long enough to reach, around the earth
at the equator. Pittsburgh’s tonnage is greater than the im­
port and export tonnage of Hamburg, L,ondon, New York,
Liverpool and the Suez Canal combined. The tonnage of
the Pittsburgh district has increased 100% in the last eig^it
years.
(In support of the foregoing statistics relating to the indus­
trial and commercial supremacy of Pittsburgh, we respect­
fully refer to a letter dated July 31, 1914, addressed to your
Honorable Body by the Pittsburgh Industrial Development
Commission, a copy of which letter is printed at the end of
this brief).
We might speak of the educational facilities of Pittsburgh.
Here is a city which in addition to a magnificent public
school system and many excellent private schools, has within
its limits the University of Pittsburgh with over 2800 .stu­
dents, and the Carnegie Technical School with over 3000
students. We might speak of the numerous large and finely
equipped office buildings of the city, a sure index of the
magnitude of her business. We might speak of her beauti­
ful suburbs and the substantial character of her population.
We might mention the names of the men of affairs of Pitts­
burgh whose reputation for high ability and integrity is
known and recognized all over the country.




7

It is a fact established beyond the possibility of dispute
that from every standpoint Pittsburgh is the metropolis of
the Fourth Federal Reserve District.
We must go back to an early date to trace the beginning
of Pittsburgh’s great achievements. In an unsettled region,
on account of the necessity for transportation facilities, the
line of the advance of population is almost invariably along
the rivers. The United States was no exception to the rule.
In their order of development in this country the lines of
transportation were first the rivers, then the wagon roads,
then the canals and lastly the railroads. When our ancestors
were advancing to the conquest of the west, by far the most
important means of transportation from the Appalachian
Mountains westward was the broad Ohio River, which, with
hardly a single rapid to interfere with navigation, extended
for a thousand miles into the heart of the continent. It has
been well said that “of all the natural factors entering into
the problem of the settlement of the West this river was the
most important.” Along this great highway the settlers and
their families moved in constantly increasing numbers. Pres­
ently settlements began to appear which later, where location
and natural resources warranted, became towns and cities.
In this great march westward the spot on which now stands
the City of Pittsburgh was always a pivotal point. The
, French recognized this when, pushing down from the lakes,
they seized and fortified the junction of the Allegheny and
Monongahela Rivers. This fort was finally taken by the
English in 1758 and remained the great strategic point in
this whole section of the country. It is not chance that has
made Pittsburgh the metropolis of this section. In the early
days its claim to importance lay in its location at the head
of the Ohio, the great highway into the heart of the conti­
nent. It turned out, however, that Pittsburgh was not only
fortunate in this respect. Located in the center of the lines
of east and west travel, the city is likewise in the center of
a district whose natural resources have made it one of the
most marvelous regions on the face of the globe.




8

Every one, familiar with the history of our country, knows
that as the great lines of transportation became established
running east and west, so the lines of trade have followed the
lines of transportation. Nowhere in the northern part of the
United States, west of the Allegheny Mountains and east of
the Mississippi, do the lines of trade run north and south.
They run east and west. This has been recognized by the
railroads, which have been located so as to take care of the
trade and commerce of the nation. Almost without exception
the great trunk lines of the country run east and west.
The Fourth Federal Reserve District lies in the heart of
the great east and west trade movement, between the north­
ern states and the Pacific coast, and as the principal lines of
trade in the country are east and west, so are they in the
Fourth District. Would it not be extraordinary if it .were
otherwise?
Compare, for a moment, the location of Cleveland with
Pittsburgh. Only one trunk line system, the New York
Central System, runs east and west through Cleveland. That
line runs from New York City north to Albany, then turns
westward, skirts the lake, and scarcely touches the Fourth
District. Pittsburgh, on the contrary, lies right in the center
of the lines of transportation, east and west throughout the
district. Through Pittsburgh run two great trunk lines, the
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and the Pennsylvania System, the
latter amounting, in fact, to two separate systems, because it
divides at Pittsburgh into two railroads, one running almost
due west to Chicago, and the other southwest to St. Louis.
Further, through arrangements recently made with the West­
ern Maryland Railroad, the New York Central Railroad now
runs a trunk line from Chicago, through Pittsburgh, to the
Atlantic seaboard. We respectfully request your Honorable
Body to note that we are not speaking merely of accessibility.
So far as that point is concerned, it does not admit of argu­
ment that, of the two cities, Pittsburgh is far more accessible
from every place in the district, except from a few towns
located in the immediate vicinity of Cleveland. The point
which we particularly emphasize is that




the lines of trade run

9

through Pittsburgh east and west through the district

. It is
axiomatic that banking capital must follow the lines of trade.
What are banks for if not to furnish financial resources for
trade and commerce? The fact is that is the principal pur­
pose behind the Federal Reserve Act.
Cleveland, being located on the extreme northern border of
the Fourth District, is inconvenient of access so far as con­
cerns the greater part of the district. Most of the business
from the Pennsylvania and West Virginia territory, and a
large part of the business from the Kentucky territory, in­
cluded in the district, would be compelled to pass through
Pittsburgh on its way to Cleveland, and the extra four hours
consumed, both in going and coming, would, in transacting
banking business, frequently mean the loss of two days.
Because of geographical and railway conditions, the State
of Ohio, taken as a whole, can be served quicker and better
from Pittsburgh than from Cleveland, and the bankers of Ohio
are to-day transacting more of their business through Pitts­
burgh than through Cleveland.
Will this Board attempt to change the great lines of trade
from east and west to north and south?
Will this Board attempt to force banking capital into
Cleveland, where it does not want to go, and where it is not
needed?
The bankers of the Fourth District are in the habit of
coming to Pittsburgh, where they and their customers are
well known. The usual course of business is to and from
Pittsburgh. For more than a century the lines of trade of
the district have been established east and west through Pitts­
burgh. Trade centers in Pittsburgh, not in Cleveland. Bank­
ing capital is in Pittsburgh, not in Cleveland. The demand
for the resources of the Reserve Bank are in and about
Pittsburgh, not in and about Cleveland. What substantial
reason can be given for disregarding the laws of trade and
placing this bank on Lake Erie, at the extreme northern edge
of the district?
We respectfully, but earnestly, maintain that these consid­
erations should not be lightly dismissed. The success of the




10

Reserve Bank of this district will only be assured as this
Board recognizes and follows the laws of trade and commerce
instead of going counter thereto.
We file herewith petitions of member banks praying that
Pittsburgh shall be designated instead of Cleveland as the
Federal Reserve City in this district. Of a total of 766 mem­
ber banks, 476 have signed such petitions. We have printed
on page 12 of this brief a summary showing the number of
banks that have signed the petitions. It will be noted that
of 306 Pennsylvania member banks, 304 have petitioned; of
9 West Virginia member banks, 8 have petitioned; of 73
Kentucky member banks, 57 have petitioned; and of 378
Ohio member banks, 107 have petitioned.




Respectfully submitted,
W il l ia m

W a t s o n S m i t h ,'

Counsel fo r Appellants.

11

FOURTH FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT
CONSISTING OF

Pennsylvania— Nineteen counties out of sixty-seven.
Ohio (Entire state)—Eighty-eight counties.
Kentucky—Fifty six counties out of one hundred and
nineteen.
West Virginia— Four counties out of fifty-five.
SUMMARY.
No. o f
B an ks

States

Pennsylvania (19 Counties)........................................................806
Ohio (Whole State)..................................................................... 378
Kentucky (56 Counties)......................... ................................... 73
West Virginia (4 Counties)........................................................ 9
Total...................................................................................766

BANKS IN DISTRICT THAT HAVE PETITIONED FOR
DESIGNATION OF PITTSBURGH AS FEDERAL
RESERVE CITY.
Pennsylvania................................................................................. 304
Ohio.............................................................................................. 107
Kentucky....................................................................................... 57
West Virginia................................................................................ 8
Total................................................................................. ^476
Unsigned........................................................................................290
Proportion signed............................. 62.1 %




12

P i t t s b u r g h , P a .,

July 31st, 1914.

F ederal R eserve Board,

Washington, D. C.
G e n t l e m e n :—

In connection with the appeal of the Member Banks of the
City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to the Federal Reserve
Board in the matter of designating the Federal Reserve City
in the Fourth Federal Reserve District, this Commission
assumes the responsibility for the following facts and figures
which have been compiled after an exhaustive and careful
census based on eminent authority.
The Pittsburgh district comprising, for this purpose, a ten
to thirty mile radius, produces:—
30.5% of the Nation’s output of Pig Iron,
36.0% “
“
“ Steel,
50.0% “
“
“ Coke,
25.0% “
“
“ Bituminous Coal,
50.0% “
“
“ Steel Cars,
60.0% “
“
“ Tin Plate,
65.0% “
“
“ Glass and Glassware,
50.0% “
“
“ Crucible Steel,
45.0% “
“
“ Pipe and Tubing,
90.0% “
“
“ Vanadium,
85.0% “
“
“ Radium.
Pittsburgh has the largest cork manufacturing plant in the
world.
Pittsburgh has the largest pickling and preserving plant in
the world.
Pittsburgh leads the world in the production of finished
aluminum.
Pittsburgh has the largest structural steel plant in the
world.
Pittsburgh has the largest pipe and tube mill in the world.
Pittsburgh has the largest independent wire manufacturing
plant in the world.
Pittsburgh has the largest air brake manufacturing plant
in the world.




13

Pittsburgh has the largest plant in the world for the manu­
facture of rolling mill machinery.
Pittsburgh is the National plumbing supply center.
Pittsburgh’s jobbing market serves ten million people, and
does an annual business of one billion dollars.
Pittsburgh stands third in the Nation in the distribution
of produce and vegetables, handling more than thirty-five
thousand cars annually.
Pittsburgh’s tonnage, aggregating 177 million tons, is
greater than the combined import and export tonnage of
Hamburg, London, New York, Liverpool and the Suez Canal
combined. Pittsburgh’s tonnage has doubled in the last
eight years.
The value of manufactured products in the Pittsburgh
Metropolitan district as per the census of 1910 was greater
than the value of the combined manufactured products of
each of twenty-one sovereign States of the Union, including
Missouri, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Connecticut and
California.
The banking surplus of Pittsburgh exceeds the combined
surplus of Cleveland, St. Louis, Buffalo and Detroit, and is
more than double that of the Bank of England, Bank of
Germany and Bank of France combined.
x
Very respectfully submitted,
P it t s b u r g h I n d u s t r ia l D e v e l o p m e n t C o m m is s io n .

H. P. B o p E, Chairman.
F. F. N i c o l a , Vice Chairman.
(Note.—The standing of this Commission is shown by the following
extract from an official report made for the United States Bureau of Com­
merce and Labor in October, 1912, by G. A. Weber, Commercial Agent:
“ This Commission appears to be the most practical and energetic organiza­
tion for the development of trade that has thus far been visited. * * *
it is deemed worthy of considerable space in a report. Although in exist­
ence but one year, the extent of its activities is surprising.” )




14

5. Pittsburgh is much more convenient of access than
Cleveland with respect to the greater part of the District.
the undersigned have caused this

In W itn e s s W h e r e o f ,

petition to be executed by their proper officers this 24th day
day of July, 1914.

FARMERS DEPOSIT NATIONAL BANK,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
By

T. H.

G iv e n ,

President.

UNION NATIONAL BANK OF PITTSBURGH,
By J.

R.

M cC u n e,

President.

MELLON N ATIO N AL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By A . C. K n o x ,

Vice President.

LINCOLN NATIONAL BANK,
By H.

A . J o h n sto n ,

Cashier.

W ESTERN NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By C h a r l e s M c K n i g h t ,

President.

GERMAN NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By

J.

F.

W.

E versm an n ,

Cashier.

MONONGAHELA NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.




By

John

D.

F raser,

Cashier.

1

By C. F. McCombs, Cashier.

TH E FIRST-SECOND NATIONAL BANK
OF PITTSBURGH,
By L a w r e n c e

E.

S an d s,

President.

TH E PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By H e r v e y S c h u m a c h e r ,

Cashier.

TH E BANK OF PITTSBURGH, N. A.,
By H a r r is o n N e s b i t , President.

COLUMBIA NATIONAL BANK, of Pittsburgh, Pa.
By C. C.

Ham m ond,

Cashier.

COMMERCIAL NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By

H. W.

B ic k e l,

Cashier.

MARINE NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh,




By

J. G.

B rook s,

Cashier.

Reproduced from the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of the National Archives

TH IRD NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.

TH E EXCHANGE NATIONAL, BANK, Pittsburgh,
By

J osep h

W.

M arsh ,

President.

TH E FIRST NATIONAL, BANK OF ALLEGHENY,
By W. L- GuCKERT, President.

DUQTJESNE NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By W. S.

L in d e r m a n ,

Vice President.

TH E KEYSTONE NATIONAL BANK, of Pittsburgh,
By

A. S.

Cashier.

B eym er,

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BIRMINGHAM,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
By

C. F.

B eech,

Cashier.

DIAMOND NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By W m . P r i c e , President.

UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By L. S.

J o h n s,

Cashier.

GERMAN NATIONAL BANK OF ALLEGHENY,




Pittsburgh, Pa.
By G e o r g e G. S c h m id t,

Cashier.

SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF ALLEGHENY,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
By A. K,

G ru b b s,

Cashier.

LIBERTY NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By H. H.

W ood s,

Cashier.

PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By R. M. Da.vis, Vice President.

M ETROPOLITAN NATIONAL BANK, Pittsburgh, Pa.
By

H arry

B.

S te w a rt,

Cashier.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SHERADEN,
Pittifburgh, Pa.
By W. W. H ill , Cashier.

And now, July 24th, 1914, the Pittsburgh Clearing House
Association hereby joins in the foregoing petition.




P i t t s b u r g h C l e a r i n g H o u s e A s s o c ia t io n ,

By

C h a r le s M c K n ig h t,

President.

P e n n s y l v a n i a — Continued.

N e of B
am
ank

L
ocation
Cambridge Springs......
California.....................
Canonsburg..................
<
<
Castle Shannon............

C
apital &S rp s
u lu
....... $
80,000
.......
150,000
.......
350,000
.......
61,000
.......
120,000
.......
225,000
.......
37,500
.......
28,000

Charleroi.......................
Cherry Tree.................
.......
.......
.......
.......
.......
.......
.......

Cochranton..................
Confluence..................
Conneaut I^ake......... .
Connellsville................

...............

.......
.......
.......
.......
.......
.......
.......

ii
ii

“

.................................

<<

Coraopolis.....................
Crafton..........................

..............

.......

Cambridge Springs..............
..........

First National..............................................................

Dayton.....................................................

......
......
Edinboro...............................................

............
............

Ellwood City...............
ii

»C

Erie..............................
......
......

a
a

75,000

Evans City...................




125,000
120,000
250,000
30,000
37,500
75,000
40,000
43,500
225,000
133,000
300,000
150,000
90,000
100,000
120,000
65,000
55,000
100,000
85,000
210,000
50,000
30,500
100,000
142,500
85,000
100,000
130,000
30,500
45,000
150,000
58,000
61,000
225,000
750,000
650,000
550,000

2

Location

Name of Bank

Export........................ .
Fairchance..................
Palls Creek..................
Farrell.........................
Payette City.................
Finleyville................. .
Ford City.....................
Franklin.....................

Capital ft Surplus
,....$

....
....

.....................

....

Fredericktown............
Freedom .....................

....

“

44

Fredonia......................
Freeport......................
Fryburg......................
Garrett....... *............... .
Gerard........................ .
Greensburg................

....
....

44
(l

Greenville...................
44

Grove City..................
44

Glen Campbell............
Harrisville..................
Hays............................
Herminie....................
Hickory......................
Homer City.................
Homestead.................

....

44

Hooversville................
Indiana.......................

.....

(4

Irwin...........................
“ ...........................
Jeannette.....................
44

75,000
110,000
139,000
30,000
100,000
350,000
280,000
45,000
150,000
97,000
32,000
70,000
28,300
46,000
67,000
450,000
200,000
300,000
195,000
180,000
150,000
120,000
134,000
50,000
31,250
28,500
35,000
57,000
500,000
110,000
63,000

60,000
440,000
150,000
100,000

125,000
61,000

.....

200,000

.....

Kittanning.................

140,000
239,000

4(
44

Knox (Edenburg)......

I^atrobe...........................
44

.....

44

I/eechburg .................




43,000

3

110*000
100,000
130,000
200,000
65,000

Reproduced fro the Unclassified / Declassified Holdings of the National Archives
m

P e n n s y l v a n i a — Continued.

P e n n s y l v a n i a — Continued.
Location

Name of Bank

Capital & Surplus

Leechburg.V.........................First National................................... $ 100,000
Ligonier..............................First National...................................
50,000
“
..............................National Bank of Ligonier...............
100,000
Lyndora..............................Lyndora National.............................
35,000
Manor................................. Manor National................................
80,000
Marionville......................... Gold Standard National...................
77,500
100,000
Marion Center..................... Marion Center National...................
Mars.................................... Mars National...................................
75,000
Masontown.......................... First National....................................
50,000
“
.......................... Masontown National.........................
50,000
Meadville............................. New First National.............. ............
200,000
“
............................. Merchants National..........................
200,000
Mercer................................. Farmers & Mechanics....... ..............
110,000
“ ................................. First National....................................
240,000
Myersdale........................... Citizens National...............................
165,000
Myersdale.............................Second National...............................
110,000
Midland...............................First National....................................
60,000
Midway................................Midway National..............................
75,000
Millsboro..............................First National...................................
25,000
71,000
Monaca.................................Citizens National..............................
“
..............................Monaca National..............................
42,000
100,000
Monessen............................. First Natiou al....................................
“
............................. Peoples National................................
110,000
Monongahela.......................First National Bk. ofMonon. City...
75,000
Mount Morris.......................Farmers & Merchants.....................
50,000
Mount Pleasant................... First National....................................
200,000
“
.................. Peoples National..............................
75,000
Munhall................................First National...................................
50,000
MacDonald.......................... First National...................................
250,000
McKeesport..........................First National.............................. .....
800,000
“
..........................National Bank of McKeesport..........
450,000
“
..........................Union National.................................
180,000
McKees Rocks..................... First National............... ....................
175,000
Natrona...............................First National....................................
100,000
New Alexandria...................New Alexandria National................
50,000
New Bethlehem........... ....... First National....................................
150,000
New Brighton..................... Old National.....................................
140,000
“
.................... Union National..................................
180,000
New Castle.......................... Citizens National..............................
450,000
“
.......................... First National................. ................
900,000
“
.......................... National Bank of Lawrence County.. 1,150,000
“
.......................... Union National.................................
116,000
New Florence.......................New Florence National....................
20,425
New Kensington..................First National...................................
75,000
New Salem.......................... First National....................................
50,000
New Wilmington................First National....................................
80,000
North East.......................... First National...................................
100,000




4

P enn sylvania — Continued.
Location

' Name of Bank

Capital & Surplus

North East.......................... National Bank of North East...........$
Oakdale................................First National....................................
Oakmont..............................First National...... .............................
Oil City................................First National....................................
“
................................Lamberton National.........................
“
................................Oil City National..............................
Parkers Landing.................. First National....................................
Parnassus............................. Parnassus National...........................
Perryopolis.......................... First National....................................
Pitcairn................................First National....................................
Pittsburgh.................. ,.........Bank of Pittsburgh, N. A..................
........................... Columbia National.............................
............................ Commercial National.......................
............................ Diamond National.............................
............................ Duquesne National...........................
............................ Exchange National..........................
............................ Farmers Deposit National................
............................ First National of Birmingham..........
............................ First-Second National......................
............................ German National..............................
............................ Keystone National.............................
..... ...................... Liberty National..............................
............................ Lincoln National..............................
............................ Marine National................................
............................ Mellon National................................
............................ Metropolitan....................................
............................ Monongahela National.....................
............................ Pennsylvania National.....................
............................ Peoples National..............................
............................ Third National.................................
............................ Union National................................
............................ United States National....................
............................ Western National..............................
Pleasant Unity..................... Pleasant Unity National..................
Plumville............................. First National....................................
Point Marion.................. .‘...First National...................................
“
.......................Peoples National..............................
Punxsutawney.....................County National..............................
“
.....................Punxsutawney National...................
Reynoldsville...................... First National....... ............................
“
...................... Peoples National..... ........................
“
...................... Citizens National..............................
Republic..............................First National..................................
Rices Landing..................... Rices Landing National...................
Rimersburg.......................... First National...................................
Rochester.......... ................. First National....................................
“
............................ The Peoples National.......................




5

60,000
100,000
75,000
150,000
300,000
125,000
50,000
40,000
125,000
95,000
4,800,000
1,400,000
500,000
2,100,000
1,300,000
2,000,000
7,200,000
200,000
4,950,000
1,200,000
1,250,000
300,000
1,300,000
400,000
8,200,000
700,000
2,500,000
360,000
2,000,000
700,000
6,000,000
654,000
1,450,000
40,000
46,000
75,000
60,000
114,000
500,000
175,000
120,000
65,000
25,000
45,000
65,000
195,000
80,500

P e n n s y l v a n i a — Continued.
Location

Name of Bank

Capftal ft Surplus

Rockwood............................Farmers & Merchants National....... $
35,000
........................... First National........ ...........................
75,000
R&scoe................................. First National...................................
83,000
Rural Valley......... .............. Rural Valley National......................
57,000
29,250
Russellton............................ First National...................................
Salisbury (Elk Lick).......... First National...................................
'65,000
Saltsburg..............................First National...................................
125,000
Scenery Hill........................ First National....................................
50,000
Scottdale..............................Broadway National..........................
80,000
“
..............................First National....................................
325,000
150,000
Sewickley........................... First National...................................
Sharon................................. First National....................................
275,000
................................ .McDowell National..........................
220,000
“
“
................................. Merchants & Manufactursrs Nat’l...
210,000
121,000
Sharpsville.......................... First National...................................
Sheffield............................... Sheffield National............................
105,000
Sheridanville.......................First National Bank o f Sheridan.....
60,000
Shippenville.........................First National..................................
33,000
Sligo.................................... Sligo National...................................
25,100
Slippery Ro«k..................... Citizens National.............................
42,500
“
..................... First National...................................
58,000
Smithfield............................ First National...................................
40,000
Smithton..............................First National...................................
29,400
Somerfield............................First National....................................
45,000
Somerset..............................First National...................................
150,000
“
..............................Farmers National..............................
60,000
32,500
Spartansburg.......................Grange National...............................
Springdale............................Springdale National.........................
48,000
Stoneboro............................First National....................................
30,000
Stoystown............................ First National....................................
60,000
Somerville........................... Union National.................................
60,000
Sutersville............................First National....................................
37,500
Swissvale............................. First National....................................
55,000
Sykesville............................ First National...................................
33,500
Tarentum.............................Peoples National..............................
100,000
“
.............................National Bank of Tarentum.............
125,000
Tionesta............................... Citizens National..............................
70,000
“
............................... Forest County National....................
150,000
Titusville..............................Second National...............................
525,000
Trafford City.......................First National....................................
36,000
Turtle Creek........................ First National................................ .
60,000
Union City. ..........................National Bank of Union City...........
145,000
Uniontown.......................... National Bank of Fayette County...
600,000
-“
.......................... First National.................................... 1,700,000
“
.......................... Second National................................
265,000
Vanderbilt............................First National...................................
35,000
Vandergrift..........................Citizens National..............................
75,000




6

L
ocation
N m of B
ae
ank
C
apital &S rp s
u lu
Verona................................. First National................................... $ 150,000
Wampum............................. First National....................................
38,000
Warren.................................Citizens Natioual..............................
160,000
“
.................................First National........ ...........................
250,000
“
.................................Warren National...............................
575,000
Washington.........................Citizens National.............................. 1,600,000
“
.........................First National...................................
500,000
.........................Peoples National..............................
107,500
“
Waynesburg.........................American National............................
270,000
Waynesburg.........................Citizens National.............................. 1,200,000
“
.........................Peoples National..............................
233,000
Webster................................First National...................................
37,500
West Alexander................... Peoples National..............................
51,000
52,000
“
....................West Alexander National................
West Elizabeth....................First National....................................
41,000
West Middlesex................... First National...................................
28,200
West Newton.......................First National...................................
200,000
Wilkinsburg.........................Central National............................125,000
150,000
“
.........................First National..................................
Wilmerding......................... East Pittsburgh National..................
200,000
“
..........................Wilmerding National.......................
95,000
Wilson................................. First National...................................
50,000
Winber................................. Citizens National.................... ........
75,000
Youngsville..........................First National....................................
75,000
Youngwood.......................... First National...................................
60,000
Zelienople.............................First National...................................
60,000
62,000
“
.............................Peoples National...............................
304 Banks—
Total Capital and Surplus.................................$96,347,120




7

Reproduced fro the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of th National Archives
m
e

P enn sylvania — Continued.

DISTRICT No. 4.
OHIO MEMBER BANKS.
Location

Name of Bank

Capital & Surplus

Bradford............................... First National....................................$
Bealsville..............................First National...................................
Bellaire................................ Farmers & Merchants National.......
Belpre....'............................... First National...................................
Bethel................................... First National...................................
Bremen.................................First National....................................
Barnesville.......................... Barnesville National....,....................
Bellaire.................................First National...................................
Cadiz.................................... Harrison National.............................
“ .....................................Fourth National...............................
Carthage..............................First National...................................
Cheviot.................................First National...................................
Clarington............................First National..................................
Cleves.................................. Hamilton County National..............
Coolville...............................Coolville National.............................
Cambridge........................... Guernsey National............................
Dennison............................. Dennison National............................
Dresden...............................Dresden National..............................
East Liverpool.....................Potters National...............................
“
.....................Citizens National.............................
“
................ ....First National...................................
East Palestine..................... First National....................................
Eaton................................... Eaton National.................................
“ ................................... Preble County National.....................
Franklin..............................Franklin National.............................
“
..............................Warren National...............................
Georgetown.......................... Peoples National..............................
Germantown........................ First National....................................
Gettysburg........................... Citzens National...............................
Glouster................................First National...................................
Greenville.............................Second National...............................
Grove City........................... First National....................................
Greenfield.............................Peoples National..............................
Hamilton..............................Miami Valley National....................
Harrison............................... First National....................................
Higginsport.........................First National....................................
Hillsboro............................. Farmers & Traders National............
Hopedale..............................First National...................................
Kingston.............................. First National...................................
Lancaster..............................Hocking Valley National................
Lebanon............................... Citizens National..............................
“
............................... Lebanon National.............................
Lewisville............................ First National...................................
Lockland..............................First National...................................
Loveland..............................Loveland National............................
Lowell................................. First National...................................




28,000
32,250
125,000
25,000
33,500
34,000
150,000
240,000
150,000
170,000
27,500
29,500
65,000
29,000
30,000
65,000
100,000
28,000
285,000
200,000
275,000
50,000
90,000
120,000
100,000
26,500
75,000
100,000
47,000
26,600
200,000
25,250
55,000
240,000
40,000
32,000
61,000
55,000
32,500
130,000
155,000
200,000
35,000
95,000
65,500
50,000

O

h io

— C o n t in u e d .
Nm m «f Baak

Cajttal * S«r»te*

Malta.................................... Malta National.................................. $
Manchester.......................... Farmers National..............................
McArthur..............................Vinton County National..................
Mt. Sterling......................... First National....................................
Marietta................................ German National............. ................
“
................................ First National....................................
Mason.................................. First National.....................................
Middletown.......................... First National....................................
Mingo Junction....................First National....................................
Monroe................................ Monroe National..............................
Morrow................................First National....................................
McConnellsville...................First National....................................
“
...................Citizens National..............................
Middleport....... ...................Citizens National.............................
Neffs.....................................Neffs National..................................
Newark................................ Franklin National.............................
“
................................ The Park National............................
Newcomerstown.................. First National................................. .’.
New Matamoras.................. First National............................. .
New Paris............................. First National....................................
Norwood.............................First National.....................................
“
..............................Norwood National............................
New Concord....................... First National....................................
Okeana................................. First National....................................
Oxford................................. Oxford National.................................
Piketon................................. Piketon National...............................
Powhattan Point.................. First National....................................
Pomeroy..............................Pomeroy National..............................
Quaker City......................... Quaker City National.......................
Ripley.................................. Ripley National.................................
Roseville............................. First National....................................
Racine................................. First National....................................
Sabina...................................First National....................................
S t Clairsville......................Second National.................................
S t Paris................................ Central National................................
Sardis...................................First National....................................
Seven Mile............................Farmers National.............................
Somerton.............................. First National....................................
Somerville...................... . Somerville National.........................
Steubenville......................... Commercial National.......................
“
......................... National Exchange...........................
......................... Peoples National..............................
“
Stockport............................ First National....................................
Summerfield......................... First National....................................
Springfield ...........................Lagonda National.............................
“
.......................... Mad River National..........................
Tippecanoe City.................. Citizens National...... %
.......................




9

60,000
50,000
60,000
140,000
115,000
500,000
26,100
150,000
38,000
31,000
80,000
122,000
145,000
45,000
27,000
300,000
116,000
>61,000
51,000
26,400
300,000
250,000
26,900
25,250
75,000
36,000
30,000
60,000
150,000
108,000
28,000
25,500
54,600
110,000
55,000
27,200
26,750
30,000
26,250
250,000
500,000
167,000
29,500
34,000
175,000
350,000
90,000

O h io — Continued.
C p l AS rplu
a ita u s
L
ocation
N e of B
am
ank
Toronto.................
............ $
50,000
Tippecanoe City....
............
90,000
Utica.....................
............
100,000
Watertown...........
31,000
............
Waynesville..........
............
140,000
Wellsville.............
............
128,000
Wilmington..........
...........
140,000
Woodsfield...........
............
80,000
Washington Court House....Midland National............................
100,000
Waverly...............
............
75,000
West Union.........
............
26,500
Williamsburg.......
............
25,250
Wilmington..........
............
96,000
Zanesville............ .
............
600,000
107 Banks—Total Capital and Surplus................... ............ $11,043,300

DISTRICT No. 4.
KENTUCKY MEMBER BANKS.
Location

Name of Bank

Capital

&

Surplus

...... $ 210,000
100,000
Barbourville.....
50,000
<
<
................... National o f J. H. Black.............
47,500
48,000
Berea................
30,500
Burnside..........
Catlettsburg.....
140,000
li
87,000
45,000
Cannel..............
Carlisle............
31,000
Clay City.........
30,000
Corbin.............
35,000
25,500
Covington........
450,000
Cynthiana........
140,000
<
<
175,000
68,000
Dry Ridge........
25,710
East Bernstadt..
33,000
Greenup...........
45,000
Harlan.............
Ashland...........
it

a

Hazard.............
Hustonville......
Jackson............
Jenkins............

.......

90,000
80,000

4<




71,000
107,250
51,000

10

K e n t u c k y — Continued.
Capital &Surplus
,..$ 600,000
... 1,250,000
...
956,390
London........................
30,500
Louisa.........................
50,000
ti
70,000
Manchester.................
41,500
Maysville....................
126,000
<
i
...
120,000
U
...
110,500
Middlesborough..........
131,500
Mt. Sterling................
..
115,000
<
C
78,000
<
<
75,000
Newport......................
165,000
Nicholasville...............
165,000
Paintsville...................
320,000
Pikesville....................
..
■ 100,000
Pineville.....................
28,250
Richmond...................
120,000
<
<
165,000
M
106,000
Russell........................
27,000
Stanford.......................
78,000
<
<
200,100
Salyersville..................
34,000
Somerset.....................
155,000
Williamsburg..............
35,000
Whitesburg.................
25,000
Wilmore......................
26,000
Winchester................. .
..
150,000
<<
300,000
58 Banks— Total Capital and Surplus................................ . . $8,224,200
Loeation

Name of Bank

Lexington...................
<
<
(<

DISTRICT No. 4.
WEST VIRGINIA MEMBER BANKS.
Location

Name of Bank

Capital & Surplus

Cameron .............................First National................................... $
72,000
Chester.................................First National....................................
80,000
50,000
Kim Grove.......................... First National....................................
Moundsville......................... First National...................................
70,000
New Cnmberland................ First National...................................
72,500
Wheeling............................. National Exchange........................... 1,000,000
“
............................. Citizens National.............................
125,000
Wellsburg............................Wellsburg National...........................
135,000
8 Banks—Total Capital and Surplus................................... $ 1,604,500




11

Reproduced from the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of the National Archives




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Reproduced from the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of the National Archives

itcccivcits

WESTE

no.

UNION

TEL

AM

THEO. N. VA1U PRUDENT

SEND dieMowinjTelefrwn, subject to the terms
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WM THOMSON

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LEWISTON IDA
ANSWERING YOUR TELEGRAM WE ARE DECID EDLY IN FAVOR OF

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STATES




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R ep rod uced from the U ncla ssifie d I D ecla ssified H oldings of the N ational A rchives

UNION

Form 2

AM

THEO. N. VAIL, PR ESID EN T

SEND'the following Telegram, subject to the terms

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on back hereof, which are hereby agreed to

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Reproduced from the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of the National Archives

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WESTERN UNION
no.

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& EL

THEO. N. VAIL, PRESIDENT

SEND the following Telegram, subject to the terms

11

on back hereof, which are hereby agreed to

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NO.

T h e C it iz e n s
OF
BOARD

9 4 3 2

N a t io n a l

B ank

SALM ON

OF D IR E C T O R S

E. S . E D W A R D S
E. E. E D W A R D S
GE O. E. S H O U P
L OU I S F. R A M E Y
W. C. S M I T H
CSEO. H. MONK
G. B. Q U A R L E S

C A PITA L

S

$10 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0

a l m o n

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a h o

G.
E. S . E D W A R D S , V i c e - P r e s i d e n t
GE O. H. MONK, CASHIER

.

2/7/1914

Reserve Bank Organization Committee,
Washington:-D.C.
Gentlemen:-

All the mail from Lemhi County,Idaho,whether it be
going east,
west,north or south passes over the Gilmore and
Pittsburgh R*R. to Armstead,Montana,in Beaverhead County and
from there it is routed.
Armstead in practically the center of Beaverhead
County,
Hontana and due to the fact that /our mail goes to
that point before being routed, we would say that Lemhi County
Idaho should be placed in the reginal reserve district
that Beaverhead County Montana is placed in and we trust that
in placing Lemhi County,Idaho in a reginal reserve district
that you will take the routing of our mail and place us
with Beaverhead County,Montana, and this,where-ever Beaverhead
County,Montana is placed.
Trusting that you will do this we are




Yours very truly,

President.

Reproduced from the Unclassified IDeclassified Holdings of the National Archives

WESTERM UNION
TELEGRAM
THEO. N. VAIL, P R ESID EN T

RECEIVED AT
5 8 SK JM 6
WALLACE ADA JAN 26 1 9 1 4
m

THOMSON
LEWISTON

IDA

YES OF P O S S IB L E TO GET




IT
F IR S T NATIO NAL BANK
447P M

Form 18C4

R ep rod uced from the U ncla ssifie d / D ecla ssified H oldings of the N ational A rchives

WESTBgH UNION
TELEGRAM
THEO. N. VAIL, P R ESID EN T

RECEIVED AT
11 SK 0 -

I B COLLECT

\

u,A L L A O - IDAHO JA N.

26TM,

1914.

WM. THOMSON,
LE'V}ST of} f DAHC,

' * € ARE IN FAVOR OF THE E S T A B L I S H M E N T - O F A NORTHWEST RE G IO N A L
RESERVE D I S T R I C T




EMBRACING FCUR NORTHWESTERN S T A T E S .
WALLACE N A T IO N A L BANK.

Form 18C4

R ep rod uced from the U ncla ssifie d / D ecla ssified H oldings o f the N ational A rchives

WESTER

UNION

TELE&RAM
THEO. N. VAIL, P R ESID EN T

RECEIVED AT
35SK 0- 13 ANS

WEI SER IDAHO JAN. 27TH, 1914.
WILLIAM THOMPSON,
LEWISTON IDAHO.
IN ANSWER TO YOUR TELEGRAM THIS BANK WOULD SAY YES IN LARGE LETTERS,




FIRST NATIONAL BANK.
1023AM

Form 1864

Reproduced from the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of the National Archives




Reproduced from the Unclassified / Declassified Holdings of the National Archives

POSTAL

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t e r m s a n d c o n d it io n s p r in t e d o n t h e b a c k o f t h is b l a n k

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PROGRESSIVE

Astoria, Oregon., -ran.4-14*
Reverve Bank Organization Coianii4te#t
Washn,D.C,
In com on with a ll banks in
m
w believe in creation of
e
a northwestern Federal district
that the growing commerce of
the northwest practically deaaong* thtm separate recognition*
1115p
Siational Bank.




,

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Reproduced from the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of the National Archives

F. L . M E Y E R S , C a s h i e r
E A R L Z U N D E L , A s s t .C a s h i e r

F. J . H O L M E S , P r e s i d e n t
W .J . C H U R C H , V ic e P r e s i d e n t




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7,

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The Reserve Bank Organization Committee,
Treasury Department,
Washington. D. C.

Gentlemen:
It is of vital importance to this sectaon of
country that a Federal Reserve District be createX^dmbracing
the states of the Pacific Northwest, as distinct from a
single grouping together of all the states on the Pacific
Coast.

This is necessitated by considerations of business,

industry and finance; of geography and relative remoteness
from other centers; of agriculture; of foreign and Alaska
trade; and of future development.
Ve would strongly appeal to you and urge the creation

FLM CGB

Reproduced from the Unclassified IDeclassified Holdings of the National Archives

M, W, HARRISON, Pans,

H. T,

E R W IN

S O T T g , V iQS-Pnm ,

H A R R IS O N , C a s h ie r .

Oo
DIRECTORS
M-

W.

H A R R IS O N ,

CARL

H A B E R 1 .A C H , H .

T . B O T T S , D . F IT Z P A T R IC K ,

E R W IN

H A R R IS O N .

T IL L A M O O K , O R E .

fr

Jan. 3, 1914.
Reserve Bank Organization Committee,
Washington,

D.

0,

Dear Sirs:We urge the

creation of a

Reserve District of the Pacific Northwest as opposed
district for the entire Pacific Coast

Federal
to one

and assigning San Francisco

to be the reserve city in such case,~
1st.

Our remoteness from San Francisco and the necessity
of quicker and easier communication that the banks
and people of the Northwest may secure the full
benefits of the system to which they are entitled.

2nd.

On account of Geographical and consequently of commerce
separateness.

3rd.

Immediate future development in trade and population
will no doubt be able to command such separate dis­
trict within a short time if same is not created
at this time*
Hoping you see fiy^grant this request after due and

careful investigation, we are,




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Reproduced from the Unclassified I Declassified Holdings of the National Archives




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the UnclassifiedI / Decfassifled Holding's of the National Archives




N9 9070

The Xoin i i w k s t k k x N a t io n a l H ank
c A P im $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 . 0 0
H .P IG resident
.B A E,P
T O H P IGE,V e P esident C .M ML IN,V eP es,a Csh r
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P. E H A ----- W . HL W 5 ON
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A sist n Csh rs
s a t a ie
H k I JJX < H L V M > Y V S II IX G T O X

January 2nd, 1915*

Reserve B r Organization Gonanittee,
a ite
Washington, D C.
*
G
entlem
ens
W wish to urge strongly that you create a
e
Northwestern Federal Reserve District, as w believe
e
that this, section of the country should "b represented
e
by a bank in this Horthwest section*
Situated as w are in the Northwestern part
e
of the U S. an being to a certain extent a com unity
*
d
m
rem
ote from the other shipping centers, w think: that
e
a reserve district should be created, taking in the states
tributary to the Puget Sound region.

All of the Alaska

trade and m
ost of the foreign freight business arrives first
in this Puget Sound country, an w believe that for these
d e
reasons# as well as m y m
an ore, that a northwestern District
should be fomed.

from the Unclassified / Declassified Holdings of the National Archives

NIGHT L E T T E R

TH E WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY
INCORPORATED

25,000 OFFICES IN AMERICA

CABLE SERVICE T O ALL T H E WORLD

This Company T R A N SM ITS and D E I,I V E R S messages only on conditions limiting: its liability, which have been assented to by the sender of the following: N igh t Letter..
Errors can be guarded against only by repeating a message back to the sending station for comparison, and tbo Company will not hold itself liable for errors or delays in
transmission or delivery o f U nrepeated N ight Letters, sent at reduced rates, beyond a sum equal to the amount paid for transmission; not in any case beyond the sum of
f i f t y D ollars, at which, unless otherwise stated below, thi.s message has been valued by the sender thereof, nor in any case where the claim is not presented in writing within
sixty days after the message is filed with the Company for transmission.
This is an U N R E P E A T E D N IG H T L E T T E R , and is delivered by request o f the sender, under the conditions named above.

___________ B E L V ID E R E B R O O K S , G EN E R A L M ANAGER

T H E O . N . V A IL , P R ES ID E N T

R eceived at
'CTHCHXL

4 6 ML tIO EXTRA

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WASHINGTON DC
WE EARNESTLY URGE THAT P A C IF IC

NORTHWEST BE ORGANIZED INTO ONE

OF FEDERAL RESERVE D IS T R IC T S WASHINGTONCOMMON INTEREST AND ARE A L L IE D




OREGON IDAHO MONTANA HAVE

MORE CLOSELY WITH UPPER M IS S IS S IP P I VALLEY

THAN WITH P A C IF IC SOUTHWEST BOUNDARY
LOCATION OF RESERVE C IT Y THEREIN

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OF B IS T R IC T OF F IR S T IMPORTANffE

SECONDARY

COFFMAN DOBSON AND CO BANKERS
126AM JAN 3RD

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NIGHT L E T T E R

Form 2289 B

TH E WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY
IN C O R P O R A T E D

CABLE SERVICE T O ALL T H E WORLD

25,000 O F F IC E S IN A M ERICA

JChis Company T R A N S M I T S and D E L I V E R S messages only on conditions limiting- Its liability, which have been assented to by the sender o f the following: N ig h t L e t t e r .
Errors can be guarded against only by repeatiu;r a message back to the sending station for comparison, and the Company w ill not hold itself liable for errors or delays in
transmission or delivery of I jn r c p e a t e d N ig h t L e tte r s , sent at reduced rates, beyond a sum equal to the amount paid for transm ission; nor in any case beyond the sum o f
F i f t y D o lla r s , at which, unless otherwise stated below, this message has been valued by the sender thereof, nor in any case where the claim Is not presented in w riting within
sixty days after the message is tiled with the Companv for transmission.
This is an D N R E P E A T E D N I G H T L E T T E l i , and is delivered by request o f the sender, under the conditions named above.

B E L V i D E R E B R O O K S , GENERAL MANAGER

T H E O . N . V A IL , P R E S I D E N T

3 9 NL

1669

4 EXTRA

EVERETT WASH OAN 5 1914
1914

RESERVE BANK ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE

6

AM 5

32

WASHN DC
THE IN D U S TR IA L COMMERCIAL AND F IN A N C IA L

INTERESTS OF OUR C IT Y SINCERELY

URGE A PACIFIC'NORTHW EST RESKRVE D IS T R IC T
WEST BUSINESS AND IN D U S TR IA L AFFAIRS

SP EC IAL CONDITIONS OF NORTH

ALASKAN AND ORIENTAL TRADE AND

UNDOUBTED FUTURE GROWTH WARRANTS IT
EVERETT COMMERCIAL CLUB
W W BLAIN SECY
S13AM




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G r a n d v i e w , W a s h in g t o n
E. O . K E C K , PRESIDENT

GEO. M. C H A S E , VlCE-PRES.

A . W . H A W N , CASHIER

Jan. 2, 1913.

To the Honorable
Federal Bank Organization Committee,
Washington, D. C.
Gentlemen:W believe that it ie of vital importance that a
e
Federal Reserve District be created, embracing the states of
Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington and the Territory of
Alaska.
W do not believe that other Pacific Coast states
e
should be included in this district, as the small state banks
could not enter the system with profit if the Pegional Bank
is to distant.
W believe that owing to the identity of interests
e
of these four states and Alaska, their industrial developement
will be best served by the creation of a Regional Reserve Bank
in the State of Washington.




classified Holdings of the National Archives
W . J . S h in n , p r e s i d e n t
j . L . m ? k e n z ie , v i c e -p r e s .
M. R . Ha r d y , T r e a s u r e r
B . A . B o w en , S e c r e t a r y

nmntmtal m\h Mortal (EUtlr
.1914

Reserve Bank Organization Committee
A COMMUNITY OF
THREE THOUSAND
PEOPLE.

G/o Secretary of the Treasury W. G. M Ad
e
Washington, D. C.

IN THE WHITE
RIVER VALLEY

Gentleicen;SOIL UNSURPASSD

CLIMATE DEUGHTFUL

##
SCENERY UNEXCELLED

m

At a meeting of this Club Jany, 13th, 1914 i t was
unanimously voted that this Club go on record as favoring the
establishing a Northwestern federal reserve d istrict embracing
the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho aiid Western Montana.

TRANSPORTATION
FACILITIES—
FIVE LINES OF
RAILWAYS
THIRTY MINUTE
SERVICE TO EITHER
SEATTLE OR TACOMA

W therefore urge the need of the establishment of the dis­
e
tr ic t as above outlined to accommodate our community and the
D istrict as a whole.

MOUNTAIN SPRING
WATER

99
PAVED STREETS

w#
SEWER SYSTEM

EXCELLENT SCHOOLS

SPLENDID CHURCHES

IDEAL BERRY SOIL
AND THE HOME OF
ALL SMALL FRUITS

FINEST DAIRY VALLEY
IN WASHINGTON

EXCELLENT FACILITIES
FOR MANUFACTURING

.

. FURTHER INFORM­
ATION, WRITE TO
SECRETARY OF
THE CLUB.




. A J U Z .

Reproduced from the Unclassified / Declassified Holdings of the National Archives
N °2948

HDH P IN ,
. , OK S
JA . G 9 U D .
S .MC R Y

C a s h ie r .

F E -J B IL IY
RD . A E ,

V ice P r e s i d e n t .

CAPITAL

$50,000

SURPLUS

A sst. C ash ier.

$30,000

P o r t T o w n s e n d ,W a s h .

January 2,1914

The ReserTe Bank Organisation Committee,
Washingt <n, 2»G«
Gentlemen:
In Tiew of the fact that you are soon to determine the
location of Federal Beaerre District a, I desire to c& l your attention
to the necessity of establishing a Reserre District embraaing the
States of the Pacific Horthwest.

During the past ten years the

commerce of this section has shown a greater growth than in any other
portion of the United States and owing to its geographical location,
with Alaska contiguous,to require the hanks of the pacific Northwest
States to beeome neuters of a regional bank located in a remote
d istrict,fo r instance,California,would be working a hardship and
great inconrenience upon them and in a great measure would destroy
the purpose for which the Federal Reserve B ill was designed*
I

beg to assure you that in writing this le tte r ,I am

actuated purely from patriotic, rather than from any selfish m tire.
o




Jffirat H of W H
ank
rit? ltrifa
Uaahtngton

Dear Sirs:
We wishto ask the special consideration of your
Honorable Body towards the formation of the Pacific Northwest
states into a Reserve District rather than to form the Pacific
States into one, as we believe is being urged.
The Northwestern states are in the identity of their
products, methods of marketing and commercially hound to­
gether and definitely separated in a 31 these ways from the
southern portion of the Pacific states.
Oregon, Washington,

Nothing grown in

Idaho or Montana is marketed through

southern states and no city in the Pacific states could
be found for the establishing of a Reserve Bank which would
in any sense be a commercial center for the entire district
and none could be found that could give the service to the
entire district that can be found if the Northwest if these
states be f o m e d
'

into a district.

We specially urge that before this matter be definitely
settled that yo ir

committee investigate these conditions

personally while on your tour.




Respectfully yours,