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3' BUCKINGHAM GATE,

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1111i

'0i,

lig 4100 !:ontview Boulevard.
1:enver, Colorado,

October .3rd, 1916.

dear Lord Bryce:

Our conversation of last -arch wh

I enjoyed your hos-

pitality in London, has so frequently been i
tnat

J.

y mind since then

cannot retrain from telling you- wh

rsat pleasure I

had in reading your recent admonition to your c
you reiterated in public the vi
pressed

Amid all t

me.

c

in this country thai

s

rtening and depressing
for hopefulness does appear.
d's best traditions, is a

Your speech, which I

welcome recall to

you had privately ex-

it is di

.curing this war, an occasional q

n rymen, when

on sense

The growth of the conviction

e must a o me our share of the reolonsibilN,_

ity for the,ffki kenancis-Vfpoace, once it is established, is
//

another o u e for re o cing.
csibly y
Diplomacy

have seen Professor :Aowell's book, "'he

woof 1914", in which his uaialysis of the grit-

ish ',:hite Papers leads him to use the expression that Sir Edward

Grey's diplomacy will stand forth "as one of England's glories
and as a pattern for generatione to co:_e."

What a calamity if

by the pressure of public opinion this record snould be marred
by peace arrangements in which was consciously planted the berm
of later strife and how can neutral support be accorded to a peace
in which one half of the belligerents are left shackled in a

mercial


dungeon!

CGUI...

NI -

ob.

-0

Get. 23, 1916.

The Right Honorable Lord Bryce.

A policy of commercial and financial "Coventry", such
as now seems to appeal to a part of the press of ,i1gland and

Trance, surely means abandoning hope for reduced naval and military establishments - it surely means pt,,rpetuating the animosi-

zed this war frrm

ties, never more bitter, which have characte

the start

it will surely force Germany to a more intense na-

tionalism than ever - it will bo a peace of

o m and not of sub-

stance.

Many of our leading
including Mr. Vilaon,

H

have expressed viev:s more or

1 =tters and in public life,

t and Mr. Roosevelt,

ongly thai deace must be
which the employment of

insured hereaften by
//a

economic and milita

force wi

justified, and that this

country should emer

from its

elation to the extent that it

be>tati-ta_atd obligations of such an arrange-

will share in
ment.

it makes

C

uch obligation be undertaken by neutral nations if
em the ja 1 ra of outlawed nations!
r ea

already noticeable here in the activity

of the protective tariff advocated, many proposals for ex- ort

trade combinations and other nimilar projects, all possibly
proper enough as weapons of defence, but which will, i hope, not
be required in order to face a world w:iicn has armed itself with
every political contrivance for
to the point of extermination.




commercial strife to be carried

-3..

To

Right honorable Lord Bryce.

Oct. 23, 1916.

I hope that brighter days are coming and that you
may retain your ;ood health ano Vigor to enjoy the

to the

uttermost.
gill you present my compliments and warm, regard:; to

l'ady 4ryce, and with every good wish, I am,
Sincerely yours,

The Right honorable Lord Bryce,
London, inglard.

Rs/vc,.




44,

(

!"

4

k
JAN 1

3,

BUCKINGHAM GATE,

i

SW

iI Yc- I

th December, 1917.
1911

Thank you for your very interesting letter of.

October 23rd, which I ought to have

answered sooner and

would have answered but for constand pressure of urgent
work.

I want to say to you ho:: entirely I agrre with what

you say about the folly of a policy of commercial and
financial

Coventry.

It would not only destroy the prospect

of a renewal of t2lcrable relations between the belligerents
and so increase the danger of a future war, but it would

reduce the chance that the Germ-n people may revolt against
the dEtestable system from which they suffer and it would be
an injury in the long run to England herself.

This policy

is largely the fruit of momentary passion and we hope that
its weakness will be seen when passion abates and when the

difficulties inherent to the plan will have been more closely
examined.

In any case there is really no danger that we or

France :,culd enter on any policy prejudicial to trade between
ourselves

and the U.S.

We Liberals would of course -ive

resist-nee to any such proposal and I do not
the strongest

believe it v.ould succeed.
I knov. Professor Stowetes book and think it one of

the very best that the war has brought forth.

It is cer-

tainly the best vindication of our diplomacy.

zany of us







here deeply regret that a sudd,I. upturn in politics has

caused the retirement of Lord Grey fro

the Foreign Office.

Although Germany has come forward with the desire
of peace upon her lips, we do not believe that she is in the

least prepared to abandon her ill-gotten gains or to make
the reparation which we deem necessary and there seems very
li tle chance that any peace negotiations entered on now
would have a useful result.
is quite against them.

The feeling in this country

V;e have had too much experience of

Germany to trust her good faith.

The national sentiment

is as much resolved as ever to prosecute the war to a
successful issue.

46.

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Denver, Colorado,
January 12, 1917.

Dear Lord Bryce:
It was a great pleasure to receive your kind letter. of December
20th, 7)articularly as I had hoped that my

not be understood to impose upon you an
My enforced absence in the 'Ast o

r o

ber 23d would

bligation to r
account of illness,

has kept me away from Now York and close touch with affa
May, makes it difficultfactory reply to
send
for n

elieve that it is the

think, nor do

, I do

o and in other .Ostern

he MIMI vote in Co

a election; on the contrary,

ntri

reased
H

nd

14-

'

outs!)

Pre

ar vote.

This was no doubt due on

.n pledge of his believe in :rational

nt's reiteration of his conviction that

e for the states to decide and ncbt for the

FVF77; that the eight hour legislation contributed

,000 votes to the :resident's campaign, only partly

those Who were eliminated from Democratic ranks by

as class legislation.

My personal opinion is that the

tion resulted from two main causes, - one being the

ference of the great mass of popUltation in the central

of the war, the agricultural and laboring classes of

ling strongly the arguments of prosperity growing out

The other active influence



and one which 1 thin. has

..'hick

s since last

S
2.

Ali

To - Lord Bryce.

Janudry 12, 1917.

.40P,

not men appraised at its full value was the mistaken theory upon which
the Republican campaign was conducted.

it was not construct

almost entirely confined to violent and even bitter attacks upon the

administration at a time whpn the country needed a leader to point out a
course for the future whi

would be ante

who are too remote from the At

ble to

ard, or too d

their on affairs, to do their own thi

many of t

lions of voters

ly engrossed in
pressin_ issues

of the day.

Since writing you the
?resident's conviction tha
international arrangements
this country's unimpair

OS

enduring pe

a character th

this will require pa
I have

in his opinion will require

will throw the weight of

, great p oulation and productive capacity

J..: the scales as a facto

course purely speculativ

emphasis to the

,Able form this can tat :e is of

upnnot believe that it is in his mind that

nation>

this country in peace parlies, although

o knowledge on the subject and am expressing my personal views

only.

would imply mediation at a time when the attitude of neither

group of bel
other band,

s would justify intrusion of that character.
i

to be gained b
prior to the c

)n the

gradually coming to the view that there are many advantages
11 belligerents through the arrangement of terms of neace
plete exhaustion and, if you please, subjection of the

central powers, nrovided always that the continuance of such L. peace is

insured so far as human arrangements can be made effective by the assumption
of obligations b

this country, as well as the other neutral nations.

i

have been greatly shocked in reading an account sent me by a personal friend



3.

AIL

To - Lord Bryce.

January 12, 1917.

in Loddon, which was furnished him by one of his friends in Belgium of
the details or tho procedure being followed by the military government
in Belgium in expatriating Belgian labor.
I cannot conclude this letter without
wish that happier times are in prospect

etriken Eu

larly for you and your fellow ccuntrym
If my present plans are carried out,
of seeing you in London Barnett

With warmest regards

V

Rt. Hon.
Lord Bryce,
3 Buckingham date
London, laigl

BS/CC




1

ng my hope and

who are making
1 hope to hair

a

zaer.

bee to rema
sincerely your

and particuu h sacrifice.

he ploasure

116

a

3,

BUCKINGHAM GATE,

SW
8th February, 1917.

I am very glad to hear from you again and shall be
happy to see your friend, Mr. Johnson, when he comes.

He has,

however, not yet apprised me of his arrival in London;

possibly

the disturbance of ocean sailings may have prevented it.
I feel some doubt when this will reach you but will take my chance

The whole situation has been of course greatly ch'nged by the
action most properly taken by the President with regard to the
threats made by Germany.

My own belief is that should war come

between Germany and the U.S., it would have a most important
effect in shortening the present struggle in Europe, for the
Germans would feel that they could not possibly succeed and
nothing is more dispiriting to a nation than to have to go on
fighting where no victory is imaginable.

We in England have

been much surprised that over the West generally and especially
in the Mississippi Valley there has been comparatively little
horror excited by the atrocious series of crimes which the
German Government has committed.

This would not surprise one

so much in other nations but your people are so exceptionally

humane and kind-hearted that I can only attribute it to the fact




Vi
9-

400

that the conduct of the Germans has not been realised in its
In the Eastern States where it is realised,

naked horror.

nothing of course could be stronger than the indignation that
has been shown.

I should like to know whether you think that the
woman suffrage in States like Colorado and Idaho made any
difference in the Presidential election, especially in the way
of inclining women to support Mr. Wilson because they thought
he had kept them out of war.

A.,

44c

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Though some persons doubt whether the entry of America
into the war will make any great practical difference, it seems
to me clear that it must materially abridge the war, not only by
adding financial strength to the Allies, but also by the conviction that it will inspire in Germany that success is for them
impossible.

41-1I-e

1j/ ,e

Liles`',

14-6-14.

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LYdial
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Denver, Colorado,
March 8, 1917.

My dear Lord Bryce:

Your interesting letter of February 8th has reached me safely
and with unusual dispatch, as much of my

ss the water has

been takinc, well in the neighborhood of o.ur weeks.

Mr. Johnson has advised me of the nece,

e same mail

y of his leavi London almost

immediately after his arrival in order to take up his
it may be that he has found i
duction.

By

in _'aria and

letter of intro-

In any event, I

you for your hospitable

intentions.

I wish it we
convincing on the vari
ficult to generalize as
people, of every race,

such a vast territory

mething conclusive and
in your letter.

It is dif-

elings and motives of a hundred million
s of intelligence, scattered over

I think it is misleading to endeavor

to sump dome one formula to explain such a complicated and involved
matter as pu

n the United States i

these difficult times.

iring you, however, let me send you some personal reflec-

At the risk o
tions, Which

almost grown into convictions after nearly a year's

inactivity d

my convalescence, with much time spent in thinking about

these matters.

As to sentiment in regard to the war, you are entirely right in
your estimate of the feelings which have been inspired in the eastern
states.

72'r,




sense of horror and resentment is strong enough to outweigh

To - Lord Bryce.

ilarc'i 8, 1917.

personal and selfish considerations, and I think you must understand the
reason for this.

But in the middle west; that is 1,
the Idississippi Valley

and in this section where I have spent the last seven months, it is undoubted2:7 true that considerable indifference has existed, at least until

It can be explained in various

recently.

of war.

?irst, lonz2: distance from the s

It is

robably fair to

say that the indifference displayed in

ac of the war
land at the ou

les of water
was largely due to twenty or thirt whi

separated and prod miles of water and

tooted England from military
one thousand milres, or mo

an indifference in this

region, only much magnifi

erienced when the war first

started.
co.
The second oxplana

People of the middle west

have little direct cont everythin; filters through Thew York
as an intermediate Cl to sneak, where the current of direct

' is broken.

Th

=

s that political, social and economic

e a mystery to the middle west, and European affairs are reby the

think it

ticular

zen here as of no particular consequence to him.
a even more true to say that he regards this country as of

rtance to Europe in this awful strugle.

e have had no

cal relat one with Europe of consequence, we have never loaned money

ope and our sense of detachment has led leople out here to believe

n European affairs we do not count.

The war suddenly imposes upon

h political and financial responsibilities of supreme importance to

ves and to Europe; in fact, one might almost say of deciding importance,

e middle west has not yet fully waked up to it.




3.

JILTo - Lord Bryce.

Larch 8, 1917.

The third reason for the indifference is undoubtedly the fact that
the farmers of the great valley between the Alleghenies and the Rockies,

where we produce grain and cattle in such abundance, have seen the value of
their products about doubled by reason of the war and unprecedented prosperity has resulted in a feeling of satis
on v
.e status quo,

ot

to see distur

renc

I believe, has

n the compare-

ecently) to war news

many newspapers
it was six months or

character of our popula-

very considerably German and
ies.

y be said, is the reluctance of many

disapprove of the military spirit of
see it introduced here.

ot be minimized, is undoubtedly a

ur people have been injured and abused

ions and t:-Ie lawless propaganda in

or complaint against Great Britain also

n other words, there is so-e feeling

as boon shown by both sides.

lead me to believe that probably more

mpathetic with the cause of the allies,

gence and particularly ladies believe

at we should keep out of it.




4.

To - Lord Bryce.

March 8, 1917.

There is no doubt that the developments of the last few weeks,

particularly the astounding disclosures of attempted conspiracies in
Mexico, have awakened western neople to a better appreciation of the real
seriousness of our nos it ion.

I believe I can detect, both in the
of individuals, the growth of a deeper
of the war and of its consequences,
public opinion is confused and is I

1
'

n the expressions

z

.reciation of

as is

true significance

sioill)

111e to remain conf

case with us,

until directed

by strong leadership.
Your question as to

suffrage vote on the out-

come of the Presidential

ossible to answer conclu-

sively, because of t

es in so many of the states.

You may have gathered
rooted against President
conclusion according t
Where suffrage has not
made

the caumei

Hughes gave
sponded that

the decision
the suffrage

lson.

he suffrage movement was die reelection, Which would not be an accurate
n those states, particularly in the east,

d by the women, a determined effort was
et suffrage pledges from the candidates.
approval of"votes for women".

Mr.

Mr. Wilson re-

was a state question and, while he was not opposed to it,
rest with the voters of the different states.

At once

era in sections whore they had no vote organized to onnose

Inquiry in Colorado, however, which is the first suffrage state,

and Which gave Wilson 60,000 majority, leads me to believe that the women
quite generally voted for .ilson, because they felt he had kept the country
out of war and would continue to do so.




same Jas undoubtedly true in

6.

To - Lord 3ryce.

March 8, 1917.

Kansas and probably so in Wyoming and Idaho.

I have hoard of cases in

California where the men of a family voted for Hughes and the women for
nelson on this very proposition.
vote

It is probably fair to say that the woman

suffrage states ran lroportionately ahead of the men's votes for

Wilson, to some extent and possibly to a
On the other hand, the influence of the

this very ,;round.

was directed

frag^e propo

=

again:A Wilson in those sections Where

e women had no

The complication that I refer to had principally
bition.

The women have line

and there is no doubt that

paign has confused the iss

some sections

hand, the administrati

So far
tion can be f.

the past four y

it difficult to determine
Wilson's supposed inter-

/hich gained him man;,: votes.

s aetiv

On the other

in opposition to so-called Anti-Japanese

states, cost the ?resident a good many

e would otherwise have had.

that the we

e active prohibition cam-

ew years ago midoubtedly gave him

s

standing with the labor e

votes

_=

somelhat and
Here in Col.

ference in behalf of the

legisla ion in the Paz

ohibition movement,

solidi

just how the woman v

do with prohi-

I am inclined to think, however,

ole was a vote for peace.

the ?regressive vote is concerned, what better explanathan the legislative record of the Democratic party of
?

This administration has nraoubtedly produced a great

mass of legislation which the country has accented as being "advanced", or
"progressive" LI character, as being anticapitalistic and antimenopolistic
and designed for the better security and Prosnerity of the laboring classes.
The Federal Reserve Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Clayton Act, The



6.

To - Lord Bryce.

;.larch 8, 1917.

Federal Farm Loan Act, the Seamans Act and others loss well known, and
finally, on the eve of the election, the _damson Light -hour Law.

These

legislative accomplishments enabled the President, and I thin,: with con-

siderable justice, to make a very strong appeal to the Progressive vote,

and I imagine that he more than divided th

. Hughes in tho

partition that resulted from the abando

Progressive

party by its chief leaders.
After groat patience, our country finally must

a decision

hardly second in importance
The decision

Fort Sumter.

wards crystal

a few Somag7S5 have blo
posure of Germany's dupl
ornment, is going a lo

alt

leadership is directed to.

public

division of pulf.iic

11t

for the relief of

much of t

that, I fear an unfortunate
esentment that

e

s pro

--combined wiAlothe ex-

all of theit- representations to our gov-

solidifying

Aix

opinion.

of our ?resident I have little patience,

all respects h s polio; has not been the one that I could like

to have se

are with the
:ace during a

ane on your side is better acquainted than you
ficultias which the President of the United States must
od such as we have passed through.

Until recently the

President would
ve faced a seriousl-,- divided country, had he exercised

hority which he undoubtedly possesses to pursue a more aggressive

than he has heretofore adopted.

You will, I hope, pardon this ion_ letter from a friend whose only




7.

- Lord Bryce.

Larch 8, 1917.

wish is that his country be not misunderstood, particularly
by you and
others who I know have a deep affection for the United
States.
With kindest regards, believe me,
Sincerely yo

Rt. Hon.
Lord Bryce,
3, Buckinzham Gate, S.
London, Lhg.

BS/CC




4.,

Lord Bryce's letter of Lich. 8th.

April 4, 1917.

P. S.
I have been holdin; the above letter since
it was dictated on
March 8th, expecting that developments
were pending which would mako all
speculation as to this country's position quite
unnecessary. 13xactly
that has transpired. The President has determined
upon a course which
makes him truly the leader of public opinion and
the country's enthusiasm
has been awakened most unmistakably.

There aro millions of Americans who feel the
same va,iafidction and
elation that I do in having our country
finally lined up alongside of the
allies and pledged to contribute its wealth and
energy to bring the war
to a successful conclusion.




May 21, 1918.

Dear Lord Bryce:
sc2(

Your ntte of April 24th reaches me just as we are responding in this country to the call of the fled Cross for a minimum of

$100,000,000, and were it not for that it would give me great pleasure
to send you a larger check than the enclosed for the work of the
British and Foreign Sailors' Soviet :..

2f course, you are aware of

the many demands made upon all of us for contributions of this kind
bzt I do not want to plead that as an excuse for making no contribu-

tion at all so I am sending you a check for;25.

Very often I recall our discussions of where the United
States stood in the war.

None of your friends on this side feel

any greater satisfaction that I do in witnessing the magnificent development of feeling which has taken plane over here.

?his country

is in the war to stay; to finish it; to beat 'ermany and to help with
you and France in later years in constructing the basis for permanent
neace.

You really cannot understand how strongly the American people

Bow feel without being over here.

The only complaint now heard on this side Ls when some evidence of failure, delay or inefficiency in getting ouf war machines
started becomes apparent.
There is just a possibility.- that I will be in London this

summer and if so,

I hope to have the pleasure of seeing you and Lady

Bryce in rejoycing, as I know you do, in our partnershir to rid the
workd of the German menace.



2.

Lord Bryce.

5/21/18.

With kind regards to Lady Bryce and to yourself, I beg
to remain,

Very sincerely yours,

The Right Hon. Viscount Bryce, 0. M.,
British & ForeIry Sailors' Society,
'akefield House, Cheapside,
London. F . C. 2.

BS PEG







/67/7

/

1:(

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1.14

June 19, 1919.

Dear Sir:

This letter, together with my passport and his own,
will be presented to you by ly secretary, Mr. Vaughan.

I ex-

pect to visit Great Britain on official business of the Federal Reserve Bank at an early date, sailing from New York on or
about the 1st of July, and shall appreciate it very much if you
can accanplish the formalities of visaing these passports without requiring my personal presence, as the present pre3sure of
business would make it very inconvenient for me to attend.
Very truly yours,

Governor.

Consul Generll of Great Britain,
44 Whitehall street, New York.







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:1..tz Hotel, London,

l919.

September

:':77 dear nalor Oratford-Stuart :

Your note and card have just -reached me as I a

leav-

ing the hotel fora week-end in the country, and I am Indeed
greatly disappointed that the arrangement for accomrlodations on
the "nauretanis

could not be oarriei out.

I shall certainly adopt your suggestion and file an
airlioation for anything which hap,)els to he given UD just as

soon as 1 Fet back nonday morning.
Unfortunately, my engagements next week, partic.darly
if I m-Ist leave bye the "Baltic", seem to make it hopeless for me
to e7:flect to have the pleasure of lunching with you, much as I

should like to do so.
In any event, we shall have, I hope, malty meetings in
iashington and Hew York aft' r arrival, and in the meantime man;T

thanks for your assistance

in to

matter of the reservation.
incerely yours,

17ajor G. .I. Crauford-Stuart,

_onm 7G,
2orei7n office,
:.cndon.

B3/2r

CLARENCE H. MACKAY, PHESICEtcr

TELEGRAM

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26 2EX RELAY V I A GX

WASHN DC

29

)13

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK

GOV STRONG,

15 NASSAU ST
NYC

YOU WOULD GIVE ME PLEASURE

SHOULD BE VERY GLAD IF

OF YOUR COMPANY AT LUNCHEON

NEWYORK YACHT CLUB WEDNESDAY DEC

THIRTY FIRST ONE OVCOCK
GREY,

OF FALLODON

Form 16

Misc. 34

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
OF'NEW YORK

Sent by

COPY OF TELEGRAM

Lritieh AiiiLtxesli.dor

1306 Gennectiout

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indeed to t.i.ke luncheon iit,"
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NEWCOMB CARLTON, PRESIDENT

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GEORGE W. E. ATKINS. FIRST VICEPRESIDENT

symbol appearing after the cheek

RECEIVED AT

48NY A TA

13

2EX
NE 'NYrIRK

RN

'GOVERNOR

STRONG

HA PRO R

VERY MANY

JAN 6 19 20

"""

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FE DE RAL RESERVE PANK

THANKS KIND GIFT

MY BE

SYMBOI

Telegram

GO PARK AVE NE AINORK

WISHES FOR NEW

YEAR

G RE Y

OF FALL 0 DON

1105A

Fallodon, a 11
Embleton,
Alnwick,
Northumberland.

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which is the best I am able to do ae yet, I 'ooh; to rwiLLn

Sincerely ycJr::,

The RiEht Honorable Lord Grey,
Fallodon,
Embleton, Alnwick,
Northumberland, Inglaud.

April 14, 1917.

LEMORANDUM OF CONVERSATION aITH
SIR HARDLIAN LEVER
OF THE BRITISH TREAbURY.

The Bank of England, acting as fiscal agent for the Treasury,

has taken entire charge of the

flotation of the various issues, with

the exception of the preparation of the i_rospectus.

The National Committee

of AdvertiStg took charge of the publicity campaign but the Bank of Eng-

land designated all the offices

and agents through which subscriptions

could be received and generally became responsible for the success of the
issue.

It was necessary, esp

at the last issue, for the Bank of

England to take outside quarters and organize a special staff.

The short-time Treasury bills were only converted in mart into
new bonds.

Various accommodations were made to the joint stoc)r. banks to

enable them to make their payments without dislocating funds, and the payments were made in a number of instalments lasting over a period of 2 1/2
months.

About 380,000,000. a month has been received of late from the
local savings societies of which there are about 20,000 organized throughout the Kingdom headed by the important business and laboring men in each
community.

These societies have placed a one pound obligation in non-

negotiable form with wage earners maturing in five years, eelling it to
them for
4%.

shillings 6 pence, whioh is a discount of a little more than

These have been -xtreaely popular and bring in a steady stream of

money as many of the wage earners are making excellent incomes just now.

Neither the loans nor the sale of these one pound certificates have resulted
in causing substantial withdrawals from the regular savings banks.
The gilt edged securities have gradta.11y declined about 1% in

4111

yield, but this has been grad-al rather than sudden.
Sir Hardman Lever then spoke of the taxation, mentioning the

munitions establishment tax under which establishments wore permitted to
retain the average earnings of two years prior to the war ill's 20, with
an additional allowance for increased output.

All above these amounts

were taken by the Government.

The income tax has been increased to 25c:

and the surtax as high as 501.

These figures will not be increased.

He

said that Lloyd Geor_:e always planned in making a tax to have what he
called a "buck" in it;

that is, to leave an incentive for a man to exer-

cise his initiative and energy to iroduce better results.
It was understood that Sir Hardman Lever would cable over for a
complete sot of all the printed matter and data regarding the placing of

loans and the organization and working of the war savings societies.

OFFICE OF THE BRITISH TREASURY REPRESEATAT10-14.

TELEPHONE HANOVER 5180

HIGH COMMISSIONER

t..214)

THE EARL OF READING, G. C. B.

WALL STREET,

NEW YORK CITY.

''''''''''111.-TJZN'T.C'0-141;-119111'10.N"E-R FOR FINANCE

SIR S. HARDMAN LEVER. K. C. B.
FINANCIAL SECRETARY TO THE TREASURY
tAnflinAMINIIIIIIMARMAINARS1110001..."

9 June 1919

Benjamin otrong, Eso.,
The Federal reserve Bank,
120 .roadway, New York City.

Ly dear Strong,

I have your letter of the

4h

and would

be ver:- pleased to do anything possible to make your

trip on the other side more comfortable.

I am writing

by this mail to 6ir John iradbury, asking that all
facilities be extended to you on your arrival in
Liverpool, or whatever port you definitely decide to
sail to.

.hen you reach London he will no doubt be

able to further assist you.

Please let me know when you aeciae on
your boat so that I may send a cable.
Yours sincerely,

June 7,

1919:1138 A"
UN 1 8 1919

Sir Hardman Lever,
Care Llessrs. J. 2. Lorcan and Company,
238 all Street, New York City.

BRN
FEDERAL RE,SFPVE

My dear Sir Hardman:
It now lcioks as though I will sail for Europe the

latter part of this month and I shall doubtless spend about
a month in London.

ill it be possible to have some arrangements made
for facilitating my trip by cutting the official red tape
on the other side?

I would not sugc:est this except from

consideration of health, and I will greatly appreciate any
countesy which can be arranged in connection with my trip.
Sincerely yours,

Treasury Auilding, Washington

Juno 11, 1919.

Sir S. Hardman Lover,
Oars Messrs. J. .2. Morgan :Ad Company,
23 Wall Street, New Yor-e: OitY.

My dear Lsvnr:

You are most kind to taro a personal interest in
tho comfort of rw trip.
I have ongagod tyaoe for the Baltic', sailing July

lst, and have every oxpeotation of sailing on that date.

With Idndest personal regards, believe no
Sincerely ;yours,

1_00-16
19-\

30%.-

ZDVik

Jlnkl 30, 191').

:y dear Lever:
:P.efereli.g to my letter to ;,,on of Ituu 11th, d2ted
t e
of the Baltic rhich rnx post-oned or eo-:citnes.: of
troubles at Liverpool 17:3,-, no
I:cell definitely set for the 12th of

July, on which date I eroect to len7e for England.

With kindest personA regards, believe me,
Sincerely 7ourn,

it S. Hnrdmn Lever,
c/o -essrs. J. P. Morgan & Compa ny,
23 all street, 'Ter York.

V

4

S

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November 1L, 1914.

Sir George Paish
Hotel Shoreham
Washington,

D. C.

In case, as I understand, you are in New York next week, I trust

you will Li e us the pleasure of opportunity to see you and possibly reserve
time for luncheon before you return to Washington.
Benj. Strong, Jr.

HOPE COTTAGE,

2, MATFQRD TERRACE,
sEXETER.

MARI 5 Str-/?
fri-pg-rvo,
177

7/7

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4/1-r-c,"

74 71
A-g2/X-e.A/4

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It was learned today that the bankers in New York who drafted the

report of conferences with Sir George Paish and Basil P. Blackett, Esq.,

had asked Mr. iavison, of J. P. Morgan L;; Company, and I.!r. Bro.n, one of

the membele of

London.

the Committee, to continue the discussion of the report in

1.1r. Brom is now in London, and Lr. Davison is saLling on the

";idriatic" on 'aednesday, on which ste=amer Sir George Paish and Er. Blackett

are returning home.

Ritz Hotel,
Piccadilly,
TELL

C ADDRESS

London, W.

RITZOTY-LONDON

March 22nd, 1916.
11y dear Sir George:

If the address which you made
yesterday before the Royal Statistical
Society has been printed, I would very
much appreciate indeed having a few
copies to t. ::e home with me.

I am counting upon giving myself
the pleasure of a call at your office
some day this week, or early next week.
It was a great pleasare to see
you at the dinner the other night.
With kindest regards, believe me,
Very truly yours,

TELEGRAMS:
STATIST, CENT. LON DON.

Zhe

TELEPHONE 1.M

el TV

itt#11rit,

S259.

51, CANNON STREET, LONDON,E.C.
EDITOR'S OFFICE.

Farah 23, 1916.

by dear Strong:

I shall be very glad to see you at any time you can call
a*4 I hope you will give me the pleasure of your company at

luncheon, or if more convenient to you at dinner.

Could we not

meet on Monday at 1.15 at the Reform club for luncheon, or
Tuesday evenin,

for dinner at the Reform at 7.30?

My papar on "war Finance" is to be printed in the "Statist"
this week and I shall be very pleased to send you some copies.
With high regards

Benj. strong, Fsq.
Pitz Hotel.

-^1111111.410-

W -"w0141/11gisz Colorado,
March 15, 1917.

y dear Sir George:

It was most kind of you to write me for I

ow how very busy you

and others who are devoting themselves to various

r activities must be

and how difficult it is to find Lime f

rrespondence.

Events over here are developing with astonishi .idity and it
oen

looks as advisors,whatever may ha v:
and his thou,;h, this coun
MTd,

frankly, for many

;

our neutrality

forced upon us.

With kindest

3S/CC

If war comes with Germany,
owing that it is

fled and more than

xeter. Lo

comes as a relief to have the
med.

we will have the sat

Sir Geo e PAIghs.
Hope Cot
e
2, Matfo

p

patience of t
have no choice as.president
to its

errace,

justi-

jr

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/ktif4t/

Ld(

32 CURZON STREET, MAY

a,/?

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Denver, Colorado,
January 2, 1::17.

My dear Lord Reading:
the

The onclosed copy of a note jlaie

liberty of handing t,) my friend Mr. C
itself.

Mr. Johnson is one of the l

es A. Johnson

=

rig citizens of

and I think you may be interested in having a littlejvc
him, in case you are able.

Loins

ver
with

""11101

of a liberty

Realizing that it

oduction to

wit:1 a vol.:: busy olan to g

u that Mr. Johnson

friend, I -grite th

to accord him an

will fully undorstnnd
interview.

ry 000d wish for the New

With warmest
Year,

beg to remain
Faithfully yours,

Rt. Honorable
Royal Law Cour
London, Englan

BSAX

rd Reading,
Strand,

Denver, Colorado,
April 19, 1917.

My dear Lord flooding:

It seems a long time since we were discussing the arrangement
of a loan in the United States 4hich at that time appeared to be a difficult,
if not impossible, task.
feeling;

Since the::

have watched the development of

this country with the conviction for many xnonihs past that the

time would come When the people Of the United States would insist upon an
active participation in the war.

That time has now arrived and with it

1 am glad to say comes an enthusiasm and determination to place the resources of this country behind the cause of the allies, without stint.

Unfortunately, my health will not permit my doing much more than
to a: silt in some small way

various financial arrangements.

son, however, has been mustered into the Federal army, he

My oldest

is now on active

duty, guarding interned German sailors, and 1 have no doubt, as he has
had over a year's military training, that he will be among the first to
go abroad wit'''. an.,; expeditionary force that is sent.

I cannot refrain fro:. sending you these few lines of felicitation

and to express my confidence that the moral and material influence of this
country as one of your allies will bring the war to a decisive and successful
conclusion before 7ery long.

I am happy in realizing not only t'-o pledge of success Which we are
now about, to extend to you, but further than that the assurance of a closer

sympathy and kinship between your country and ours when the war is over.

2.
To - Rt. Hon. Lord Reading.

April 19, 1917.

With warmest regards, believe me,
Sincerely yours,

at. Hon. Lord Reading,
Royal Law Courts, Strand,
London, England.

BS /CC

ROYAL. COURTS OF JUSTICE,

LONDON, W.C.

May 25th, 1917.
Ly dear Ir. Strong,

I thank you warmly for your letter and for the thought
that prompted you to write it.

The entry of the United

States of America into the war serves to increase the esteem
and friendship already existing between so many Americans
and Englishmen, including you and me.

Times have indeed changed since the Autumn of 1915, but
even the world-momentous entry of the American people into
the titanic struggle between progress and reaction has not
dimmed my recollection of the services you and others rendered
to the Allied cause when I visited .New York at the head of
the Anglo-irench Lission.

I have never wavered in the

conviction I then formed that America was heartily in
sympathy with our cause, as was made evident by the desire
for the success of the L,ission.

Thoughts of this visit bring

back very vivid recollections of the late

.

Joseph Choate

and of the splendid assistance he then gave us.

I have never

spoken with greater conviction and sincerity than when from
the -beneh in the presence of all the Judges and Law Officers

and many of the bar 1 had the
opportunity of testifying

to

ROYAL COURTS OF JUSTICE,

LONDON, W.C.

the admiration and affection felt by the lawyers of England
for this very distinguished American gentleman.
Not even ,et are we able to realise the full effect of
America and ourselves making common cause against the enemy.
The memory of past differences dies hard, old prejudices
linger long but this joint march in the van of progress will,

I trust and believe, sweep both differences and prejudices
away and give place to the immeasurable vista of good our
two Nations may be able to achieve together for the benefit
of humanity.

11.

am, my dear iy.r. Strong,

/
2315, Massachusetts Avenue,
WASHINGTON, D.C.
16th. October, 1917.

DIRIGINeloV Strong,
.

noTtInreply to your letter of October 13th, and to

confirmpLord Readines telegram R.9 of the 15th, I am
writing for

Lord Reading to let you know what information

I gave to Mr. Croxton about Lord Reading's visit to New
York.

Lord Reading would be very grateful for the use
of a private car.

He and party leave Washington at 1E.30 p.m.

on Wednesday the 17th, arriving at New York at 5.56pm.

He

also has great pleasure in accepting your kind invitation to
be your guest at the Plaza Hotel during his stay, and also
to meet the members of the General Committee at dinner at
6.30 p.m. on the evening of the 18th.
In regard to the order of making his address, so

long as he is not last of the three speakers he is content
to leave the matter in your hands.

A box containing six seats will be ample for his
party for the meeting.

In regard to rooms at the Hotel, Captain Sir
William Wiseman, Bart., 115 East 53rd. Street, New York, had
already selected the rooms for the party 'before it was known

that we were to be your guests.

I have let Mr. Croxton know

this in order that the rooms already engaged might be retained
and that there might be no clashing.

Lord Reading desires me to thank you very much
for all the arrangements you are making for his comfort.
With kind regards,

yours sincerely,
Governor Strong,
Federal Reserve Bank,
NEW YORK.

Octob.r 19th, 1917.

Dear Lord Reding:
Your willimmess to help in our
oampai,;n by making that magnificent address
last night is appreciated by every member of
our organization.
I have been asked by my
associates if you would have any objection
to our pAblishing what you said in full. They
41isee,a to think that it ras a very great address and we want to presurve it in tho archives as well as
it in the course of our
efforts in this and later loans.
Of course,
a copy of the manuscript would be sent you
before it was printed.

Again, with wamest thanks for
your help, I

Very sincerely yours,

To the

Right Honorable Lord Reading,
2315 Vassachusette Avenue,
Wi.shington, D. C.

Misc. 34

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK

Sent by rr

ilaF NEW YORK

(SEND TO FILES)

COPY OF TELEGRAM

7,4ord Readin,
P315 gageriehusetts Ave.,
WariltirTior. 11. C.

of look
to welotelmrtor torlorroa nftcremon rerlrinl.rpr rrob "y r
til 4 a -,prrent*
alas
tr ^1!* tiff .
rasiterve bwrlt
if you will bo direr rlp,Pd for 1 ure or dir.rer 'Y'hurreltty or rriitty.,
poirc

ftttznd

r-

" trOn
Chlrge

FrdertAl Rosary* Danir.

120 Broadway.

8-5

r.ov mrts or

CLASS OF SERVICE

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[CLASS 0

7 QcZcaii ciag..1:ENT

AM /

GEORGE W. E. ATKINS. FIRST v

Nit.

Night Message

NI
Night Letter
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NIpears after the check number of
words) this is aday message. Otherwise its character is indicated by the
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RECEIVED AT

!95 BROADWAY N '(
1917

ORXCEIVED
CT 3yy- pm
7

MC WASHINGTON DC 7c 7P

2568

GOVERN OR STRONG

FED RES BANK NEWYORK. NY

R 35 VERY PLEASED IF YOU WI LL LUNCH; WI THUS THURSDAY AT 13C.)PM
2315 MASSACHUSETT S AVE
READING

3

Misc. 34

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
OF NEW YORK

Sent by

(SENI,

COPY OF TELEGRAM
Ntic;isor "174 141

NOV

1917

L.ord Beading

=lb Massachusetts Avenue
,ashlOgtqn, Ds Q.

ior vur tel,,arws

7e;ret that I find it neceevary to lostpene my

tri; to 'Aatihingt on until net week

ill aivlse you later

7.unjnialn
Federnl Reserve
3.

B -5

Nasniu Street, :gym. Tor:.

.7

r fl;.

I

AgSOCIATI..04101 FiriptailARP
CORRESPONDENTS

w

3illtrIaD,R.§Tral
Ft

En!

I

FEDERAL RESERVE Bt NIc
April 19th, 1919.

FAREWELL DINNER TO THE EARL OF READING
You are cordially invited to a farewell
banquet to t
122---Ear-1-94-aP-agi-the.4.--11r-assador
and High Commissioner and Lord Chief
Justice of
England to be given by the Association
of Foreign
Press Correspondents in the United States
at the
Hotel Plaza at 7.30 P. M. on
THURSDAY, APRIL 24th.
Cheques for twelve dollars per cover
should accompany acceptance and be made payable to the
Treasurer of the Association,

Percy Sutherland Bullen,
Secretary,
66 Broadway,
New York.

N.B.

An early reply is requested.

LIBRARY
AP R

2 1919

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
April 21, 1919.

My dear Lord Reading:

Your many friends in this country are almost regretful that the time is
approaching when you are to return home.

17e will miss you very much indeed, and

will retain memories of a most happy personal relationship founded upon your great
work in this country.

I am sure the basis of this feeling is the belie: in the minds of so
many of us that the penalties of this terrible war can only be minimized by the
closest of friendship and cooperation between your country and ours.

Juch a re-

lationship, in order to be permanent, must rest upon mutual confidence and friendship, which you have been so successfus in promoting.

I didn't want you to return home without sending you a word of this
kind.

*3e will Miss you very much, but will always remember you.

I am wondering

whether, in the multitude of your duties, it may be possible for you to find time
to send me one of your photographs, with your nac.e written on it.

I will value it

as a souvenier of our association in some important matters in which our object
have been identical, and, it i may say 30, with some pride, the results hare not
been without success.

lith warmest regards, which 1 hope you will also convey to Lady Readin
I beg to remain,

Jincerely your friend,

Right honorable Lord: Reading,
British imbassy,
4ashington, 1). J.

BS/M3B

LIBRARY
MAY

1919

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
May 2, 1919.

Dear Lord Reading:

I have just this minute received the splendid

photograph which you were good enough to lot me have and
which I shall prize most
This and more I had hoped to say to you and to
Lady Reading before your departure.

I know that it is no

kindness to take even a minute of your time When so

mriny

matters are pressing and so again convey to you my warmest
regards and best wishes by letter.
It is quite probable that I ipay have the pleasure

of seeing you in London this summer.
'.)ordially yours,

Right honorable Lo7201 Reading,

Plaza hotel, Lew York.

7

27712,5

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ROYAL COURTS OP JUSTICE,

LONDON, W.C.

the admiration and affection felt by the lawyers of England
for this very"distinguished American gentleman.

Not even yet are we able to realise the full effect of
America and ourselves making common cause against the enemy.
The memory of past differences dies hard, old prejudices
linger long but this joint march in the van of progress will,

I trust and believe, sweep both differences and prejudices
away and give place to the immeasurable vista of good our
two HatiOns may be able to achieve together for the benefit
of huManity.

I am, my dear Yr. Strong,

c"),:i4v/ 6C-0
/5-5
2315, Massachuset ts Avenue,

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RL70,4. GEORGE W. L. ATKINS. F:RST
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VERY PLEASED IF YOU WILL LUIT, CH 7, ITHUS THURSDAY AT 13 CPL

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APR 2 2 1919
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK
111)ri3 21, 1919.

Hy dear lord Reading:

Your many friends in this country are almost r(retful that the tirne is
approaching when you are to return home.

Wo will miss you very much indeed, and

will retain memories of a most happy.personal relationship founded upon your great
wore in this country.
I am sure the basis of this feelinl; is the belie: in the minds of so

many of us that the penalties of this terrible war con only be minimized by the
closest of friendship and cooperation between your country and our
lationship, in order

Such a re-

mutual confidence and friend-

ship, which you have been so successful in promoting.
I didn't want you to return home without sending you a word of this
kind.

We will miss you very much, but will always remember you.

I am wondering

whether, in the multitude of your duties, it may be possible for you to find time
to send me one of your photographs, with your name written on it.

I will value it

as a souvenier of our association in some important natters in which our objectsa
have been identical, and, i: i tasty say so, with some pride, the results have not

been without success.

With warmest regards, which I hope you will also convey to Lady ileadin,
I beg to remain,

Sincerely your friend,

Ricjit honorabnlord
British
Vashincton, D. J.

B3/2,33

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MAY

4.

1919

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK

11,4y 2, 1919.

Dear Lord Reading:

I have just this minute received the splendid
photograph vihich you were good enough to let me have and

which I shall prize most highly.

This and more I had hoped to say to you and to
Lady Reading before your departure.

I kno-1 that it is no

kindness to take even a minute of your time when so many
matters are trossing and so again convey to you my viarmest

regards and best wishes by letter.

It is quite probable that I nay have the pleacure
of soeint; you in London this summer.

Cordially yours,

Right honorable 10'..d Re riding,_

11=a hotel, Lea York.

B3/1133

A

Ritz hotel, London,
6eptember 17, 1919.

-/Ige

14 dear Lord Realing:
it has been a great disappointment to one not to

-sre nal opportunity of seeing you on my visit to London.
when I first arrived from America I had only a few days before
proceeling to the Continent and had to be satisfied with a
glimpse of you at the Law Courts :ken i stopped there on the

chance that you might not be engaged in court.

I returned to

London from tae Continent last -week but, unfortunately, find

you out of the city.
i am wri,ting particularly to ask you also to expret,s

'y regrets to Lady Reading.

ith kindest regards, believe me,
sincerely yours,

Rt. hon. The -c,arl of heading,
32, Curzon .itreet,
London, ,;11.

etc.,

January 18, 1P275.

My dear Lord Reading:.

With this I 8:1 enclosing a copy of a note of introduction which
I have taken the liberty of giving to nrs. Charles T. Barney of Now York,
who expects shortly to make a trip through India, accompmied by her friend
Tire. Stanford iThite.

These ladies are travelling in a tour party but are unF.ccompsnied
by any men of their families, and I have not hesitated to take the liberty
of giving them this note to you because they may need some adVICO or
counsel, which I have assured them you and your associates will gladly give
them.
t
41; 1-. bo

I think it is quite likely that Lady Reading may recall Mrs.
I Lir under the impression
Barney or Mrs. White, or possibly both of thorn,
that they had the pleasure of meeting Lady Reading when you were in this
They are bath me,n5ers of ol'.4 Noa York families ant *ell kno:.n to ?11
country.
friends in this countr;.
of your
May I take this opportunity to congratulate you upon the addition
It
of Sir Basil P. Blackett to your staff.
personal help to you but added strength to your fine organization..

kill I am sure be not only a

Also nay I convey my warmest regards to Lady Reading, and my
best wishes to you.
I beg to rerain,
Faithfully yours,

To His Excellency,
Right Eonorable the Earl of Reading,
Viceroy and Governor General of India,
r1-71hi, India.
B5.!1!!

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FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF NEW YORK

is
Sir t7illiar Tyrrell

London England

and I were fortuay.te enoug

to share on the n:Airctralia.

I hope that Lord Grey has sor.e good fishing 7:nd
as great freedom from the bothers of the world an I have
recently had, and th t your share fricnd Sir 'fillips'.
not rrnve to wrch fr my good of these bothers will The
world Jo up lido down, but I am not quite pure that that
luotifies n
any people of importance over hers standing
an their heads, an they seem to be trying to do. Tokwibly,
.it is a natural effort on their part to put their brains
in the por:ition which /1Z.TC intendedtthem to occupy.
With warmest

which I hop© you wia. also

convoy to Lord Grey, eh , d you Doc him, or 11:-Aro 000aion
to write him.

I am

Vary sincerely yours,

Foreign Office,
SW.J.

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Foreign Office,
S.W.1.

19 March, 1928.

Ij dear Strong,
1-lny congratulations have reached me

from your country ou, none were more welcome and
more appreciated tYy me than yours, as I look upon

you as an old friend Who has the same outlook as
myself on life, but whom I do not see sufficiently
often to please me.

I do not expect to take up my appointment
until the summer, but I hope very much that on your

next visit to Europe in Lay you will extend your
trip to London.

I shall take it as a great favour

if you will let me know of your presence here so
that we may meet.

Yours always sincerely,

Benjamin J. Strong, Esq.

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174. BUCKINCoAM PALACE ROAD,S.W.

September 28th, 1926.

My dear nr. Governor,

- a pleasure to see your handwriting,

and a real disappointment to have missed ycu on your
return journey.

HLd I seen you,

I could have told

you at length ofthe favourable reception of our Report,
which I attributed in large measure to the impetus Liven
to its launch by your evidence.
Perhaps I should have had courage, too, to

express to you a word of admiration for the most distinguished work which you did for our common cause during those
months, whilst suffering, as I now learn, under a disadvantage from ill-health.

With expressions of the warmest regard, my
dear Mr. Governor, and of the hope that our paths may cross
again, and before long,
I remain,

Yours sincerely,

T1

A

Stuyvesunt Road,
Biltmore Forest,
Biltmore, N.C., February 14, 1927.

qty dear Commander;
Phi

seems ineeed a meet tardy response to your kind letter of

September 28th, but you may indeed have learned that immediately upon my
return from Europe I was smitten with pneumonia and since then have been
incapacitated from any work or evon reading most of my mail.

It seemed to

me to be a fact that I had something of this sort in store for me when I WRS
abroad last Sumaer, as I was not fooling well then, and possibly only by a
miracle wac my illness delayed until I got safely home.

But I am now grad-

ualiy recovering and hope by April to be back at the office.

It was most kind of you to write me so appreciatively of our efforts

to assist in your Lreat aork for the cause ofIndien curr

.

Possibly you

have been good enough to somewhat exaLgerate the importance of what vie did.

If it was helpful, I am sure you underctand that no purely self-interested
motive led to our appearance.

After some study, I was convinced that the

proposal with which we were dealing would have been a calamity for India, for
Great Britain, for us and for the world, and it is the greetest possible relief to feel that the danger is past and that under your guidance India will
shortly, I hope, embark upon u really modern, progressive system of monetary
reform.

While it is interesting to deal with sash matters academically, it

is even moreso to ueal with them practically, aud I only wish that I might
spend somo time in India and see the matter take shape personally and on the
ground.

I hope it will be a great success, and that it will redound, as it

should, tc your credit.

2.

2/14/27.

440

May I ask you to give my kindest regards to Mru. Young and
accept the cams for yourself.
Very sincerely yours,

Right Uonorable M. Hilton Young,
174, Buchang,ham Palace Road, s.r.,
LONDCN.
PS: ad


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102