View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.




o JU ~ t..\tC l ^
4Lsf~
's

^

U

^

#L
4 * £ < 2 y ~ / :r^
t ^

A A y r r r t ^ & if f y w IQ uA J -




<
' flC

> v U -'/

pv-^-l

7//»
*

Form 1227

UNION

C U SS OF SERVICE DESIRED
Fast Day Message
Day Letter

Rsteitet's No.

ChSCH

Night Message
Night letter
Pattens should math an X oppo­
site the class of settice desired:
OTHERWISE THETEIEGRAM
W ill BE TRANSMITTED ASA
FAST DAY MESSAGE.

AM
N E W C O M B C A R L T O N , P R E S ID E N T

lima Filed

G E O R G E W . E. A T K I N S , P lR S T V IC E -P R E S ID E N T

==
S e n d th e follow ing telegram , subject to the term s
on back hereof, which are hereby agreed to

To-

(s h - tL s A n *

- t
J)y y (E\d4~

' ■--

/--tv
AeS'/^ PhS

vv6^j

Hr------------ -----— ---------- ------------ 1--- - ■ " :: : ~^r--




U.

-£-va- /

ZtutrU,*u'-M-----

SENDER'S TELEPHONE NUM BER

Af
> L~
,
/ .




DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY
W A S H IN G T O N

August 1 5 ,

Bear O r. Haynes:
When Mrs. Haynes gave me y o u r c o l l a r p in I
im m ediately dropped i t in to iqy p in tr a y on th e desk
and a lth o u g h I have sea rc h ed d a ily f o r i t I have n o t
been a b le to f in d i t any p la c e . Tou do n o t g iv e me
any s t r e e t a d d re ss f o r D e tro it b u t I am sen d in g th e
Cards th e re in th e c a r e o f the Employment S e rv ic e .
Mr. G ile s Jackson h as been in the c i t y
tw ice - the day fo llo w in g y o u r le a v e and to d a y f
He c a l l e d the o f f ic e b o th tim e s . The f i r s t tim e he
s ta t e d t h a t he came up w ith the hope o f s e e in g you
and would go back and w r ite you f o r an in te rv ie w
l a t e r . T his morning he ask ed me to say th a t he had
sane in fo rm a tio n on the a t t e r you b o th a re i n t e r e s t e d
i n , and to e x p re ss to you h i s b e s t w ishes and say th a t
he tos so rry to have m issed you a g a in , e s p e c ia lly sin c e
he would soon be going to A tla n tic C ity , rem ain in g th e re
f o r th e E lk s C onvention which w i l l keep him u n t i l a f t e r
th e 2 6 th .
Mr. Jay C lif f o r d was in th e o f f ic e today and
w anted to see you v ery badly about an u rg e n t m a tte r .
He would n o t t e l l me \tiiat i t m s b u t I u n d e rsta n d the
■Jar H isk h a s d ism isse d some o f h i s h e lp e r s ; he pro b ab ly
w anted y o u r in flu e n c e i n g e ttin g them back .
Mr. V a le n tin e w rote you n o t to send a sub­
s t i t u t e so Mr. J e n n if e r d id n o t go.
I sen t the p ic tu r e to M iss Iyons o f th e World
O utlook. I suppose you a re going to be back h e re in time
to g e t th e a r t i c l e to h e r by September 1 .
I am e n c lo s in g some correspond® © a s p e r th e
re q u e s t o f Mr. R e id , and t h i s h a s a ls o l e a l me to en­
c lo s e a l e t t e r from Mr. Macbeth which I have been h o ld in g
f o r f e a r i t m ight n o t reach y o u .
JU&Have you M rs. I r v i n 's
Yours t r u l y ,
r e p o r ts on Ohio?
MATTIE.




**

Ftebru^iry 1 0 , 1920,

Dear Or. Haynes:
Supplementing yonr l e t t e r from Mr. if e llll p s
o f Pefcrusixy 3 , I aa e n c lo sin g oath o f o f f i c e , which
Mr. Baldwin ha* ju s t made s o c i a l request for the
Y llia s th e r e o f, h r . Baldwin s ta to a that u n le ss h is
o f f io e r e c e iv e s th e oath before February 15 i t w i l l be
im p ossible fo r you to r e c e iv e aay pay for the f i r s t
h a lf o f t h is month, m i you n o t, th e r e fo r e , g iv e
th is your immediate a tte n tio n ?
^his morning I fornarled to you a telegram from
JI13S Ury c a llin g o f f the engagement in Baltim ore for
February 1 5 .
T rusting th at a l l goes w e ll with you and your
new work, 1 am

Yours s in c e r e ly .

tHenttesare ^griritliural attit Bttdusirial
f o r m a l £ $ t\u x & l
W I L L IA M J . H A L E .

P r e s id e n t

JXasJtbillr

i-'*r• G e o rg e E . H a y n e s
D e p a rtm e n t o f L ab o r
W a s h in g to n , D .C .
My d e a r M r. H a y n e s -

utrAHlMENT OF LASOf

0CT 1 1 1919
Direc,° r o ' N « r o E co n o m ic

Y o u r l e t t e r o f O c to b e r 4 t h r e c e i v e d .
I w as i n W a s h in g to n f o r
tw o o r t h r e e d a y s a n d r e g r e t t h a t I w as u n a b l e t o s e e y o u .
I
h a d a t a l k w i t h C o n g re s s m e n B u r n s a n d H u l l .
I am r e a d i l y b e ­
h i n d t h e m o v em en t a n d I am w a i t i n g t o h e a r fro m y o u f u r t h e r o r
u n t i l y o u g i v e me t h e w o rd .
W ith v e r y b e s t w i s h e s
H-V




f o r M is s C a m p b e ll a n d f a m i l y ,
Y o u rs v e ry t r u l y ,

I am




Ootober 13, 1919.

Ur. W illiam J . K ale,
P r e sid en t, L tate Normal dahooi,
H a sh v llle , Sana.
Dear Ur. Hales
I thank you so much fo r your good words to Congressmen Burns
and H u ll, and r eg r e t that 1 d id n ot have th e p lea su re o f
s e e in g you and showing you sane c o u r te sie s w hile you were
h e r e.
You w i l l d ou b tless be in te r e s te d to know th at tho
Secretary has Just approved an estim ate fo r the next f i s c a l
y ea r fo r th is work and has tran sm itted i t to th e Treasurer
fo r p r e se n ta tio n to the A ppropriations Comnittee.
I s h a ll
o a ll on you fo r help on t h is l a t e r , as w e ll as on the m atter
o f sane oth er le g is la t io n which we are shaping up.
Yours very tr u ly ,

D irecto r o f Hegro aoonomics




^Agricultural and 3u£ruBirial
f t t n i t p u tm ^ y ^ tV u tA

p ~ CJS-fVEO

W I L L IA M J . H A L E , P resident

DEPAi

JiiEskbillE

O c to b e r l

6,

mm

19 19

M r. G e o rg e E . H a y n e s
D i r e c t o r o f N e g ro E c o n o m ic s
D e p a rtm e n t o f L ab o r
W a s h in g to n , Us
D e a r M r. H a y n e s Y o u r l e t t e r o f O c to b e r 1 3 t h r e c e i v e d f o r w h ic h I t h a n k 'y o u .
O ur s c h o o l o p e n e d o v e r tw o w e e k s a g o w i t h a v e r y l a r g e
a tte n d a n c e ,
W ith v e r y b e a t w i s h e s f o r y o u a n d f a m i l y ,
Y o u rs v e ry

I am

tru ly ,

OF LABOR




DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY
W A S H IN G T O N

F il e 3-93 (D. II. E . )

F ebruary 5, 1919.

H r. C h arles E. H a ll,
S u p e rv is o r o f llegro Economics f o r Ohio,
74 E. Cay S t r e e t ,
Columbus, Ohio.
r* • „ ,

o ir:

P u rsu a n t to i n s t r u c t i o n s , a u th o r ity i s hereby g ra n te d c o v erin g
th e t r a v e l and o th e r expenses in c u rre d by you in p ro c e e d in g from y o u r
o f f i c i a l s t a t i o n , Columbus, Ohio, to W ashington, D. C ., and r e tu r n to
Columbus, on such d a te s as v /ill p e rm it you to t r a v e l , co m fo rtab ly and
c o n tin u o u s ly , to and from y o u r o f f i c i a l s t a t i o n , to perfo rm o f f i c i a l
d u tie s connected w ith th e v/or

o f t h i s Department a t W ashington, D. C .,

on F ebruary 15, 17 and 18, 1919.
These expenses a re th e r e f o r e p ro p e rly p ay ab le from th e a p p ro p ria ­
t i o n "'War Emergency - Employment S e rv ic e 1919", and, in o rd e r to ex;-

D

e p a r t m e n t

o f

C

o m m e r c e

BUREAU O F THE CEN SU S

W A S H IN G T O N

June l o , 1920.

l£r. K arl F. P h i l l i p s ,
A s s t. D ire c to r Negro Economics,
Department o f L abor,
W ashington, D, C.
Dear Mr. P h i l l i p s :
R eplying to your in q u ir y co n cern in g th e c o lo re d p o p u la tio n o f
P h ila d e lp h ia p erm it me to a d v ise you th a t t h i s d a ta i s n o t y e t a v a il a b le ,
and th a t i t w ill p ro b a b ly be sometime befoi'e a d e ta i le d r e l e a s e , c o v erin g
th e d i f f e r e n t elem ents o f th e p o p u la tio n , w ill be made fo r th a t c i t y .
Vo>«tr t.x n l TT

R E C E IV E D

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
ch/ m




JUN 1 5 1920
D irector o f Netrro Economic*




D

e p a r t m e n t

o f

C

o m m e r c e

BUREAU O F THE C E N SU S

W A S H IN G T O N

Y/ashington, D. 0 . ,
Alarch 2 , 1921.

Dr. George i. Haynes,
D ire c to r, Negro Economics,
Department o f L abor,
.Washington, D. G.

•

Dear Mr. Haynes:
I have had your name p la c e d on the m a ilin g l i s t o f t h i s
bureau fo r c o p ies o f our P re lim in a ry Announcements - A g ric u ltu re
1920.
These county p r e s s summaries show the number o f c o lo re d
and w h ite fa rm e rs fo r th e y ears 1910 and 1920, b u t the c o lo re d in
elu d e N egroes, In d ia n s , C h in ese, Jap an ese and a l l o th e r non-w hite
The t o t a l number o f Negro farm o p e ra to rs in each s t a t e
w i l l be in d ic a te d o nly on th e S ta te Summaries, c o p ies of which
you w ill r e c e iv e .
The same in fo rm atio n fo r each of th e 3067
c o m itie s w ill p ro b a b ly be a v a ila b le w ith in a few v/eeK S.

R E C E IV E D

DEPARTMENT OF l* RnR
MAR 3 1921
D irector of

Economics







DRAFT
Mr. John R. Hawkins
14 and Q S t r e e t s , N.W.
Y /ashington.
%■ d e a r Mr, Hawkins:
I am le a v in g today f o r Chicago r e p r e s e n tin g the
Departm ent o f Labor because o f the la b o r s i t u a tio n a u t t h e r e .

I found

my way in to a m eetin g o f the I n v e s tig a tin g Committee h e re fo llo w in g the
r i o t s i t u a t i o n and was v e ry rmioh p le a s e d to see the b u s in e s s - lik e way
in vdiich the gentlem en were going a t th e m a tte r .
h e re to a tte n d the

I had hoped to be

e x t m ooting b u t am c a ll e d away on acco u n t o f

c r i t i c a l s i t u a t i o n a t C hicago.

I am w r iti n g , how ever, to say th a t I

am a t th e s e rv ic e o f yo r com m ittee i n any way I can h e lp .
I may add th a t i f any q u e stio n a r i s e s th a t comes
w ith in the j u r i s d i c t i o n o f t h i s Department a f f e c t in g la b o r i n t e r e s t o f the
community

Department w ill want to have i t c a ll e d to i t s a t t e n t i o n .

Yours v ery t r u l y .




September 29, 1919,

Mr, ifrack Howard H all io n ,
E ditor, l i e t h o d%
311 North fou rth E t«,

hiohrsand, Y&.
liy dear Ur* H allion:
1 have enjoyed reading the "Method" and thank you fo r the
cou rtesy o f sending me a oopy.
Ur. P h illip s , a ls o , tnanks
you fo r h is oopy.
I hope you w i l l keep us on your m a ilin g
lis t.
1 aia glad th at the o rg a n isa tio n o f Negro b u sin ess i s flo u r is h ­
in g in Blohraond.
I t i s one o f the s a f e s t and b e st ways o f
Insuring th e s t a b i l i t y o f Negro b u sin e ss.
M th kind regards to the League, 1 am
Yours vexy tr u ly .

D irecto r o f Negro doonomlos

METHOD
A BUSINESS M A G A Z IN E

E x p o n e n t of th e P r o g r e s s iv e Negro B usiness M an
FRANK




HOWARD

H A L L I O N . Ma n a g i n g E ditor

5T4 N O R T H S E C O N D S T R E E T

R icH m ond. Va.

October 22 ,1920 .

Dr. George Haynes,
Departm ent % t Labor,
W ashington, D. G.
Dear Dr. Haynes;
W ill you p le a s e put Method on your n a ilin g l i s t , o r r a th e r
change my ad d ress to 514 N orth Second S t. in s te a d o f 3 H North
F o u rth St,?
Your r e le a s e from Newark N. J . , O ctober 22, on S p e c ta c u la r
o E n te rp r is e s would c e r ta in ly fu rn is h e n lig h te n in g and i r . t e r ng re a d in g m a tte r fo r Method, The Magazine o f Negro B usiness.
nder i f you would p re p a re an a r t i c l e on same fo r an e a rly
e, sending me your cu t io use in co n n ec tio n .
~
The f i r s t is s u e w i l l be ou t November 15, and you w ill p o s s ib ly
not have tim e to get your a r t i c l e read y by th e 1 s t, th e l a t e s t
d a t e ,f o r we go to p re s s th a t d a te . The December is s u e would
c a tc h i t .
I am p u ttin g you on my m a ilin g l i s t .
Very s in c e r e ly yours,

F H / UF

/

R E C E IV E D

DEPARTMENT OF EAEOR
OCT 2 5 1920
D irector of N e *ro

E c o n o m ic *




Copy
514 N orth Second S t r e e t ,
Richmond, V a., O ctober 22, 1920.

D r. George E. Haynes,
D ept, o f L abor,
W ashington, D. C.
Dear Dr. Haynes:
* * * * * * *
Your re le a s e from Newark, N. J . , O ctober, on S p e c ta c u la r Negro
E n te r p r is e s would c e r t a i n l y fu r n is h e n lig h te n in g and i n t e r e s t i n g re a d ­
in g m a tte r fo r "Method" - The llag azin e o f Negro B u sin e ss.
I WONDER IF YOU WOULD PREPARE AH ARTICLE ON SANE POR AN EARLY
ISSUE, SENDING HE YOUR CUT TO USE IN CONNECTION.
The f i r s t is s u e w ill be o u t November 15, and you w ill p o s s ib ly
n o t have tim e to g e t y our a r t i c l e ready by the* 1 s t, th e l a t e s t d a te ,
f o r we go to p re s s t h a t d a te .
The Deoember is s u e would c a tc h i t .
* * * * * * *
Very s in c e r e ly y o u rs ,
Prank H. H a llio n
Managing E d ito r .

1 s t Indorsem ent

October 25, 1920

Mr. Frank H. H a lllo n ,
Managing E ditor - ''Method,"
514 North Leoond s t r e e t ,
Hi almond, Va.
ley dear Mr. Hal lio n :
We have today noted your change o f ad d ress, and have co rrected our
m a ilin g l i s t so as to in su re your g e ttin g , both p erso n a lly and as
Managing E ditor o f the 'Method," cop ies o f future departmental r e le a s e s
and pub IIo a t io n s.
Your request fo r an a r t i c l e by D r. E&ynes has been referred to him a t
hew York fo r imuediate p erson al r e p ly .
Yours vory tr u ly .

A ssista n t D irector liogro economics.

P . d . P le a se a c c e p t thanks f o r p u ttin g t h i s o f f ic e on your m a ilin g l i s t .







FRANK




HOWARD

H A L L I O N , M a n a g in g E ditor

5T4 N O R T H S E C O N D S T R E E T

R icH m ond, Va. November 5, 1920.
r e c e iv e d

departm ent

Dr. George E. Haynes,
D ire c to r o f iiegro Economics,
Department of Labor,
W ashington, D.C.

fyjQV 6

OF LABOR
1920

.
Director of Np'crr* Econom •

Dear Dr. H aynes:
I thank you fo r your l e t t e r r e l a t i v e to th e a r t i l c e
I have asked you to p re p a re fo r Method, and r e g r e t very much your i n a b i l i t y
to comply r ig h t of f .
P ro fe s s o r Erwin, w ith whom I have ta lk e d concerning
t h i s p a r t i c u l a r a r t i c l e , i s very anxious to s e e i t . He i s one among
many who would a p p re c ia te a pro d u ct o f your pen on th e s u b je c t in hand.
May I encroach upon your a lre a d y crowded tim e by ask in g
i f i t would be p o s s ib le fo r you to w rite t h i s a r t i c l e fo r th e December
Method? I f you can get your m a tte r in by th e 12th of December, alth o u g h
our forms w ill have th e n been made up, I s h a ll h o ld open space fo r you.
T h is, Dr. Haynes, i s in th e l i g h t of a fav o r I am ask in g you to ren d er
a new, s tr u g g lin g , worthyy e n te r p r is e .
W ith very b e st w ishes fo r both you and Mr. P h i l l i p s , I am

S in c e re ly yours,

"Z fu
fh/ uf

Managing’ E d ito r.




Ur. Frank H a llio n .
Managing E d itor,
’’The Method" ,
514 Horth Second S t . ,
Hlchmond, Va.
Dear Mr. H allion:
l ® u ld li k e very much to make you a
promise to g e t the m a ter ia l to you by December 12,
but I am going to be under very heavy pressure between
t h is and th a t tim e, w ith a tr ip South on my hands,
oome o f my previous prem ises must be clea red up so
1 fe a r to have you expect i t and not g et i t in tim e.
I w i l l g iv e you something a t the e a r li e s t d a te, but
am unable to say ju s t when now.

Youm v a ry t r u l y .

D irecto r o f negro Economics.
H/MLC

M

E

T

H

O

D

THE M AGAZINE OF NEGRO BUSINESS
E X P O N E N T OF PROGRESS

F r a n k H o w a r d HALLION, Managing Editor




5J4 North Second Street

RICHM OND, VIRGINIA.

„ « r> '-lV E D N o v e m b e r 24, 1 9 2 0 .

S5;

of

\.M5<w

DEC 1

Dr. Geo. E . H ay n es,
D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r ,
W a s h in g to n , Dc Ce

Economic*
Director

of

My d e a r S i r :
So muoh h a s b e e n s a i d c o n c e r n i n g t h e s h o r t com ings
o f Hegro b u s i n e s s , and so much h a s b e e n s a i d c o n c e r n i n g th e
e f f i c i e n c y Of Hegro b u s i n e s s , i t s t r i k e s me t h a t th e v ie w s o f
some o f t h o s e p e r s o n s who have made headw ay i n th e b u s i n e s s
w o r ld w ould a t t h i s tim e do a whole l o t to w a rd h e l p i n g t o
s t a b i l i z e th e g e n e r a l b u s i n e s s m o r a le o f o u r p e o p l e , ^and w ould
be th e means o f p l a c i n g i n a new a n d b e t t e r l i g h t b e f o r e t h e .
p u b lic , th e b u s in e s s v e n tu r e s of th e r a c e .
Would y o u , t h e r e f o r e , do u s t h e f a v o r to w r i t e f o r
M ethod a n answ er t o th e f o l l o w i n g q u e s t i o n : "What Does Hegro
B u s i n e s s M ost Heed?" You may make t h i s a r t i c l e i n th e fo rm of
a l e t t e r d i r e c t e d t o th e e d i t o r and I w a n t to p u b l i s h them i n
an e a r l y i s s u e on a page o r p a g e s to be h e a d e d w i t h th e q u e s t i o n
a s k e d , w i t h t h e s t a t e m e n t : "A nsw ered b y Ten H eads o f L e a d in g
E n te rp ris e s ."
I am a s k i n g you to be one o f th e t e n .
You a re on l i s t t o r e c e i v e a c o m p lim e n ta ry copy o f
t h e f i r s t i s s u e o f M ethod, w hich makes i t s a p p e a r a n c e a b o u t
t h e -25-th o f ,„Havaak»r-.
^
W ith b e s t w i s h e s , I am,
S in c e re ly y o u rs,

E d ito r.
FHH:AET




M

E

T

H

O

D

TH E M AGAZINE OF NEGRO BUSINESS
E X P O N E N T OF PROGRESS

F r a n k H o w a r d HALLION, M anaging Editor




5J4 North Second St eet
RICHM OND, VIRGINIA.

December 3, 1920.
R E C E IV E D

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Dr. George E. Haynes,
D ire c to r o f Negro Economics,
Department o f Labor,
W ashington, D. G.

DEC 4

1920
.

D irector of N e»ro Economic

Dear Dr. Haynes:

^

F ind en clo sed co^y o f l e t t e r I am sendingy in
i n t e r e s t o f th e D iv isio n . This^one o f th e th in g s I h< d on
my mind to t a l k w ith you about when you were in Richmond some
tim e ago. I t i s my presum ption t h a t th e t o r r e n t i a l r a in s p r e ­
v e n ted your re tu rn to th o o f f i c e .
I do not know i f I have covered th e s u b je c t to
th e s e gentlem en.. ju s t as you would l i k e to have i t covered, and i f
»t
n i
1 j
'
x * j ___ ____ j ______
tim
e would
p e rm it,*r I would
send you copy sfo
r c r•itic
is m and c o rre c ­
t i o n b e fo re being m ailed , but I f e e l t h a t t h i s m a tte r sh o u ld be
p re s se d , and w hatever we have in mind to do should be clone imme­
d ia te ly . I am not going in to d e ta i l in th e l e t t e r s to S en ato rs
Swanson, G lass, ilontague and Flood, concerning th e v/ork o f th e
D iv isio n , b e lie v in g t h a t th e e d i t o r i a l does t h i s f a i r l y w e ll.
. .

____

________ j .

___________

________ j

_________

__________

_____ ________

-

_____

I s h a ll be g la d to have a l i n e from you as to what
you th in k o f t h i s e f f o r t , and as to xvhat you th in k I may f u r th e r
do to h elp th e cause.
With b e st w ish es, I am
S in c e re ly yours,

G \a

C \,




4’• V*wj3
/

■
i

<-^tksr

J}

J

ja

-

K -o JX & ^

~

O u u t-iQ

- i'yV *y\ (

3

A

I -V
Dadamber

3,

1920,

Senator Claude
Swanson,
Sonata O ffic e B u ild in g,
W a s h in g to n ,

, o.

Honored S irs
Un<i«r separate cover, 1 an m oiling you a marked
c.^py oj i.TlIOU, th e magazine p f Negro b u sin ess, co n ia in in ;:. ai;
e d it o r ia l on tho \wrk o f the D iv isio n o f Negro ^cononice o f
th e Department o f Labor,
i^xie D iv isio n h-.s accom plished great good, e s p e o ia lly
'm * 190 in th® 5 t» te c f V irg in ia , and I wish i t had bom ao th a t
you could have had opportunity te take c lo se oulVr4.aaaae o f th e ru•iulta ob tained
t h i s arm o f th e United d-u tee Govemnent.
iou
th a t th e appropriation oarrying p ro v isio n for th®
oon tin aation o f t h i s work, under L*r. Ooorga jJ, Haynes, was out
a :» r t, and th e u ir s c to r a lso had to out short h ie operating o r ta n z a tio n .
3om6 tim e, during t h is Congress perhapu, th e laatter
o f contin uin g the D iv isio n o f Negro Nononomiea w ill again come
up, and I at: wri-iii,^ to auk t l * t you throwfeuah a id and in flu e n c e
^BP°**d toward h elp in g t o - p e r fe c t a work which lias
4 | * 6 e e eaioh to help th s whit© people o f V irg in ia .b y a S il e n t ! f i c
W j I U lu t io n f with t h e ir labor problem, both in th e incfcurtrlal and
th e domeetio l i f e . The Negroee o f V ir g in ia , I f e e l free to e ta te
w ill be under un told o b lig a tio n s to you for a n y th in g you may
’
f e e l disposed to do in t h i s premioee.
With very best w ishes, I am, a ir ,
••Joat r e s p e c tfu lly yours,




December 1 4 , 1920

Ur, Jraok Howard Hall ion ,
Jiditor - "liothod”,
514 lo r th Second S tr e e t,
Riahiocnd, Yu,

Dear Hr, K allion :
I have to con gratu late you on the f i r s t i9eu e o f 'Uethod" fo r i t s sub­
sta n c e , i t s makeup, and i t s fon a.
I have to thAwfc you a ls o fo r the
lib e r a l a tte n tio n you have giv en to liegro Economics.
I am sure t h is
w i l l h e lp .
Coiy o f your l e t t e r to Senator Glass was r ec e iv e d , and I a p p reciate i t
more than 1 can t e l l you, as I t was broad-minded and u n s o lic it e d .

V
The en closu res are se lf-e x p la n a to r y .
Tours very tr u ly .

h

P
Enclosures - 2




D irector o f Regro Economic*•

METHOD
T he Magazine of Negro Business
EXPONENT OF PROGRESS
Vol. 1, No. 1.




Richm ond, Va., December, 1920

$1.60 Per Year

HAVE learned from a long experience in the work of up­
lifting my people th at if we accomplish anything as a race
in this country, we must do so as other people do, by hard
work, close application and rigid economy. I have learned that
no m atter what rights are granted us by the general government,
we must succeed or fall largely by our own efforts.
“And while we ask to be governed by the same laws and
accorded the same rights with all other citizens, the Constitution
of the United States and the laws of our country can never be
the means of forcing success upon us. We must rise by our own
efforts, by industry and constant perseverance, or fall by reason
of our own worthlessness.
“No people can hope for much in the way of progress and
civilization, who are unable to develop a capacity for BUSI­
NESS.”—
From the speech of T. W. Walker of Birmingham., Ala., de­
livered before the first meeting of the National Negro Business
League at Boston in 1900.

I

x:

$20.
inGold - 1st P riz e
$10. in Gold - 2 d P riz e
$ 5 .0 0 in Gold - 3 d P riz e

Method Subscription
Contest
OPEN TO 100
This Contest begins with the December issue and closes on March
First, 1921.
Pleasant, profitable work, introducing METHOD to your com­
munity. The regular commission on all subscriptions will be paid to all
entering the contest. The Prizes are extra, and you are paid for your
service whether you win a prize or not.
We will send you five sample copies free to start you.
METHOD is new and distinctive. Everybody who is interested
to any degree in business is a live prospect. You do not have to be a
salesman—Method sells itself.
Number of contestants limited to One Hundred. This statement is
being read in many States, so write immediately for particulars to

The Editor, M ETHOD,
514 North Second Street,
Richmond, Virginia.
Just drop a card.
x:




x

METHOD
THE MAGAZINE OF NEGRO BUSINESS
EXPONENT OF PROGRESS
Pledged to help keep America the leading nation of the world by diligent effort to further the
economic status of its colored citizenry

Vol. 1. No. L

Richmond, Virginia.

Published once a month at 514 North Second Street,
Richmond, Va., by
THE HALLION PUBLISHING COMPANY.
FRANK HOWARD HALLION, Editor.

Subscription Rates—$1.50 the year in advance. By
the copy, 15 cents. Give old and new address when
ordering change of address
“Seest thou a mjan diligent in his business.
stand before kings ..........”—Prov. 22: 29.

He shall

C H R ISTM A S
In the everlasting rush, hustle and bustle for the
almighty dollar, it behooves us as business men to
pause at least periodically and consider whither we
are driving. W e should ask ourselves a few ques­
tions and then proceed to answer them, for they
must be answered.
In the competition of business are we mindful
that the immediate point we are trying to gain and
the dollars we are struggling to get are not the ulti­
mate aim of our being?
In the eternal thraldom of financial effort do we
ignore our religious duties and relegate the obliga­
tions God has imposed upon us ?
While custom dictates in business that “every
tub must stand on its own bottom’’; “each for him­
self and the devil take the hindmost,” do we listen
to the other teachings which, if they mean anything,
mean we are our brothers’ keepers?
Then again, do we go about our business as if it
were an unpleasant duty and view it in the light
of a necessary evil, or do we look upon it through
eyes which reflect our daily routine as a delightful
means to a bigger aim?




December 1920

$1.50 the Year

’ Do we try to inject the element of JO Y into
our daily contact with our fellow-workmen, or are
we “too busy” ?
Nineteen hundred years ago the Lord and Master
came heralded as a fountain of joy. He never came
to declare any unpleasant duties. He never came
to impose any ugly obligations. He never came to
set up a system of discontent and discord. He never
came to teach men to work only for personal profit.
He never came to declare any selfish, one-man pro­
gram system of life. He never came with a gloomy
edict to forbid a Christian having pleasure. • He
came with JO Y . He preached JO Y . He lived
JOY.
W hat a lesson in His life for business men today;
and while we are again on the threshold of the An­
niversary ot Jhlis birth, let us remember His teach­
ings and try to apply them to our business. Let
us try to lighten somebody’s burden. Let us speak
an encouraging word to the office boy. He is human.
Let us compliment the work of the stenographer.
She is something more than a gum machine. Let
us tell that book-keeper what a help he is to our
business. He also likes J O Y ; and the joy market
will never be cornered. W hat avenues of JO Y we
can open up with such a slight effort!
M r. Richard H. Edmunds, the editor of t
Manufacturers Record, nearly two years ago s
in an editorial that what is most needed in this
is a revival of good, old-fashioned, prayer-mee
religion. If ever a man spoke the truth it was
Edmunds. A revival of old-fashioned r
would without doubt cure most of the disease
a League of Nations, or a Democratic or
lican, or a Socialistic Administration could

L a

2

METHOD

DECEM BER

to that degree is he a successful man, and insofar
as he fails to ascertain why he is here, just to that
degree is he a failure and misfit in the general
scheme. W hat is true of individuals is true of insti­
tutions like Method. W e have our work to do—
our service to render, and that service will be for
the Negro business man, which said service consti­
tutes the reason for our existence.
W e hope this magazine might furnish you the
M ETHOD.
inspiration to follow closely what the Negro is doing
Method is a synonym for system. In christening in business. It is with the spirit of business that we
this magazine we selected this name as the most fare forth on our mission. No politics, no “isms”
apropriate for our needs. It fits to a nicety the of any kind except commercialism, shall guide our
principles for which we are established.
policy in contending for a business race. W e invite
All business must be run under system. W ithout you to read it each month and we shall always be
system, if a man is successful, it is in spite of him­ glad to publish any authentic information concern­
self and not because of his methods. W e deplore ing our business men provided such articles carry
the condition of some offices and business places we no prejudice toward or against religious organiza­
have visited, and wonder at their existence in view tions or strictly political subjects.
of all the lack of system that is so evident. 1 here
As an exponent of the progressive business man,
was a time when the entire records of a business who very often is the younger type of man, we have
could be kept in the head of one man. T h at time no axe to grind with that fine group of older men
is no more. Business is the most complex study who have done so much toward making it possible
presented to us today. W ith its arms stretching for the younger man to succeed and climb higher.
out into every field of human activity, system is Under given conditions, however, we feel that it is
absolutely necessary, not necessarily for the purpose time the younger Negro was taking some of the
of preventing and detecting fraud, but it takes a load off the shoulders of the fathers, and we also
load off the memory and leaves an executive’s mind feel that it is time some of the fathers were taking
free for constructive thinking.
some of the stumbling blocks from in front of the
T he modern accountant’s work is a masterpiece sons. W e therefore especially invite the younger
of intricate, almost automatic detail, evolutionary in and struggling Negro business man to keep in touch
its application to the business man’s needs and not with us, so that we may help him and that he may
revolutionary as so many of us are afraid. The ac­ help us and we may help others through him.
countant’s work depends absolutely upon system.
T he success of a business depends largely upon the
T H E N A T IO N A L N EG R O BUSINESS
accountant’s work. The accountant is the doctor
LEAGUE.
for a sick business. He is the safety valve for the
“ Reorganization and Reconstruction” was the
business that attempts to stretch out too far. He is slogan of the National Negro Business League at
he accelerator for the business machine that runs its 1920 Session at Philadelphia. Not a single re­
10 slow— and his entire work depends upon system, organization or reconstruction suggestion came to
nee our statement that business is dependent upon
the attention of the open convention that anybody
em— Method.
remembers. The only reorganization and recon­

diagnose. It was this old-fashioned prayer-meeting
religion which Christ, centuries ago, came to de­
clare and He came to declare it with JO Y . If
we practice the same kind of religion we will have
earned the right to sing in chorus with the Herald
Angels of old, “Joy to the W orld; the Lord is
Come.”




T H E PO LIC Y O F M E T H O D ,
make no apology for our debut. There is a
ror the existence of every human being on
nsofar as a man ascertains that reason, just

struction idea proposed at all was one which was
delegated to a “special committee” to meet some­
time in October. No one yet has given any in­
telligent reason for not allowing the business of the
League to come before the open convention so that

1920

the membership might act on its own matters and
not depend on the League’s political machinery to
foster the work in a way most advantageous to
that machine. It simmers down to the point in the
eye of the public of the League being a political or­
ganization and not an economic one for the ad­
vancement of the business interests of the American
Negro. How long the general public will stand for
this is a matter of conjecture. Suffice it to say, it
has already stood for it twenty years.
T he program enunciated by Secretary Emmett J.
Scott at Saint Louis in the 20th Annual Session of
the League is a masterpiece of business economics.
T he only trouble with it is that Dr. Scott enunci­
ated a program which brings into being a wonderful
power, but he did not enunciate any plan for apply­
ing that power to the needs of the Negro business
man. The reconstruction idea proposed to the
League in writing at its last convention and hid in
a “special committee” had to do with a means
of application for this program of Dr. Scott’s, and
essayed to meet the present day demands on the
League by a dissolution of the League in its present
form into a stock corporation. The details of this
plan were sent out by the former Special Assistant
to the Secretary of the League to members of the
Official Board and one or two other prominent
persons. The managing editor of the Philadelphia
American, one of Pennsylvania’s most widely circu­
lated journals, stated in a letter to the former Assist­
ant Secretary, that he would review and criticise
this plan through the columns of the American
for the benefit of the public.
In Dr. Scott’s Saint Louis program the National
Negro Business League has in its hands one of the
most effective assets any group of people could lay
hold of. There are numerous men and women scat­
tered all through the race who would go the limit
in helping to put this program into action; but then
there is the machine to consider. O ur people are
becoming too busy now to be disposed to enter into
any movement that is going to take their precious
time, if the leaders of that movement insist on wav­
ering. W hat is the answer?
It appears that the answer would be the organiza­
tion of a new League or an organization of some
name to actually put across the program that the




3

METHOD

National Negro Business League is allowing to go
to waste. There are two or three points in the
program that can easily be handled by an institution
like Method, and Method proposes to render the
service represented by those two or three points.
How long will the progressive Negro stand by
and see the business interest of the race retarded?
How often do the business men of the race inflict
their presence upon organizations composed of the
professional men, such as the Medical Association
or the Teachers’ Association? How long will the
business man stand for his own organization being
run by school teachers? How long will the men
who know what the League really ought to repre­
sent rest content with the National officers taking
up all the time at the conventions, giving no ap­
preciable time for the discussion of business sub­
jects—the real object for which the League was first
founded ? Then, these same officers after monopo­
lizing the program of the Convention will return
home and not even the headquarters of the League
itself can hear very much more from them until
the next annual “frolic.” At one session of the
Philadelphia convention, out of a four-hour pro­
gram, about twenty-five minutes were given to busi­
ness men for the discussion of business subjects, the
National officers taking up the rest of the time in
nobody yet knows what.
Personally we are a League man and anywhere
you see us you will find a League enthusiast, but—
and right on that “but” hangs the suggestion that
the progressive element of American Negro M an­
hood ought to organize itself into a body to carry
on the work the League is neglecting. W hat’s the
matter with bringing into being “The American
Chamber of Business” so that the Negro business
man will have a clearing house of ideas and methods
just like the Chamber of Commerce of the United
States functioning for the white people?
Method will publish any constructive criticism
of its stand on this subject.
H O U SIN G .
Housing seems to be as serious a situation now as
during the W orld W a r; indeed in some of the
larger cities it is even more serious. Poor housing
conditions reflect in the efficiency of a man’s work,

METHOD
and most of the larger industrial institutions of
the country have recognized this fact and have made
provision to take care of its thousands of em­
ployes.
It is alarming to see how little concerted effort
is made by Negroes to meet a similar situation
among our own people. O f course, we have few
great plants comparable to those concerns that are
able to finance the erection of a whole town, but
we do have real estate men by the score. In sev­
eral of the larger cities a score or more of colored
real estate men do business and they seem to be
working away, each in his own way, to solve the
housing problem. W e wonder if the real estate men
have ever thought of establishing a Real Estate
Association? W e wonder how many Local Negro
Business Leagues, those local organizations cor­
responding in spirit to the chambers of commerce,
have invited the real estate men to sit in on their
meetings and handle this question for them. If
the housing problem is to be solved, the real estate
men must do it, despite the fact that a bill has been
introduced in Congress to virtually convert the Pos­
tal Savings system into a Building and Loan As­
sociation; but, the real estate men can do it better
as an organization than they can working indi­
vidually. Building hotels won’t do it. People want
homes and not stopping places. Certainly we need
hotels but the pressing need is living quarters for
the average family.
Read in this issue the interesting and instructive
article on this subject by M r. Thos. J. Calloway, of
Washington, a man who has made exhaustive study
of the situation.
' T H E W O E F U L LACK O F BUSINESS
C O U R TESY .
.
One thing war conditions have brought about is
lack of courtesy. This is due largely to the fact
that no business is suffering for the want of patron­
age, and this period of inflated prosperity has be­
gotten contempt on the part of too many merchants
and others toward their one-time much sought cus­
tomers. Go into most any store and notice the
general lack of that deference accorded a would-be
purchaser in pre-war days.
Now, this period of abnormal prosperity attribut­




DECEM BER

able to abnormal conditions in the supply market
will not last always and when it is over the demand
end of the game is also going to let down. Then
the now haughty merchant who almost seemingly
scorns in some instances his patrons, will be out
again gunning for elusive profits that come into his
till from the pockets of the people who give him
his living. The public does not easily forget, even
if P. T . Barnum was right about the people liking
to be fooled, and the merchant who now makes a
specialty of courtesy will be remembered when the
slack season comes and he will have no trouble
keeping the trade he had built up, while his less
careful brother will be bemoaning the fact that his
rent is due, his stock is slow moving and the re­
ceivers threatening to close him up, as he should
be. M oral: “Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.

\\

^ H E DIVISION OF NEGRO ECONOMICS
OF THE UNITED STATES DE­
PARTMENT OF LABOR.

Every Negro of thought has at some time given
the work of Dr. Haynes of the Division of Negro
Economics of the Department of Labor some con­
sideration. Some have given it more than passing
thought, and it is our firm conviction that every
forward-looking Negro in the country should get
behind this one proposition for this Congress and
use his influence to have the work of this division
perpetuated. W e are going to write a letter to
Senator Carter Glass and to our Congressman right
away, and by the time this article is published the
letters will be in the hands of these gentlemen. W e
hope also that as many of our friends who can
will do likewise and not wait until the time for
Congress to act upon this matter before taking it
up with the powers who are to decide upon it.
T he Associated Negro Press under a release of
November 27th states:
“R. L. Mays, international president of the Rail­
way M en’s International E. I. A., has taken up
with Senator Medill McCormick and Congressman
M artin B. Madden the subject of having Congress
provide for the continuation of the Bureau of Ne­
gro Economics in the Department of Labor.
Congressman Madden in a statement to M r.
Mays says: “This bureau and several others were

1920

METHOD

created as war measures for the better correlation
of different groups of workers during the war period.
It was thought by many that when the war ended
there would be no need for their further continu­
ance, but if the experience of those most directly
affected leads them to believe that the work done
during the war proved of such value as to justify
its continuance as a peace-time activity, I see no
reason why their judgment should not be given great
weight and the question of legislation making it a
useful arm of the government given early and fav­
orable consideration.”
In another release under the same date the same
Associated Negro Press Service has this to say:
“Thousands of Negroes, who flocked North by
trainloads during the summer, are returning South.
“Disappointed by failure to find the higher wages
and better conditions about which employment
agents glibly talked, their old employers say they are
eagerly seeking to return to the work they left.
Country Negroes declare their higher pay was
more than counter-balanced by increased living costs
in industrial cities. City Negroes often found their
wages in Northern cities did not equal their pay in
Southern cities.
“ Reports received by local employment bureaus
show that 250,000 Negroes went North during
June, July and August this year. There was con­
siderable Negro migration almost from the start of
the war.
“Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, Georgia, Ala­
bama and Kentucky were chiefly hit by the Negro
migration, Mississippi showing an actual decrease in
population.
“The supply of Negro labor in Mississippi is esti­
mated to have been cut 50 per cent during the
summer.
“According to R. C. Wells, of the Memphis em­
ployment Bureau, and railroad men, the migration
of Negroes has now almost completely stopped, while
the return movement is growing so heavy that, if it
continues at its present rates, about 85 per cent of
those who left will have returned before the end of
the winter.”
Further on in this article we are printing the
Plans of The Department with reference to this
work, the same having appeared in an article pre­




5

pared by Dr. George E. Haynes, Director of the
Division of Negro Economics, especially for the
“Negro Labor Survey Edition” of the California
Free Lance, a publication which has done as much
in the interest of Negro Labor as any other journal
in the race. Study the conditions as set out in the
second release of the Associated Negro Press and
then drift over to the program of the Division of
Negro Economics, and then see if you don’t think it
is well nigh impossible for the Federal Government
to handle this important phase of administration
duties without some well organized division under
the immediate direction of some specially trained
Negro expert like Dr. Haynes. W e draw no fur­
ther conclusions here, but put the matter up to you
straight, furnishing the facts and ask that you draw
your own conclusions. After you draw your con­
clusions, get busy with your stenographer and dic­
tate that letter to your congressman and senator
before it passes out of your mind.
The work of the Division of Negro Economics
was cut short when appropriations were exhausted
and Congress failed to make any further provision
for this important work. However, Dr. Haynes
has been able to maintain a skeleton of his war-time
efficiently organized field staff, and under untold
handicap has been able to prove beyond a question
that this work is all but indispensable to the general
governmental welfare. By dropping this work
when it did the government lost the services of some
mighty good men. The State Supervisor of Virginia
had built up 56 county Negro W orkers’ Advisory
Committees and they were a compact, careful, pains­
taking group. The government lost the services
of T . C. Erwin, state supervisor for Dr. Haynes
Division in Virginia, one of eleven state divisions.
It was the Government’s loss but possibly the race’s
gain for Prof. Erwin since that time has helped
organize and is now the president of what promises
to be one of the most prosperous banks in Virginia.
The program of the Division of Negro Economics
as furnished the California Free Lance Labor Sur­
vey Edition by the Director of Negro Economics is
as follows:
1.
Surveys— The department plans to continue
keeping informed of migration and movements of
negro labor and of its available supply, shortage or

6

MET HOD

DECEMBER

demand in various localities, in order that both em­
ployers and wage-earners may be served.

and improvement of negro workers will be con­
tinued.

2. Investigations—Negro conferences and meet­
ings of various kinds wherein the state of mind of
the negro people may be ascertained from a neigh­
borhood and locality viewpoint will be the subject
of information to the department.

6.
Efficiency Campaigns—T he department plans
to stimulate the co-operative negro workers’ advisory
committees to be of more practical value for increas­
ing the productive power and efficiency of negro
workers and improving their relations to white em­
ployers and white workers. To this end a variety of
means is contemplated in the way of shop talks, pic­
tures, cartoons and placards; public speeches and the
presentation of printed matter to negro audiences;
and a generally systematic educational campaign.

3. Publication and Publicity— Publicity will be
given to such facts and information as will be help­
ful to white employers, white workers and negro
workers in creating good will and a spirit of co­
operation. Local conferences of these groups, where
the lead and consent of representative white citizens
may be obtained, will be held and the free and frank
discussion of local problems and conditions of labor
wi 11 be had.
4. Co-operation — T he department will seek
gerater co-operation from white employers and
white workers who are interested in improving the
productive efficiency of negro workers and improv­
ing their relations to white employers and white
workers. In this effort the department will welcome
the aid of individual employers and of associations
of employers, chambers of commerce, councils of
national defense and organizations, agencies and
boards, as well as local officials and local govern­
mental agencies that may be interested.
The department recognizes in this negro work
the local character of the problems between local
employers and local employes and that the complete
co-operation of all the interests involved is indis­
pensable to any amicable adjustment of the delicate
and difficult questions that are now confronting agri­
culture and industry where negroes are involved.
Conferences and co-operation with employers will
be sought, looking to the training, housing, thrift,
health, regularity, stability and recreation of negro
workers as being the means through which greater
efficiency may be attained by them, to the end that
the growing demand for more efficient labor may be
met by the use of negro workers in as many lines as
possible.
5. Advisory Service — Advisory service of the
division of negro economics to the several bureaus
and divisions of the department in such ways as
will help in the more effective recruiting, distribution




Present Scope of Negro Economics.
After the close of the past fiscal year Congress
failed to provide any funds with which to finance
the negro economics work in its full strength during
the fiscal year. This lack of funds made necessary
a closing up of the field offices in eleven states and
curtailment of the administrative force at W ash­
ington.
The high regard for the work by the secretary
of labor and his desire to continue it with whatever
strength was possible is well evidenced by the fol­
lowing words of the secretary in a personal letter
to the director of negro economics under date of
July 12, 1919:
So important do I consider the information, advice
and departmental aid furnished through your work
as director of negro economics, a war service of the
Department of Labor which I created in order to
harmonize the labor relations of white workers,
negro workers and white employers and thereby to
promote the welfare of all wage-earners in the
United Staets, that I hereby request you to continue
the service.
P A T R O N IZ E O U R A D V ERTISERS
Dependability is the bulwark of modern business.
M E T H O D is an exponent of modern business,
and modern business men look for dependable
mediums through which to sell dependable goods
to dependable people.
The commodities offered in our advertising pages
are dependable, and we recommend that you lend
a partial ear to the messages of the houses offering
them.

1920

M ETHO D------

----

7

GETTING UNDER ROOF
By
THOS. J. CALLOWAY
(The author is possibly best remembered by his “Getting Under Roof at the James­
town Exposition— 16,000 exhibits of 9,000 Negro exhibitors. M r. Calloway has
made an exhaustive study of housing conditions, having been engaged in a big
way in the real estate business ever since the Exposition, and is located in If ashington. I'Ve are fortunate in being able to give to our readers Air. Calloway s
views on this all important subject.— The Editor.)
The most urgent problem of the race is that of
correct or improved housing. Just now all the
cities and industrial centers have the same story of
over-crowding and enormous rents to pay. The
high wages are all for naught if the wage earner
must pay it all out for a place in which to live and
still, even after paying such prices, have a place
that is not conducive to the most comfort. I t is
useless td recite statistics of the various cities to
prove this statement, for it is the same and uni­
versal story in all centers. W hat then is the
remedy? This is all that can interest us at this
time.
Shall the remedy be to preach and urge all per­
sons to leave the cities and go back to the spacious
farms? Such advice will fall on deaf ears. T. he
great majority of those who have left the farm
for the city will not go back. They dread the iso­
lation, the long days of hard, strenuous work, the
uncertainty of harvests, the poor school facilities
for their children, the absence of social life, etc.
At whatever sacrifice or shortening of their ways
by unhygenic living they will suffer all these rather
than go back. Then, too, the cities need their labor
and in these cities they can find the high attractive
wages that purchase the wants of their lives, good
schools and churches, lodges and social clubs. All
this goes to show that the “back to the farm” slo­
gan is a losing propaganda; at least till rural life
is improved either by government activity or other­
wise.
One remedy would be to build up apartments of
many stories like those of New York City and con­
tinue to multiply them as fast as the city population
demands. My multiplying apartments of eight to
ten stories height provision can be made for a vast




population in a small area. But is it wholesome to
live under such congested conditions? Let any one
who has made even a casual inspection of the con­
gested section of New York City answer.
There is another solution for the city housing,
and this seems to me to be the best. 1 would make
suburban living available to the family of small
income by providing it a lot and a cottage in the
fresh air within a trolley ride of the city jobs. 1 his
plan calls for less investment than the.plan to mul­
tiply apartments in the heart of the city, it offers
private ownership to the family which is conducive
to a higher standard of citizenship, it enables the
thrifty family to have a garden, poultry, etc., and
thus meet the cost of living in this way supplemental
to their wages.
W ill suburban living attract the family of small
income? A few years ago some of us decided to try
the experiment. W e secured a tract of land on
the trolley connecting Washington, D. C., and
Baltimore, Md., and Annapolis, Md. O ur tract
is nearly 14 miles from the heart of Washington
and about 7 miles from the line of the District of
Columbia and Maryland, being located in Prince
George’s County, Maryland. W e named our sub­
division Lincoln, Maryland, after the martyred
President. The building lots were made to average
50 feet wide by 150 feet deep so as to provide ample
space for the garden, the flower beds, the chicken
yard, the pig sty, fruit trees, etc. The separating
streets were from 50 to 70 feet wide so as to assure
plenty of air space and roominess between homes.
We had some cool springs of splendid water and
these springs were gathered into a reservoir specially
constructed of concrete and hold fifty thousand gal­
lons. Upon a high point we erected a ten thousand

8

METHOD

gallon wooden tank and we provided a gasoline
engine and pump with which to hoist the water
into the tank. From the tank the water flows by
gravity through a two-inch main into all the homes.
W ith this water system all necessity of wells was
removed and the opportunity for modern plumbing
was made available. Most of the homes are so
provided, so that there is little difference between
the city convenience and those in Lincoln, Md.
But the real question is, has Lincoln attracted many
home-seekers from the city? If we are to be guided
by the actual numbers who are living there the
answer would not seem to be very decidedly pro.
A t this time there are less than fifty homes in Lin­
coln and Buena Vista, the latter being an outgrowth
of our experiment. But the actual count does not
show that we have not the real solution of the city
housing problem. If we could finance the building
of homes in such way that the city renter could
move into a home on rent terms without so large a
first payment it would be no difficulty in getting
takers. W e have had many times more applica­
tions for homes than we have been able to provide,
for the reason that heretofore we have had to re­
quire a very substantial first cash payment which
the city applicant has been unable to provide.
Given sufficient building funds we would have a
constant stream of immigrants. W e are now en­
gaged in constituting such a fund and we hope to
demonstrate the solution to the financial as well
as moral satisfaction of those engaged in the move­
ment.
It may be asked, How does the life in Lincoln
compare with that in the city in its moral and civic
aspects ?
In answer let me cite some illustrations. For
some years, beginning shortly after the beginning of
the colony, there has been maintained a Lincoln
Citizens Association, membership in which attaches
to each resident. This organization looks after
the general interests of the community. I t con­
ducts an annual fair in which are shown choice
specimens of chickens, pigs, garden and farm prod­
ucts, sewing, fancy work, canned articles, and for
those pronounced the best prizes are awarded by
disinterested judges. Some one is invited to deliver
an address and music is usually provided. The




DECEM BER

effect of the fair is to stimulate garden and poultry
raising, to stimulate a lively competition for prizes
and to create a local interest in general progress.
Another demonstration of the good work of the
association has just been proven. T he road leading
from Lincoln to the state highway had to be aban­
doned because of a broken down bridge and certain
lack of title. Another and shorter way had to be
adopted, but there were certain engineering difficul­
ties that made the new way very expensive. It
was necessary to build some 400 feet through a
marsh by hand labor. W ithout any appropriation to
provide for this the men of the community volun­
teered to meet on two nights a week and by the
use of artificial light carry on the work. In this
way the work was completed in six months and a
road that would have cost three or four thousand
dollars to accomplish was done by volunteer labor
by men who had public spirit enough to do this
work after performing a day’s work in their own
jobs. One other illustration: The public school be­
came too small. It was decided to have a larger and
better building than the country could be expected
to provide. A subscription list was started and some
entertainments given so that some eighteen hundred
dollars in cash and bonafide subscriptions has been
raised. Other illustrations might be given in the
care of the public park and in the erection of the
church. I do not need to remind the reader that
children and adults who live in such atmosphere
must be more moral, more co-operative, more public
spirited, more serious minded than the average citi­
zen of the city who is surrounded with so many
institutions promoted to commercialize his amuse­
ments and to entertain him to no serious purpose.
The Delsarte Film Corporation, a moving picture
concern, has been organized in New York. As far
as we can learn, this corporation intends having
colored players in the leading role. The subject
matter of the plays will be for the most part racial.
— The Promoter.

The Sarco Realty Co. has commenced building
a theater at the southeast corner of 137th Street
and Seventh Avenue, New York.— The Promoter.

1920

= ME T H 0 D

—

9

ADVERTISING-SCIENTIFIC AND PRATICAL
By F. GRANT GILMORE,
Advertising Expert, of Philadelphia, Pa.

(M r. Gilmore is the author of that great Negro drama, "The P r o b l e m o n e of the
few mediums which have successfully disputed the claims of "1 he Birth of a
Nation." The white as well as the colored press stands at a respectful distance,
before the pen of this rare talented business man. M r. Gilmore is located in
Philadelphia, from which place he conducts a national advertising agency. The
Gilmore Co., of which he is president, is the accredited agent for the Advertising
Department of M E T H O D .— The Editor.)
The success of individuals, firms, corporations or son believed he could “cut expenses ’ as the firm
any institution through which the interest of the was well known; so the son gives orders to stop
public is solicited requires originality in thought publicity, taking from the business the life that was
and originality in an expression of that thought. the source of the firm’ ssuccess.
Publicity awakens the curious. Once aroused,
One can be an inventor, yet with all the knowledge
investigation
is in order. I have something. You
of the mechanical construction of his particular dis­
covery, remain unable to market his product. It is
here the advertiser is called upon to give to the
world that which ingenuity conceived.
Advertising is both a science and an art, improved
by experience with a persistency to force your prod­
uct on the markets of the world regardless of com­
petition. Advertising in fact was designed to bat­
ter down competition and turn the wiles of the com­
petitor into boosters for your own product. A
writer has said “The pleasure was in pursuit and
not in possession.” The love of the game is the
motive power behind the advertising man who sees
in the object he is exploiting a service not only to
the trade but to humanity.
To rise to fame along commercial lines various
methods are adopted to prosecute the motive of the
individual. A man starts in business. If he has
capital he must in an economical way so apply his
judgment that the money invested will receive the
proper impetus to give life to his enterprise. Origi­
nality, personality and persistency are brought for­
ward to add vigor to this new life of commercial
activity. In commercial circles we find divers cases.
A man has risen to wealth and power. He trains
his sons to follow in his wake. The father dies
and the son becomes the head of affairs. Although
the son knew the scientific end of the business he
lacked the one potent force that was the secret of
his father’s success. The father spent thousands a
year advertising his business. At his death the




think you need it. I picture the great good and
service I can be to you. You see; you read; you
buy. The quality may be good or bad, nevertheless
you have my goods and I have your money, and the
cycle of trade is completed.
There are several forms of advertising, promiscu­
ous, scientific, conservative, tactful originality, prac­
tical. Promiscuous advertising for example— a man
tells of his product on a small bill or sheet; he em­
ploys men to distribute the same all over the city,

10

METHOD

they are thrown in the gutter where they are not
read; they lack the influence to attract hence are
useless. Conservative advertising—W hen an article
has demonstrated its value to the public the promoter
needs only to keep alive the existence of the product
as for example, the Ford car, the Kodak, the tele­
phone. Scientific Advertising—T hat which is dis­
played to the person needing the article. A firm
manufactures cork limbs. Although any one may
need the service of the firm or manufacturer, yet
you find most of his advertising in medical journals.
T he ad attracts the surgeon and he does the rest.
Tactful originality—The New Product—The ad­
vertiser must first find the market for an article
which is unknown, plunging with reckless abandon
upon competitors using new thought, original dis­
play, courting criticisms never abandoning his mo­

DECEM BER

tive—putting the thing “over.” Once established,
success is assured.
He then adopts practical
methods. Practical advertising is using only the
mediums needed to keep alive the interest and cut­
ting the expense of the initial drive.
All branches of human activity must advertise.
W e find schools of learning, universities and col­
leges, advertising; modern religion finds that the
more publicity it uses, the more the public becomes
interested in its cause. Along all lines of civic,
social, financial, in fact in all lines of endeavor,
results obtained only through this particular chan­
nel. It only remains to improve the science of ad­
vertising that the application will fit the interest
in which w i are directly concerned. It is largely
through this modern science that we will succeed
as individuals, a race and a nation.

FARMING AMONG OUR PEOPLE IN THE SOUTH
By

.

R. W. WESTBURY,
President, National Negro Farmers’ Association.

Just at this time the farmers of the South, es­
pecially the Negro farmer, are facing what appears
to be a desperate situation. Most of these.are what
is generally termed the one-crop farmer, in many
instances the share-cropper; and now the price of
cotton has fallen so far below their expectations the
Negro farmer finds himself in rather bad condition.
During the war, under the direction of the Food
Administration, more atention was paid to food­
stuffs and greater economy practiced. Enough food
was raised for home consumption and some to spare,
but the high price of cotton for the past few years
has induced the farmer to plunge largely into debt,
neglect the food crops and practice extravagance.
Many now find themselves unable to meet their
demands. The cotton must be sold at a sacrifice,
causing much loss and many privations.
W e believe that the Negro is especially adapted
to the South and to farming and when properly
taught and educated in the business ethics as well
as the scientific methods of farming he is a grand
success.




W e have living examples in our own state (South
Carolina) of his ability to acquire wealth and suc­
cess as a farmer. The greatest need of the Negro
farmer in the South is more education and protec­
tion from those who would take advantage of his
ignorance and trustfulness to induce him to spend
his earnings extravagantly.

Jefferson City, Mo., Nov. 30.—The State Board
of Agriculture has received information that corn
is selling as low as 40 cents a bushel in localities not
accessible to markets. Any considerable distance
from a railroad, the usual price is now 50 cents per
bushel. Corn has not been so low in years. Tw o
reasons are ascribed for existing conditions. One
is the large crop and another is the fact that farmers
have largely ceased feeding for the market.
Persons from Wichita, Kans., who were here to­
day, say that corn is selling in that State as low as
35 cents per bushel some distance from a good
market.—St. Louis Argus.

1920

M ETH 0 D

II

INSURANCE-A VOCATION
BY GEORGE W. BLOUNT.
The following article has been published and distributed as a hand-poster by M r.
Blount, but it carries such an optimistic insurance message to the man in the field
that M E T H O D is glad to publish it again for the benefit of Negro insurancegenerally.— The Editor.
Fundamentally the purpose of life insurance is to
provide protection against all financial loss which
may be caused by sickness, accident, disability, old
age, or death. It cultivates and encourages sys­
tematically the habits of thrift and economy. It
provides the safest and most profitable form of sav­
ing and investment for the average person.
Insurance is recognized as a necessity and it is
daily increasing in volume. As long as there is a
demand for insurance, there will be a need for the
efficient man who is willing to render useful service
to the insuring public and insurance business.
W ith life insurance as your vocation, you have
the opportunity of rendering to mankind a most
useful and valuable service, a quality of service equal

in value to that being rendered by those represent­
ing any other vocation, profession or business.
To write insurance so that it will remain perma­
nently on the books of your company, it requires
careful preparation, regular and systematic study
with earnest thought in your daily task. Be loyal
to your company and its officers. Be an enthusiastic
promoter and teacher of life insurance and its bene­
fits. Help build and represent a financially sound,
efficiently and progressively managed, modern com­
pany.
Your personal success will take care of itself if
you put the interest of your company, its policy­
holders and prospects first and yourself afterwards.
“He who serves best will profit most.”

METHOD GETS A “SEND ALONG”
CONGRATULATORY R EM A R K S FROM DR. E M M E T T J. SCOTT,
Secretary National Negro Business League.

(Dr. Scott needs no introduction to the public. His twenty years of racial service at
Tuskegee and his practical program for the National Negro Business League are
known from the Gulf to Canada and from Coast to Coast. Dr. Scott is one of
the younger Negro men of vision, and we might add "pep."— The Editor.)
“ In contributing a few words to the initial issue
of Method, The Magazine of Negro Business, a
monthly to be published and edited by Frank How­
ard Hallion, lately associated with me as Special
Assistant at the Headquarters of the National
Negro Business League at Washington, D. C., I
wish to say: M r. Hallion attracted my attention
more than a year ago by his energetic effort to put
the Richmond Negro Business League ‘on the
map.’ It was these efforts which led to my request­
ing him to join us in Washington as executive assist­
ant at our national headquarters. His keen interest
in the cause of the League and his sympathy with
the program submitted by me at the Saint Louis
Session of the National Organization, have been of
/




the greatest possible help to us in our efforts, along
with the other officers of the League, to make it a
living, vital force in the business life of our racial
group.
“Under the direction of the devoted band of
workers at the helm of the National Organization,
I feel quite sure that if we may have the sympathetic
co-operation of business men in all parts of the
country, we shall make our National Organization
a potential force in the commercial life of America.
“It gives me great pleasure, therefore, in this
more or less informal way, to congratulate M r.
Hallion upon this individual effort of his in behalf
of Negro business. He has my warmest congratu­
lations and best wishes.”

12

METHOD

AN U N L IM IT E D F IE L D O F O P E R A T IO N
A N D AN U N B O U N D E D O P P O R T U N IT Y
FO R SERVICE
By T he E ditor

In reply to a letter sent out from Method to
newspapers and other journals of the race, seeking
advice and opinion, we have received some very help­
ful suggestions and some interesting opinions which
we feel our readers would like to hear. W e haven’t
the space to print every communication received but
give here extracts from the offices of some of our
friends and admirers. W e print here the opinions
and keep the advice part for ourselves.
From away out in Frisco J. E. Wysinger, of
the Western Outlook, sends this message in his
letter to the editor: “As the field is a virgin one,
much may be accomplished in giving our business
men advice and arousing a community of interest
that will be helpful to the race as a whole; and as
your name implies, more Method in the conduct
of business enterprises.” He closes by saying, “W ith
these few lines we hope you may realize your fond­
est hopes and become in fact the ‘Exponent of
Progress.’ ”
Rev. K. W . McMillan, of the Inquirer Publish­
ing Company down in the Lone Star State, writes:
“W e are indeed glad to know of the appearance of
such a magazine as yours among us, and congratu­
late you upon the step you have taken. W e believe
that you can do wonderful things.” W e believe so,
too, Rev. McMillen, and are glad to see that some­
body else does also.
John H. Rives, editor of the Dayton Forum,
after congratulatory remarks, states: “You will be
of great service to the race if you can through
“ Method” lead our business men into a modern
system of conducting business.” W e are going to
let the business men lead themselves, M r. Rives, by
telling each other every month through “ Method”
just how they are conducting their particular busi­
ness. Kind of a hard thing to try to do so too
much “leading.”
Up from where you get your furniture Geo. M.
Smith, managing editor of the Michigan State
News, sends us these encouraging sentences: “I am
very much interested in our group becoming more




DECEM BER

modern and more united in our business relations
and believe that in our efforts to compete, one with
another, we often lose valuable advantages through
lack of corporation. If your proposed magazine will
point a way to a bigger and better fraternity among
Negro business men, you may count on us among
your followers.” Read the editorial on Christmas,
M r. Smith, and see if we are not trying to preach
the gospel of a brotherly spirit among business men.
The Smoky City sends down this through Ira
F. Lewis, managing editor of the Pittsburgh
Courier: “W e think that this magazine which you
are putting out will fill a long felt want in the
colored business field.” W e agree with M r. Lewis
that want has been “long felt,” and we are trying
to fill it.
Then come Wesley C. Peoples, the great Pacific
Coast publisher, and offers us the service of news
releases distributed weekly by his various news­
papers. He says: “Anything we can do for you
in this neck of the woods, do not fail to call on us.”
“Your proposition is a good one, for this reason:
the destiny of the Negro depends upon colored liter­
ature just as long as you give them good clean, truth­
ful facts,” writes Elijah Stricklin, Jr., from the
office of The Advocate, Wilmington, Del. W ith
some good, sound advice bearing on journalism in
general M r. Stricklin closes wishing us unbounded
success. W e shall try our best, M r. Stricklin, to
make our matter truthful, good and clean.
H. T . Bowman, manager of the Citizen Publish­
ing Co., strikes close home when he states: “ I be­
lieve that such an enterprise should succeed espe­
cially if it takes the place of an information bulletin,
giving progressive real news of opportunities to en­
gage in live Negro propositions.” T hat is part of
the service of Method, M r. Bowman, and we are
asking the business men all over the country to co­
operate with us in our effert to give publicity to
Negro business opportunities.
W . P. Bayless, manager, sends us the opinion
from the office of The Competitor at Pittsburgh,
that “The time is, indeed, ripe for just such pub­
lication as you contemplate publishing and we feel
certain that it will receive the loyal support of our
people everywhere.” A most encouraging message,
and we shall ever do our best to merit the support
of the business group of our people.

1920

METHOD

W ith such complimentary and encouraging, help­
ful and boosting remarks from all over everywhere,
even if we felt like turning back, the impetus given
us by the public and our fellow-journalist would
strengthen our determination to go forward. No
enterprise, we believe, has ever been started that had
any larger portion of the moral support of those
engaged in similar activity. For this we are truly
grateful, and we ask that the public co-operate with
us in our campaign of business service, that we may
help lighten the burden of the Negro business man.
O U R COVER D ESIG N
M r. George H. Ben Johnson, artist and car­
toonist, of Richmond, Va., has been engaged and is
now working on a design for our cover. I his is to
be a permanent, decorative and artistic design, the
center of the bottom panel to be left blank for in­
sertions of such mater as we see fit each month to
print, just as the current number has an extract
from the speech of M r. Walker.
George H. Ben Johnson is well known through
his cartoons which appeared in the Richmond Planet
for a long time, two of which were copied by the
Literary Digest. W e feel free in asking the public
to watch for this, another specimen of the unusual
work of a Negro; and we feel confident you will be
pleased. Method will spare no pains nor any part
of its income to constantly watch for opportunities
for making a better journal and building a better
service for the business man.

13

ties. M r. Jones will accompany the new cashier to
Winston-Salem, open the books for the bank and
remain long enough to assist in training the second
man. The Citizens Bank & T rust Co. marks the
seventh Negro bank opened by reason of the in­
spiration, information and assistance rendered by
the Tidewater Bank & T rust Co. since it opened for
business June 9, 1919. The officers of the new
bank will be: Dr. J. W . Jones, president; G. W .
Hawkins, vice-president; J. S. Hughson, cashier,
and John A. Blume, assistant cashier.—Norfolk
Journal.
A H IN T F R O M N A T IO N A L D E F E N D E R
A N D SUN
Ten thousand lines of space are to be used in the
Baltimore (M d.) newspapers by the Board of Esti­
mate in an effort to win the people over to permit
the board to borrow $51,000,000.
Here is a concrete example of sensible government
advertising. The city has appropriated 30,000 to
advertise to its residents facts, as the authorities see
them, in support of the bond issue.

Washington, Nov. 17.—The incorporation of the
Prudential Bank, a commercial and savings insti­
tution with a capitalization of $100,000, and the
incorporation of the Standard Investment and De­
velopment Company for $150,000 gave the Negroes
in the District of Columbia a total of nineteen re­
cently organized corporations with an aggregate
capitalization of $2,880,000.
Included in this list is a hotel and apartment
J. S. H U G H S O N , CA SH IER O F W IN S T O N house proposition, two banks, a broom factory, two
SALEM BANK
The Citizens Bank and T rust Co., of Winston- buliding and loan associations, a farming and mer­
Salem, N. C., will open for business December 9th chandise company, a housing corporation, a life in­
with M r. J. S. Hughson, at present general ledger surance company, a theater corporation, a com­
bookkeeper and auditor of the J. idewater Bank & mercial company owning valuable property, an in­
T rust Co., as cashier. M r. Hughson is a Howard vestment and development company that recently
man and taught languages at the Booker T . W ash­ purchased eight stores for $120,000 in the busiest
ington High School, Norfolk, Va., before entering part of the uptown section, a suburban pleasure
the banking business. His training and experience, park association, a motion picture corporation, sev­
both theoretical and practical, in banking acquired eral realty corporations, whose recent purchases of
at the Mutual Savings Bank, Portsmouth, Va., and large and centrally located apartment houses have
the Tidewater Bank & T rust Co., under the capa­ greatly relieved the housing situation among our
ble supervision of M r. J. S. Jones, as cashier and group, and several co-operative organizations that
secretary-treasurer, respectively, makes him pre­ are conservatively from the sale of stock to members
eminently fitted for his new duties and responsibili­ of the race.— C has . E. H all, in The Negro IVorld.




14

METHOD
CLASSIFIED SECTION

DECEM BER
T H E N E X T ISSUE

P. B. Young, journalist, banker and publisher, in
the next issue will tell through a letter to the editor
what he thinks Negro business most needs. C. C.
KATES FOR. THESE COLUMNS, 25 cents per line Spaulding, of insurance fame, will also state his
-in advance. Minimum charge, $1.00.
views on the same subject. M r. Spaulding ought to
If you are ambitious and want to earn from 35 to
know, for he is a pioneer in possibly the Negro’s
75 dollars a week, in work that will take you among the
most progressive business people, write to Melwin Finance greatest business branch—insurance. George W .
Corporation, 514 N. Second St., Richmond, Va.
Blount s Creed of a Negro Salesman” will also
WANTED—5,000 Subscribers for METHOD in 30 appear, and Dr. W . S. Woodson, Grand Worthy
days. Will you be one,
Master of the True Reformers, will tell of “The
Practically Every Business Man of the race will see
this space. What have you to say to them.
Rise and Progress—The Failure and the Coming
AGENTS make good selling METHOD, The Mag­
Back of the Reformers order. The editorials will
azine of Negro Business,_______
have the usual punch. Don’t fail to follow the editor
When Considering Investment Securities consult us
first. No charge for advice. Melwin Finance Corporation, in his discourse on The New Year. Other feature
514 N. Second St., Richmond, Va.______
articles will round out another “knock-out” issue.
Peiton was once poor. Now he is rich. He did it
Fathers, let your son enter a pleasant and profit­
advertising. For you own problem try METHOD’S able business for himself. By handling M E T H O D
classified section.
he will come in contact with the business men and
10 First Class Salesmen Wanted at once. Full
time proposition. Apply in person or own handwriting. women of the community, getting business atmos­
Melwin Finance Corporation, 514 N. Second St., Rich­
phere as well as learning further the lessons of self­
mond, Va.
reliance which you have been teaching him at home.
SELECT LIST OF BOOKS: The Haitian Revolution,
Irtce, $1.50; The Negro Faces America, Price $175' Keep pace with the business spirit of the race by
Dark Water, by DuBois, Price $2.00; The Aims and
Method of a Liberal Education (Addresses by Edward constantly reading M E T H O D , The Magazine of
VVilhnot Blyden), Price 50 cts. Agents wanted. Write Negro Business. In order not to miss a single copy,
to Young’s Book Exchange, 135 West 135th Street
send in your subscription at once.
New York.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
POSITIONS OPEN
EMPLOYES AVAILABLE

WANTED Live Agents at once, to sell Dudley's
Famous Auto Polish for furniture, pianos, church pews

hardwood floors and hundreds of other things that have
a varnished surface. Makes them look like new. Aeents
can make $50.00 to $75.00 per week selling Dudley’s
1 olish to furniture dealers, drug stores, hardware stores
churches, housekeepers, automobile stores, paint stores
and grocerystores. Special Offer: For 00 days we will
ship to all new agents $10.00 worth of Dudley’s Polish
tor $5.00. Take advantage of this special offer at once
Dud ey & Porter Manufacturing Co., 916 S. Main St
Muskogee, Okla.
’




Another modern and up-to-date bakery, known
as the Universal Negro Baking Co., recently opened
at 2488 Seventh Avenue, between 144th and 145th
Streets. W e beg of our readers to give this new
corporation all the patronage possible. Let the
Race First” idea actuate your purchasings.— The
Negro IV orId.

Dr. JULIA P. H. COLEMAN, Pres.
THE HAIR-VIM CHEMICAL COMPANY
Washington, D. C.

Will have an important announcement to the
business women of the race, in this space
next issue. Watch for it.

15

METHOD

1920

<xxxxxx>
Your Meals at the_

I f you want service and quality when in Washington

)E A L L U N C H R O O M
The Dining Room Beautiful
W. B, WADE, Proprietor

Street, N. W.

TAKE YOUR MEALS AT

4 * Magfnngton’g Cafe
llth and You Streets, N. W.

Washingtin, D. C.

Open all day

A n d all night.

X X XX X X X XX X X X XX X X X XX X X X XX X X X XX X JO O C XX X

. Church Street Lunch .
JOHN MOORE, Proprietor.
Meals Served at A ll Hours.

1464 Church St., N. W.

Washington, D. C.

OSCAR QUIVERS
Leading Colored Optician in Washington.

E. L. CRUMMIE

.'.

COMMERCIAL ARTIST.

SHOW CAR D WRITER
MAIL ORDERS.
1359 You Street, N. W.,

IF O IR

Washington, D. C.

S A L E

FINE WATER COLORS AND OIL PAINTINGS

THE WORK OF

A ll Styles and Makes of Frames and Glasses.

Mr. S. 0 . COLLINS, The Artist,

CONSULT ME ALONG ALL LINES.
928 You Street, N. W.

PRICES REASONABLE.
Studio: 1816 12th St. N. W., Washington, D. C.

cxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx^xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

n“THE TATLER”
45,000 READERS WEEKLY

sA Great Investment Gpportinty-—Buy Stock in the

jSavannah Motion Picture
Corpora tion
($100,000 CORPORATION)
A C o r p o r a t io n o f N e g r o e s

CATERING EXCLUSIVELY TO NEGRO TRADE

FRED R. BYRD, Editor.

A Snappy Journal of Society




THE THEATRE.
Stock now on sale, $10.00 per share, C ash or In sta llm en t]
X
p la n . P o sitiv ely a S a fe In v estm e n t.

BUY STOCK NOW AND GET IN ON THE
GROUND FLOOR.

{Send for circulars and application blanks. G. H. Bowen,
General Agent, 523 W. Broad St., Savanah, Ga.

6




,METHOD=

“ATTENTION”
Advertising is intended to make sales and sales make MONEY.
That’s what you are in business for. But you can’t sell a man until
you have his ATTENTION. That’s what METHOD is for. It is a
great power for attention-getting because.
It is new. It is novel.
It appeals to the business instinct of the race. I t’s articles are full
of interest and information.
It SERVES the business man and anything that SERVES gets
attention.
The attention METHOD attracts will bring YOUR business to
the attention of our clientele.
It is circulated mostly in the business world and specializes in
QUALITY attention and not QUANTITY attention. It will pay
you to write at once for rates to
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT METHOD,
514 N. Second Street,
Richmond, Va.

DECEM BER

x:

------x------

In offering a Security to the Public
THE

MELWIN FINANCE
CORPORATION
OF RICHMOND, VIRGINIA
makes thorough investigations and takes care that the stocks it recom­
mends are of the first water.
All securities we are handling have had to under-go the acid tests
of our experts, and we offer to you with impunity the stock of

The Commercial Bank and Trust
Company
OF RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

AT $25.00 PER SHARE
This Bank is now open and doing business. Deposits on opening
day were over $53,000.00.
We have a few openings for salesmen of ability.

Melwin Finance Corporation
514 North Second Street,
R CHMOND, - VIRGINIA.
M. C. CLARKE, President.




)

T. C. ERW IN, Sec’y-Treasurer.




RICHMOND
THE RICHMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
furnishes the following facts.
RICHMOND has, within the city limits, a population of 171,667—
U. S. census of 1920.
According to the census, is growing at the rate of 34.5 per cent.
Has an area of 26 square miles.
Has $39,828,069 invested in manufacturing enterprises which yield
annual sales of $155,745,600.
Has forty out of every 100 of its working population engaged in
manufacturing and mechanical affairs.
Has very low electric, gas and water rates.
Has forty-two public schools, and 34,444 scholars, and many private
and parochial schools.
Has the largest book publishing house, and the largest lithograph­
ing establishment in the south.
Has the largest cigar f a c t o r y , cigarette factory, wood works, baking
powder factory, blotting paper industry, and bottled flavoring extract
factory in the world.
Has one of the largest locomotive plants in the world, and is the
home of the world’s largest fertilizer works.

THE RICHMOND NEGRO BUSINESS LEAGUE
Makes the following claims
RICHMOND has good schools, good churches, good water, good
drainage, good jobs, good money, good homes, good heat and good light.
Richmond has good colored people and good white people—good
relations between all its people—Richmond is the best place in America
for a colored man to live.
Any person desiring a good location for business or the practice of
his profession will do well to write and get full particulars from

THE RICHMOND NEGRO BUSINESS LEAGUE
514 N. Second Street,
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.




September

21 ,

1920.

Dear J r . H rr iu o n :
I

u n d e rs ta n d

th »t

yon

fr

w

p ro -*

pered « referen ce l i s t o f s o c f s l surveys, i f vou
have coplos fo r d is tr ib u tio n I nonli appreciate
r e c e ip t o f two o r three c o p ie s .
'lh a n s d n ^ y o n

In

>’ t v « n o e ,

I re g a in

Tours v e ry t r t u y ,

H/MLC

R O BERT LA N SIN G , Chairman General Committee

J O H N R. M O T T , Chairman Executive Committee

W ILLIAM B. MILLAR, Secretary

I nterchurch W orld M ovement
OF NORTH AMERICA
SU R VEY DEPARTM ENT
45 W est i8th Street
H om e Missions Division

N E W YORK C I T Y
S. EARL TA Y LO R , General Secretary

R A LPH E. D IFFEN D O RFER




•ian u a ry 2 , 1919

. i s s l i a t t i e L. C am p b ell,
Secretary,
c /o D r. Geo. E. H ay n es,
D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r,
W a sh in g to n , D.C.
Hy, d e a r M iss C am p b ell:
T h is i s to sa y D r. H aynes h a s
a d v is e d t h a t a l l m a il a f t e r th e
2nd and 3 r d . T n s t . be s e n t to A t l a n t i c
C i ty , c /o n i d i y H o t e l, A r t i e A v e .,
b e t . I n d i a n a & Ohio Ave.

S e c re ta ry .
i
K

a

KW3

n

'9 2 °

G EORGE M. FOW LES, Treasurer

U. S, Department of Labor
INFORMATION AND FDUCATJON SERVICE
Washington

.

A SOLUTION OF THE RACE PROBLEM
Inform ation re g a rd in g one of th e most s u c c e s s fu l exp erien ces in th e employment
of Negroes ever undertaken in t h i s country has been re c eiv e d by th e D ire c to r of Negro
economics, Department of Labor, irorn R.M, Andrews, one of i t s f i e l d i n v e s t i g a t o r s in
Aorta C a ro lin a , in a r e p o r t on th e p o lic y of a la r g e m anufacturing company o p e ra tin g
17 p la n ts in the United S ta te s and Canada. The North C aro lin a p la n t in v e s t ig a te d by 3
Mr, Andrev/s i s a a id to be t y p i c a l o? th e l o t .
In view of th e f a c t s r e c e n t l y brought out by th e i n v e s t i g a t o r s of Negro migra­
t i o n in 1916-17, .nd th e consequent la b o r sh o rta g es in c e r t a i n p a rts of th e South,
th e re p o rt i s of very p r a c t i c a l i n t e r e s t , fo r th e negroes employed by t h i s company
a re so v/ell s a t i s f i e d w ith co n d itio n s t h a t they seldom leave t h e i r employment.
At th e North C aro lin a p l a n t , 900 of th e 1700 workers are Negroes, mostly from
Jortn C a ro lin a , Georgia and M i s s is s ip p i , The company expects soon to employ 1200 Ne­
groes t h e r e . The t o t a l Negro p o p u latio n of the town i s about 2000.
ihe average worker makes $lU0 a month w ithout d i f f i c u l t y , working an 8-hour day,
and as th e jv o rk i s n o t p h y s ic a lly e x a c tin g , can almost double t h i s amount through
o v e rtim e . The company a ls o pays a monthly bonus in c r e a s in g w ith le n g th of s e r v ic e .
Ahe p la n t i s equipped w ith s t e e l lo c k e r s , in d iv id u a l wash bowls, and shower b a th s ,
nvery e f f o r t i s made to provide f a c i l i t i e s n e c e ssa ry for comfort and c l e a n l i n e s s .
ihe Negro colony i s composed of w e l l - b u i l t houses, equipped w ith running w ater
-nd e l e c t r i c l i g h t s . Rents a re low, and th e homes may be purchased on a 10-year p la n ,
name buying i3 encouraged, and every home has a garden p l o t , The company pays for a
sch o o l, open nine months in th e y e a r . There i s a n ig h t school fo r workers who wish to
s tu d y , Boys more than 17 years of age employed in th e p la n t are re le a s e d fo r school
a tte n d a n c e a p a r t of th e tim e d u rin g th e day.
Many Negroes are engaged in business e n t e r p r i s e s . They o p e ra te boarding houses,
c a f e s , a dance h a l l and a drug s t o r e . A w hite firm o p e ra te s a pool room and p ic tu r e
t h e a t r e fo r co lo red workmen. The company i s b u ild in g a h o s p i t a l and two churches,
and i s a s s i s t i n g th e S u p e rv iso r of Negro F,conomics fo r North C aro lin a in an educa­
t i o n a l campaign to promote t h r i f t and e f f i c i e n c y among th e w orkers.
Gnly i n t e l l i g e n t and s e l f - r e s p e c t i n g workers a re employed, and m arried men are
given th e p r e f e r e n c e . Colored le a d e r s , in co o p eratio n w ith the company, have succeed
ed in almost e l im in a tin g drunkenness and o th e r v ic e s .
A r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o f the Department of Labor has o rganized a t tho North C arolina
p l a n t a Negro v/orkers' a d v iso ry committee.




W A R C A M P COMMUNITY SERV ICE
SURROUND

THE CAM PS

W ITH

H O S PITA LITY

O FF IC ERS
Ho n o r a r y P re sid e n t T H E O D O R E R O O S E V E LT
P r esid en t
J O S E P H LE E
2 d V ice-P r e sid e n t
W IL L IA M KENT
3 d V ice-P r e sid e n t
ROBERT GARRETT
Treasurer
*
G U S T A V U S T. K I R B Y
S ecretary
H. S. B R A U C H E R

C O N D U C TE D BY

REC REATIO N

A S S O C IA T IO N O F AM ERICA

1 Ma d i s o n A v e n u e . N e w Yo r k
FO R THE

W ar

departm ent and

N avy D e p a r t m e n t

c o m m is s io n s on t rainin g ca m p activities

B U D G E T CO M M ITTEE
H o r a c e E. A n d r e w s
C l a r e n c e M. C l a r k
My r o n T . H e r r i c k
J o s e p h L ee
C h a r l e s D. N o r t o n
H enry W. De F orest

Ma n a g e r . W a s h i n g t o n O f f i c e




E. D A N A C A U L K I N S
W a s h in g t o n O f f ic e

G 9 f M If Wk
- f Ht n w WKni e s t fr—P w -o

1800 V i r g i n i a Avenue N.W.
Washington, D. C.
J u ly 12, 1919.
Mr. George S. Haynes
D ir e c to r of Negro Economics
Department o f Labor
W ashington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Haynes
This w i l l acknowledge r e c e i p t o f your l e t t e r o f J u ly 1 0 th ,
w ith en closed l i s t , f o r w hich p le a s e a cc e p t my th a n k s.
I would suggest t h a t you send me the names o f th e two
women whom you b e lie v e t o be s u i t a b l e f o r our work and I w i l l tr a n s m it
them to our Personnel Department f o r th e n e c e s sa ry c o n s id e r a tio n .
S in c e r e ly y o u rs ,

Manager

nr„

RECEIVED

department of labor

)UL 1 5 7919
Di,rector

N e rro E

mics

GENERAL

A P P O IN T M E N T - F IX E D

DATE!

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF CLERK
W A S H IN G TO N

Oc-tob'
Octoberr 13, 1919

’i r ;
You h a v e b e e n a p p o i n t e d , s u b j e c t t o

ta k in g th e o a th o f o f f i c e ,

a n d t o a c t u a l e n t r a n c e up o n d u ty ( u n l e s s on a u t h o r i z e d
d a te

th e

in

in d ic a te d ,

th e —

a t a s a la ry
e ffe c tiv e
th a t d a te .

............. -E xpert.......... ....... ........

l e a v e ) on

............................

.....-.......... .2ur.e-XA..o.f...Labor.. _it.at.in.ti_Q a ...... ..................
( f o r duty o u ts id e o f the d i s t r i c t o f Y lu rib in )

,udr.e& -.an& ._3i;'- d o l l a r s p e r

of

Q

October 1, 1919, i n accordance w ith D epartm ental a u t h o r i t y o f

Your appointment w i l l c o n tin u e f o r a p e r io d n o t to exceed th re e months.
( ’V e x te n s io n o f ap p o in tm e n t).

By d i r e c t i o n

o f th e

S e c re ta ry :
R e sp e c tfu lly ,

A p p ro p ria tio n :

i c e lla n e o u s h-.ponses, B ureau o f Labor S ta tis tic ! .

V ic e :
L e g a l R e sid e n c e :




Tennessee.

RECEIVED

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
OCT 16 1919
Director of Nejrro Economics

,




1s t

to

8th

/ashington.

9th to 12th

Hew York

13th and 14th

Washington

15th

Columbus

16th

D e tr o it

17th Toledo
18th

P ittsb u rgh

19 th I’eadvi 1 le
20 th

P ittsb u rgh

2 1 st and 22nd

C incinn ati

23rd

L o u is v ille

24th

En route

25th to 27th
28th

A tlanta

En route

29th to 3 1 st

7/ashington.







imSftLEff

fiAflEvS:

November 14 aril 1 5 (n lg £ t) - New York - 894 Broadway
November 16 - S p r in g fie ld , Mass. - Care o f fiav. to. N. DeBerry,
p a sto r , S t.J o h n ’ s C ongregational Church.
November 17 and 18 - New York - 894 Broadway
November 19 and 20 - Washington
November 21 and

22

- Columbia, 3.C . - Care o f J . l . J . Brock (904
N ational Loan & Sxohange Bank B llg .)

November £3 (Subject to change) - B a iin , N.C. - Care o f Andrews
Noveaber 34 - !Sn route
November 25 - New York
November 26 - Washington
Noveaber 27 to December 2 - A tla n ta , Ga. (200 Auburn Avenue, Care
o f .7.A . 3al 1 ) •




November

22,

1919

Dr, George E, Haynes,
D ir ec to r , Purvey - Interohurch World Movement,
894 Broadway,
New York, N. Y.
Dear Dr. Haynes j
Herewith, in d u p lic a te . Is l i s t o f names o f members o f Negro
Workers' Advisory Committees.
R e sp e c tfu lly ,
Karl ?. P h illip s







S c h e d u le

Dec. 18
ii
19
it

Geo L

H a y n es.

S t . L o u is
P in e S t .
I J a s h v i l l e Tenn. c /o
810 Bdwy.
Mr. S to c k b r id g e ^
9 t h S t . Y.M .C.A.

20
21
22

L o u i s v i l l e Ky
C in c in n a ti 0
C le v e la n d 0 .

Z / 0

ii

23

P i t t s b u r g h , Pa

c /o

ti

2 4 -2 5 W ash in g to n C.C. 1761
Depa
2 6 -2 8 N. Y .
29 o Ja n 1 - 120
Des M o in e s ,la .

ii
ii

ii

ti

Ja n

2

GEH/TCM.

c :o
c /o

16 X tU -d A M i

801 H ippodrom e B ld g .
Mr C. R. Z ah u i s e r
2451 4 t h Ave.







ROBERT L A N S IN G , ChainMn General Committee

J O H N R . M O T T , Chairman Executive Committee

W ILLIAM B. M ILLAR, Secretary

I nterchurch W orld M ovement
OF NORTH AMERICA
N E W YORK C I T Y
Home Missions Division

S. EARL TA Y LOR, General Secretary

RA LPH E. DIFFEN D O RFER




D ecem ber 5 1 , 1919

M iss M a ttie L. C a m p b e ll,
D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r,
W
_
, D. C.
tly d e a r M iss C am p b ell:
I am e n c l o s i n g h e r e w i t h D r.
H a y n e s'
i t i n e r a r y fro m J a n u a r y 1
to J a n u a r y 5 and w i l l m a il th e"
s c h e d u le f o r th e f o l l o w i n g d a t e s
w i t h in a few d a y s .
C arbon c o p ie s o f l e t t e r s
fo rw a rd e d t o Des M oines r e c e i v e d .

Y ours v e r y t r u l y ,

G EO RG E M . FOW LES, Treasurer

ITINERARY
D r. G eorge E . H ay n es.
Des M oines

C h ic a g o , 111

fJk.
r~




c /o

H e a d q u a r te r s S tu d e n t V o lu n te e r
C o n vention*
L eave Des M oines V ia Rook I s la m
1
(5 1 0 :1 0
Ari’iv e 8 :3 5 A.M.
Mr. F . 0 . 3 e d k , 1318 A s s o c ia ­
t i o n B ld g .

D e t r o i t , M ich c /o

Mr. J a s . II. C o le ,
395 S t . A n to n io S t,

D e tro it

L eave
» l t 5 :2 0 P .M .f o r
T o le d o , 0 . L eave T o le d o by
n ig h t tr a in .

P h ila d e lp h ia

‘r

c /o

c /0

( , ry -D e a n L*BJAo o re 2337 S t .
A lban S t . )

J ir e c to r o f 3e&ro -oonoaios




Jan. IS , 1920.
2* 3« Manly,
C a re H a ^ u o u ,

In i erohu roll .o rld i~c verdant,
46
18th 2tr©eu,
lev? Tork.
aootoy .'ore.v anti




January 27, 1920.

Dr. George 3 . Haynss,

D irector o f negro .iconomlcs,
45 \7o3t 18th S t r e e t,
How York, H. Y.
Dear Dr. Haynes:
The en closu re is s e lf-e x p la n a to r y , being the statem ent I have
prepared on your v i s i t to 3adin , report on which was requested
by A ss is ta n t S ecretary W ilson.
Yours vory tr u ly ,

Expert - Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s
P
P
E n c l o s u r e




February I>, 1920

Dr. door?;© B. HayneB,
D ire c to r c f Vegrc iiconomias,
4b Vff.ot 1 6th s t r e e t ,
Her? York, B. Y.
Ity d e e r Dr. Haynes:
The C h ie f S t a t i s t i c i a n e f th e Eureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s a d v ise e
t h a t y o u r appointm ent has boon extended and re q u e s ts th a t you ap­
p e a r and ta k e o a th o f o f f i c e a t y o u r co n v en ien ce.
Yours r e s p e c t f u l l y .

Expert - Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s .
F

R SC SJVED

department op labor
NATIONAL HEGKO BUSINESS NOTES

1

1920 /

/

\

P u r n i ^ d by th e S e c r e ta r y of th e N a tio n a l Negro 3 u 3 i n f e ^ . g d < ^ ^ 0»©*fle8
^
of R a c ia l P ro g re ss
NATIONAL HE'JXJUARTHR3 OP SEE 114II0FAJ NEGRO BUBiFnSS LEAGUE

/

■18X6 T w elfth S t r e e t , Northwest
W ashington, D.C.
( S p e c ia l) B usiness development among Negroes over th e e n t i r e c o u n try i s ta k in g oh
a mo..e . /ro gieeoi v« a sp e c t ev ery clay. Almost d aily ,, r e p o r t s cciiir m from th e
v a rio u s .,ccal leagues t e l l or some rev; e n t e r p r i s e Being launched, and th ese e n t e r phases are m new f i e l d s as w e ll as i n th e old e s ta b lis h e d l i n e s . New and b e t t e r
ma • os a r e b e Ang in s ta - io d and th e watch-word among th e tr a d e is " U l t r a - e f f i c i e n c y 1'
The './age E arners Bank of Savannah, Ga., p u rch ases an e n t i r e block of b u ild in g s at
t/.e southwest c o rn e r of 135th s t . , and Seventh A ve., New York, a g e n e ra l improvemen in tn© p ro 1©!
boin^; contemplated • The purchase p r ic e was n ^ a r a q u a r t e r of
a m illio n *
Tne D iv is io n of Negro Economics c f the Department of l a b o r , D r. George E. Haynes
D ir e c to r ^ r e p o r t s continued r e s u l t s i n the o r g a n is a ti o n c f b u i l d i n g and lo a n a s s o c i a c i c n s throughout the S t a t e of Ohio, and an e x te n s io n of t h i s e f f o r t to T id ew ater.!
V irg in ia .
■
The Commercial Bank and T ru st Company, Xiohmord, V a., i s b e in g promoted under a
c a p i t a l i z a t i o n of $100,000.00, s u r p lu s , :„:i2,500„00«. T.C.Erw in, P r e s i d e n t .
L r . J o in / . Lewis, p r e s id e n t of th e I n d u s t r i a l Sa-"ing? Bank of Washington, D.C.
i s head in g up tn e N a tio n al Mutual Improvement A rs o o iu ti. a .;he o b je c t of which w i l l be
among o th e r t h i n g s , th e f in a n c in g of worthy b u s in e s s p r e f e c t s t h a t a re needed.
S L ? nnrr S

Bui^ d in S and lo a n A ss o c ia tio n of 7 a s h in g to n , D .C ., i s c a p i t a l i z e d atj
Edward R a t t I c y p r e s i d e n t .
1

^> 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0 wich Mr. J .

? ST^ V9f Sal Ccvelcpi/ientand Lean Company, 502 T S t . , W ashington,D. 0 . , C harles
c a t - ' t i ’ ?n f 1 g ’ lV)1 w r . ^ '
' 01' 3 £ S£i'e r a l r e a l e s t a t e and loan b u s in e s s under a
capita- Of ¥-00,000.05, organized in January.
^ \ ! ? r nen- ^ , P i ° tUr0S Cor:-3 0 fa tio n * J W illia m s C l i f f o r d , P r e s i d e n t / i s c a p i t a l i z e d
,
a uu--1~OTi and proposes to produce s u p e r - f e a tu r o motion p i c t u r e s to b r in g a p r / . / a r *"6 ;hcrough u n fie rsta d in g and a p p r e c i a t i o n of Negro L ife in America, The
"
c c r p o r a tio n i s now p la c in g i t s s to c k on the market from i t s h e a d q u a rte rs in Y/ashj
In fo rm a tio n from Mr. B ert M. Roddy, C ash ier of the Solvent Savings Bank and,
o . , Memphis, T e n n ., shows t h a t th e C o -o p erativ e S to r e s of th a t c i t y , w ith
te e n s t c r es i n t o t a l , o p e ra te s on a ¥36,000.00 paid in c a p i t a l , doing anj
mo.itnly b u s i n e ^ of v30,0C 0.00.
s
I n t e r e s t i s a l s o b ein g shown in th e probable e s ta b lis h ]



hnite

ja m

information mi t h i s i.

The Progressive B usiness A s s o c ia tio n of P h i l a d e l p h i a , th e lo c a l league of
t h a t c i t y , r e p o r t s through. i t s s e c r e t a r y , I-Irs. Sonr .a r v i l l c F a u r .tle r o y , t h a t
t h i n g s are g e t t i n g under way f o r t h e e n t e r t a in»nent of tire N a tio n a l League in
t h a t c i t y i n August, which m eetin g promises to be the most im portant y e t h e l d .
The N orfolk Negio B usiness League, l i k e Chicago,
h e a d q u a rte rs w ith a phid s e c r e t a r y in c h arg e.

h a s now a r e g u l a r e s ta b lis h e d

A t l a n t a , 3 a r. V s r e c e n t l y re v iv ed and r e c h a r t e r e d , 200 Auburn W e ., w ith J .C ,
Moss, P r e s i d e n t , and ex p ects t o lau n ch an immediate campaign f o r development.
D r. H.Roger w illia m s fu rn ish e d th e "pep 11 t h a t got i t o v e r.
The N a tio n al Negro Business League i s now c o o p e ra tin g w ith th e T reasu ry De­
partment th rough Mr. W illiam Mather Lewis, D ir e c to r of the Savings D iv is io n
of th e War Loan O rg a n iz a tio n , in a "T h rig t Drive'*.
As f a r west as Lr-s Angeles and from th e Mexican to th e Candaian Border th e in ­
flu e n c e of the N a tio n a l Negro B usiness League is f e l t and expressed in a ta n g i
-ble way. The P ro g re s s iv e League of Los Angeles staged a b ig r e v i v a l meeting
and Mr. It. 3 . Abbott went a l l th e way from Chicago to speak on the b u sin ess
o u tlo o k . The New Age r e p o r ts th a t "Open a bank - awake to your o p p o r tu n i tie s "
was th e keynote of h is a d d re s s .
The N atio n al Negro B usiness League w ill a p p r e c ia te a u th e n tic in fo rm atio n r e ­
garding new v e n tu r e s . Be sure t h a t your c o rp o ra tio n is l i s t e d w ith th e League.
During the week of A p ril 26th th e V ic to ry Investment Company, Oscar I.. H ayes,
P re sid e n t • conducted a B usiness F a i r in th e Gym room of the T 4£.C.A, b u ild in g
a t which tw enty-'three l o c a l b u s in e s s concerns were re p re se n te d by booths and
a gen eral acq u a in ta n ce meeting held every n i g h t . Each n ig h t brough some speci
fe a tu re d program, th e most o u ts ta n d in g bein g B usiness Night held Tuesday.
Addresses were d e liv e red by i . r . Jn o . « L e v is , of th e 1 n c u s t r i a l havings
Bank, Mr. J . F in l e y W ilson, e d i t o r of th e Washington Eagle and Mr. .’i l l i a m
Stevenson, Executive S e c r e ta r y Y.M.C.A.
(The League f u r n i s h e s th e above a s in fo rm a tio n only and does not guarantee
or stand as sponsor f o r any of th e concerns here r e p r e s e n t e d )













COMMITTEE

CO MMI TT EE

•publicity Committee

J A M E S H. D I L L A R D . CH AIRMAN

T H O M AS JESSE

Charlottesville , Va.
MRS.

JOHN

D. H A M M O N D .

Burkeville, Va.
THEODORE

JONES.

Washington, D. C.
For Makinc Known

D. B R A T T O N .

of

the

ARTHUR

C o n s t r u c t i v e As p e c t s

Race R elations

in t h e

S

B.

KROCK.

Louisville, Ky.

outh
M R S . J . H. M C C O Y ,

Jackson, Miss.
EDWARD

E. B R I T T O N .

CHARLES

L. C R O W .

Nashville, Tenn.
C . P. J. M O O N E Y .

Washington, D. C.

Mrs. J

Gainesville, Fla.
W.

S. C U R R E L L .

Columbia, S . C

ohn

Memphis , Tenn.

D Hammond

W ALTER

New Orleans, La.

Secretary
MRS.

B o x 11. B u r k e v i l l e . V a .

Richmond. Va.
DORAN.

Dallas, Texas
CLARK

HOWELL.




PERCY

W.

Box 462, I s l i p , N.Y.
1/11/1921
Dtp;

D. W E A T H E R F O R D .

Nashville, Tenn.

•.fctoASftti'
DEFAT ' i ■ T>F,J.ABOR

Atlanta, Ga.

W . C. W I N S B O R O U G H .

. . . .

ector ofr

Dr. George Haynes,
W a s h i n g t o n , D.C.

V. P E N N Y B A C K E R .

A ustin , Texas

J A C K S O N D AVIS.

E. B.

PARKER,

S t. Louis, Mo.

j

-to Economics

D lr e r tr ’- of Nr '■

"

inn mica

Dear D r. Haynes:
I e n c l o s e a co py o f my t h i r d a n n u a l r e p o r t t o
t h e members o f my Com mittee, w h ich I t h i n k you and M rs.Haynes
may b e i n t e r e s t e d i n s e e i n g . I ’d be v e r y g l a d , i f you h a v e any
p e r s o n a l knowiddge o f t h e work b e i n g u s e f u l i n an y way, i f you
would t e l l me.
I would be g l a d , t o o , t o h ave y o u r e x a c t W a s h in g to n a d d r e s s .
I s u p p o s e you m u st be gone fr o m t h e I n t e r - c h u r c h ; so I am t r y i n g
t o r e a c h you t h r o u g h t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r . I hope v e r y much
t h a t t h e new C o n g r e s s w i l l h a v e " g r a c e and gum ption" enough
t o p u t y o u r work i n t h e D e p t , o f L ab o r on a p e r m a n e n t and
adeq.u ate b a s i s .
W ith r e g a r d s t o Mrs. Haynes, I am
S incerely,




TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SOUTHERN PUBLICITY COMMITTEE:
At tho c lo s e o f i t s t h i r d y e a r o f work, th e r e l e a s e s o f t h i s Committee
a r e n a i l e d a s follow s:
To: Southern d a ily p a p e r s .......................................................... 116
"
county w e e k l i e s ........... ........................................... 505
"
r e l i -;ious p a p e r s ........................................... • •« 66
N ejro p a p ers, m o s tly S o u th e rn ......................................... 61
N o rth ern w hite p a p e r s and m is s io n B o ard s.................. 45
P r e s i d e n t s o f S o u th ern w hite c o l l e j o s ........................240
"
"
"
c o lo re d s c h o o l s ................. . 213
C o lleg e Y.M. and Y .W .C.A.'s (b o th r a c e s ) .......................234
I n d i v i d u a l s (s e e b e lo w ).................................................
572
T o tal
2052
I do not know how much th e p a p e r s u se them.
Mr. Aery, the p u b l i c i t y
a j e n t fo r Hampton I n s t i t u t e , t o l d me I co u ld ;ot no a c c u r a te id e a
from employing a c lip p in g bureau, a s none o f them cover th e t e r r i t o r y
concerned i n a way to ji v e f a i r l y c o r r e c t r e s u l t s .
The l i t t l e I
know I le a r n p e r s o n a lly and o f t e n by chance.
The e d i t o r o f th e
A t l a n t a C o n s ti tu tio n , f o r in s ta n c e , t o l d ne seme months a jo t h a t he
r a r e l y u sed th e m a t e r i a l i n h i s d a i l y e d i t i o n , th c u jh sometimes ho
h a s based ar. e d i t o r i a .1 on th e fa.cts o f some r e l e a s e ; but he s a i d he
u s e d i t " c o n s id e ra b ly " i n h i s tr i - w e e k ly e d i t i o n , which ha.s a country
c i r c u l a t i o n o f n e a r ly 150,000.
The e d i t o r o f M an u factu rers Record
w rote me l a s t summer t h a t w h ile he d id n o t p r i n t tho r e l e a s e s , ho
re a d them a l l ; and t h a t th e y h ad "broadened h i s th c u jh t" o f the
N e jrc , and so h ad in flu e n c e d much t h a t he h a d w r i t t e n on th e economic
a s p e c t s o f Southern l i f e .
I have happened a c r o s s s e v e r a l c lip p in g s
from w hite p a p e rs in th e l a s t y e ar which were e v id e n tly based on cur
r e l e a s e s ; bu t I do n o t know how f r e q u e n tly t h i s i s done.
S e v e ra l N e jrc e d i t o r s have p u t me on t h e i r exchange l i s t ; but some c f
th e s e have dropped mo s in c e th e p ap er s h o rta g e became s e r i o u s .
Of th e
p a p e rs I see n e a r l y a.ll make sane u se o f th e m a t e r i a l ,
Mr. Aery, who
t r a v e l s a jre a .t d e al, t o l d me l a s t A u ju st t h a t he f in d s th e Negroes
aware of our work everywhere he jo e s , and v e ry a p p r e c i a t i v e o f i t .
Ho th in k s i t an in flu e n c e f o r jc o d amen3 them.
I have n e v er e x p e c te d much u s e o f th e r e l e a s e s by county w e e k lie s .
I ma.de t h i s l i s t because th e men who w r i t e n e a r l y e v e ry th in ;: t h a t
cur more i n o r a n t and p r e j u d i c e d people rea.d, need to have t h e i r own
th o u g h ts broa.dened; and th e y a re sure to r e a d anythin;; th e y j e t h e ld
o f about th e N e jro .
However, Dr. A lexander, D ir e c to r o f th e work
c f th e Inter-R a.cia.l movement, t o l d me n e t Ion.; a 3 c t h a t many c f the
county i n t e r - r a c i a l committees were a t work on th e se e d i t o r s to je t
them to p r i n t c o n s tr u c ti v e f a c t s ; and he thcu.jht a l a r g e r u se c f cur
m ateria .1 would r e s u l t .
The r e l i ic u s w e e k lie s make, a p p a r e n tly , considera.ble u se c f th e m a t e r i a l .
The m is sio n a ry p u b l i c a t i o n s o f th e Southern B a p t i s t s and th e Southern
M eth o d ist, b o th w ith c i r c u l a t i o n s w ell over 40,000, u se i t q u ite f r e e l y .
Dr. H ailey , th e B a p t i s t s ’ s e c r e t a r y f o r c o lo re d work, t e l l s me he u s e s
i t i n h i s p u b l i c speeches,, made in w hite B a p t i s t churches a l l ever th e
South, and in w h ite and c o lo r e d B a p t i s t s c h o o ls . The Southern Meth*

- 2 -

d ^ S f e ^ J 8 Bi ° nCJ ? « ° ^ ? U li a a t i cn Liakds c o n s id e ra b le use cf i t in t h e i r
of_Pu 5) l i c i t y- c f t o n changing th e form o f i t to s u i t t h e i r
cvm need s.
T h e ir monthly b u l l e t i n s go to between 4,000 raid 5,000
xccal a u x i l i a r i e s , with a membership o f ev er 200,000.
T h e ir p u b l i c i t y
i n t r iS
™-r i c u s c o n fe re n c e s a ls o get some o f i t o c c a s io n a lly
m t c l o c a l new spapers.
1 ! t J e r s i n d i c a t ® ^ s n r owing u se in c o lle g e s .
The p r e s i ­
dent o f th e s t a t e u n i v e r s i t y o f M isso u ri w r i t e s th a t he r e g u l a r l y tu r n s

IS * !? * *

r ^ u a s i 0? 608 r 0 r ^
heftd Cf th e d 0Pa r t o - n t o f so cio lo g y w ith a
V iS a
t ! ? US? /
^
h i s claESGS‘
C ollege p r e s i d e n t s in
r *5 C a r c lin a s , A la brxia, M i s s i s s i p p i , Tennessee, Arkansas,
t“
r t T 3l ’ haV0 tC ld n e Pe r s o m l l y t h a t they speak c f th e f a c t s
tL l
s tu d e n ts , or p u t th e r e l e a s e s cn th e b u l l e t i n boards; and
t l i e i r t y t ^ fr0(1Uently u s e d t h ® ^ t a r i a l in p u b lic a d d re s s e s through
^

t

°r h^

n i s s i c n a r y b o ard s have ask ed f o r the m a t e r i a l , since
S
* SPr^ d tC th6 N c r th * m d usd “ in t h e i r p u b l i ad drosses*
Three o r fo u r tim es t h i s f a l l I have seen
our . a r t i c l e s i n Southern p a p e r s c r e d i t e d to th e s e N orthern so u rces.
* 5 ” ? f ° a n t l y been t a d a t n a t t c m l Y.W.O.A. h e a d q u a rte rs th a t cur

K*k
•

mil
u f of g th a t « 3 a > i M t t c n , especially in eclleqe
The colored s e c r e t a r i e s write me they find i t especially useful.

u se
Ccnr- l t t 9 e lvcrk ^ M i s s i s s i p p i w r i t e s me they
r a c i - 1 tverk
mv, rcu::hcut th e s t a t e , in sch o o ls, raid in county i n t e r sec ro t-rv
1 3 i n t a l k s a nd a d ^ ^ s e s .
The F l o r id a s t a t e
K nrK ^i y
J c l d me h j found i t s i m i l a r l y u s e f u l , and th e s e c r e t a r y fo r
X
Cf
not lc n « > “ ■>* ™ t o ^ e n f
w h w , /
s t a t ; s e c r e ta r y , whose name I had n o t o b tain ed ,
s..yin_, he would u s e i t w id e ly among th e Negroes.
X n r i l 1 ? £ i da iS tatG r' ;en t fCP IlG' r c rara'1 s c h o o ls r e c e n t l y w rote th a t he
s i n i l - i r ^ o f f i c i a ? SB.ra0®t U s e , raid s u g g e s tin g t h a t I sJn a them to a l l
of
f ; 01? 8 tt11 vt h d r s t a t j s “ which I have dene a l l a lo n g . O thers
o f than, l i k e Mr. Newbcld c f North C a r o lin a and Mr. F a v rc t c f Louisiana
have e x p re ss e d s im i l a r a p p r e c i a t i o n .
’
ST
P i v i s i c n c f th e Red Cross asked f o r cur m a t e r i a l a
'^ubarX il 8 aa’G^ ’ ^ l o i r p u b l i c i t y agent h a v in g seen seme c f i t a t A n tiW t h ^ c r i 8 h 0a d T r t e r S in M l a n t a ‘
1 fc^ d the Red Cross i s ^ u sh in •
off“ t t t S
^
8 th ro u g h o u t th e South, and i s a ls o making an °
'
h i i
^
I
S ln l0C al ccnd i t i c n s among Nemroes. Many m e e t in - S
f o r th o se - S e r i n - °
1 3 l i t t l d kncwled£e c f s d o i a l work; and ^
Our r e l t h
CS fpeechGs nnd i’n c t s a re p re p a re d a t h e a d q u a rte rs .
c c rx iu n itie s^ iT ro
t** th f a r n i s h na^®r i a l to Pnt b e fo re th e se backward
in hundredc
1
th e N° d r o * They w i l 1 bG used, I was assu red ,
r e r^ rh ^ n tv, 31103:1 p ln c e s throughout th e Southern s t a t e s .
T his i s to
raL
—
in o■ fr^/.t
•*« th
tv,-,
i
t
, o f cur work r 0
t h i>s perh
y e aap
r , s th e most e n cccuura
)m
- c t in
e development




-3 *

Mcst o f the names cn the l a r g e p e rs o n a l l i s t a r e o f w hite o r co lo red
church or s o c i a l workers, c e n t r e s o f groups, la r g e c r sm all, who make
u se o f cur m a t e r i a l in t h e i r group m e etin g s; th e p r e s id e n t o f a P r e s ­
b y te r ia n m is s io n a r y s o c ie ty in Covington, T enn.; a church and club
le a d e r in A ugusta, Ga.; a n o th e r in M i s s i s s i p p i ; the h ead o f a b ig
g i r l s 1 club in Birmingham; a c o lo re d p r o b a tio n o f f i c e r in the same
town who i s a member o f a l a r g e c o lo re d clu b ; a Je a n e s worker in
F l o r i d a who u s e s i t in h e r county; w hite m is s io n a ry o f f i c i a l s of
a l l denom inations, members and o f f i c e r s o f women's c lu b s who have
e s p e c i a l i n t e r e s t in th e s u b j e c t , e t c .
W ithin th e year^ I have added th e names o f a la r g e number o f men who
a r e p ro v in g t h e i r i n t e r e s t in r a c i a l problem s.
These in c lu d e the
100 or mere L o u is ia n a men who c a l l e d th e s ta te - w id e co n feren ce cn the
Negro l a s t June - bankers, law yers, p l a n t e r s , e d i t o r s , m erchants,
o f f i c i a l s c f chambers o f commerce, R o ta ry Clubs, e tc ; th e growing
number o f men who a re c c - c p e r a t i n ; in th e I n t e r - R a c i a l movement:
m i n i s t e r s who a r e openly s ta n d in g f o r j u s t i c e : c o lle g e p r o c e s s o r s
who have ta k e n an a c t i v e p a r t in i n t e r e s t i n g t h e i r stu d en ts? and
th e l i k e .
A ll th e s e p e o p le a r e doing seme speaking on th e s e q u e stio n s;
th e y a re i n t e r e s t e d , and w i l l re a d udiat th ey re c e iv e , and a r e p r e t t y sure
tc give i t out to th e groups th e y touch.
I an a ls o ad d in g th eso names n o t y e t on th e l i s t o f the 100 or more women
who a tte n d e d th e rem arkable m eetin g in Memphis t h i s f a l l h e l d under the
a u s p ic e s c f th e I n t e r - R a c i a l Movement.
Every one o f th e s e women i s
in c lo se to u ch w ith seme group - mcst c f them la r g e groups - w ith viiich
th e y a re in c o n tin u a l communication; and th e y a re th o ro u g h ly in e a r n e s t .
T h is development o f p u b l i c i t y t h r c u ^ i p e r s o n a l c o n ta c ts i s th e main
f e a tu r e o f th e y e a r ’ s work.
I t seems tc me p u b l i c i t y c f an i d e a l k in d ,
e s p e c i a l l y c o n s id e r in g th e m e n ta l a t t i t u d e o f cur Southern p e o p le .
I
in te n d tc c a r r y t h i s development to th e l a s t l i m i t o f our a p p r o p r ia tio n
t h i s coming y e a r .
My only r e g r e t i s t h a t t h a t l i m i t i s a lr e a d y so
n e a r l y re a c h e d .
^
I have r e c e iv e d more r e q u e s t s f o r cur m a t e r i a l in the l a s t s ix months
^non in th e r e s t o f the tim e o f i t s is su a n c e p u t t o g e th e r .
The work i s
a,
Pr c c ° s s , slow, h id d e n , and h a r d tc measure; but -qnquesticna b ly the le a v e n i s a t work.




(Signed)

Mrs. John D. Eamnond
S e c r e ta r y , Southern P u b l i c i t y Committee.

A r m e n i a A m e r ic a S o ciety
287 F O U R T H A V E N U E
N E W YORK

AIM OF SO C IE T Y : "T o unite in co-operation the many friends of Armenia for the purpose of
ascertaining the needs of Armenia, of bringing those needs before the American people,
and of securing the satisfaction of those needs through American assistance.”

I desire to be enrolled as a member of the Armenia
America Society.
Name-----------------------------------------------Date------------------

Address-----------------------------

Amount contributed $ -------------Those contributing five dollars or over become voting members.






COMMITTEE

Committee

J A M E S H. D I L L A R D . CH AIRMAN

*
MRS.

COMMITTEE
THOM AS JESSE

J otlN

D. H A M M O N D .

Burkeville, Va.
THEODORE

For Making Known

D. B R A T T O N .

of

the

C o n s t r u c t i v e As p e c t s

Race R ela tio ns

in

the

S

outh

ARTHUR

B.

KROCK.

Louisville, Ky.
MRS. J.

H. M C C O Y .

Nashville, Tenn.

Jackson, Miss.
EDWARD

C.

B. B R I T T O N .

P . J. M O O N E Y .

Memphis , Tenn.

Washington, D. C.

Mrs. J

C H A R L E S L. C R O W .

Gainesville, Fla.
W.

S.

D. H a m m o n d

W ALTER

DAVIS.

Richmond, Va.
E . B. D O R A N .

Dallas, Texas

PARKER.

New Orleans. La.

Secretary
MRS.

Columbia, S . C

CLARK

ohn

CURRELL.

JACKSON

JONES.

Washington, D. C.

Charlottesville, Va.

'

B o x 11, B u r k e v i l l e . V a .

1 / 19 /19 2 1

PERCY

V.

PENNYBACKER.

Austin, Texas
W . O. W E A T H E R F O R D .

Nashville, Tenn.
M R S . W . C. W I N S B O R O U G H ,

S t. Louis, Mo.

HOWELL.

Atlanta, Ga.

•‘■'r. G e o r g e E . t t a y n e s ,
W a s h i n g t o n , D .C .
D ear D r. H ay n es:
T h a n k y o u v e r y m u ch f o r y o u r l e t t e r a n d i t s s u g g e s t ­
io n . 1 h av e n e v e r s e n t o u t a n * g e n e r a l i n q u i r y su c h a s you s p e a k o f ,
b u t I h a v e w r i t t e n t o a l a r g e 'n u m b e r o f p e o p le i n d i v i d u a l l y , and h av e
t a l k e d t o a num ber o f n e w s p a p e r m en. I h a v e p r o f i t e d b y t h e i r s u g g e s t ­
i o n s . And I ' d e s p e c i a l l y a p p r e c i a t e i t i f y o u w i l l t e l l m e, now o r a t
a n y o t h e r t i m e , o f a n y t h i n g w h i c h y o u t h i n k w o u ld make t h e s e r v i c e
• b e t t e r . 1 h a v e t o k e e p i.» *.iind, h o w e v e r , t h a t t h e p e r s o n f o r v/hom i t
i s p r i m a r i l y i n t e n d e d i s t h e p r e j u d i c e d S o u t h e r n w h i t e . T h e o n l y way
t o g e t u n d e r h i s p r e j u d i c e s a n d d i g th e m l o o s e i s t o c o n v i n c e h im
t h a t o t h e r v / h i t e S o u t h e r n e r s do a n d t h i n k t h u s a n d s o r e g a r d i n g t h e
N e g ro a n d b e l i e v e t h e i r p o l i c i e s b e n e f i c i a l ; a n d I h a v e t o p u t e v e r y ­
t h i n g i n a way t h a t w i l l a t l e a s t n o t a n t a g o n i z e h im a n d s e t h im a ­
g a in s t su ch th in g s . I t i s n ' t l i k e w r iti n g w ith a f r e e hand a t a l l .
I t i s w r i t i n g f o r a d e f i n i t e p u r p o s e u n d e r t h e m o st s e v e r e an d som e­
t i m e s e m b a r r a s s i n g l i m i t a t i o n s . I n e v e r f e l t t h i s i n s u c h a ( t o me)
i r r i t a t i n g way a s i n r e p o r t i n g t h e w o m e n 's m e e t i n g a t M e m p h is; b u t
t h a t w i l l show y o u w h a t I m e a n . T h e c o l o r e d women who s p o k e t h e r e
m ade t h a t m e e t i n g . I n t h e b r i e f a r t i c l e I c o u l d s e n d o u t i t w h s n e ­
c e s s a r y t o g i v e t h e n a m e s o f t h e m e m b e rs o f t h e G o m t i n u a t i o n Com­
m i t t e e , f o r t h e e f f e c t t h e y w o u ld h a v e on t h e c l a s s o f w h i t e p e o p l e
I am a f t e r ; a n d I w a s n ' t g o i n g t o r e f e r t o t h e c o l o r e d women w i t h o u t
g i v i n g t h e i r n a m e s , w hen 1 h a d t o g i v e t h o s e o f t h e v / h i t e w o m e n .B u t
i f 1 s p o k e o f th e m a s " M r s . " - a n d 1 c e r t a i n l y c o u l d n o t s p e a k o f t h e m
i n a n y o t h e r v/ay, i n j u s t i c e , d e c e n c y o r t r u t h - 1 w o u ld b a r my n o t ­
i c e f r o m e v e r y o n e o f t h e h u n d r e d s o f p a p e r s I w as s e n d i n g i t t o . 1
th o u g h t a b o u t i t a good w h ile ; and I f i n a l l y d e c id e d t h a t th e r i g h t
t h i n g f o r me t o do w as t o g e t o v e r t o t h e c l a s s o f p e o p l e I am t r y i n g
t o r e a c h t h e f a c t t h a t t h e s e S o u t h e r n w h i t e women s t o o d f o r t h e t h i n g ?
t h e y d i d s t a n d f o r i n t h a t F i n d i n g s r e p o r t . So I h a d t o c u t o u t a l l
m e n t i o n o f w h a t w as t h e g r e a t e s t f o r c e i n t h e c o n f e r e n c e e x c e p t t h e
s p i r i t o f C h r i s t h i m s e l f ; a n d v / a i t t i l l i c o u l d i n some l a t e r r e l e a s e
m e n t i o n t h e w h i t e v/omen w i t h o u t g i v i n g t h e i r n a m e s , a n d s p e a k o f t h e
c o l o r e d v/omen i n t h e sam e w a y . - When I w r i t e a n a r t i c l e f o r a m ag ­
a z i n e t h a t i s d i f f e r e n t , ■‘■hat i s p e r s o n a l ; I a c c e p t p e r s o n a l r e s p o n ­
s i b i l i t y ; and th e p u b l i c a t i o n , i f i t ta k e s th e a r t i c l e , h a s to p u t i t
i n a s I w r i t e t t - e x c e p t t h a t s o many o f th e m w o n ' t u s e a c a p i t a l
f o r N e g r o , no m a t t e r w h a t I s a y t o th e m : t h e y a d m i t i t i s w ro n g s b u t ^
t h e y " h a v e t o c o n f o r m t o o f f i c e r u l e s " . 1 w as r i g h t p l e a s e d n o t l o n g
a g e w hen a n a r t i c l e o f m in e a p p e a r e d i n t h e N a t i o n a l C h am b er o f Com


m e t'c e J o u r n a l , t o f i n d t h a t a f t e r t e l l i n g me t h e y w e r e a f r a i d t h e y couldn’ir
m anage t o c h an g e t h e i r r u l e i n t h i s t h i s r e s p e c t , th e y d id u s e th e c a p ­
i t a l a f t e r a l l . -°u t t h a t d o e s n ’ t h a p p e n o f t e n .
- B u t 1 w a n t t o p a s s on t o y o u a q u e r y j u s t r e c e i v e d f r o m T e x a s . R ev . J . C
W i l l i a m s , D .D . , p r e s i d e n t o f W e s t m i n s t e r C o l l e g e , '^ e h u a c a n a , T e x a s , ha.s
w r i t t e n t o a s k me w h e r e h e c a n f i n d " a t y p i c a l o l d - t i m e -‘e g r o p o l i t i c a l
s p e e c h , a n d a t y p i c a l s e r m o n . " He d o e s n ' t m ean " s o m e t h i n g by a n e d u c a t e d
N e g r o , o u t b y a n i l l i t e r a t e b u t e l o q u e n t N e g r o . Some g r e a t t h i n g s h a v e bee>i
p r o d u c e d , " h e a d d s , " a n d I w a n t t o f i n d t h e m . " 1 c o u l d n ’ t h e l p h im o u t ;
b u t 1 w r o t e h im a b o u t y o u , a n d t o l d h im I h a d p a s s e d h i s i n q u i r y on t o
y o u ; t h a t y o u w o u ld know i f t h e r e w e r e a n y s u c h s p e e c h e s p r e s e r v e d ; a n d
t h a t y o u w o u ld w r i t e h im . B u t I t o l d h im a l l t h e g r e e t N e g r o s p e a k e r s I
k new o f w e r e e d u c a t e d m en; a n d t h a t 1 d o u b t e d i f t h e r e w e r e a n y r e c o r d s
k e p t o f g r e a t i l l i t e r a t e s p e a k e r s , th o u g h 1 d i d n ' t d o u b t t h e r e w ere
s u c h s p e a k e r s b e f o r e t h e w a r . Can y o u h e l p h im i n a n y w ay^
I ' m g o i n g t o s e n d o u r r e l e a s e s h e r e a f t e r t o M rs . H a y n e s , a t t h e home a d ­
d r e s s y o u h a v e g i v e n me. I ' d l i k e f o r h e r t o s e e th e m ; a n d s h e c a n p a s s
th e m on t o y o u . P l e a s e re m e m b e r me t o h e r c o r d i a l l y .
- l w as d r e a d f u l l y d i s a p p o i n t e d i n t h a t Home M i s s i o n s m e e t i n g . I t w a s a
f a r c e , a l m o s t . I w i l l c e r t a i n l y n e v e r a g a i n go t o t h e t r o u b l e and e x ­
p e n s e o f a n o v e r - n i g h t t r i p t o hew Y ork f o r a m e e t i n g l i k e t h a t . I f t h e y
h a d g i v e n t h e e v e n in g t o t h e one s u b j e c t , an d had l e t you and M rs. J o h n ­
son open th e d i s c u s s i o n v /ith th e tim e n eed e d f o r b o th a d d r e s s e s , and f o l ­
lo w e d t h a t w i t h g e n e r a l d i s c u s s i o n , s o m e t h i n g c o n s t r u c t i v e m i g h t l a v e e ­
m e r g e d . As i t w as
- b u t t h e r e ' s no u s e s a y i n g w h a t 1 t h i n k a b o u t i t .
•^aybe t h e y w i l l l e a r n b e t t e r n e x t t i m e .







COMMITTEE
COMMITTEE
JAMES H.

jlm rtljent ^itblictt^ Committee

D I L L A R D . C H A IR M A N

THO M AS JESSE

Charlottesville , Va.
MRS. JO H N

A R T H U R B.

F or Making Know n

D. H A M M O N D .

Burkeville, Va.
THEODORS

the

KNOCK.

C o n s t r u c t i v e As p e c t s

o r Race R ela tio ns

in t h e

S

Louisville, Ky.

outh

M RS. J . H. MCCOY.

Nashville. Tenn.

D. BRATTON.

Jackson, Miss.
EDWARD

C . P. J . M O O N E Y .

Memphis , Tenn.

E. B R I T T O N .

Washington, D. C.

Mrs. J

ohn

D. H a m m o n d

WALTER

PARKER.

New Orleans, La.

C H A R L E S L. C R O W .

Secretary

Gainesville, Fla.
W.

S.

CURRELL.

B o x 11.

Columbia, S . C
JACKSON

B urkeville.

MRS.

PERCY

V. PEN NYBACKER.

Austin, Texas

Va.
W.

D. W E A TH E R FO R D .

Nashville, Tenn.

D A V IS ,

Richmond, Va.
E. B .

JONES.

Washington, D. C.

MRS.

W . C. W IN S B O R O U O H .

S t. Louis, Mo.

DORAN.

Dallas, Texas
CLARK

HOWELL.




Atlanta, Ga.

" r . G e o r g e E . iAa y n e s ,
W a s h i n g t o n , D .C .
•Gear D r .

haynes:

re le a se s fo r
a w h i l e , t o do
h o p e fu lly a t
t h a t m ade i t
w ork cro w d s

I a p p r e c ia te your su g g e s tio n ab o u t th e d i f f e r e n t
d i f f e r e n t c l a s s e s o f p e o p l e . I t m ay b e p o s s i b l e , a f t e r
so m e th in g l i k e t h a t ; and I lo o k e d fo rw a rd t o i t q u i t e
f i r s t . B u t I h a v e n e v e r h a d a n in c o m e f o r t h e w o rk
p o s s i b l e . The sum a t my d i s p o s a l i s s m a l l , a n d t h e
i t to th e l i m i t , as i t i s .

The m o re I t h i n k i t o v e r , h o w e v e r , t h e m o re d o u b t f u l I am o f t h e
w isd o m o f s u c h a p o l i c y , e v e n i f I h a d t h e m o n e y f o r i t . I t w o u ld
c e r t a i n l y b e c o m e k n ow n, s o o n e r o r l a t e r , t h a t we w e r e s e n d i n g a d i f ­
f e r e n t k i n d o f r e l e a s e t o ■‘-•egro p a p e r s f r o m t h o s e s e n t t o w h i t e p a ­
p e r s ; a n d I b e l i e v e t h a t w o u ld a r o u s e s u s p i c i o n o n b o t h s i d e s , a n d
b l o c k t h e v e r y t h i n g I am t r y i n g t o d o . I t s e e m s b e s t t o go on w i t h
t h o s e who m o s t n e e d t o b e r e a c h e d a s my m a in o b j e c t i v e - t h e p r e ­
j u d i c e d w h i t e p e o p l e , who w i l l a t l e a s t l i s t e n t o w h a t o t h e r S o u t h e r n
w h ite p e o p le a re d o in g , even i f th e y d o n ’t e n d o rs e i t ; and l e t th e
r e l e a s e s do w h a t g o o d t h e y c a n am ong o t h e r c l a s s e s . Gome d a y t h e
s i t u a t i o n w i l l b e b e t t e r ; a n d t h e n o n e may f i n d o t h e r wayp s u i t
b e tte r.
rti t h c o r d i a l a p p r e c i a t i o n

/

U

' -•




Name: SuBie Edwina Hancock - Date: June 27, 1919.
P resen t Address: 2406 - 6th S t . , N. W., Wash., D. 0 .
B irth p lace: A u stin , T ex ., Raoe: Colored: Amerioan C itizen : Yes.
Languages you speak; E n g lish .
D escribe any marked p h y sic a l d e fe c ts: None. General Health: E x cellen t
Time l o s t on account o f sick n e ss l a s t two y ears: Hone
Age: 55
Height: 5-6
Weight: 148
Married: Widow
Dependents: Hone
Are you liv in g a t home or boarding? At home
Sho should be n o t ifie d in case o f a ccid en t or illn e s s ?
Name: L rs. T. Wl. Gregory - Address 2406-6 th s t . , N. W.,
Wash., D. C.
name: Mrs. w. H. w litch ellg Address 619 Dawson S t . ,
San Antonio, Ter.
In what c it y do you w ish to be sta tio n ed : Washington, D. C.
F f M Now long have you liv e d there? Three months.
What was your p revious address; 619 Dawson S t . , San A ntonio, Texas.
Are you w illin g to tr a v e l? Y es.
Have jo u supervised men or women? D ir e c tly ; Y es, men and women
How many? 500 men, 700 women.
How long? 7 years
What previous Government experienoe have you had: H ostess a t
Camps Greene, Travis and Gordon.
What occu p ation al or b u sin ess experience have you had which
q u a lif ie s you fo r t h is p a r tic u la r p o s itio n ? Matron a t
P r a ir ie View C o lleg e, T ex.; h o ste ss a t T ra v is, Greene and
Gordon.
Por what kind o f work do you con sid er y o u r s e lf b e st f it t e d ?
Gupervisory or ex ecu tiv e work w ith men cr women.
Second c h o ice; Any s o c ia l s e r v ic e work
What s a la r y : Any reasonable sa la ry
When could you report fo r work? Immediately.
Education: Grade School - 6 years - graduated - 1878 - A ustin , Tex.
H i£i School: 4 years - graduated 1882 - O berlin, Ohio.
Trade or b u sin ess sch ool: No.
N ight or correspondence sch ool: No
C ollege or u n iv e r s ity : S o.
T echnical o o lle g e : No.
What are you doing fo r self-im provem ent? Heading, observation and
study o f s o c ia l work.
P resent or la s t employer: Y. W. C. A ., from 1918 to 1919 - E xecutive
h o s te ss - compensation $1,020 per yea r - th ree aimy camps.
L eft account o f c lo s in g o f camps.
Previous employers: P r a ir ie View C ollege - 1912 to 1918 - Matron
having su p erv isio n o f 700 g i r l s (P r a ir ie View, T ex.) $800
per year - Resigned to e n ter Y. » . C. A. h o ste ss work.

* /* "




e

July 19# 1919.

Ur. 2 . Jana (Jaulklna, U«r.
Waaniugtoa O fflu e
War Canp Cauauni zy Servioa
1800 T lr g ln la Avenue JT.W.
Washington, D.O.
% dear Ur. Qauldiaaj
B eepoallus to your l e t t e r o f July 1 £ , I am
p lea sed to send you the a a o i and addras* below o f one woraan
who Btrldad m as being s u ita b le fo r your worit. I f i g*t
traok o f another same I sh a ll forward I t to yo u .

Hoc* address:
2406 S ixth S t r e e t, V.V.
Washington, D.Q,

Tours very truly.

iU reotor o f le g ro Soonond.cs.







September 19, 1919
? ile 1-211

Mrs. S . £• Hanoook,
o/o Prof. Montgomery Gregory,
Howard University,
Washington, D. 0.
My dear Mrs. IIanooak:
Mrs. Haynes has referred to th is o ffio e your inquiry regarding
appointments to the Bureau o f the Census, and i t is a pleasure
for me to give you, informally, my best information, althougi
1 may frankly Bay that 1 have not kept in the olosest touch with
the o lv il-se r v lo e regulations and with the announcements o f the
Bureau of the Census, Department of Coranoroe.
1 understand that the f ir s t examinations w ill be held October
16-16, 1919, under the supervision of the U. S. C ivil service
Commission, 1724 "F" S treet, H. 9 .
My beet advioe would be
for you to go at onoe to the Coranlsslon and f i l e oompleted
blanks, specifying whether you desire "departmental" or "field"
serv ice.
There is nothing to prevent an applicant taking both
examinations, so far as 1 know.
The Corasle sio n 's blanks and
information w ill give you f u ll knowledge of the subjects re­
quired to be taken.
You have noticed in the papers, no doubt,
the advertisements of the various private o lv il-se r v lo e sohoole.
Should you decide to make any special preparation, you w ill
find in the f i l e s of the Congressional Library the f u ll in­
structions of these schools.
There le a considerable demand
for ty p ists , tabulators and adding machine operators.
When
X was in the departmental and fie ld services I found i t very
helpful to my progress to be fsm iliar with the d ifferen t types
o f machines.
May 1 suggest that you go to the Appointment Clerk and the Chief
Clerk o f the Census Bureau and make fu ll inquiries regarding
appointments.




2

I think 1 am safe in saying that there w ill he an unusual number
o f applicants for positions under the Census Bureau th is year.
This w ill be because o f the large turn-out o f c le r ic a l help
on June 30, 1919, and because of the great o lerlo a l adjustment
a l l over the country.
I am quite sure that the "early bird w ill
catch the worn" so I am urging prompt action on your part.
I f Or* Haynes' of flo e can be of further help to you, we sh all
be very glad to know your wishes.
Yours very tru ly.

Assistant to the Director
o f Negro iijonomios.

National Mortal Workers’ Exrijange
M rs . E D IT H S H A T T O KING

( agency )

M anager

130 EAST TWENTY-SECOND STREET
T E LE P H O N E GRAMERCY 4916

NEW YORK CITY

N ovem ber 1 7 ,

1919.

D r. G eo rg e E . h a y n e e ,
D e p t, o f L a b o r,
W ash in g to n ,
D. C.
V y .d e a r D r. h a y n e s :

M rs. G u sie E . n an co ck
has r e g is te r e d w ith us f o r p o s itio n s
w ork, b e in g e s p e c i a l l y i n t e r e s t e d

in s o c ia l

in

w e lfa re

w o rk .
We u n d e r s t a n d t h a t y o u c a n g i v e u s
in fo rm a tio n a s to
f o r s u c h w o rk .
y o u r o p in io n ?
tra in in g ,

th e r e g i s t r a n t 's q u a lif ic a tio n s

May I a s k f o r a f r a n k s t a t e m e n t o f
The s p e c i a l p o i n t s a r e ,

e x p e rie n c e and p e r s o n a lity .

w i l l you m e n tio n th e
w eak p o i n t s

of co u rse,
I f p o s sib le ,

s tr o n g e s t p o in ts and a ls o any

t h a t s h o u ld be e s p e c i a l l y c o n s id e re d ?
T h a n k in g y o u f o r y o u r t r o u b l e

th is m a tte r,

I re m a in ,
V ery s i n c e r e l y y o u r s ,

RECEIVED
d e p a r t m e n t o f la b o r

NOV 1 8 1919
M anager

DirectorofNe«jro Economics



in




X

/




o t X
s’

/"

\t

'

RECEIVED

17
/

Oo
n

department of labor
FEB 1 1 1920
Erector of Neoro Economics

7




February 1 3 , 1920.

Mr. n .
Hardy,
Hanpton I n s t it u t e ,
Hampton, Va.
My dear 31r»
1 have your l e t t e r o f February 1 0 , making Inquiry regarding
th e new in d u s tr ia l o p p o rtu n ities fo r the Negro.
1 beg to ad vise you th a t th e data which the D iv isio n o f Negro
ZconoraiCE has secured on t h is su b ject i s b ein g prepared fo r
Issuance to the p u b lio , in the form o f a b u lle t in which i t
i s hoped may be pu blished in the near fu tu r e .
Your name
lias been en tered upon our l i s t fo r the r e c e ip t o f th at Informa­
t io n , when ready, inasmuch ae your p resen t inquiry i6 o f such
a w ide scope th at i t would be im practicable to attem pt to
answer i t in f u l l a t t h is tim e.
However, i f your inquiry merely r e la t e s to o p p o rtu n ities o f a
gen eral nature, we s h a ll be p lea sed to g iv e you a b r ie f general
Statem ent.
Yours very tr u ly ,
GfiORGL 8 . HAYH.eS,
D irecto r o f Negro Heanomies
Sy

A 8 8 1
P

P




COPY.

2 0 2 6 D r u i d - l i l l ..ve. ,
B a l t i m o r e , Lid.
A p r i l 14, 1930.

Mr. George Haynes,
i 2 Vi. 1 8 t h S t . ,
Hew York C i t y .
Dear S ir :
The l a d i e s o f t h e Du B o is C i r c l e o f t h i s c i t y
a r e i n v i t i n g you t o be t h e s p e a k e r on th e o c c a s i o n o f t h e
c l o s i n g o f t h e C i r c l e which w i l l be h e l d on t h e f i r s t
F r i d a y e v e n i n g i n June a t 8 : 0 0 o c l o c k .
<*e t r u s t you w i l l g r a n t t h i s and we s h a l l hope
f o r a favorable reply.
I s h a l l be g r a t e f u l i f you w i l l k i n d l y l e t me
h a v e an an sw er n o t l a t e r t h a n Monday A p r i l 1 9 t h , as
we h o l d o u r l a s t b u s i n e s s m e e t i n g on t h e d a y f o l l o w ­
ing th is d ate.
Hoping a f a v o r a b l e an sw er I r e m a i n ,
Yours v e r y r e s p e c t f u l l y

Cor Sec.
RECEIVED

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

APR 1 7 1920
Director of Is' ®°rro Economics







" p tm b ir 8 , 1920.

Mr. F.C. Hondareohottt
■ M ana.ftfnD ireoto *,
UM Lona.1 A asoolation o f Corporation 'l'rainin*.
Irrlnir xjlaca a t 15th S tr e e t
lew Tor 5c O lty .
Deal* Mr. Houle r so h o tti
Responding to your n o tic e o f appointment
hy P r e c lie n t Park %e a member o f the A s s o c ia tio n s Pub-Coma l t t e e on U nskilled Labor and V noricnnisaticn, It Is a
pleasure to accep t t h i s appointment.

Yours v ery truly*

D ir e c t o r of M«gro Boonoralos.

T

h e

H

a m p t o n

N

o r m a l

a n d

A

g r i c u l t u r a l

i n s t i t u t e

H A M P TO N . VIRGINIA
Bo a r d

of

T rustees

J a m e s E. G r e g g , pri nci pal
G e o r g e P. P h e n i x . vi ce pri nci pal
F r a n k K. R o g e r s , tr ea s ur e r
W i l l i a m H. S c o v i l l e . secretary

W I L L I A M H O W A R D T A F T . PRESIDENT
F R A N C I S G . P E ABO DY . VI CE P RESIDENT
C L A R E N C E H. K E L S EY . VICE P RESIDENT
GEOROE F OS TE R P E ABODY

CHARLES E. BIGELOW
A R T H U R C U R T I S S J AM ES
W I L L I A M J A Y S CH IEF PE LI N
W I L L I A M W . F RA ZI ER
F R A N K W . D AR LI NG
S A M U E L C . M I T C HE L L
W . C A M E R O N FO RB ES
A LE X A N O E R B. T R OWS RI OOE
C H E S TE R 0 . EMERSON
J A M E S E QREOG
R OB ER T R. MO TO N
H E N R Y W I L D E R F OOTE
Ho m e r L. F e r g u s o n




O ffice o f th e

P rincipal

September 3 rd , 1920.

Dee* pr. gayneB:

Dr, Gregg I s talcing th e se two or th re e weeks as a
v a c a tio n and I am t h e r e f o r e sending him no more b u s in e s s l e t t e r s
a t p re sen t.

T his w i l l be brought to h i s a t t e n t i o n hovrever,

as soon as he r e t u r n s .
S in c e re ly y o u rs,

S e c r e ta r y to th e P r i n c i p a l ,

Dr. Geo. E. Haynes,
D ire c to r o f Negro Economics,
Department of Labor,
W ashington, D. C.




X

la reply to the point istth e

nemoiendum that during these negoti­

a tion s Hr* .'aahington oould have reached by le tte r or telephone the
representatives of the League, while le tte r s and telegrams were passing
between him and me,- 1 am a t a lo ss as to why the opinion should be held
against Mr* ashing ton fo r not oonmunioating with Hr* H ill or other rep­
resen tatives of the League instead of with th is o ffice* when Hr* H ill,
representing the League and as sworn o f f ic ia l of the Hsployment serv ice,
without the knowledge of Hr. '’hashington and over h is head as the superi­
or o f f io la l, had gone ahead with plans for the establishment of that
of f lo e .

Mr* Washington was really a t a lo ss how to meet the situ a tio n

and wrote and telegraphed me in order to have a clearer understanding of
h is authority aul to have th is point e lea rly understood by the Federal
Lireotor, namely, that he was the man to advise about further work la
Chicago and I l l in o i s , and not Mr. H ill.

This brings out the real

issu e! namely# whether or not Mr. H ill a s the representative o f a
private organization and as a dollax^-a-year Exami ner—in-charge of
an employment o f f ic e , should have the resp on sib ility and authority for
the department of Labor’s general work for trying to adjust Hegro labor
Batters in Chicago or whether he should cooperate with Mr. Washington,
who fca the responsible o f f ic ia l for such general work.

Were Mr. H ill

In Mr. Washington’ s p o sitio n , and Ur. Washington in Mr. H ill’s , the
principle involved oould not be a ltered .




XI

The memorandum s t a t e s , fu r th e r , th at Hr. Washington d id s o t seek the
ooopexation of th e numbers o f th e Urban League a t a la t e r tim e, e x ce p t onoe
In December when Dr. Haynes was In Chicago*

She records show th at in

connection w ith a d v isin g th e Federal D irecto r about the estab lish m en t of
th e o f f i c e a t 5000 S ta te S t r e e t , h r . Washington accep ted th e recomriendat io n a s to lo c a tio n and two o f the p e r so n n e l, which had been proposed
by the Urban League, although the recommendations and arrangements fo r
lo c a tio n had been made w ithout h is knowledge, although he s a s the re spon­
s i b l e o f f i c i a l th ere fo r a d v isin g th e S e r v ic e .

The memorandum i t s e l f

adm its th ese f a c t s .

In sending in suggestions fo r membership on the Hegro Workers’
Advisory Oonznittee, the names of representatives of the Urban League
were included.

In response to a le tte r from Ur. Hlll,M r. ' ashington

wrote me on Hov. 19, saying that he had been asked to attend the con­
f e r noe and to make some suggestions for i t , and asked i f I desired
him to attend the conference.

Following h is suggestions, I asked au­

thority for him to do so , as co n flictin g previous engagements made i t
impossible for me to a tten d .

Hr. "ashington claims that during a l l of

the time of the running of the other braneh o ffic e s he has taken especial
pains to advise that opportunities lis te d there which could not be promptly
f i l l e d be file d with the o ffic e o f the Urban League.

Be points out that

he has asked Ur. H ill and other representatives of the League to confer­
ences and meetings and to serve on committees.




IXI

She memorandum further sta tes that several days a fte r Dr* Haynes*
v i s i t to the c it y , a t the tin s of the December conference mentioned above*
a meeting mu o il led by the Federal & rector to create a bureau fo r re­
turning soldi ore and sa ilo r s) that th is meeting had organized for the pur­
pose o f creating the bureau; that subsequently* Hr* H ill* Executive sec­
retary of the Urban League* was informed by Mr* Allinson* the secretary
of the new organization* that he had been placed on the Executive Com­
mittee o f the Bureau* and that confirmation of the appointment would bo
sent to him in w riting by Mr* Walter* Manager of the Bureau* and that
Hr. H ill had no previous knowledge of h is appointment nor had anything
to do with the seleotion of h is name*
In response to th is point the fa c ts are that the f i r s t meeting to
esta b lish the Soldiers* Bureau was called on December 15, 1918* Hr*
Washington and 1 attended at the in vitation of the Federal Director* Ur*
Crawford*

After the preliminary organisation,the e lectio n of president

and secretary, I was given an opportunity to mention the need of some
sp ecial steps for takixg oar© of Negro soldiers* and placed the name of
Mr* Washington as the responsible o f f ic ia l a t the disposal o f the committee
that m s proposed*

That night Mr* “achington and 1 le f t the o ity to

attend the Missouri sta te Conference at St* Louis* Mo*

I t was vary much

of a surprise to us to find that when Mr. Washington returned from the
three days' absence some one had proposed Mr* H ill’s name to represent
the colored people on the committee*

This raised lnmediately, again* the

question of o f f ic ia l resp on sib ility and authority for advising the Federal
Director and the Department on the general work of trying to adjust Negro
la




IT l

lab or B atters*

The q u estion o f who was resp o n sib le fo r su g g estin g Hr*

H i l l ' s name does not s e a s to be relev a n t*

From the f a c t th a t Mr* H ill

had no previou s knowledge o f h is appointment ssr anything to do w ith the
s e le c t io n o f h is name does not e x p la in the fa c t th a t a f t e r he did know
th a t Hr* Washington* a s the r esp o n sib le o f f i c i a l , had w is e d o b jec tio n s
he continued to n e g o tia te about the m a tter, and Mr* Washington, in order
to avoid a s much f r i c t i o n as p o s s ib le , agreed to one or more conferen ces
w ith Mr* H i l l about the q u estion o f names and committees and gave Mr* H ill
con sid era b le v o lo e in a d ju s tin g th e matter*
In t h is connection the memorani tan s t a t e s , fu r th e r , th a t Mr* Washing­
ton took excep tion to th e appointment o f Hr* n i l , s ta tin g th a t the Chicago
Urban League was not in good standing and su ggestin g th a t Mr* ashing ton be
appointed on the Coranittee in p la c e o f Hr* H illj th a t a telegram was re­
c e iv e d from the u. 3 . anployraent S e r v ice sign ed by th e A ssista n t D irecto r
General o f th e s e r v ic e , t o th e e f f e c t that to appoint Mr* H i l l on the
Committee would be o b jec tio n a b le to oth er a g en cies and th a t Dr. Haynes
should be co n su lted b efore anything e l s e was done*







Belta IRbo fforensic Society
L in c o l n

U n iv e r s it y ,

P a .




Mr. J . Fovrton I T illt
Delta Hho Foronelo 3 o o le ty ,
Tlneoln A d v e r s it y , Fh.
Dear Mr. H fllt
Re sp o o lin g to your l e t t e r o f January f
about S o c ia lism , th ere l n a l i t t l e book published by
Cross e n t it le d " E ssen tia ls o f Socialism " nhl ch contains
not only b r ie f statem en ts o f v a rio u s phases o f the
methods' bat a ls o com plete refer en ce * . I f in any oth er
nr?y I can serve y o n , p lea se c o l l upon me.
Toots very t r u ly ,

D irector o f Hegro Sannomles*

H/SLS

August 30, 1919.

Chicago Urban Laasfu®,

My dear Hr* H i l l i
Plaaee aooept my acknowl a d v e n t and thanks fo r the corrected oarny
o f the m inutes o f the ciootia e o f w elfare and employment a^anoiea
a t whiua 1 wan perm itted to bo p rsco u t.
Hay 1 a ls o take t h is
oooasion to address to you my h earty a p p recia tio n o f your many
c o u r te sie s to mo whoa 1 was In your o it y .




Yours voxy tr u ly ,

D irector o f '.to^ro -iooncraiae.

■I

JAMES B

*

D U D L E Y . P r e s id e n t




A

T. W H I T S E T T . T

T h e N eg ro A g r ic u l t u r a l a n d T e c h n ic a l C o ll e g e
of

N o r t h C a r o l in a

F
N

D. B L U F O R D . D ir e c t o r A c a d e m ic D e p t .
A M U R R A Y , D ir e c t o r A. fit C D e p t .
H . M T A Y L O R D ir e c t o r M e c h a n ic a l D e p t .

G reensboro,

N. C.

O c to b e r 2 3 - 1 9 1 9 .

D r . G e o rg e E . H a y n e s ,
New Y o r k , N. Y .
My d e a r D r . H a y n e s :
Y o u rs t h e 2 0 t h r e c e i v e d .
to

a s s i s t M r. H in e s a l l t h a t

I

I s h a l l be v e r y g la d

can.

jbd / l d .

IN

AGRICULTURE

reasu




December 5, 1919.

P r o f. George li. Hines,
D ept, o f Ootanerce end final ice,
Howard U n iv e rs ity ,
Q. 0 .

iiy dear Prof. Hines;
In response to y o u r re c e n t in q u e s t, ? t i? a p lea su re to fo r ­
ward to you., under s e p a ra te oovor, none n n te r la l r e la t in g to
negro la b o r .

'/our.; very tru ly ,
QEQQGH JJ. ^ vTKKT),

Di root or of Segro 3oonon1.ee
%-

A s s i s t a n t .




DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
*

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY




W A S H IN G T O N

M O K 42A X




I > . IK . I I I T K

A R C H IT E C T

December 16, 1920.

Hr. fcorgan D. 2 . H ite ,
Chairman, Negro Surrey Committee,
211 Camp S t r e e t,
New O rleans, La.
Hy dear S i n
itollow lng Dr. Haynes• l e t t e r to you, y esterd a y , 1 am forwarding today
a p ortion o f the m a teria l promised you.
The departmental b u lle t in "The Megro a t work during the World War and H eoonetraction Period", now
on th e Government p r e s s e s , probably contain s an account o f such ex­
p erien ces as w i l l be o f h elp to you.
We s h a ll be pleased to see th at
an advance copy o f t h is b u lle t in i s sen t to you as soon as a v a ila b le .




Yours v e iy tr u ly .

A ssista n t D irector Negro Economics




1r
c is is - t^ A A

J i/ i y

/ //_

a t ^ i—
-

& s^ ~

j O u l^

-4 ^ -

&
V

a~zst.

A ^ - ’£ ' 1

S 7 ^ c .
/ .

*

-P

~

s'.

Z

&

,-

.

- .....

J ' ' -(

- / / %

fc Y

/ „ / v ^ A

-J . t < *—^ |

/
^ f c >

gA L s

^

,..

/ y r _ .

ys

't ,f ! j U
J ! *

x
u

.^

A

^

z

2

£ r

.

Qj

(2s?~t-*-Si~^l-J’

s /u J^

t^ -u . sy^ *p/
sA cs ^A,

f/
^ y C

& Jy C rO -cC s

(/HSU* f o -j f 4^
7 & - rts*^ 4$ /IV -la J




l

~&~

/ J t ' A

uU<^

l r ' / ^

S

L , J

/

*-




7 «

^

enM A

02c ^ Z ^ ^

i/L ~ ;5?w
w f 0

c

~ /S ^

y Y « ^

ju £

S

* j £ - ‘+ A £ £ * .

<_ v

\g^'i^L

e#

/ 9 / Z a ^ - '°
jfr^rytSLA-*

/
*z*~

v

*. -tz e.

c ^ -f

------- — f - ^ y A L ^ J ^ o x y -Y

^

^

% iy A J j A

. /

0Aj

y

t

^ -7 T _ ^

^ Jr^ L^ -<

/ fc A

ijfa y n J { $ L& z

A -^ _ ^ y / <Y

/

jJ

”^

A tJ * ~ ± A Z A
4 -r(Y ~%&-crX_

JL^>

@ Jv~ d

y£

- A

iX

■ <Z*Ls

(U c J Z .

UsU4-< L

<*A

A
^

^
j^

A

L

J it .
A M

i'

^t<L- £L/




■

A y

w * -* - $ ^ c

A l* 4 .

*/X4Stt4L * t? & 0

/o ^ & £ -

Y
A*

f t £

•

_£_.

€

/ £ r-

pisfr> iJLg-^ / /j.4 -' & -Z
£

, ^

^

j &
/ j /

^7p

cn>^i_

/ Z S ' —

a ^

j f ; ^

y

Ja s s a rJ* -

oJ l

z ty ^
,u .u

/•*

c '

^

-^

/

j

/

i ^

*■ “ /: ■

f
t^oU

i* ^
'

</

^

Z Z -F — Z
,

j

*-*~*-^*~’

•/ c2 ^ & j -*-*-a-&C_,
d Z

$ Z ~ ~ -Z Z Z )

JL^*-




^ Z Z Z ^ Z ^ ^ ^ Z Z -.
/ / *

<U z

} z /Ls^LS*

* S ~ /j z z Z

^

z Z /Z *

j/r ,

ROBERT R. MOTON.

EMMETT J. SCOTT.

p r in c ip a l

Secretary

WARREN LOGAN.

TREASURER

BOARD OF TRUSTEES
William G. w illc o x . Chairm an , member of
3 south William S t ., new York . N. Y.
w w Ca m pb e ll . Vice -Chairman ,

investment

Committee

T he T uskegee
Normal and I ndustrial Institute

tu s kesee . ala

WILLIAM J SCHIEFFELIN. MEMBER OF INVESTMENT COMMITTEE
170 WILLIAM ST . NEW YORK. N. Y
Ch a rle s ' s . Mason . Member of Investment Committee
30 state st .. Boston , mass .

fo u n d ed

Prank Tr u m b u l l , member of Investment Committee
6 1 B roadway. New York . n . y
theooore

Ro osevelt ,

oyster

Ba y .

BY BOOKER T. WASHINGTON

n . y .. deceased

FOR THE TRAINING OF

J ulius Rosenwalo . A rthincton St . and Homan Ave .
C hicago , III.
William m. Scott, ibtm and Hamilton Sts.
Phila d elphia , pa .

C O L O R E D Y O U N G M EN A N D W O M EN

GEORGE MCANENV. IB EAST 47TH ST.. NEW YORK. N. Y
V. H. TULARE. 433 S. RIPLEY ST.. MONTBOMERY. ALA
Charles W.

hare.

Tuskegee . A la .

WARREN LOGAN. MEMBER OF INVESTMENT COMMITTEE
TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE. ALA.
A. J. WILBORN. TUSKEGEE. ALA.
E dgar A. Bancroft . 606 s. Michigan a v e .
C hicago. III.
A lexander Man n . D. D.. Trinity Ch b r c h . Boston . Mass
Robert
C harles

r . motor .
a.

Tuskegee Institute ,

T u s k e g e e In s t it u t e . A l a .

a la .

August 5, 1919

Wichersham . Atlanta . Oa .

C. E. Thomas . Prattville , a la .
V. EVERIT MACY. 68 BROAD ST. NEW YORK. N. Y




nr

R e c e iv e d

DEPAK7 (V?£/VT OF LABOR
AUG

Dr* George 3* Haynes,
Department O f Labor,
Washington, jj. C*

7 1979

D.
,rectop of Nerro Economics

Dear Dr* naynes:
Your l e t t e r o f the f i r s t has been for­
warded to Dr*

moton*

1 am also oarrying a copy

of i t with me to S t. Louis as a precautionary mea­
sure to l e t him see i t in case the origin al whioh
I am forwarding to him may not reach him before he
leaves for S t. Louis.

ROBERT

R.

MOTON.

P ri nci pal

WARREN LOGAN.

Tr i a s u r i r

BOARD OF TRUSTEES
William G. Willco x . Ch airm an , member or Investmknt
3 South William st .. new York n . y .

co mm itte e

T he T uskegee
Normal and Industrial Institute

W w Ca m pb e ll . V ice -Chairm an . Tuskkoee . A l a .
J. Sch ieppc lin .
170 w illiam St .,

william

membkr or i n v e s t m e n t committee
new Yo rk . N. Y.

C harles E. Ma s o n . Member or Investment Committee
30 State s t .. Boston , Mass,
prank

FOUNDED BY BOOKER T. WASHINGTON

Tru m bu ll . Member or Investment Committee
• 1 Broadway. New York . n . Y.

Theodore Ro osevelt . O yster Ba t . N. V..

deceased

J ulius

Homan Av e .

rosenwald . arthingtor s t .. and

FOR THE TRAINING OF

CHICAGO. ILL.

C O L O R E D Y O U N G H E N A N D W O M EN

WILLIAM M. SCOTT. 19TH AND HAMILTON STB
Philad elphia . Pa .
v. H. Tu la r e . 433

s.

Ripley

s t ..

Mo ntgomery . Al a .

Charles W Ha r e . Tuskegee . A l a .
Warren Logan , mvm ber or investment
Tuskkoee institute . Ala
a.

J. wiLSOBN. Tuskegee .

a la

committee

.

E doar A. B a n c r o f t . SOS S. Michigan Ave
Chicago , il l .

T u s k e g e e In s t i t u t e . A l a .

ALEXANDER MANN. D. 0.. TRINITY CHURCH. BOSTON. MASS
ROBERT R. MOTON. TUSKKSKK INSTITUTE. ALA
CHARLES A. WlCKERSHAM. ATLANTA. OA.
C. E. THOMAS. PRATTVILLE. ALA
V EVERIT MACY. SB BROAD ST.. NEW YORK.N Y.




November 7 , 1919*

Dr. George K. Haynes,
D ire c to r o f Hegro Economics,
U nited s t a t e s Department o f L abor,
V asnington, J . C.
Dear Dr. Hayness
I am sen d in g under s e p a ra te cover a marked
copy o f The Tuskegee S tu d e n t, c o n ta in in g a n e x tr a c t from
your D e tro it a d d re ss .
I hope you re c e iv e d th e teleg ram which we
sent to N a s h v ille .
Yours v e ry t r u l y ,

E d ito r o f
THE TOLEEGrHB STUD; NT.
.EH

RECEIVED
d e p a r t m e n t of l ^ p or

NOV

10 1919

Pi. ector of Ne<rro Economics




DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
W A S H IN G TO N

Hovember 10, 1919.

Ur. Albon L. H olsay(
xJditor - "The Tuskegae stu d en t."
Tuakegeo I n s t it u t e , A la.
Uy dear U r. iloisey:
P lea se aooept thanks fo r the lib e r a l spaoe g iv en In your p u b lica ­
t io n to the departm ental r e le a s e on Dr. .-iuynea* statem onts re­
gain in g "The Negro In Industry" as per copy o f "The Tuakegee
student" transm itted w ith your kind l e t t e r o f Hovamber 7, 1919.
1 s h a ll be p lea sed to bring the same promptly to Dr. Haynes*
a tte n tio n upon h is retu rn to the o lt y .
1 am q u ite sure Dr. Haynes receiv ed the telegram which you
forwarded to him a t K a a h v ille.
I f you Incurred any exponso
in r ela y in g the message w i l l you k in d ly a d v ise t h is o f f i c e .

A ssista n t to the D irector
o f Negro doonomloa.

VO LU M E 30
N U M B E R 32




SATU RD AY

October 2 5 . 1 9 1 9

iVovember

th to

9

11

th

FOR

.

The Roosevelt M em orial Association
The T hird R ed Cross R o ll C all
The A labam a Soldiers' M em orial
November 9th

Sunday— Opening A ppeal

—

November 10th

—

M onday

—

Tag D ay

November 11th— Tuesday— Armistice Celebration

Be a Peace Patriot
i S

(^SlX J A

5

7'

' • " '

''

£=1

H

i m

C O L L E G E that has its students devote one-half their time to actual useful work is so in line with common
sense that we are amazed that the idea had to be put in execution by an ex-slave as a life-saver for his disfranchised
race. Our great discoveries are always accidents: we work for one thing and get another. I expect that the day will
come, and ere long, when the great universities of the world will have to put the Tuskegee Idea into execution in order
to save themselves from being distanced by the Colored Race.— E l b e r t H u b b a r d , In “A Little Journey to T uskegee.”

Is There A Deserving Young M an or Toting IVoman in Your
Community who needs A Chance? I f so perhaps

^

The Tuskegee Institute
Offers the Very Opportunity which H e wants

t/ U S K E G E E is not only a school. It is an Institution and an Influence. It helps
the worthy student to help himself. Location unsurpassed for healthfulness. Forty
trades and industries for young men and women. Excellent Literary and Normal Courses.
Smith-Hughes Vocational Courses for advanced students.

Home Economics, Agriculture, Industries
‘• 7 U S K E G E E IN S T IT U T E is no place for sluggards. From rising bell to taps, there
*
is a full program—drills, class-rooms, shops, farms, etc. M a y b e y o u r boy n eed s j u s t
th e s o r t o f tr a i n i n g w h ic h ‘T u s k e g e e O f f e r s .
WRITE for Catalog of Information.

ROBERT RUSSA ftfOTON, Principal, Tuskegee Institute, Alabama

J o h n H . D rakeford

A gents, Make $10.00 to $25.00 a day

F loyd F. F orman

sellin g

T H E JOHN H. DRAK EFO RD

EMMETT J. SCOTT’S OFFICIAL
HISTORY

IN SU R A N C E A G E N C Y

i

of the

AM ERICAN NEGRO IN THE
WORLD’S W AR
We are headquarters for this book. Best
commission—prompt delivery. Outfit free to
workers. Address, R. L. PHILLIPS PUB­
LISHING COMPANY, Dept. B., Plymouth
Court, Chicago, Illinois.




All kinds of insurance at prevailing
rates in good companies. Best
service at no extra cost.
Losses paid promptly

BIG CHANCE FOR MEN AN D
WOMEN
Earn one hundred per cent profit selling an
allround household cleaning and dyeing prep­
aration for Hats, Gloves, Shoes, Dresses, etc.
Write for Free Instructions.
THE PULLMAN SHOE POLISH MFG. CO„
3222 S ta te S t., C hicago, 111., D ept. T.

Office in
THE BANK OF TUSKEGEE

A L E X RICE
“Your Money’s Worth or Your Money Back”

A lw ays Shows the

H O W IS YOUR EYESIGHT?
DO YOU SE E AS W E L L AS YOU L IK E ? Do you suffer with
headache or eyestrain? Is your vision blurred or do the words
seem to run together and your eyes become watery? if so, it would
be to your advantage to come to our store and have your Eyes Tested Free. Our
Mr. Lewis has fitted glasses for years and fits you Scientifically at about One-Half the
Cost you have to Pay venders or traveling opticians. Our records show a large and
growing list of well pleased customers and we guarantee satisfaction. W e have
built up the Best Drug Business in T uskegee, and our guarantee means something to
you—‘‘your money back if not satisfied.”

L E W IS ’ DRUG L p SEED STORE, The Rexall Store
Bttow

P h o n e 131

T u ik « f> e, A la

NEWEST AND SMARTEST
STYLES IN WEARABLES

For Men, Women, B oys and Girls.
MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

“On the Square”

WE ALWAYS FEATURE
A class of merchandise that is thor­
oughly dependable. 38 years at the
same location “on the square” tells you
who we are and how we stand.
CAPITOL CLOTHING STORE
MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

O oriL im n nn n

GEO. C. W RIGHT
FIRE INSURANCE AGENT
Rates Furnished on Application

ia«m m m m iM ifM m ii.m .i.ss mi n im u m im am s

Star Pianos and Phonographs excell in tone and quality.
your nearest branch for catalogue and prices.

W rite

T H E S T A R PIA N O COM PANY
Factories: Richmond, Indiana; 108 Dexter Ave., Montgomery, Ala­

TUSKEGEE, ALA.

bam a; 1820 Third Ave., Birmingham, Alabama; F ifth Avenue, Nashville,
Tennessee; M arket St., Cnattanooga, Tennessee; Knoxville, Tennessee.

P itts b u r g h
Plate Glass Co.
Plate Glass, Window Glass,
Mirrors, Figured and Sky­
light Glass, Paints, Oils,
Brushes, Painters’ Sundries
and Framed Mirrors.

Customers May Buy Their Styles Here With as Mu
Safety as They Would Buy 44SterllTlg^^ in Silver.

L e o n a rd , A itzp a trick , yh/ueller

General Distributors of
The
Progressive
Standard
Agencies
Paint
in every
of the W o r ld ^ ^ lJ jP p Southern

Dependable Dry Goods and Apparel

Write for Color Card and we will
give you the name of dealer nearest
you.

Loeb H ardw are Co.

SOUTHEASTERN HEADQUARTERS

Wholesale Hardware, Veedol oil, Automobile accessories
and Repairs

ATLANTA, GA.
Southeastern W arehouses

A tlanta, Ga.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Birmingham, Ala.
Savannah, Ga.

The
Harvey Seed Co.
Dealer# in

All Kinds of Garden and
Field Seed

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Montgomery, Alabama

Drugs, T oilet A rticles
and Candies
We carry a full line of the best and most reliable merchandise. Standard proprie­
tary medicines, toilet articles and sundries.
Fresh candies. Unexcelled soda
service for our colored patrons. Call or phone your orders.

J O H N S T O N B R O T H E R S , D ruggists a n d P harm acists

15 M o n r o e St., M o n tg o m e r y , Ala.

CONKLIN

Tin Plate and Metal Co.
Roofing supplies of every des­
cription, r o o f i n g tinplate,
bright tinplate, sheet metal.
ATLANTA

SAVANNAH

“The Quality Shoe and Stocking Shop”

BULLOCK SHOE CO.
For Men.

For Women.

For Children.

On Dexter Avenue a Third of a Century.
MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA




S E R V I C E F I R S T —Our delivery and store lervice ha# been a strong appeal to our customers during
the nearly quarter of a century we have been in butinea# in Tuskegee. After aerrice cornea
G O O D G O O D S A T J U S T P R I C E S —W e receive daily ahipmenta of bread and cake from Schleamgers, one of Atlanta’s largest model bakeries. Freah fruit# and v e g e t a b l e s . Telephone
connection.

A . J. W ILBO R N , T u sk egee, A la .

TULLIS-GAMBLE H A R D W A R E
C O M PA N Y
W e carry a complete line of Stoves, House Furnishing Goods, Vehicles and H a ratta. We i m
agents for the following standardized goods: B. F. Avery Sc Son's Agricultural Im ple m ents , A m er­
ican Fence, W eber Wagons, Moyer and Columhua Buggiea. Our catalog is now ready for dirtribution. W rite for your copy. Addreaa:

36 and 38 Commerce Street

Montgomery, Alabama




The “ Constitution” of To-day— Electrically Propelled
HE U. S. S. “ N ew Mexico,” the first Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gen­
battleship of any nation to be electri­ erators of 400 horsepower each, supply
cally propelled, is one of the most important power for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps,
achievements of the scientific age. She not fans, shop machinery, and kitchen and laun­
dry appliances, etc.
only develops the maximum power and,
with electrical control, has greater flexibility Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea
marks the advancement of
of maneuver, which is a
another phase of the elec­
distinct naval advantage,
F ig u res th a t t e l l th e
trical industry in which the
but also gives greater econ­
S to r y o f A c h ie v e m e n t
General Electric Company
omy. At 10 knots, her
Length —624 feet
is the pioneer. Of equal
normal cruising speed, she
Width—97 feet
importance has been its
Displacement—32,000 tons
will steam on less fuel than
Fuel capacity—a million gal­
part
in perfecting electric
the best turbine-driven ship
lons (fuel oil)
transportation
on la n d ,
Power—28,000
electrical
horse­
that preceded her.
power
transforming
the
potential
Speed—21 knots
The electric generating
energy of waterfalls for use
plant, totaling 28,000 horse­
in electric motors, develop­
power, and the propulsion equipment of the ing the possibilities of electric lighting and
great super-dreadnaught were built by the many other similar achievements.
General Electric Company. Their operation
A s a result, so general are the applications
has demonstrated the superiority of electric of electricity to the needs of mankind that
propulsion over old-time methods and a scarcely a home or individual today need
wider application of this principle in the be without the benefits of General Electric
merchant marine is fast making progress. products and service.

T

A n illustrated booklet describing the “N ew M exico,” entitled,
“The E lectric S h ip /9 will be sent upon request. Address
General E lectric Company, D esk 44, Schenectady, N ew York .

ctric

ales Offices in

11 la r g e c itie s ..

95-108D

The Tuskegee Student
D e v o t e d to th e I n t e r e s t o f S tu d e n ts a n d G r a d u a te s
o f th e T u s k e g e e N o r m a l a n d I n d u s t r i a l I n s t i t u t e

VOL. 30

TUSK EG EE INSTITUTE, ALABAM A, OCTOBER 25, 1919

NO. 32

Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother

Urban League

Principal Moton’s Sunday Evening Talk in the Institute

To Open Southern Office at
Atlanta, Ga.
.

Chapel, Sunday Evening, October 5th
During the time that I was away last week,
I met one of the parents of one of the students
l.ere and he told me that he had not heard
from this young man since he had left home
for Tuskegee, and I felt ashamed that any
Tuskegee student would be so lacking in the
proper respect for his parents as to neglect
this important duty.
Frequently we have received letters from
parents inquiring about their son or daughter,
whom they haven’t heard from for a long
period—sometimes months. I met one mother
sometime ago who said she hadn’t heard
from her child for a year. I was both dis­
appointed and disgusted to hear that.
When we read the ten commandments we
find that the first four of the ten command­
ments refer to God. “Thou shalt have no
other gods before me. Thou shalt not take
the name of the Lord thy God in vain. Re­
member the Sabbath Day to keep it holy,” etc.
The fifth commandment refers to our mother
and father: “Honor thy father and thy
mother that thy days may be long in the
land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.”
And the interesting thing aiv<u> inis com­
mandment is that it is the only one which
has a promise attached to it. We are told that
we must honor our father and mother so that
oui days may be long in the land which the
Lord gave us.

I tell you, young men and women, it is a fine
thing to go to school, and have your ideals
and inspirations broadened. Tt is a grand
thing to know how to read and write, to review
the history of those that have gone on before,
and to know what other men think, but it is
a shame for any student to become careless
and indifferent about his parents because
he may be educated and thinks that he is
above them.
I know of a young man, who entered a
certain school and studied for four years,
graduated and went back home, secured ?
school and went to teaching. He was a very
good teacher and his pupils all loved him. He
went back to his old home in a log cabin, and
said that there was no one for him to associate
with. He called his old mother, “Mrs.” and
didn’t want her to call him by his firs:; name.
When he returned she gave a reception in his
honor and tried to make it pleasant for him,
but he humiliated and embarrassed this old
mother with his new found airs. His old crip­
pled stepfather, who had spent every dollar
that he could “rake and scrape” to educate
him from a baby up, was called “Mr.” Along
with that talk and that attitude went the
same kind of disrespectful treatment.




This boy crushed the life out of his parents
His poor old mother died with a broken heart,
and before she died she talked with my mother
with tears in her eyes, when my mother would
tell her how kind her sons tried to be to her.
/That old crippled man who had raised that
boy from a baby talked with me before he
lied and told mo how he had struggled to ed­
ucate the boy, and he wept as he talked.
I have no compassion or sympathy for any­
one who would do that kind of thing. I hope
that none of you will ever come to that point
where you will become careless and indiffer­
ent towards your parents, and crush the spirit
out of their hearts. When they suffer and work
hard for you to go to school, they look for­
ward with pride for you to come and bright­
en their lives because of your training and
your education. I think that the children
suffer more than the parents do when they
are disrespectful. I don’t believe any suc­
cess will come to a boy or girl that does the
kind of thing I have described. The young
man about whom I spoke just now was a
clean man; there was nothing against his
moral character, and yet the superintendent
of the county schools would not permit him
to teach in the county so he went to the next
county and they wouldn’t let him teach there.
He had to go over a hundred miles before
he could find work.

He taught school there

for a while and died, and was almost buried
in a Potter’s Field. His pupils took up a col­
lection to bury him, because he was a good
teacher and was popular with his students.
Sometimes parents don’t always do what
we want them to do, and sometimes disappoint
us; but I don’t care what they do, they are
oui parents, and as for that matter we don’t
always do what they want us to do. In fact,
more children disappoint parents than parents
disappoint children. I don’t want to hear of
any Tuskegee student being unkind or in­
different towards his mother or father.
When Jesus was upon the cross He saw
His mother standing among His disciples.
He called His mother and His friend, John,
to the foot of the cross and said to H i moth­
er, “Woman, behold thy son!” and to His
friend, He said, “Behold thy mother!” Thus it
was that one of the last things in the n ind
'of Jesus in the hour of His greatest agony
was the comfort and care of His mother.
I tell you, young men and women, I don’t be­
lieve God will be pleased with you; I don’t
believe God will let you have a successful
life if you don’t honor your fattier and
mother. I don’t believe that you can remain
long in the land which God gave us.

Announcement was made sometime ago that
the National Urban League would open
Southern Headquarters at Atlanta, Georgia,
which would have the general supervision of
the work of the Urban League in the South­
ern States.
Mr. Jesse O. Thomas, a graduate of the
Tuskegee Institute, and formerly Northern
Financial Secretary, has been placed in charge
of the work of the Southern Headquarters,
and is planning to open the Atlanta office
at a very early date. In a recent address
before the Urban League Industrial Con­
vention, held at Detriot, Michigan, Mr. Thomas
in commenting upon his plans for coming
South and opening the Atlanta office, said:
“Notwithstanding large numbers of Negroes
have migrated north from every southern
community in the past few years, there are
still between seven and eight million N e­
groes in the fourteen Southern States. I am
very much pleased that the Executive Officers
in the National Urban League have been far­
sighted enough to realize this fact. They
realize that it doesn’t matter how successful­
ly the policies of the League may be operated
in the Northern and Western States, that,
notwithstanding, the League may succeed in
securing a larger place in the economic life
of the community for the Negro in cities like
Chicago, Detroit and other large centers, that
ultimately the organization will have largely
failed, unless its program can be carried to
the Southern States, unless it can help the
Negro in centers like Atlanta, Georgia; Birm­
ingham, Alabama, and other congested South­
ern cities.
“The officers of the League have also, been
wise in the policy they have adopted in their
effort to carry the League’s activities into
the South. Their plan and purpose are to or­
ganize in the South, by the South. After all
is said and done, there can very little be done
in the South of a permanent nature in the
way of race adjustment and development of
racial relationship without the sympathetic
and active co-operation of the better element
of white men and women, black men and wom­
en.
“I shall attempt briefly, to describe the
plan of organization for the South, and the
program for each southern community. First,
it is the League’s plan and purpose to have
a large Advisory Committee, made up of the
leading white men and women, colored men
and women, of all of the Southern States.
The Field Secretary, or Southern Organizer,
will frequently turn to this committee for'
advice on all problems and policies affecting
that part of the country. This Advisory Com­
mittee will serve as a point of contact between
the Organizer and citizens at large, in every
(Continued on page A)

THE TUSKEGEE STUDENT OCTOBER 25, 1919

2

Mr. W. T. B. Williams Visits
the Calhoun School
Mr. Williams was the speaker at the open­
ing exercises of the Calhoun School, Tues­
day, October seventh. These exercises are
held annually at Calhoun, at the opening of
school in memory of the founding of the in­
stitution. This is a very unique feature of
the school in that it celebrates at the begin­
ning as well as at the close.
,
i t..'st. exercises serve the purpose also of
awakening interest among the patrons of the

school. On this occasion more than a hun­
dred fathers and mothers and friends of the
school gathered with the children for the
opening day exercises.
In Mr. William’s address he pointed out
the purpose of education, showing especially
that it is designed to make larger, better, and
more effective men and women and to draw
attention also to the good fortune of these
rural people in having such a school as Cal­
houn. This school has done far more than
teach the conventional subjects. It has
reached out to the homes and influenced the
whole life of the people about the school.
He then called attention to the duty that
these people owe to their Northern friends,
as is the case with most colored people w hj
have received education. He encouraged them
in their loyalty and devotion to the school
and to those who have conducted this worK
through twenty-eight years of its existence.
In this connection he was able also to di­
rect their attention to the increasing num­
ber of Southern white friends who are g iv ­
ing more and more nowadays to the w el­
fare of the colored people. He was able to
point to specific instances of such in that
particular community. The Southern white
friends at Calhoun and elsewhere are giv­
ing special attention to the improvements of
colored schools.
Mr. Williams referred to the fact that the
influence of the Calhoun school had been such
as to keep practically all of the people of the
community on their lands in spite of the at­
tractions that carried so many colored people
northward.
He closed his address by urging the col­
ored people not to be frightened away from
their homes which they had acquired by great
effort and thrift. He assured them that the
disturbances of today were only temporary
and formed a part of the unrest that the
whole world is experiencing. The good peo­
ple of Alabama have no desire to drive away
such neighbors as have been developed about
the Calhoun school and he urged them to sit
steady, educate their children, make attrac­
tive homes for them and that will continue
to hold them in this community.

Helping the Little Brown Brother
Tiny waifs of humanity from far Turkey,
Montenegro, Serbia, the “lost children of the
Urals”— all waiting the answering love and
care of the “Greatest Mother in the World”
—their swarthy little faces wreathed in smiles
of happy, trusting hopefulness. So they
have been found by the American Red Cross,
which sent to the ravaged lands across the




waters many helpers in answer to the plead­
ing call of these homeless, hungry tots and
their despairing mothers. Blind to color,
race and creed, the “Greatest Mother in the
World,” seeing only the sorrow and the want,
has opened her arms to the suffering, an!
high over the heads of her loved people has
raised her standard, crossed with gleaming
scarlet.
Just as she has welcomed to herself and
her protecting care the little brown brothers
of Europe’s shores, so has she looked with­
in America’s boundaries for our own little
brown brothers who need her among the
Negro race of this country. And, just re­
cently, they needed her badly. When the race
riot in Chicago left hundreds of families
homeless and helpless, the Red Cross respond­
ed with shelter, clothes, shoes and food for
all—and especial care of the little ones was
taken in the issuing of one pint of milk
daily to the children.
But it is not merely in some dire emergency
the Red Cross Mother aims to help her dark­
er children. She plans for their future needs,
and to this end, the Red Cross Home Service is
planning a great, instructive campaign whereby
both Negro and white mothers may learn self­
care and self-help in the home. Recogniz­
ing the fundamental value of proper physical
care of the child from the start, the Red
Cross classes and clinics, are training moth­
ers in home nursing, hygiene, care of the
sick, weighing and measuring of babies,
standards of physical health and other vital­
ly- important factors in the care of children.
In order to foster a healthy development in
the child life— as well as that of the entire fam­
ily—courses in home dietetics hold an impor­
tant place in the work of the Home Service
chapters. In addition to actual, practical
demonstration, the instruction is supplied
through appropriate literature, set forth in
plain phraseology and made more graphic
by striking illustrations.
In this Home Service work, the Red Cross
has received and expects to still receive the
co-operative support of the Negroes them­
selves. It was during the world-war crisis
that the Negroes first organized into Red
Cross chapters. In these they conducted
surgical-dressing rooms, and held classes in
dietetics, hygiene and home care of the sick,
while, of the Modem Health Crusade, none
were more earnest members than the col­
ored children. Every war-time activity of the
National Red Cross won from these people ear­
nest and enthusiastic support. Having proved
their ability during a world crisis, they are
not going to fail their own race as long as
it needs their work and support.
During the recent Chicago riot, Red Cross
stations were, in many centers, wholly op­
erated by colored women. Untiring, efficient
and in the fullest co-operation with mem­
bers of other chapters, was the work of the
colored members of the Red Cross.
So will their work remain—and in those
parts where colored members and teachers
are not available for carrying on the work,
there the white “mothers” will take up the
work of our “little brown brother” in America,
just as she worked for those swarthy-skin­
ned little mites across the sea.

The Roosevelt Memorial
Campaign
“Theodore Roosevelt embodied, as no other
American in our history those American con­
ceptions of equality, of rights and of obliga­
tions, of liberty under the law, and of a
people united, not by ties of race or tradi­
tion, but by the bond of faith in a great idea;
and his name will, through the generations
to come, be a symbol, not only of vigor and
manliness and power, but of orderly govern­
ment and undivided allegiance to the Ameri­
can flag and all it stands for.”— Colonel Wil­
liam B. Thompson, President of the Roose­
velt Memorial Association in a letter to Prin­
cipal Moton.
“His courtesy knew no wealth or class;
his friendship, no creed or color or race. His
courage stood every onslaughter of savage
beast and ruthless man, of loneliness, of vic­
tory, of defeat. His mind was eager, his
heart was true, his body and spirit defiant of
obstacles, ready to meet what might come.”—
From Resolutions adopted by Boy Scouts of
America.

* * * * *

Principal Moton and Mr. Robert R. Church,
Jr., of Memphis, Tennessee, are members of
the National Committee representing the N e­
gro race.

* * * * *

Colonel Roosevelt was a friend of many
years’ standing of Dr. Washington, and was
an active Trustee of Tuskegee Institute. In
his address on the occasion of the Memorial
Exercises to Dr. Washington, Colonel Roose­
velt said of Dr. Washington: “He was one of
the men to whose counsel and guidance I
frequently turned when I was President of
the United States.”

* * * * *
Every student and teacher is urged to join
the Roosevelt Memorial Association.
United Peace Drive
November 9th to 11th
BE A PEACE PATRIOT

Foot

Ball T ea m

th e G uest

of

th e

Y. M. C. A. at an “Open
House” Entertainment
On Saturday evening, October 18th, between
the hours of 9:30 and 11 p. m., the foot­
ball team and party of the Birmingham
High School, and the Tuskegee football
squad were guests of the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet
of the Institute in an “Open House” enter­
tainment. Among the Birmingham party of
thirty splendid young men were Professors
Carnes and Johnson. After a short but high­
ly enjoyable musical and literary program,
the young men spent an hour becoming ac­
quainted, playing games, and eating refresh­
ments. Rev. John D. Whittaker, Major W .
H. Walcott, Mr. A. L. Holsey, Rev. J. W. Kelly,
Mr. John B. Watson, Mr. James Gayle, Cap­
tain R. S. Daraaby, and Secretary J. J.
Rhoads were among the members of the fac­
ulty who enjoyed the evening with the young
men.

THE TU SKEGEE STUDENT OCTOBER 25, 1919

Principal Moton Tours the
Tennessee Valley
( C o n tin u e d fro m p a g e 5 )

the unrest when colored people can be made
to feel that they have protection in both per­
son and property if they are industrious,
law-abiding and self-respecting. In closing
his remarks to the white people he spoke very
directly and frankly of the abuses and difficul­
ties which colored people meet with in JimCrow cars. These things he described with a
detail that is familiar to every colored man and
woman who travels upon the railroads of the
South. But he was telling them, he said, be­
cause he believed that most white people are
entirely ignorant of what colored people have
to endure in Jim-Crow cars. Against these
abuses, he said, the colored people protest
strongly, not because they want to ride with
white people—“as a matter of fact, they do
not, for colored people have, perhaps, more
prejudice in this matter than white people
have.” But what they want is comfort and
cleanliness and equal accommodation for equal
money paid.
He closed his address with an appeal to
both races to think less about color and race
and more about service. The important thing
was to serve wherever and whenever it was
needed, without regard to color or condition
of those who need the service.
Many Favorable Comments Heard
In every instance throughout the trip, Dr.
Moton in his addresses held the attention of
his audience and received the m anifest approv­
al of those who heard him. On each occasion
one or more of the representative white citizens
took the opportunity at the close of the meet­
ing to express their satisfaction both in what
he said and the manner in which he said it.
This sentiment was best expressed at a meetin the court house at Scottsboro when a prom­
inent lawyer of the town in expressing his
satisfaction with the meeting said that bis
only regret w as that all the white peoole and
all the colored people of Jackson county had
not been present to hear the address.
In all, fifteen places were visited, including
Athens, Decatur, Sheffield and Florence, be­
sides smaller communities. In each place Dr.
Moton made an address sometimes in church,
sometimes in a court house, sometimes in a
schoolhouse and at least twice in a grand
stand of the county fair. Altogether the
tour covered between four and five hundred
miles over rough and dusty roads that had
not been visited by a rain in two months.
These roads constituted the hard part of the
trip, but on each occasion they were forgotten
in the cordial hospitality and generous service
that greeted the party at aach stopping place.
Many Courtesies Received
The plans for this trip were made by Mr.
T. M. Campbell, District Agent of the United
States Agriculture Extension Service with
the aid of his assistant, Mr. Harry Simms.
At Huntsville, besides President Buchanan, the
party was joined by Mrs. Buchanan the daugh­




ter of the late Professor William H. Council,
founder of the State Agriculture and Mechani­
cal College at Normal, and Miss Whitfield, the
District Home Demonstration Agent in that
section. Later in the day Mr. E. H. Shields of
Sheffield, Alabama, undertaker and business
man in that city, helped in the success of the
tour by his own service and the U3e of his tour­
ing car for the entire trip. Beginning on
Tuesday, the party was broken up on Saturday,
the various members returnng to their several
homes. All were gladdened by the evidences
of prosperity

throughout that

section,

the

generous interest in education and tne cordial
relation between the races. As an instance
of the interest in education in one place the
colored people raised Eight Hundred Dollars
within twenty-four hours in order to secure
the desired appropriation for a new school
building. In another place the school term had
been but four months in length. The county
superintendent in a public meeting said that
it would be increased to six or eight months
if the colored people desired it and would
keep their children in school for that length
of time.
It was to help in fostering and extending
this spirit that the tour was planned. From
all indications its success amply justified the
time, energy and expense put into it.

7

do to develop him along these lines will, in
the long run, result in our attracting to our
city the best class of colored labor whom
we always prefer to employ.
“Badin offers great opportunities to the
working man, our city is modern and sani­
tary in every particular, each home having
electric lights, running water and sewerage,
rent is very moderate and homes are sold
to workmen on the hundred and twenty pay­
m e n t.

p la n .

Living expenses are lower here

than they could possibly be in an incorporat­
ed city. It is notable that during the cy-eat
migration of Negroes to the North, our plant
was hardly affected, and nearly all of the
service men called to the colors by their
country have returned to their old jobs here,
where they received a hearty welcome, the
Department of Labor gave a release to the
papers of the country in a special bulletin,
setting forth the success of this company
in providing good working conditions for the
Negro workman.”

The Jeanes Fund Report
Making Labor Contented
In a circular letter Mr. J. H. Devereaux,
Employment Manager of Tallassee Power
Company, Badin, North Carolina, set forth
in a very clear and forcible manner one cer­
tain method of making Negro labor in the
South content because of the fair treatment,
a just reward for the labor and an effort on
part of the management to inject just a little
bit of the human side into all of their trans­
actions and into all of their efforts for social
betterment in the community. We quote the
following paragraph from the circular:
“We do not mean to convey the impres­
sion that we are philanthropists or that we
are attempting to solve the ‘Race Problem.’
Our business is to make aluminum and we
make no further claims than to be a corpo­
ration engaged in that business. But we do
believe that if the colored laborer is given
a chance to develop as a good citizen, he will
be thoroughly reliable, will develop greater
industry and thrift, and will have a better
outlook on life. Therefore, whatever we can

The Jeanes Fund, for the improvement of
Negro rural schools, co-operated during the
session ending June 30, 1919, with public
school superintendents in 220 counties in 12
states.
The supervising industrial teachers, paid
partly by the counties and partly by the
Jeanes Fund, visited regularly in these coun­
ties 6,212 country schools, making in all
23,345 visits, and raising for purposes of
school improvement $324,896.93. The total
amount of salary paid the supervising teachers
was $74,545.01, of which the county school au­
thorities paid $32,669.58, and the Jeanes Fund,
$41,875.43.
The business of these traveling teach rs,
working under the direction of the county
superintendent, is to introduce into the small
country schools simple home industries; to
give talks and lessons on sanitation, person­
al cleanliness, etc.; to encourage the im­
provement of schoolhouses
and
school
grounds; and to organize clubs for the bet­
terment of the school and the neighborhood.

TO MY FRIENDS IN MACON COUNTY
Having bought the furniture business of V. D. Hearne and Com­
pany, of Opelika, we are in position to make it to your interest to call
and see us. We appreciate your patronage. We are adding a full line
of funeral supplies.
PROCTOR FURNITURE COMPANY,
T. F. PROCTOR, Manager

Formerly of Tuskegee, now of Opelika

THE TUSKEGEE STUDENT

8

OCTOBER 25, 1919

Music Lover’s Club Meets
P

e r s o n

a

l

S

t

a

t i o

n

e

r y

' 100 L etter Heads 1

A Set of 300 Pieces

100 Note Heads

$4,00

. 100 Envelopes
Printed with name, profession and address on each piece of stationery, on beau­
tiful 20-pound, water-marked bond paper, in either pure white or pale blue.
I make a specialty of this kind of printing, for the personal and professional
use of particular people.
The whole is put up in neat box and will be mailed out
to any address within five days after receipt of order with money order.

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

A U G U ST U S A V E R Y TH O M AS,

672 North Thirteenth Street

INTELLIGENT LADIES AND GENTLEMEN WANTED TO SOLICIT FOR

The Competitor
A NATIO NAL MAGAZINE PUBLISH ED MONTHLY
The Largest, Handsomest and Best Magazine Published. The Editorial Staff and
Contributors comprise many of the Leading Statesmen, Educators, Churchmen and
Financiers of the race. It is the only National Magazine edited, published and issued
exclusively by Negroes and for Negroes.

After the Chapel exercises, Sunday, Octo­
ber 12th, the Music Lovers met at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Foster for the regular
monthly meeting, and the following program,
entitled, “Library Hour with Current Music
Literature,” was rendered:
Program:—Community Music, Mrs. S. P.
Martin; Negro Music and Musicians, Mr. A.
J. Neely; Solo, Little Mother of Mine, Bur­
leigh, Mr. Preston Roney; Where Woman’s
Help is Needed in Music, Mrs. R. R. Taylor;
Solo, Just a Wearyin’ for You, Carrie Jacobs
Bond, Mrs. H. Sims; Musical Appreciation,

Miss Leonie Spears; Sextette from Lucia de
Lammeroor, Mrs. Adelaide Foster; Stimulat­
ing and Sustaining Interest in Music Lovers
Clubs, Mr. A. L. Holsey,
After the program, delightful refreshments
were served. The committee in charge of the
program was composed of Miss Leonie Spears,
Chairman; Mrs. R. R. Taylor, Mrs. S. P. Mar­
tin, Mr. A. J. Neely, and Mr. A. L. Holsey.

Edited by Robert L. Vann

The Death of Mrs. Chandler

Associate Editors: Hon. Emmett J. Scott, Eugene Kincle Jones and Walter S. Buchanan
The following well known persons and many others are on its Staff of Contributors:—
William Anthony Aery.
J. E. Jones,
Mrs. Mary B. Talbert,
Hampton N. & I. Inst.
Virginia Union University Pres. N. F. C. W. C.
Calvin S. Brown,
R. R. Moton,
Hon. Robert H. Terrell,
Principal, Waters N. Inst. Principal, Tuskegee Inst.
Judge, Municipal Court.
Romeo L. Dougherty,
l ’rof. Kelley Miller,
Mary Church Terrell,
Dramatic Critic, Journalist Dean, Howard University For. Pres. N. F. C. W. C.
John R. Hawkins
T. G. Steward,
Lester A. Walton,
Edu. Sec’y A. M. E. Church Chaplain, Wilberforce Uni. Dramatic Critic, Journalist
James Weldon Johnson,
Walter J. Singleton,
Bert A. ’Williams,
Author, Sec’y N. A. A. C. P. Journalist
Inimitable Comedian.
Hon. William Henry Harrison, Chicago, 111.
C. E. Askew, Raleigh, N. C.

We regret to announce the death of Mrs.
Elizabeth S. Chandler, widow of the late
Alonzo G. Chandler, on Sunday morning, the
11th of October, at her residence in South
Greenwood. Mrs. Chandler had been in poor
health for sometime, but bravely kept up her
work in the Academic Department until but
a few days before her death when her feeble
strength gave way. Her father was summon­
ed from his home in Louisville, Ky., but did
not reach Tuskegee until after her death.
The remains were taken to her former home,
Louisville, for interment, by her father, who
also took the two small children who are left
without father and mother. Funeral services
were held on Tuesday morning in Phelps
Hall Chapel, attended by neighbors, and eoworkers, and many beautiful flowers were
sent by friends as an expression of their re­
spect and sorrow.

Be the first in your locality and get the cream of the subscriptions
C-dicitors will be gladly welcomed in every colored home. Big Commissions Paid
and All Supplies Furnished Free. For Full Particulars, Sample Copies, etc., write to
the Home Office.

THE COMPETITOR MAGAZINE
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT

518 FOURTH AVE.

W hen you want your shoes properly repaired
remember

SOLOMON’S PROGRESSIVE
- t fSHOE SHOP
Neatness and Exactness a Specialty. All work
Guaranteed. Prices Reasonable.

Farmers and People Interested in
Agriculture Subscribe to
MODERN POULTRY BUSINESS

PITTSBURGH, PA.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
sold on payments— complete sets, Brass Band
Instruments— every kind of Musical Instru­
ment, and best Strings for all instruments.
All makes Sewing Machines and Needlea
and parts or all kinds of Sewing Machines,
repairs on Talking Machines, Sewing Ma­
chines and Musical Instruments.
BLUE’S MUSIC HOUSE
Successor to
R. L. Penick,
Montgomery, Alabama

10 Cents Per Copy
Six Months

25 Cents

T o^ u ec^ l

October.—The

Chicago

Business League is the name of a new organ­

ization of local business men which proposes
to put Chicago in the lead in the way of
business progress and organization work.
Among the many new features that will be
adopted by this new organization are Woman’s
Auxiliary, Junior Department, Publicity
Campaign, Co-operative buying and a paid
Executive force.

Boston, Mass.

Importers of T ea and Coffee; Proprietors of
A R IST O N C O FFEE & SPICE M ILLS.
Manufacturers of Ariston Goods.

Phones

409-411 W. Huron Si.,
Chicago,
Illinois

Headquarters for visitors from Tuskegee Institute
Full and complete stock of Drugs. Fresh can­
dies. Unexcelled Soda Service
123 Monroe Street- -Phones 388-2264-9166

9:00 a. m. to 1:30 p. m.




Illinois,

The New Dean Drug Store

Office Hours
a ;00 p. m. to 6:00 p. m.

(Associated Negro Press)

Chicagot

CALUMET TEA
& COFFEE CO.

Edited by a Colored American who is a
Cornell graduate, a trained practical
poultry expert and teacher.
Dept. D, 34 Cornhill.

Chicago Business League Organized

Office—3242
Residence—3298 J

C H. W ILSON, M. D,
Practice Limited to

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat

CRANE CO.
Manufacturers of

Clean — Progressive— Accom m odating

Tulane, H arris

and

M cCall, Proprietors

The Express brings us daily the newest in
LADIES’ READY-TO-WEAR AND
MILLINERY

THE FASHION SHOP
“Where Fashion Reigns”

Over Ideal Drug Store

WROUGHT PIPES, VALVES AND
FITTINGS

Montgomery, Alabama

Birm ingham , Alabama

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

16 Dexter Avenue

’

ROBERT R MOTON

Pp iNCfPAl

BOARDTJF TRUSTEES

T he

ifILL'AM0 W.LLCOJ.

• SOUTH WIUIAH ST- NEW YORK N Y
W W. Ca r p b il l , * lc t c h a ir h a h . tu sr eoee . A t * . ..................
WILLIAM J SCHIETETL1N. KEHRER OR IRYEETMIRT COMMITTI!
WILLIAM ST., new YORK. N Y.
CHARLES E Major , m em b er oe ih v ijt m e m t committei
SO STATE ST.. BOSTON MASS.
Frank Tr um ruu .. member of i n v e s t m e n t committei
• I BROAOMAT NEW YORK. N Y
JULIUS ROSENBALD. ARTHINGTON ST, ANO HOMAN AVt
CHICABO. ILL
WILLIAM M Scott . 19th and Hamilton Sts .
PHILAIELEHIA. P».
V. H. TUIAHE. *33 S R.PLET ST.. MOHTBOHERV ALA
CHARLES W. MARE. TUSKEOEE. ALA.
warren Lobak m em ber of in vestm en t committee
TUSKEBte INSTITUTE. ALA.
A J W l v « o R N , TUS EF fi Ef . ALA
EOBAR A BANCROFT. 134 S. LASALLE #•
CHICABO, ILL.
A lexander Man n . D 0.. T rinity church Boston Mass
rohfrt r Moto r . Tusnegee institute . A la
Cha rles a Wickerb Ham . Atlanta Ga
C. E. Thomas , pr a it v il l e . a la .
IRVINS S. MINRELL. SYRACUSE. N . Y
P aul m w arburc , it c sotn St n e w v o r k , n y

170




Normal

tuskegee

and Industrial institute
r OUNDEO BY BOOKER T. WASHINGTON

FOR THE TRAINING

OF

C O L O R E D Y O U N G M EN A N D W O M EN

T u s k e g e e In s t it u t e , A l a b a m a

August 30th* l:><d)«

• ' ° A '* i M EN? OF LABOR

T1*'"’ Donomics
O r. Oeorge E . Haynes,
d i r e c t o r o f Negro Dconomica
D epartm ent of la b o r .
Dear Doctor Eajmest

I r e g r e t to say th a t X am
u nable to send you a c a ta lo g u e a t th is tim e due to
the f a c t th a t our very la rg e stu d e n t body l a s t season
com pletely exhau sted our su p p ly . She new catalo g u e
is now on th e p re ss and we w i l l fo i’ward one as soon
as tht y a re com pleted.
Very t r u l y y o u rs ,

S e c re ta ry to th e P r in c i




DEPARTM ENT O F LABOR
T E L E GRA M

i:
wu

14

Q 44 C o lle c t NL
A tlan ta, Ga, Aug 6,1919.

pr. Goo. 2# Haynea,
rapt Labor, Washington*

Leaving A tlan ta a t three p.m. fo r Washington.

/ A a "" ~

W ill a r riv e in Washington Thursday a t twelvo twenty five Jr- 0 /f h
i f you w ish confarance w ith me k in d ly coma to S ta tio n fo r \
i t aa I w ill b e in Washington only a abort while en route to
engagement in New York.

John Hope
10am Aug 7

/

'

| HOWARD U N IV E R S IT Y
INAUGURAL E X E R C IS E S
iTO BE HELD IN

A N D R E W R A N K IN M E M O R IA E C H A P E L
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER TWELFTH, 1919
10:30 a. m.—Academic P rocession starts from Carnegie

L i­

brary
T H E AI'TEHNOON TO HR DEVOTED TO AN IN S PE C TIO N OF T H E
UN IVERSITY PLANT

8:00 p. m.—
A lumni N ight —
to be held in Andrew rank in memo­
rial Chapel
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER THIRTEENTH
R econstruction and Rkaimustmknt Congress —
to be held in
ANDREW

RANKIN MEMORIAL CHAPEL

10:00 a. m.—
Morning S ession
8:00 p. m.—
E vening S ession



////rrffie /t / f / t t f / m / , / / / / t / Y f r / /

//< r.i/f/

>

^/

t

j

f

^ f / / ////■//
iA .

■ / / M

1

/ ■ r y t / r j A r / / / / / t / r r r r / i/ y / / r t / A / r r j j r / / At

S m m e A A C //. /

1
I

■/ r r t r A t r y . / srt rjt/ rrf
,/ A o t r t r t r / /
' / t t t /•/•/■ ) t / y / / t r j/ t / / t y A t t t ,A / . At.




y

'V

d

Gammon T h e o lo g ic a l Sem inary,
A t la n t a ,Ga.
M a r c h ,2 3 r d ,1921.
Dr. G eorge

E . H aynes,

D ir e c to r o f Negro E con om ics,
U .S .D ep artm en t o f L abor,
W ash in gton ,D .C .
u ear

Director of Ne«re *&>«*«"**

r , iiaynes:

. h a r e b e e n c a l l e d to

ammon T h e o lo g ic a l Sem inary a s Dire<i^-L>

o f R ural E c o n o m ics,w ith s p e c i a l r e f e r e n c e to th e p a r t th e Negro M in istx y
can p e r fo r m . I t would be a g r e a t jo y to me to e s t a b l i s h a working
r e l a t i o n w ith your o f f i c e *
I h ave m a tte r s u n d er c o n s id e r a t io n which sh o u ld be p r e se n te d to
you i n o r d e r to h e lp im p rore th e c o n d it io n s o f th e c o u n tr y churches o f
th e S o u th .
T hese m a tter s w i l l be su b m itted prom ptly a s so o n as i n v e s t ig a t io n
i s c o m p le te d .
e

A community o f N egro lan d owners ab ou t th r e e hi

Ln number

c iis lr e s to s e c u r e a s s i s t a n c e from th e f e d e r a l lan d lo a n .P le a s e g iv e any
s u g g e s t io n you have f o r them to m e,and th e word w i l l be p a sse d a lo n g to
th e community a t o n c e . We have about s e v e n t y f i v e young men i n advance
c l a s s e s who a r e doin g s p e c i a l work,and l a t e r w i l l have one hundred R u ral
P a s to r s h e r e f o r th r e e w eeks t r a i n in g .P l e a s e put me on you r m a ilin g l i s t
and when e v e r p o s s ib le l e t me have a r e p o r t or i f p o s s i b l e enough r e p o r ts
to su p p ly my c l a s s e s . Any fa v o r s shown w i l l




Yours f a i t h f u l l y ,




Marah 2 6 , 1921.

jip . fc.T- J . H e m a l,
D ire c to r o f Rural i3conerode g,

(Janssen ^heologioal Seminary,
A tla n ta , Georgia#
Dear Mr* Howard:
Tour l e t t e r o f Maroh 23 i s j Uat r eo e iv e d .
sh o r tly a fter n o tic e from the Seoretm y that Negro 3 o em * io e went would he aholitdiBa a s e f A pril 1 . I regret
▼ery much, th e r e fo r e , th at you w ill be disappointed in
being able to e s ta b lis h a « d c in r e la tio n fcc v?ork in
t h is e f f i o e . 1 am a s y e t -uioartain th a t iry fu r tla r r e ­
l a t i o n s h i p with uhe Department w iilb b e . you can 7i*ite
Me at 3$r r e sid e n c e , 1761 i'e&SDfcreet, B#h#, in erne I am
no leagor with the devermaont. I s h a ll be glad to got '
rep orts about your in v e o tiR a tio n s.
I* you w ill write to tip b’ed eral /a m
-,oi.n, ./anhingtun,
th%- w i l l give you f u l l lni'crioatio n about ifcat your Jfegro farmers zaqr <fc fo r a s s is ta n c e
from the Pederal Land Loan Sank.
T rusting to heap in touch w ith you «nd that
Z may be e f fu rth er s e r v ic e , I remain

Tours sin cerely,

Director, Negro Booaoaios#
h/ mlo

a ~*t

vi<3
vcw *




< tree t,
.d i. o n , . i : . ,
'larch h i , 1921.

1' oi e . *Tayr ■ ,
irect- r of
t
a s h i n g t o n , T .C .

c

n-

lit ,

Lear '"ir:
In y o r l e t t e r of

' a r c h 14 ,,ou s t a t e d t h a t y o u

’T 'e g r o m i g r a t i o n i n 1 9 1 6 - 1 7 " and a t u d y on he " r e
lb
e n t i t l e d "The ITerro diirinr- t h e ' o i l d
ft
an: d u r i n g h e c o n s t r u c t i o n " . T h ese t o p i c s must h a v e
'

!■

,

them a s o e t .
h o n i e y u h av e ' i;

m a t e r i a l on. the c a r • t c r i s t i o
*

s u b j e c t v e r y b r o a d l y I would a p p r e c i a i ®
i f y o u \ aid
6 ■i s a ,
to ne.
I
sera' -'

y ,u f o r the t r c u b l
‘ .i
-;.ti v i a l .

m om

ve y much

you are ia h i n g in

" ry 1

ly

•

,

A p ril 1 , 1921

Mr. ? . C. Boyer,
619 Lake G treet,
Mad!con, " i s .
Dear Sir*.
Pleane a d v ise i f you have not y e t rocoivcd b a llo t in s referred to In
Dr. Baynes* l e t t e r o f inarch 14th, and your rep ly o f liarch 2 1 s t.
If
•ame have net y e t boon rec e iv ed , through Government P r in tin g O ffic e ,
I s h a ll be glad to send you a d d itio n a l c o p ie s .




fou rs very tr u ly .

G peclal Agent

THE ARM ENIA AMERICA SOCIETY
287 F O U R T H
NEW

AVENUE

YORK
▼

IVe have been saving the Armeni ans; now we must save Armenia.
America has fed and clothed thousands of individual A rm enians; now
the nation demands our aid. W e have been giving charity; now we must
dem and justice, and dem and it in such a w ay th a t justice will result
for the people w hom we have caused to look to us for all th a t they
have.
T h e A rm enia A m erica Society has been founded “To unite in
co-operation the many friends of Armenia for the purpose of ascer­
taining the needs of Armenia, of bringing those needs before the
American people and of securing the satisfaction of those needs
through American assistance.” So long as the N ear E a st Relief so
splendidly m eets the physical needs of the sufferers the A rm enia
Am erica Society will concern itself chiefly w ith the political needs of
Armenia, and in perfect harmony and co-operation with the Near East
Relief. Three special needs make the strongest appeal just now;
The Armenians need help in defending themselves. W ith some
assistance from the F rench and the B ritish the A rm enians had,
in a m easure, re-established them selves in th eir own hom es. But




w hen th e assistance was w ithdraw n they w ere obliged to defend them ­
selves ag ain st trem endous odds. T hey are now fighting for their lives
in th eir own trenches defending th eir ow n hom es, and they call on
A m erica to aid them .
The Armeni ans need a fair solution of their boundary questidn.
The forces that massacred the people are now claiming their territory.
E urope seems ready to give back tw o-thirds of A rm enia to the T u rk s
as a com prom ise w ith the pow erful forces of violence. O ur P resident
has been asked to settle the question and the A m erican people m ust
help him to settle it right.
Armeni a needs protection as it establishes itself in its homeland
again. Hundreds of thousands of exiles are eager to return but cannot
till a restraining hand is laid by a mighty power on those who have seized
their lands and homes. Uncounted thousands of captive women and chil­
dren are y earning for release, b u t there is none to deliver. O ur allies
have counted on us to provide this stro n g hand of justice to give the
new nation a chance. W e m ust do it.
T h e O rg an izing C om m ittee of this Society is com posed of exceed­
ingly busy men, b u t men who are ready to devote them selves to this
trem endous task. T he chairm an is M r. W a lte r George Sm ith, one of
P hiladelphia’s m ost distinguished law yers and a m em ber of the first
N ear E a st Com mission. A ssociated w ith him are M r. H am ilton H olt,
editor of The Independent; M r. R. J. Caldwell, a noted cotton m erchant
and chairm an of the M id-European A ssociation; C anon R obert Ellis
Jones, of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine; Hon. William N. Run­
yon, ex-G overnor of N ew Jerse y ; D r. C harles S. M acfarland, secre­
tary of th e F ederal Council of Churches, and Dr. S tanley W h ite, of
the B oard of Foreign M issions of the P resbyterian Church. T hese
gentlem en ask you to join them in u n itin g the sentim ent of Am erica
to save A rm enia.




T he Society proposes to carry on a cam paign of educating the
public on the op p o rtunity and responsibility before A m erica in helping
A rm enia to justice and righteous governm ent in liberty. I t plans to
u rg e directly upon the D epartm ent of S tate in W ashington the need
of action along the lines nam ed. I t also hopes to reach the S enators
and R epresentatives directly and through their constituencies with
the sam e plea.
E v ery A m erican genuinely desirous of joining in such a united
effort to save A rm enia m ay become a m em ber by applying to the tem ­
porary S ecretary and T reasu rer of the Society, Rev. E rn e st W . R iggs.
287 F o u rth Ave., New Y ork City. V oluntary contributions are the
only source of incom e for the Society, and those contributing five
dollars or over will be considered as voting m em bers.
If A m erica has thus far failed to do her p a rt it is because the
individual men and wom en in A m erica have failed to do their part.
In union there is strength. Join the A rm enia A m erica Society.
E very day th a t A m erica delays action m akes action m ore difficult.
Join now.
4




E rnest W. R iggs,

Tem porary Secretary and Treasurer.




J'one 27, 1919*

h r . Jamas E. Hubert
N ational League on Urban C onditions Among Negroes
2303 Seventh Avenue, New Yortt C ity .
V j dear Hr. Huberti
I have receiv ed the ooplee o f "A Nov Cay for the
Oolored Woman fo r te r" which you so iclndly sen t and thank you
most h e a r tily fo r them.
This pamphlet c o n ta in s such valuable Inform ation
th at I am d esiro u s o f o b ta in in g 40 more c o p ie s fo r d is tr ib u tio n
to teachers in connection w ith a le c tu r e course that 1 am to
g iv e a t the Hampton I n s t it u t e summer sc h o o l. I f you have so
many on hand, w ill you ftlndly send theca to m a t Hampton
I n s t it u t e , Hampton, V a ., oare o f Or, Oeorge p, ffceaix, s t a t in g
p r ie s o f each pamphlet or whether the League fu rn ish es them
g r a tis fo r such purposes. I should be p lea sed to have these
sen t w ith in a few days,
T rusting th at you w ill fin d i t f e a s ib le to grant
t h is r eq u e st, I am

Yours very tr u ly ,

d ir e cto r o f Negro Economics.
• ft.

"4

1 IL 0
SftrtACT C f « I I STn ':r

m m

lY rUy'‘RCE

I fiJ k & fe S * jm L

-J'

.

V iC i -G h a ir m a n

C h a irm a n

NEW

YORK
FOR

SOCIAL

A.

M R S . A L B E R T J. E R D M A N N
S IC R IT AR Y

E. P. R O B E R T S

Ml S B E L I Z A B E T H W A L T O N

URBAN
SERVICE

AMONG

S.

PR ISSE LL

LEAGUE

NEGROES

H ranch o f the National Urban League, Inc.
127 E . 2 3 rd Street, New York City
2303

SE V E N TH

AVENUE.

N EW

YORK

CITY

T E L E P H O N E : M O R N IN G 8 ID E 7B1-782

EXECUTIVE

BOARD

EXECUTIVE BOARD
A. C L A Y T O N P O W E L L
M R S A L B E R T 9. RE ED
E. P . R O B E R T S
M R S . E. P R O B E R T 9
M IS S E L L A S A C H S
MRS. C E C E L IA
C AB AN ISS-S A U N D E R 8
GEORGE H SIMS
M IS S M A R Y L. S T O N E
M R S . A D A H B. T H O M S
M IS S E L I Z A B E T H W A L T O N
BENJAM IN T WITHERS
L. H O L L I N G S W O R T H W O O D

W I L L I A M H. B A L D W I N . 3 RD
W I L L I A M H. B R O O K S
M19 8 V I O L A P. C O N K L I N
O R G E R T R U O E E. C U R T I S
JO H N D A N IE LS
M I S S H E L E N A T. E M E R S O N
MRS. A L B E R T J E R D M A NN
A S F RI8SELL
ALLEN B GRAVES
EUGENE KIN C KLE JONES
F R E D R. M O O R E
J O H N E. N A I L

Affiliated Move­
ments o f
the
League Exist in the
following Cities:
ATLANTA

Dr. George E. H a y n es ,
Hampton I n s t i t u t e ,
Hampton, Va.
My d e a r D r , H aynes:

AUGUSTA
BROOKLYN
CAMBRIDGE. MASS
C H A R L O T T E . N .C .
CHATTANOOGA
CHESTER
C H IC A G O
CLEVELAND
C O LU M B U S . OHIO

I was v e r y much s u r p r i s e d t o
l e a r n from y o u r l e t t e r j u s t r e c e i v e d , t h a t
t h e c o p i e s o f p a m p h l e t s e n t some weeks ago
have n o t r e a c h e d you.

OETROIT
E A ST ST. L O U IS
E N G L E W O O C . N J.
J E R S E Y C IT Y
LO U ISVILLE
M EMPHIS
N ASH VILLE

I h a v e j u s t s e n t 15 c o p i e s by
s p e c ia l d e liv e ry fe a rin g t h a t the other
c o p i e s may n o t r e a c h you i n t i m e f o r y o u r
conference.

NEWARK
NEW YORK
NORFOLK
P H ILA D E LP H IA

(a)

PITTSB U R G H
SAVANNAH

R e g r e t t i n g t h i s d e l a y a nd h o p i n g
t h a t t h e s e may r e a c h you i n ample t i m e ,
I am

S PR IN G F IE LD . M ASS
ST. LO U IS
TRENTON
W E S T F I E L O . N . J.
W HITE PLA IN S
Y O U N G S T O W N . OHIO




j h h / w-




'* L e t m not w o t a> as colored people nor as
white people fo r the narrow benefit o f any
group alone, but t o g e t h e r f as American
citizens fo r the common good o f our common
city, our common country . "

Mrs . W illiam H B aldwin , J r .

WHAT WE DO TOWARD THIS FND
We
I.

Try to show social welfare agencies
the advantage of co-operation.

2.

Secure and tram social workers.

3.

Protect women and children from
unscrupulous persons.

4.

Fit workers

3.

Help to secure playgrounds and
other clean places of amusement.

6.

Organize boys' and girls’ clubs and
neighborhood unions.
•

7.

Help with probation oversight of
delinquents.

8.

Maintain a country home for con­
valescent women.

9.

Investigate conditions of city life as
a basis for practical work.

work




J u ly 2 9 , 1919.
L i i i B a a

U r. Janes H. Hubert,
Executive S ecreta ry , New York Urban League,
£303 Seventh Avenue,
New Yoxtc, N. Y,
Vy dear Ur* Hubert*
P lease fin d en c lo se d
check ror $1*80, b ein g the 10 c e n ts each
fo r 1£ cop ies o f th e study o f Negro women In New York, and fo r
3 a d d itio n a l c o p ies o f the l o t which you p r e v io u sly sen t me.
I would a p p recia te I t i f you s e e your way c le a r to rep lace
th ese th a t I n ig h t have a few e x tr a c o p ies fo r u se a t p la o es
Where they may do good.
Yours very tr u ly .

Enclosure

D irecto r o f Negro Economics,

M ISS E L IZ A B E T H W A L T O N

E. P. R O B E R T S

CH A IRM A N

MRS

A L B E R T J.

V l C l ' G H A I R M AN

NEW

YORK
FOR

ERDMANN

A.

SECRETARY

SOCIAL

URBAN
SERVICE

AMONG

8.

FRISS8LL

TREASURER

LEAGUE

NEGROES

Branch o f the National Urban League, Inc.
127 E . 2 3 rd Street, New York City
2303

SE VE N TH

AVENUE.

N EW

TELEPH O NE; M O R NING SID E

YORK

CITY

761-782

EXECUTIVE

EXECUTIVE BO AR D
W I L L I A M H . B A L O W I N . 3 RD
W I L L I A M H. B R O O K S
M IS S V I O L A P. C O N K L I N
D R G B R T R U O E S. C U R T I S
J O H N D A N IE LS
M I S S H E L E N A T. E M E R S O N
M R S . A L B E R T J. E R D M A N N
A S FRISSELL
ALLEN B GRAVES
EUGENE K IN C KLE JONES
F R E D R. M O O R E
J O H N E. N A I L

JAMES

H.

EXKCUTIVS

BOARD

A. C L A Y T O N P O W E L L
M R S . A L B E R T S. R E E D
E. P. R O B E R T S
M R S . E. P R O B E R T S
M IS S E L L A S A C H S
MRS. C E C E L IA C A B A N I S S - S A U N DERS
G E O R G E H SIMS
M IS S M A R Y L. S T O N E
M R S . A D A H B. T H O M S
M IS S E L I Z A B E T H W A L T O N
BENJAM IN T WITHERS
L. H O L L I N G S W O R T H W O O D

HUBERT
SC CH IT ARV

O ctober 4 t h , 1919.
Affiliated Move­
ments o f
the
League Exist in the
following Cities :
ATLANTA

D r . George £• Haynes,
Fisk U n iv ersity ,
N a s h v i l l e , T en n .

AUGUSTA
BROOKLYN
CAMBRIDGE. M ASS

My d e a r Dr H a y n e s :

C H A R L O T T E . N .C .
CHATTANOOGA
CHESTER
CH IC AG O
CLEVELAND
C O LU M BU S. OHIO
DETROIT
E A ST ST. L O U IS
E N G L E W O O C . N J.
JERSEY CITY

In r e to your l e t t e r of July 29th,
i n w h i c h you s a y MP l e a s e f i n d e n c l o s e d my c h e c k
f o r $ 1 . 8 0 , b e i n g t h e 10 c e n t s e a c h f o r 15 c o p i e s
o f t h e s t u d y o f N e g ro women i n New Y o r k , and f o r
3 a d d itio n a l co p ies,"
I beg t o say t h a t t h e e n ­
c l o s u r e m e n t i o n e d was n o t f o u n d .

LOUISVILLE
M EMPHIS

We h ad in t e n d e d w r i t i n g b e f o r e t h i s
b u t was w a i t i n g t o h e a r fro m y o u .

N ASH VILLE
NEWARK
NEW YORK
NORFOLK
P H ILA D E LP H IA

(a)

PIT T S B U R G H
SAVANNAH
S PR IN G F IE LD . M ASS
ST. L O U IS
TRENTON
W E S TF IELD . N. J
W H ITE P L A IN S
Y O U N G S T O W N . OHIO




D ire c to r o f M

"■re E conom ics




" L e t us not wortt as colored people nor as
white people for the narrow benefit o f any
group alone, but t o g e t h e r , as American
citizens fo r the common good o f our common
city, our common country . ”

M rs . W illiam H. B aldwin , J r .

WHAT Wh J)0 TOWARD THIS FND
We
1.

Try to show social welfare agencies
the advantage of co-operation.

2.

Secure and train social workers.

3.

Protect women and children from
unscrupulous persons.

4.

Fit workers

3.

Help to secure playgrounds and
other clean places of amusement.

6.

Organize boys’ and girls’ clubs and
neighborhood unions.

7.

Help with probation oversight of
delinquents.

8.

Maintain a country home for con­
valescent women.

9.

Investigate conditions of city life as
a basis for practical work.

j^

j

work




Ootober 9 , 1919.

j

Ur. James H. Hubert
le u York Urban League
2303 Seventh Avenue
Hew York C ity .
1(y dear Ur. Hubert:
I r eg r e t the error about the oheek and one lose
i t . Z r e g r e t th at we did not d isco v er the error and th at the
m atter n ot coming to our a tte n tio n i t has been no long d elayed .
Did you eror g e t trace of tho fo r ty oopien you s e c t me?

Yours very tr u ly ,

Hnoloaure.

OTfloe o f the se o r o ta iy




September 1 2 . 1919.
r . b . ritklaon, 3eoy*
n ation al B a p tist Convention
P i n t Bagiaont Armory

Prof*

I o n i t | ItJ *

aaeenbled.

O ffic ia l greo tin g e to S olorate# a t B a p tist convention
Renneet your aontlnoano* o f oooperation and

— d e n — a who

UrTOtor o f regro toon a le s

3opartaa>nt of Labor*
Office of tho Donrotary

Contlarwut '"scpoxwm a , 1?20.

Colored Men ’s Civic
J oiin A. H ugos.

-

Fleming J ackson.

HEADQUARTERS:

presid en t

P eyton H arriston,

104 WASHINGTON STREET

f ir s t v . pr e s t .

GEOHGE A. Ol.lvi.R.

association
William J. Boyd ,

ROOM 3

SECOND V. P r is t .

trea surer

.

J o se ph K . Adams. J r ..

secretary
a s s t S ec ’ y

W n M p .I OF L?B0R

Pater so n .
Chas. C. Wooldridge

/

>

D ire c to r of Np<rr o E c o n o m ics

I9
j

£

)

l

'~/y/K

t

j x

d\J>V V T ^

/’ L

/U ~ A ^

j

"

tA r~

/2JLjjJ ^Xy^-A

L ^V ^t v

U / j J I a x +SL- v
^

w W < /^ '

y l r ^ A y •<

,

LaT ^ c^ v
tA ^ ± > x

g a j- c

eXjA^C*.,
J j y

J y jL

Ur-L^ y

y.

d

k-JI —

tx tr"

-w

d \a y J \^

A ,

-c i-C *

La X ^ > | v

A

“^ L -X ^ O

/\

a>

£-

.^ ✓ w

C -/^C ^<yV G A _c/>
-^^/(X \yFM rcvvA

^

/ t

J jA ^ j

jd y L L .

lv k j A

ly ^ b

9 \< x tz lj

Z ^ n

i

L

w

jy

T ^ ia a —

c a i^

v^ ' l A A / x




j^

oJ/Lisy+jUJ

^U L .

^
Q

&JL^

Yv^

/c ^ w .

l* .

y, ( / a A U ^ jl

^

u A ^ u v j,

'J a ^ \

A ^ -ji— ~tAy~

v

A

^

K

A A A j A ^ uAA^
w

a

r

_

d 5U

1bAyJL*

^

i l i^ .A

y

" t c ^ v v - «_

' ^ tr*







September 11, 1919.

Mr. John a . Huggs, xn sieo tb r
Deportment o? Labor
104 Washington S tre e t
P aterson , H.J.
Dear Hr. Hnggat
X thank yon fo r your kind l e t t e r of September 6
w ith the enelosed o lip p in g , which shows your o r g a n isa tio n I s do­
in g so mo good work in your community. Ho doubt th a t p e r s is te n t
e f f o r t lik e yours w i l l win a p la c e of ser v ic e In the aero u n ity .
X ap p reciate very much your c o r d ia l in v ita tio n
to v i s i t you and have tnaae note o f i t and w i l l he p leased to stop
a t Paterson i f 1 am in your reg io n any Sunday. At the p resen t
time 1 cm working out ny f a i l program and am uncurtain about ay
movement# u n t il th at i s oorapletau.
With many c o r d ia l a p p recia tio n s of you and
your o r g a n isa tio n , 1 am
Yoora very tr u ly .

Dir«*otor o f negro

oonomios.

h / mlo

, > '.w

J

*>JUiouoaa ojj 9jS(
1° J ° |0 3 j i q
6161 - z J o a

Q3A J302d

^tG

Ic ^ u
^ J t-a _ J ~




'J L ^ *

*^

.a *

t

'u * ^ M

C L^L^s y C jlx j

< S o -o c ^ > ^

.< f'

'••




March 7, 1921

Ur. H. A. Hunt.
P r in c ip a l, The Port V alley High & In d u str ia l S ch o o l,
Port V a lle y , Ga.
Pear U r. Hunt:
Thank you f o r y o u r good l e t t e r o f March 4 th .
I t would h elp g r e a tly
i f you would w rite a s im ila r l e t t e r d ir e o tly to th e new sec r eta r y o f
Labor, Hon. Jane3 J . D avis.
3or.o o f the sane p o in ts made in th is
l e t t e r would be good.
The enclosed e x tr a ct from recont hearings
shows the p o lic y th at we would l i k e to g et made permanent.
There haB been some misapprehension on the j>art o f a few people t h a t
we were attem pting to develops a sep arate or segregated bureau in th e
Department.
Kay I ask , th e r e fo r e , th a t you do not r e fe r to t h is as
a d iv is io n or bureau, but only aa the Segro Economics advisory s e r v ic e
in the o f f io e o f th e Secretary o f Labor.
S in o erely yours,

h
P

Enclosure




D irecto r o f Hegro Economics,




■
General
National Archives
Services
and
Administration Records Service Washington, DC 20408

The re c o rd s in t h i s f o ld e r a re a rra n g ed ALPHABETICALLY BY NAME OF
CORRESPONDENT.

In o rd e r to make e f f e c t iv e use o f S p e c ia l L i s t A-0,

S e le c te d Documents P e r ta in in g to B lack Workers Among th e Records
o f th e D epartm ent o f Labor and I t s Component B ureaus. 1902-1969.
i t i s e s s e n t i a l to m a in ta in th e a lp h a b e tic a l o rd e r o f th e r e c o rd s .


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102