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LETTER MAIL

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
WASHINGTON.D. C.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS




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PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVIJ;D
PAYMENT OF FOOTAGE, $300

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PAid M ENT OF LABOR
JUL 7 *1920'

Director of Nero Economics

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August 17, 1920.

L. Henry S. lantin„tou
Aseociate Ultra.
The Uhristlaa 'ilorAez
10 Fifth ATOMS
Tow Yor:i' City.
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n:

Basixabling •;,;(:yoir inquli7 about best Awe
for your yo.Ang friena Demurer=
for hi3 ocluoution T. think
Is vcr, /11 'Jo yo11 :Jr hi:11 `,.c
liam,..iten
ean. 7)t
• ttaace. lie s1iou.1.1 write at =co to the
2.)r.
.111. Gregg. It tJit be wall also to inquire at 1..irr.1.2.11.
about ei4th grails *.-..r./rk; al:Jo at the Bl rionto-mi
hig;
*oriel:quota D.J., :ad. at •Jargui.:.oflo e,DUktinere, i.
The Sordent owt 3ohool is q stata relrol v1th
goal equiwent eat I am aura
Irxie Met. It !z i Pc -1
under a camwoteut marl sad. zigtv.. be the Feat 01see .71r 'Lta fc:1- two
or throe yir:rs if be la latablo to ..;ot in44i Beeplion.
eir: ot111 oonuootet iurt-tine with %Ili)
Do , Lrtmout of labor aal
.a:.eiciaz
hale
71sehin7t,:i.
it /That
ter other plans w1.11 be Z an not
able i; say. I lha3.1 ha „loeci
to accept your
invitation for an exticle in "The ahriatia,n
Worker" lout shall send 071 90Me thl
OC as
that I can get tins to prepare some matter about Negro workars.
With many corlial greetinTs, I a..=

H/111,0

156

THE CRISIS ADVERTISER

HERE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY
TO SECURE A WOODVILLE COUNTRY ESTArr,
CONSISTING OF 10 OR 20 ACRES OR MORE
FOR
PER
ONLY $3250

ACRE

VERY EASY TERMS
Special advertising discounts to those who act quickly

Free Lot With Each 10-Acre Tract!
We have only a limited number of Woodville estates for sale, making
quick action necessary. People from all over the country will want
these estates, which means that they will all be sold within a short time.
Get yours before it's too late. Send for booklet containing full details.
IT'S FREE. Address
THE SWAN - ARENSON REALTY & DEVELOPMENT CO.
19 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET

ir
I

CHICAGO, ILL.

1

THE SWAN-ARENSON REALTY & DEVELOPMENT CO.,
CHICAGO, ILL.
Date
192
GENTLEMEN :—Please send me full particulars about your Woodville
offer without any
obligation to me.

1

Name

I
1

Address

1
I

I
I
I

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Town




State
I

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Mention THE CRISIS.

4




•
155

THE CRISIS ADVERTISER

Cleota J. Collins
Lyric Soprano
"Judging from the appearance of a large number of
music lovers, her sweet lyric
voice held them spellbound.
She was applauded again and
again after each number."—
Boston Chronicle.
Address:
156

HAMILTON AVENUE,
COLUMBUS, OHIO

E. ALDAMA JACKSON
Art

Graduate of Institute of Musical
Organist-Director of Music of St. Marks M: E.
Church; Concert Accompanist; Piano, Voice,
Theory, Instruction, Conducting, Coaching.
Harmony taught from beginning to completion. Private or correspondence.
Geothius system.
Studio: 185 W. 185th St., New York, N. Y.
Telephone Morningside 1708.

They Played For The Crowned Heads of Europe—
They Are Now Playing For You!
HE'LL FIGHTERS 369TH BAND, INC.
HELL FIGHTERS 369TH ORCHESTRA
Composed of the some musicians that made this band the
actuation of Europe during the "WORLD WAR."
ENGAGEMENTS SOLICITED
eno Mikell, Conductor
Lieut. F'
W. Woodruff Chlsurn. Secretary
.los. W. Grey, Mgr.
treet, New York, N. Y.
176 West

JOSEPHINE A.JUNIUS

SPECIAL

CONTRALTO
-sow is the ioss.--.1 ot a Contralto voice,
lovely in qualit), which she uses artistically."()scar Sacriger.
AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS
New York, N. Y.
74 W. 142nd Street,

$1.50
The CRISIS one year
The BROWNIES' BOOK one year - 1.50
One year's subscription to each if ordered
$2.50
together

SONGS

Clarence Cameron White
Violinist

Recitals, Concerts, Instruction
Studio:
616 Columbus Avenue

Boston, Mass.

That the Whole Country Is Whistling!
"I'VE COME BACK To YOU." wonderful ballad.
"I AN YOU FORGET," being featured by leading stage
artists.
"SHELL SHOCK SHAKY' on U. S. piano records.
"lN A GARDEN," sentimental
"YOU SHO KNOW HOW TO STRUT YOUR STUFF," ittaz
melody.
'25 cents per copy, or will mail the five numbers to you for
only $1. Address
Hell Fighters 369th Band, 176 W. 135th St., New York, N. Y.

MUSIC FOR CONCERT AND HOME
PICKANINNY

30c

ROSE

A Wonderful Lullaby which will add to any repertoire
Now You

An Egyptian Intermezzo for Piano Study

IT'S YOUR

30c

THAT THING CALLED

SPHINX, by J. Berni Barbour 30c

Can Learn

All

About It

30c

MOVE NOW

Sung by Bert Williams on Columbia Record No. 2778-A

MAUVOLEYENE WALTZ 30c
A Sweet, Flowing

Movement by Frerfk M. Bryan

THINKING OF THEE
Another Beautiful Concert Number

BEAUTIFUL LAND

30c

by 11. 11. Roc

OF DREAMS

15c

A Wonderful Ballad with a Heart Throb

LOVIN' BLUES

15c

SAXOPHONE BLUES

15c

A Typical Blues Song

Hear It On Eiaerson Records

I WONDER IF YOUR LOVING HEART STILL PINES FOR ME

15c

EV'RYTHING IS GOING UP

15c

A Song for All Lovers, Beautiful Music

15c

REMEMBER AND BE CAREFUL

More Truth Than Poetry

Advice from a Mother to Her Child

THINK OF

CHASING

ME LITTLE DADDY

As great a favorite as "A Good Man Is Hard to Find"
BLIND MAN'S BLUES
THE BLUES by Al. Piantadosi 15c

Easy to Play and Long Remembered

15c
15c

The Funniest Song Ever Written

All of these songs may be had from your music dealer or direct from the publishers.
Y,
.itr.
INN

1.54EvrooRy:
Inc., .
PACE & HANDY MUSIC CO.,
Mention THE CRISIS.

4111

SKIDMORE-RIEHLE LAND COMPANY
ql1CCESSORS TO

SKID INIC)F? E LAND

Co.

FARM Or TIMBER LANDS
r
MARINETTE,WiS.
September 10,1920
0ir,7r ,
1*Juwylc
Mr. Geo. E. Haynes, Dir. Negro Economics,
Department of Labor,
Washington, D.C.
OE
Dear Sir:

Fr)

EOEIV1 JO
INAL8WJAO

03A1333U
Under separate cover we are sending you copies of our
literature, which will rive you a very good idea of the country
we are operating in.
We have carried on a successful colonization business
for the past twenty years, and our County has grown in an agricultural way greatly in that time. We have found by all odds
thet the most successful way of meeting the various problems
that have come up, has been through cooperative effort. We
have always shaped these movements in such a way that they were
laid down on business principles.
I will cite two instances which will probably illustrate
the way we have handled our problems.
In 1915, State reports gave Marinette County a credit of
250,000 per year for dairy output; in 1917 the same report gave
us a credit of ,:,1,000,000 yearly output, and today the output is
nearly . 2,000,000 annually. We have here a natural grass country
and we can grow very excellent corn for ensilage purposes. Corn,
clover and cows look very good to us. A silo campaign was inaugur
ated,
aided by our local agricultural school, which built forms
for the
making of a solid concrete silo and loaned them to the farmers free
of charge and where necessary, helped and directed them
in the construction. This silo campaign was given a lot of publicity
and many
of the silo manufacturers put men in the field to sell their product. The result of this silo campaign has been the constru
ction
of nearly twelve -hundred silos in this County.
Along with this campaign, there was one started urging
the purchase of more and better cattle. In order to help matters
out, local business men lent their names to a guarantee, which
guarantee was used by three Trustees in endorsing farmers' notes
for the purchase of livestock. The farmer was then given an
opportunity to buy cattle and pay for them on a basis of about
half of
what the cow produced per month, and was given three years' time
on each animal if they desired it, with interest at 6,% The guarant
ee
on the back of the farmers' notes made it absolutely good at any
Bank in the County. That this plan was a good one is shown by
the
fact that thirty carloads of cattle were bought and deliver
ed to
farmers uhder it, and the guarantors will not have to make
good a
single penny, as all of the notes have been well taken
care of.
This cattle buying plan is still in vogue here, although in
a little
different form, and will in all probability finance one-hun
dred to



G.E.H.-#2
out3-hundred fifty of these cattle purchases this year.
Marinette County has been riven credit for several
years past for the clearing of approximately three-thousand
acres of new land each year. About a year ago it was thought
that Marinette County was not clearing enough land and that
much more could be done. Therefore, an Association was formed
which has over one -thousand members, ninety percent of whom are
the farmers and new settlers in the County, called the Marinette
County Land Clearing Association. This Association immediatP1V
sought the cooperation of the Department of Land Clearing, College
of Engineering, University of V;isconsin, and were assured of their
entire support. The DuPont Powder Company, who have been working
for some years in connection with the Department of Engineering,
offered their assistance, which was gladly accepted. A plan of
campaign was mapped out and a goal set at clearing eighteenthousand acres in 1920, or six times as much as had ever been
cleared before in any one year. The Association hired the best
land clearing engineer they could find, and equipped him with an
office, automobile and other paraphernalia that he wanted. All
during the winter, school-house meetings were held throughout the
County; some fifty or more. At these meetings land clearing
problems were discussed and speakers were equipped with both
moving and still pictures to illustrate their points. Also, at
these meetings, orders were solicited for dynamite, the members
of the Association being able to purchase dynamite at the carload
rate, which made a saving of between fifteen and twenty percent
for them. As a result of this campaign, we have already passed
the eighteen -thousand acre mark in newly cleared land, and there
is still sixty or ninety days for this work to go on. Normally,
the sales of land clearing explosives in Marinette County were
about one carload a year; fourteen carloads have been placed so
far this year. Besides the explosives, of course there is other
equipment such as stump pullers, pilers, etc.
think these two instances will perhaps give you an idea
of the methods used in this County for building up our farming
community. These methods have proven very satisfactory.
Yours very truly,
SKIDMORE-RIEHLE LAND COMPANY
By

y0

fLL
Secy.

FtS-EM




DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
WASHINGTON
JUMB

17, 1919

ccrrIDLInTIAL Y....LMBANDUM :

From:
To:
Subject:

1.

His Assistant
The Director of Negro Economics
Advisory Departmental Pelationshin regarding Negro matters

The functioiv of the Department of Labor in "fostering, promoting

and developing the welfare of wage earners of the United States, improving their working conditions and advancing their opportunities for
Atu„d
profitable (trent" have been well understood by - rivate,public
The interests of wage earners,—pavoiousismipy

a-°/
-""
f--11-6
-4M-i-iTdrTITft"ft,-.60404040p, have been mrli=t3=177 safeg rdedicand every oppor,
04
44.4
tunity and assistance 4lft2=b41 given
the Department of Labor in carrying out the duties imposed unon it by Congress.

When the secretary of

Labor, in furthering the effectiveness of his powers, created the Division
of .Le.ro Economic 'there was lateptly establipied a means of

24 .4., .,---.,/ e.,--iceA_,....;.„,

IL, ..e.,/-,
e
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ex largelOhe sc _e of which and the jurisdiction of which are Itmdpitad
I say "latently" because
I
a! s doubteitia-t-hat=mmak attention/\has been given to the following qkatad.
P•
power of the Secretary of Labor:
L.18. -m ,
c,
4
9
,a,a,
J4-Aeo4
“
"Re
Secretary (cof Labor) 1aet1
/
4autherity --t
o*
call upon other
departments ofA1
,12
.
1;9zernment for statistical data and the results obtained by thera"WiirrQ collate, arrange and publish such statistical
C.
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Page two

information obtained in such manner as to him may seem wise
7
.
4 .af-4

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L

7
"The Secretary of Labor jel=itive-rialett-attad-eitrembett-ao inestigate and report to Congress 41a-Plan of coordination of the activities, duties ann powers of the office of the Secretary of Labor with the
activities, duties and powers of the present bureaus, commissions and departments, so far as they relate to Labor and its conditions, in order to
harm niz rnd unify such activities, duties and powers, with a view to
A. egislation to further define the duties and powers of the DeDartment tof Labor, ..(1 toce
skIc
ti:1, vestVati ns and repor s
to the Pres ent or b' ngre s as
y b requiV
bylthem r whi
he
m nkes
po t ann lly
y, and t
e wor of h
Cong ss upon
artm nt o Labor."
From the above it is very apparent that the scope of the jurisdiction and authority of the Secretary of Labor have in no sense reached the
plane which Coagress had in mind when it created the Department of Labor.
It is obvious that a wide span was left vacant aver which the Department
of Labor may, and should, leap in fostering and promoting the welfare of
wage earners.

2.

Congressional intentions always determine the Latitude of interpret-

ing the acts of Congress.

Nothing else so specifically and so effectively

describes statutes, edicts, acts, etc., for the Law has always reasoned
that the animus of a man, be he bound by moral duty or by legislative authority, speaks for him in those things Which he does.

3.

When the Division of Negro Economics was created it functioned ef-

fectively within the several bureaus and divisions of the Department of
Labor.
earners.

It grasred single-handed the problems of thousands of Negro wageAt the end of one year it was but a mere infant in assisting the

Department of Labor through a tryin

war emergency period in which there

figured the interests of a few thousand Negroes, particularly migrants.




Page three

In no way has the Division of Negro Economics touched the normal situation,
for a normal situation has not yet existed since its advent.

3.

Throngh the Negro Workers' Advisory Committees have come to light

ways and means of touching the community life of a very small portion of
one-tenth of the total population of the United States.

The feature of

the committees has been, as you know, their volunteer character.

4.

linking up the interests of Negro citizenship, through the Division

of Negro Economics, to the Secretary of Labor, and from him to Congress
and to the rresident of the United States, is 0plainly possible that
a mere hint to you in this regard is all that is necessary.

Assuming,

from the intentions of Congress that even the Department of Labor "is
yet but an infant" department and that through it the Secretary of Labor
should have access to data and results obtained by other departments of
the Government, and should "investigate and report to Congress a plan of
coordination," etc., "in order to harmonize and unify such activities and
duties," and assuming that each and every division and bureau of the Executive Departments (as well as commissions, boards, etc.) has the intention of functioning 100 por cent in its duties to American citizenship,
I respectfully recommend:
(a) That the attention of the Secretary of Labor be specifically
called to the existence of every community, county, and state Negro Workers'
Advisory Committee, with the view of realizing that through these committees and through hundreds of others which can be easily set up, he can
effectively

enlarge upon his duties in "calling upon other departments

of the Government for * * *
'data and results."




Page four

(b) That it be sae:gested to the secretary of Labor that he can more
effectively than ever before "investigate and report to Congress a plan of
coordination," etc., ""with a view to additional legislation to further
define the duties and powers of the Department of Labor," etc.
(0) That it be sugested to the Secretary of Labor that by virtue
of his aforesaid powers and authority he transmit, through the chief executives of each department, to each bureau chief and the chairmen of commissions and boards, and report on the results of the Negro rW)norics work
calling to their attention the utility of the field organization of Negro
Economics to those bureaus, commissions and boards in carrying out their
duties relating to Labor, through this department.
(d) That the Secretary of Labor call upon each bureau chief, through
his executive head, for a frank statement of any m:nner in which this service could properly be of assistance to such bureau or division.

5.

The destinies of 10 million Negroes are at bar in a way never before

seen.

The shift of the economic status, loyalty and citizenship of 10

million Locroes is more noticeable than ever before.

Some conditions,

not mentioned herein but with which you are well familiar, are becoming
intensified every day.

The philosoplv of self-preservation is upon us.

Should not every resource be invoked to insure eeace, good will and justice to Americans, white and. black?

Respectf

kp/el




Assistant to the Director
of regro Economics

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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

••••

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No.205

Ed. 3-22-18--300,000



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TOMAHAWK LAND COMPANY LANDS
IN
Parts of Oneida, Lincoln, Langlade and Price Counties.
SCALE: I-2 INCH=I MILE.
LANDS COLORED YELLOW

FOR SALE BY

TOMAHAWK LAND COMPANY
TOMAHAWK, WIS.
4

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EXPLANATIONS
• SETTLERS
ell SCHOOL HOUSES
CHURCHES
WAGON ROADS
•••.=.RAILROADS
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ROADS ON STATE HIGHWAY
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Tomahawk Land Settlement Plan
We assist the settler to make a farm from cut-over lands.
Labor and material up to $500 advanced for house, barn and well.
We rent teams, farm tools, stump pullers, etc., on community basis at actual cost.
Visit our central farm and see the implements and tools we have for rent.

When settler can supply feed, money advanced for cow, pig and chickens.
Pay nient3 extended over a period af 23 years.
We try to have house and barn built before settler moves on land.
Stump-pullers furnished are of latest design, with all necessary
hooks.

cables, chains and

Settler can clear 10 acres a year, and have 30 acres under cultivation in 3 years.
PAYMENTS—When we make advances for house, barn, cow, etc., we expect a first
payment of $250.00 per 40 acres.
If a man is not in a position to pay $250.00 in cash at the time of purchase, he should tell us just
what he can do.

To actual settlers who do not desire advances, the first payment on land can be at
$10.00 per 40 acres.
After the first payment, no further cash payments asked for 3 years, if settler moves
on land and makes improvements averaging $10.00 per 40 acres per month, over advances.
Payment for land, buildings and rental charges distributed over 20-year period, 6';
interest.
Rental charges and supplies advanced limited to $25 per acre of land put into cultivation.

SOILS—A variety of barns.
PRODUCTS—Dairy products stand first.
Our county produced $1,500,000 of dairy products in 1918.

Clovers and grasses grow remarkably well.
Lands are in the well known "Clover Belt."

Pastures keep green throughout the summer.

Best soil in the State for potatoes.
Potatoes are considered the cash crop.

Oats, rye, roots and vegetables give high yields.
WATER

Clear, pure, cold.

CLIMATE--Invigorating and healthful.
The winters are free from the winds and blizzards of the prairies.

RAINFALL The average yearly rainfall is about 34 inches, which is as high as in any
locality throughout the State.
MARKETS—Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis and St. Paul are all tributary; 12 hours ride
to Chicago.
RAILROADS—Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Ry. (Wisconsin Valley), "Soo Line,"
Marinette, Tomahawk and Western R. R. ("our railroad").
GOOD ROADS--There are 764 miles of public highways in the county.
GOOD SCHOOLS—The county has 85 schools. Population of county 21,100.
RURAL TELEPHONES- Lines go in three directions from Tomahawk.
Work during winter months can usually be obtained nearby in logging camps, or with
those getting out cordwood, pulpwood, poles, ties, etc.
We have been here since 1888 and have seen men start with less than $500 and become
successful farmers today, worth $5,000 to $20,000.
We know that the farmer who works wins.
We have never foreclosed a settler's land contract.
"We help the man who helps himself."
WRITE TO US.

TOMAHAWK LAND COMPANY
TOMAHAWK, WISCONSIN

4-20-1M-9




FARMLA

ATTENTION

T

ill
k.L..ii.

It

NATIONAL FARMERS CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCI TION
Sends to Northern Markets THREE EXPERTS
Seeking &dvantages for patrons. They will secure for the Association best of prices on

Watermelons in Car-load Lots duriug July and August
Wire connections with the Association to be established.
To Facilitate Trade. We solicit your Trade and assure the Best Results on small commission. Write or wire—
NATIONAL FARMERS CO- OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION
• 509 West Broad Street
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL, $100,000
INCORPORATED UNDER LAWS OF GA.
Officers an d Directors
S. P. CAMPBELL, President, Midville, Ga.
R. C. REESE, Vice-President, Millen, Ga.
E. A. WILLIAMS, Sect-Treas., Savannah, Ga.
J. H. LANE, Vice-President, Munnerlyn, Ga.
B. W.PIERCE, 11,alcyondale, Ga.
S. Wilson,Savannah, Ga.
Leroy Hudson, Keysville, Ga.
J. W. Holley, Albany, Ga.




P. A. Pettis, Omaha, Ga.

P. Weaver, Waynesboro, Ga.
W. A. Bell, Atlanta, Ga.

C. Cuthbert, Springfield, Ga.
N. J. Walkeri, Millen, Ga.
Eddie Davis, Wadley, Ga.
J. C. Fisher, Savannah, Ga.




September 18, 1920.

'illSOGNSIN CCIAllizAT
lam Claire, as.

Oman,

alirafj:

IA. Kuehl, Sipoy.

Gentlemen:
Thank you so taaoh for c.lie Information
o cel .4.4izaect in ;Le litdratare sent lee about effort
s
to buil.t up flizta ooactuitiall.
Very truly yours,
Director of Negro &monde 3.

mAtia




3st,tessber 18, 192o.

TO:.01,RW
J.1; • JTT,
Tomahawk, 41s.
Gentian:1.s

ATIiTLJt Lr.

R.R. ia!lls.

Thank you so much for the information Gouts1ne4 In the
°Insular, anl lettfir seat ms about your sale of land,.

IND* truly yours,

DIreator of gegro Lounum1e.s.

RAnic

1

SPECIAL ILLUSTRATED VICTOR IAND. OPPORTUNITY EDITION
WHEN TO COME

WHERE TO GO

Customers often ask us, "When
is the best time to come?" Our
answer is "Any time." We are
one of the biggest land development
organizations in the country and
our work goes on winter and summer.
More than a third of our sales
are made during the winter. Our many
years of honorable land
merchandising has given us a reputation which
we are proud of, and with this
r:cord many oeople purchase land here
even when there is snow on the
ground. The real thing to keep in mind
is tnis: Land values are
increasing faster here than probably almost any
other place in America. It
takes a long time for $200 per acre land
to double in price but $25 per
acre land can double in price almost over
night Under these
circumstances the time to come to look over our
land is "NOW"—right now—before
prices are higher. They will never
be lower and they may be higher
very soon. The time to come is right
away. We know this will serve
your interest best. No matter when
you come you can talk to
settlers from your home state, who are now
living here, and learn not only
what success they have had in one year,
but in two, four, six or ten years.
We await your visit. Skidmore Land
Co., Marinette, Wis.

I

istration in
.4

1TE, WISCONSIN

WORLD'S GREATEST LAND MOVEMENT

Are you a prophet? We are not prophets, but
our success has been built by known; a movement that in a few year;
looking ahead and acting in accordan 3e with
what common sense told us must land values from almost nothing to mill •e?„.
come to pass. Anyone could do as well. Fifteen
years ago we took over tracts conclude that even as the present
totaling 300,000 acres of land in Mann -ette County,
Wisconsin. All the "wise world, the land movement which histo
land men" in America scoffed at us. They
were busy exploiting the semi-arid est land movement in the history cf th 3 -,
plains of the far west, and they didn't nink the
lands of Upper Wisconsin that such will be the case. Where will t).ee
would appeal to successful farmers. Mlst cf those
"wise land men" are bank- lands? The plains suitable for rapid 86.1t.le
practically all taken up. Uncle Sam's hci
rupt today because they spent their all in trying to
colonize lands which lacked
c.,d. The bulk of the best lands avail
sufficient moisture to make farming pos sible.
Against that record you find the must be found in the former timber la
Skidmore Land Co. successful, you fin J. the attention of
the entire country who are best informed know that thes'
centered on the former timber lands of the upper Lakes
region, you find two consin. What, then, will be the .7a,lue
hundred to three hundred of the count ry's best farmers
from states like Illi- war—of these rich clover, grain and Ii
nois and Iowa taking up homes in Mar Inette county
every year, you find the test located county in Upper Wiscoinio
best parts of Upper Wisconsin develop'ng with
remarkable rapidity as one of remarkably low figures as $10 to 1.'30 p er
the world's greatest livestock areas. Was our
judgment good? Decide forl that such lands, under the stimulation cf
yourself. Now let us look ahead again! We repeat
we are not prophets, but • will be selling at $50, $75 or possibly e 7er
we want you to look ahead a few years, just
as we did fifteen years ago. His- I the best farms in Illinois and Iowa will
tory records the fact that the world's
greatest land movements have all oc- prices as high as $500 per acre. Will i loo
lands in the better parts of Upper Wis
curred immediately after the world's g reatest
wars. War weariness has always ands of improved farms having
a ready
turned men to quieter lives—mainly to the
farm. You recall what took place be selling at prices as high as $100 per acre
at the close of the civil war—the greatest
land movement America has ever prophets. But we have great faith n the 1..

"Where are your lands, and where will we go to see them?" These
are questions which we are asked every day. We are glad to answer
fully. You can leave your home town on any train which will get you
into Chicago about 8:45 p. m. and arrive at either our Wausaukee. or
Marinette offices the following morning. It is better to go directly tO
Wausaukee for you will then be nearer to the better lands, and will save
time and expense. To reach Wausaukee take the Chicago, Milwaukee
and St. Paul Ry. from Chicago. You can easily find our office and hotel
at Wausaukee. It is just east and north a block from the depot. A photograph of the building appears in another part of this edition. To reach
Marinette take the Chicago &. Northwestern from Chicago. Write, or
wire us at our expense, before you start, and we will have men and
autos ready to show you the land when you arrive. Railroad fare both
ways is free to purchasers. Remember—we are opening at this time
new tracts totaling 80,000 acres; much of it the best land we have
ever opened; and those who come first will of course have first choice of
the best selections. Prices $10 to $35 per acre. Terms can be arranged
to suit your circumstances. Address all correspondence to Skidmore
Land Co., Marinette, Wis.

LAKELY FOLLOW CLOSE OF WAR
the middle west and sent store for Marinette county. We most sincerely believe that this is by all odds
.:Jore.!.. Isn't it reasonable to one of the best occasions to make a land investment in the right place which
in the history of the we have ever known. If your common sense tells you this reasoning is good,
follow, will be the great- you have the opportunity now to select land from some big new tracts which
sen.v
would indicate we are opening in Marinette county—la nds which we consider as good or better
soldiers go to get good than any we have ever been able to place on the markets. We claim for Mari,:.:::.-•occessful agriculture are nette county that it is the most progressive county in Upper Wisconsin, has a
are just about exhaust- longer growing season, and in the main, better lands. That was our judgment
Hgreatest land movement when We took over great tracts of lan d in Marinette county after having care•••';per lakes recrion. Those fully looked over practically every other locality in Upper Wisconsin. Time
.111 be found in Upper Wis- I-a
stained our judgment because development has come more rapidly, and
year or two afteT. tle iui,vaues are greater today in Mann elle county than in most other localities.
fi
of Marinette Countyi th ,eAcause we bought these lands years a go at a low price, we can sell them at a
DU can buy oday,.at .sikch\ON4.price. We cannot help but feel th at you are overlooking one of the truly
• it out
mkt
markable opportunities of your life if you fail to immediately look Marl- of relks n
.4)g of thousan
etlerer tte county over and if you find it as we have represented—which we know
'acre? If we m
not you will—secure a tract of this rich do ver land and be in a position to take the
after the war be se ii t at , profit which must almost certainly accrue at once and more particularly
expected then fdr th new when the war is over. If you live any where in the middle west you can leave
e already there are hous- your home today and be walking over these lands tomorrow. We ask you only
-.o of $75 to $150 per acre, to , to come and see—then the lands will speak for themselves. Write, or wire
we said before, we are not at our expense and let us know when we may expect you.
4.able development Which is in I
SKIDMORE LAND CO., Marinette, Wis.

DAIRYING BEST AGRICULTURAL AUTHORITIES OF STATF, iRA I ATr
DON'T LOCATE
ULM L MARINETTE
OPPORTUNITY IN
WHERE
LAND
IS
COUNTY
ON
HER
LEADERSH
IP
I"
.VELOPM
WISCONSI
ENT
OF UPPER
N NOT VALUABLE
SCORE OF YEARS
MILLION DOLLAR DAIRY DAY CELEBRATION BRINGS TO FRONT THE 1.
,AT MARINETTE COUNTY IS FAR IN THE LEAD IN DEVEL-

SUPPLY OF FOOD LESSENING
EACH YEAR WH!LE TREMENDOUS INCREASE IN POPULATION IS CERTAIN.

OPMENT AND ALL ACTIVITIES CONNECTED WITH SETTLEMENT
ASSISTANT HEAD OF WISCONSIN COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, A'
PRAISE OF FARM SUCCESS ATTAINED IN MARINETTE COUNTv
FAVOR OF THIS SPLNDID DEMONSTRATION AND CELEBP"
i.
T.T.Yr

HOMESEEKERS, REAL)
- THIS
s :Ie.:1'4E WHO HAS TO WORK FOR
•

"

;FIVLS I

E DAIRYING FARMING
OPPORTUNITY IN MARINETTE COUNTY.

ray-

QUESTION

RIGHT LOCATION

OF
Fa WISCONSIN—U. S. SENATOR LENROOT, PROF. OTIS, IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN
ANY OTHER ONE CONSID'OR OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURIST SPEAK IN WARM
ERATION, SAYS BULLETIN.
'OR EVERETT SAYS: "WE CANNOT SAY ENOUGH IN
WORK U""G ON IN THAT SP PMI" Co''NT Y. "'"EST IN FIGHT
eter

•

GENT THOUGHTiUL AND )
'1' R01
(Note—The following article is reprinted verbatim from The Wisconsin
Agriculturist of March 30, 1918. It
was written by State Senator C. H.
Everett, editor of The Agriculturist, who
is one of Wisconsin's foremost agricultural authorities. Born on a farm in
Wisconsin, and continuing in that work
nearly forty years, he is today regarded
as a man who knows agriculture and
farm
land
development
activities
throughout Wisconsin more intimately
than almost any other person. The past
twenty years of his life have. been devoted to farm journalism—giving to the
people of his state the farm experience
acquired during his lifetime. Recently
Senator Everett was honored by Wisconsin •University when a special degree. in
recognition of his Services to agriculture
in Wisconsin was conferred upon him.
As will be noted in the accompanying
article,. Senator Everett was one of the
speakers at Marinette County's recent
great Million Dollar Dairy Day celebration.)

44,

spouse which he received from the
"Your ruaudience was marked indeed, for he - ion today
witile.
was cheered again and i.sgain and the ' Jid progress. 'You har
audience arose and remained stand- proud of havng read:
ing, and cheered him for several Dollar mark in th,_
moments.
dairy pro.duct3. This
At the conclusion of the splendid prosperity to your inn
dinner, the crowd was conveyed to a your county but it a
large opera house of the city and the have set an example;
audience that entered that building demonstrated that no
exceeded one thousand in number.
sin has possibilities I
The speakers of the afternoon were passed, and that wherk
Prof. D. H. Otis, assistant dean of the else his best thought a,
Wisconsin College of Agriculture; ors upon the northem

.)

'J L'

,

YOUR WORK Wi;..L
RETURNS IN INCREASED
VALUE.

,ra- On the itheei Laiu,61 of soil fertility ana'"producers. In this, you have been
aplen- he warned the farmers in Marinette remarkably successful."
against carelessness and
in 1) be County
He also complimented the bankers
Million thoughtlessness in this respect. He for the satisfactory methods in vogue
The question of vita; oart of Upper
:tion of told them they possessed at this time in Marinette County in assisting the
ty means I a virgin soil, that fertility was being farmers along business lines and the Wisconsin you may locate in is jest
,y and to , derived from the dairy industry but co-operation that exists between the as important as the difference between locating a store like Marshall
that you that in other counties and in other banker and farmers.
you have I states, it has been found difficult to
Professor Otis very truthfully said Field's in Chicago or a town of 1,000
Wiscon- I maintain soil fertility.
that in looking forward to the future, population.
Location nas more to do with the
re unsur- I Referring to the growth of alfalfa, Marinette County will continue in the
will exer- Professor Otis said: "Marinette Coun- front rank so long as her individual , market value of a farm in Upper Wisbest lab- , ty has made a start in the production farmers will put their shoulders to consin than any other one condition.
the lat- ! of this wonderful plant. Alfalfa is the wheel and by their united efforts There are localities in Upper Wiscondo what they can to advance the sci- sin where, because of lack of transence and art of agriculture. He con- portation facilities, too much swampy
cluded by saying: "If Marinette lama, or some other cause, there canCounty becomes satisfied to rest on not be much change in land values
what she has already accomplished, it for many years to come. There are
will not be long before some other other localities where values are not
only strong and based on accomii northern county will come to the plished
farming results and climate,
front and she will be a back numbut where values are showing very
ber."
marked increases each season.
Why earmers Succeed.
The following bulletin was written
Very marked success has been attained by many farmers of that splen- originally for our salesmen. We
did county. First, for the reason that wanted them to know exactly why
The Million Dollar Dairy Day celesoil of Marinette County is fer- land values are advancing faster in
the
bration held in Marinette on Wednesand that a good class of settlers Marinette County than any other Uptile,
day of last week was one of the largbeen secured for that section of per Wisconsin locality. There were
have
est and most enthusiastic meetings
men who are thinkers, men so many requests made by our salesstate,
the
of farmers that we have ever attendout
at the meetings as they
turn
who
ed . in Wisconsin.
The war may be over before this
did last week in large numbers, and
During
the
year
Landology
victory
1909, Marinette
edition
of
who pay the closest attention to what
reaches you, but that does not ap- County farmers sold $70,000 worth of
is told them by practical men who are
On pages 5 and 6 of this edimilk • in 1915 they sold $255,000
pear probable at this time. We beasked from time to time to appear betion you will find a coupon form
worth and in 1917 they sold $1,054,to
discuss
and
them,
with
lieve to the utmost in the fullest
them
fore
which we will be glad to have you
175 worth of dairy products.
all the perplexing problems of agrisupport of our country in these
fill out and mail to us. If you have
increase
great
This
in
dairy
culture.
prodays of her supreme effort to prenot received our great land fact
duction in one of the foremost northWhile at the convention, we met
serve liberty for herself and for
book, a bound volume of 80 pages,
ern counties created so much enthusone of the two Augustine brothers, this coupon will bring
th e world. No matter what your
you a copy.
iasm among the farmers of the counwho are conducting a farm of 100
We want you to come and visit us
circumstances are, buy Liberty
business
the
men
and
of
ty
Marinette
acres in Marinette County. They are
NOW, because we know you will
bonds of each issue. Do not only
that it was deemed proper to celegrowing alfalfa and sweet clover and
save money by doing so, but if you
your bit, but your utmost. If you
brate the event by bringing to the city
carry on a three-year rotation which
cannot start for Marinette county
desire, we will take Liberty bonds of Marinette the farmers of the councarries clover over the farm once in
on the morrow, turn to the coupon
at par and accrued interest as payty.
three years.
pages, fill out both sides of the
ment on Marinette county lands.
They induced their father some
co-operation existing in that
The
blank and mail to us. We will
But whether you apply the bonds
time ago to purchase two grade Holcounty between the business men of
then immediately send you free of
to land purchases or not, buy bonds
steins and they now have in their
the city and the farmers is most excharge a copy of of our book,
and support your country in every
herd two-year-old heifers that procellent. A general good feeling preLANDOLOGY DE LUXE. This
possible way to the very limit of
duce twenty-five pounds of butter per
vails. Farmers are ready at any and
work is a text book of the land
your ability. It is your duty and
expect
heifers
They
these
to
month.
into
enter
any
kind of
all times to
situation, and no matter where
privilege.
thirty
produced
years
at
pounds
three
the
business
with
agreement
men of
you are planning on locating, you
old.
the city whereby mutual benefit is
ought to read it from cover to
have
They
in
herd
their
twenty
work upon this problem, report that derived, and especially benefit to the
cover.
pure bred females and the $1,000 De
the food value in the milk of a good . farming communities, for the busiLion
Kol
Hengerveld
bull.
These
dairy cow in one year is equal to the ness man understands that his prosboys are young and full of enthusiasm men, however, to have copies of this
food value in the bodies of five steers perity depends upon that of the farmand they will surely make their mark bulletin mailed to their customers,
ers in the surrounding territory.
weighing 1100 pounds each.
in the dairy field, and we shall hear that we decided all prospective cusProf. Washburn states that the
The business men of Marinette
from them again in the future.
tomers might be interested and conEight hundred Farmers and Dusines.s Men Di
27,761 pounds of milk produced by provided a splendid dinner which was
Passing
Cows
County
Marinette
of
In our address, we received the sequently the bulletin is reproduced
the Duchess Skylark Ormsby cow given to 600 Marinette County farm$1,000,000 Mark
•
ib
most
marked attention which was in full herewith:
had the same food value as two and ers in the splendid modern high
very greatly appreciated and we were "To Skidmore Land Co. Representaone-half tons of wheat flour. At 15 school building in that city. The farmHon. Irving L. Lenroot, United States ter will respond gene,
congratulated warmly at the conclutives and Customers:
.
bushels to the acre, eight acres of ers were transported to the high
We can- too valuable a crop not to be grown
senator from Wisconsin, and the edi- I not praise too highly,
"When you make a sale of land to
practically every farm in the sion of the meeting for having said
land would be required to produce an school building by street cars and
upon
that
work
tor of The Wisconsin Agriculturist. you have done in y
many things of interest to farmers, a customer in Marinette County, do
county. it county. It requires thought, skill and
equivalent amount of human food as automobiles, free service being supProfessor Otis was first on the pro- ; stands as a memoth'.
and especially to dairy farmers.
you contract to deliver to him anythis one cow produced in a year.
• an object patience in order to grow it. The replied by the Chamber of Commerce. gram and spoke in
We dwelt as usual upon the import- thing that he would not get in buying
part as follows: !lesson and tha who11Prof. Erf of the Ohio Station esti- The farmers of the county were not
te rejoices sults, however, justify the effort. If
•
ance of the good sire, of good breed- land at approximately the same price
; with you because 0"
mates that a dairy cow produces as allowed to spend a cent for anything
Prof. Otis' Address.
• r achieve- Marinette County is to continue to
ing, of dairy type and dairy conform- in other localities in upper Wiscon,
much food during her life time as and they certainly appreciated not
be a leader in the production of dairy
"Until recently, the largest devel- me nts.
give ation; upon good feeding; on the sin? Have you ever thought this
17 steers.
"With success and ,
only the generosity of the business opment of the Wisconsin dairy indusr achieve- products, it will be necessary to
the growing of crops adapted to the pro- over? It's mighty important!
attention
to
and
thought
The meat from one cow will sup- men of the city, but they appreciat- try has been in the southern counties. ments, come also ad:
careful
sponsibili"For one thing, you are deliverieg
forage." duction of milk.
valuable
ply a sufficient amount of beef in a ed to the fullest extent the speeches We have all recognized, however,
this
of
production
ties.
If
MariLette
s to conthat
We set forth as clearly as we know him land in a county which has a poration for two soldiers for a year, that were made by those on the pro- northern Wisconsin is naturally an tinue to progress in
;lee as she
Touching upon live stock as import- hoW, the difference between the dairy pulation of 40,000 people. Few other
While the milk from one good average gram.
ideal dairy section and it is with as in the past, s •
',.ot at this ant to farmers, Professor Otis said: form mild the beef form. The loss to localities in upper Wisconsin
are so
;
rest
time
upon
Cm will supply an equivalent value
was
br:1
held
o'clock,
at
12
much gratitude that we witness the
The dinner
reality,
your Million Dol- the dairy farmer in attempting to do well populated, and everyone knows
for twenty soldiers for a year.
following which the audience was ad- splendid development that is taking the struggle fci: egrk• aural achieve- "A large factor in
the
products,
is
business
with
scrub
cow—with that population of the right kind has
production of dairy
Look Into the Future.
dressed by Burt Williams who is the place in the newer counties in the ments has just q)eq,
. and there is lar
live stock that you have in the cow that makes some milk and more to do with farm land value thrn
The late J. J. Hill of the Great Revenue Collector for the western north and we are more than pleased much more ahead
IS which must the good
your county, thanks to the efforts of some beef of her feed; and to the any other one condition.
Northern Railroad, when discussing district of Wisconsin. Mr. Williams to note the splendid lead that Mari- be accomplished." fl
There is Value in Location.
your leaders and your progressive loss that a farmer milking that kind
the food supply of the future, predict•
- is a splendid orator and his address nette County is taking in this (levelKeep the SO.,- Fertile.
"Next, you are delivering a real
farmers who have been able to se- of a cow sustains because of feeding
was largely on patriotism. The re- opment of northern Wisconsin.
Continued on page 3, column 2.
Professor Otis dv
Continued on page 3, column 5.
Continued on page 2, column 1.
at length up- cure for your county some of the best
Republished from Eulletin No, 2, Dept.
of Educational Service, James Manufacturing Company .
The history of civilized nations
shows that the cow, a natural food
making machine, has been forcing
the animal which is consumed for its
meat, from its old place among the
people.
This same process is now going on
In the United States; the beef animal is giving way to the dairy cow.
Why this should be so, is readily
seen when we come to realize that of
all farm animals, a good dairy cow
Is the greatest producer of human
foods.
From 100 units of digestible fdod
consumed, 29% will be recovered in
the milk of the average dairy cow;
but only 14% will be returned by the
steer in the form of edible flesh.
Why Dairy Farming Pays Best.
Prof. Haecker of the Minnesota Experiment Station and Prof. Eckles of '
the Missouri Station, after years of




Buy Liberty Bonds

Free Copy of a Great Land Book

PAGE TWO

LANDOLOGY Victory

,p,letunity Edition—LANDOLOGY

LANDOLOGY—VictoA•

I
'Buckwheat
Is An Humble Crop But It Is a Good Friend to
the New Settler Who Want; to Clear Land Late in the Spring

Build Your Farm Home in "America's Real Clover-land."

OERTTIVERMENT
ss)APER TELLS OF
LAND SETTLEalARINETTE CO.,

•

ties

LOVER is the basis of all farming prosperity
in Upper Wisconsin, and is a crop which
the settler can be practically as Sure of as
he Can of the rain and sunshine. There has been
an increase in the clover acreage since 1909 of
150,000 acres. Marinette County alone now annually produces 25,000 acres of clover and timothy
hay. The acreage is increasing rapidly every
year.
All farmers know that a locality which produces
clover in great quantities is capable of re-fertilization. In other words, by the proper rotation of
crops the soil is guaranteed against running-out.
-Wisconsin has always farmed in the right way,

C

DON'T LOCATE
WHERE LAND IS
NOT VALUABLE
Continued from page 1, column 7.
value in location which is unlike any
other upper Wisconsin district.
"'How so?' you may ask. Thia is
how: What constitutes practically the
northern and western boundaries of
Marinette County are two chains of
high hills. From these chains of hills
the land slopes south and east into a
great valley; in fact into a double valley for Marinette County, as a whole,

that is, she has engaged in dairy farming and the
proper rotation of crops to a large extent. Clover !ap!,1
has always been the backbone of all farming h.
ohe
Wisconsin.
There is hardly an acre of land in !Maatinett,, '
County where clover cannot be made to produc,.. !
winning crops. It seems. to be a natural plaht , ant)
of the soil. It is always cut twice each seaso:..,
and produces from two and one-half to five toh!!ti xdrd
in two cuttings.
In many years it will produeol
three tons to the acre in the first. cutting.
,t
You know the value of a clover country, and
you are open to conviction we will be glad
show you that Marinette County is ''America
Real Clover-land." Come and see for yourself. !I
-

the land. This warmth is not absorbed quickly nor is it given off
quickly. Fall days arrive and the effect this body of water has on the
growing season again becomes apparent. The atmosphere of the land becomes colder than the atmosphere of
the sea. The sea air rushes) in and
neutralizes the colder breath of the
land. Many early fall frosts which
have done tremendous damage to
corn and other crops in southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois and Iowa
have been escaped in Marinette County because of this beneficial effect of
Lake Michigan and Green Bay on our
climate.
"Let's go further in our pursuit of

You Can Make a Good Living and Splendid Profits Growing Strawberries
in Marinette County. •

have done so far for the war and sfib'
be able to keep right on growing and r
developing this remarkable agrieultural and business community.
"In this little talk we have tried te •
bring home to you, as we have doles- fro
many times before, the knowledea,
that Marinette County is a differeei
community than other upper Wisconal r cle
sin localitiea. We started here sooner
and consequently we have advanced
farther.
• 100
We know there are good lands in e'en
other parts of upper Wisconsin, ana ;
A,
we will be the last people to ever say ; h as
anything to the contrary, but we know
cat
there are special reasons why nacre
than three times as many settkrs
have been locating in Marinette Connty every year for the past ten yeass,i
It.
as in any other part of upper Wistron-; frant
sin. We know also that if you carry . 000.
this message to the people of you:
Pla
locality in all its force of truth that -haisc
ten times as many settlers will take I ovens
up their abode here this year as in1 An.
any past year.
Let the Truth be Known.
Better lands at fairer prices in a
better location were never offered to
si
homeseekers, farmers, townspeople or
investors. It is your serious war-time
"e
duty to carry this message to the peepie seeking farm homes or legitima1e,
;
secure farm-land investments."

MEEP AND BEEF !N
HETTE

'

at Figures on Farm
ait in Recent Years.
valuation of

property increased
i00state's
to $3,600,000,000.
grown
airces have
to $600,000,000.
a increased settlees NV CI' parts of the state.
of iineccupied areas is
.11s isopreciated.
‘;:f carn has increased
P. northern counties
it ..iigreed seed grains
iucees sed by 500,000.
rodr.iles of public road

Buckwheat is an humble crop, and
there are farmers who say they
would not raise it. However, the
farmer who locates in Marinette
County and has the right spirit, wants
to devote his efforts to whatever will
serve his purpose best.
Buckwheat is a great subduer of

new land. The new settler can clear
land late in the spring, sow buckwheat as late as July 10, and it will
produce a bumper crop worth about
$50 per acre.
This scene, taken in the Athelstane district in Marinette County in
1917, shows a field of this crop on

0

ing activities than most adjoining
states.
, "When it came to choosing my lowr
c
ell
ataiiocn
e in iWairsicnoentste
in,
County andoet only
y
because of the soil and location, but
because I was convinced that the
An Illinois man who recently pur- county is the most progressive of the
chased 240 acres of land from the newer farming localities in Upper
Skidmore Co. in Marinette County Wisconsin, and because the improvesaid:
ments put on the land here appear to
"I came to Wisconsin because I , give it a much greater increase in

VIE WESTERN
SHEEP MEN TO
TRY VIMeNSIN
0

new land. To the left is seen some
stumps removed in the spring from
the land on which the buckwheat was
sown. On the right are seen the new
barn and other buildings of the settler. This little three-acre patch of
buckwheat on a piece of land which
was not cleared until June 15, 1917,
brought this settler about $160.

COMES IIERE BECAUSE
ARE pRofiREssivE
•

ASSOCIATION
ADVANCEMENT
WESTERN
BEFORE
LAYS
FLOCKMASTERS RESOURCES OF WISCONSIN.

LANDS, GRASSES,

Perk Production Fits hi Well With
GRAINS
Dairy Farming in Narinette County

cliseso have increased
1,000 pounds to 380,000,- WISCONSIN DAIRY INDUSTRY OF
AS
CITED
$190,000,000
IS
STATE'S PROOF OF SHEEP
the manufacture of conFARMING SUCCESS.
vapor ed milk have inn.imatien to fifty-three.
haae increased from
Extracts front the address of W. G.
with 45 per cent of Bissel, president of the Wisconsin Ada rmeas.
vancement Association, before the Na,crew-ed from 17,000 tional Wool Growers Association at Salt
seres.
Lake City in January, 1918.
at land in cultivated
After a thorough inspection of the
Ised moae than S10,000 Wisconsin country Frank J. Hagenlast censu§.
barth, president of the National Wool
enes1 et the cut-over Growers' Association, informed us
ii tat; northern part of that we had the finest grazing land in
seen romarkable. Rapid the United States, if not in the world,
tht.se lands is taking and we agreed with him. He told us
I sheep feeding en- that in these darkening days of stress
-a. The sheep help and struggle of our nation that it.
the blreatsrass was fan esoaeaaie crime that n singae
••
.
'

•

)
s

Strawberries are a special cash
crop which any person, who will grow
them intelligently, can make money
with in Marinette County. They do
unusually well on the types of soil to
be found here.
The editor of LANDOLOGY took
this picture in a strawberry patch
near Wausaukee in 1917. There is
something about the combination of
soil, climate, etc., which gives the
strawberry of Marinette County a
splendid flavor, and unusual size.
Some of the berries shown in the
scene above were more than half the
size of a teacup. There is a big

canning plant at the twin cities of
Marinette and Menominee, which will
pay you the market price, or higher
than the market price, for all the
strawberries you can deliver.
Frank Wood, one of ,Marinette
County's older settlers, and a member of the Marinette County Experiment Association, has been producing from three to five acres of strawberries every year. He receives gross
returns of $300 to $600 per acre from
this crop. He considers it one of the
best cash crop opportunities in Marinette County.

-,-cori him. We,
.
t
Wisseisin
(1,), :,,211 him
the maghEicen4i;.tips of grains
ea/ SI:Irs
Prtylucei6 and grasses we produce, but he imA visit to the Busby-Taft farm of
(t.erint;
.1'LTht area mediately came back at us with the
2100 acres in Marinette County wiii
beet
Wis- remark that the greatest crop that
reves1 the possibilities of sheep pro- aul4P2'
'
state could easily take he had seen so far in Wisconsin was
duction. These men have 650 west- '1unsin'
the' leading sugar beet , the moss growing on our own backs
ern ewes, and plan to run 4,000 sheep rank a-•
tes of the anion if the that prevented us from seeing the
psoduci..
on their ranch.
ifidustry,
developed. Not only. splendid opportunity that lay before
"Sheep production is a paying proeselld
sin produce all of the US.
position in this country," says Mr. al. aa e
sal by its people and
Action was immediately taken, and
Busby. "Conditions are practically
liec
lions of dollars at home before he left Wisconsin he had the
ideal.. The climate is favorable, the this
to aa
.ted among the farmers satisfaction of witnessing the birth
grasses cannot be. excelled, and are bus,
men of the state, but it of a sheep and wool company with a
moreover there is an abundance of
woe ld
flirla other -states with capital of $200,000, and I am pleased
good water available. We raise a
t.0.1:
tid millions to its to report to you that today this comgreat sufficiency of corn silage, cloy- sugar at
trade la
as." An average yield is pany has a inundation band of 5,000
er- hay and root crops to feed our aa„at
1.2 '6 to die acre.
breeding ewes on their ranch in upsheen. The grass is so good that no
large quantity of sugar per 'Wisconsin, comfortably housed. in
feed is ever necessary. except in the beet, is..
'chitty being productd in modern sheep sheds with sufficient
winter."
Masineth! nit) y. They are market- Wisconsin clover on hand to carry
An ekample of the possibilities of ed at t7'
$1,000,000 sugar beet them through the winter, and I am
beef production on the grass lands plant tw
and -in the Menominee also glad to say to you that since that
of this section is had in the exper- River hi
the cities of Marinette, time four other great corporations
ience of T. C. Jones, who brought a Wis., 1.1
miinee. Mich. In the are being organized for a similar
load of beef cattle from Chicago. year l!t1
rice paid by this sugar work and will be going in full blast
These steers on grass alone made a' factory
per ton, which on an the coming summer. So, sir, your
daily gain of beteer than three , average
tion of 12 tons per efforts in Wisconsin have not been
pounds. Ott the land which these acre ws
an a gross return of in vain.
cattle pastured, the clover was so .$12i .ae
In many cases yields
We have been 'informed that you
abundant that the steers could not of
t
tans per acre are corn- shepherds of the west are being raptrample it down.
men.
idly deprived of your range lands` and

[Not,:

Is the valley of the Peshtigo and Men- the question of whether we deliver to
ominee rivers, two of the greatest a customer, when he buys land in
streams in the upper American lake Marinette County, anything he could
not get in other parts of upper Wisregion.
"Winds from the north and west consin.
"Yes, we believe we do deliver still
are broken by these two chains of
hills, providing us with an effective more: We deliver land in a farming
barrier against occasional Medicine community where farming is not an
Hat and Lake Superior brands of experiment, but where the man who
will work and has a reasonable
spring and fall weather.
!amount of means to do with can be
"Elevation has more to do with the
practically pertain of success.
length of growing season than dis"Your customer knows the differequator.
from
I
the
tance north or south
between any proposed business
Marinette County's location in a val- ence
venture and what is known as a 'goconsidlay, the elevation of which is
ing business.' Marinette County is,
erably lower than other parts of up- from the standpoint
of farming and
per Wisconsin therefore tends to give i
faom every standpoint, a 'going
us a marked advantage in the length
The man who buys land
busine.' in
of growing season. In reality it gives
Marinette County buys his future
us a farming climate comparable to
home in a locality where all such desouthern Wisconsin, northern Illinois
velopments as railroads, churches,
and northern Iowa. What this differschools, highways and number of proence in elevation means can easily be
gressive .farmers are just about ten
realized by the fact that 100 miles due
years ahead of the average locality in
west from Marinette County there are
practically always killing frosts thir- upper Wisconsin.
"Perhaps this can best be apprety or forty days earlier in the fall
ciated through our war record to date,
than in Marinette County, and usual(July,
1918).
Marinette
County,
ly thirty days later in the spring than
since the first Liberty Bond campaign
in Marinette County. Our usual growin June, 1917, has bought $2,500,000
ing season is forty to sixty days longworth of Liberty Bonds, an Oversubthan the average upper Wisconsin
scription of 100 per cent. We have
locality.
taken $350,000 in Thrift Stamps; subA Great Inland Sea.
scribed $25,000 to the war Y. M. C. A.;
"What other value in location do $30,000 to the Red Cross; $5,000 to
we deliver, that cannot be delivered the Knights of Columbus army canelsewhere in upper Wisconsin, when tonment work; $500 for Smileage
we sell land to a customer? The an- books; sent five special War Y. M.
swer is just as important as the mat- C. A. workers into service, ten proter of elevation! We deliver a loca- fessional nurses and Red Cross work- ,
tion in a county which has a great ers and 2000 stalwart young men into
&land sea to the north, east and the U. S. Army and Navy.
south. The effect of this inland sea
What Figures Mean.
on the growing climate can best be
"Could any locality which is still
realized when it is known that the
greatest commercial cherry-producing an experiment in farming put its
region in the world bas been devel- shoulder so powerfully to the wheel
oped on the Door Peninsula of Wis- of war support? Search the records
consin, twenty-two miles across Green of other parts of upper Wisconsin and
Bay to the east of Marinette County. decide whether we speak the truth.
Land in the cherry district sells at You will also find Marinette County's
great and sturdy resources have made ,
$200 to $900 per acre.
"This' great inland sea in effect It possible for us to do more than
holds back the growth of vegetation many older and more populous counThis is a scene taken on a farm !clover sae..
)13 Wasstil from $30 to
near Phillipsburg. It was new land $60 p,er tier°
in the spring until after the danger ties in 'Wisconsin and other states.
tlaee, second cutting,
"In
spite
of
sending
During
2000
men and two years ago. The picture shows i and wil: els( sIM.-"tycm tiro to three
of killing frosts has passed.
into
the
$3,000,000
war for freedom the second cutting of clover for the I tons of la's. : -a the first cuttings
the summer this big body of water, ,
which has a depth of eighty to one I in one year Marinette County's farm- season of 1917. A part of this secIn addare;
etraws left after
hundred feet in many places, gradual- ing and business life has hardly been ond cutting is being left for seed. the clover S
is hulled makes valuly absorbs warmth from the sun and scratched. We can triple all that we Marinette County lands Will yield a able food to oung stock, and the

Clover Seed Crop Wort ;50 per Acre Taken From This
Field After Fir "filth:lg.:of Clover Yielded
2 -2 T
Iiay Per Acre.

s.-




turning under of the clover sod provides the fertility for a greater crop
of corn, potatoes, or sugar beets the
following year. Marinette County can
truly be said to be "America's greatest clover-land."

Front the Literary Digest of May 18,
1918.
We have in this country much unimproved land. In these days, when
more food is needed for the world,
why not put some of this land to
work? If food is to win the war, that
Is, if the ultimate victory is to rest
with the side that can feed its population and its troops the longest, then
the problem of land improvement is of
the highest importance. A landclearing demonstration recently held
under the auspices of the University
of Wisconsin is described in The Du
Pont Magazine. Wisconsin has recently adopted legislation to facilitate
land-clearing, and this is doubtless a
most favorable
opportunity, the
writer thinks, to put land into tillable
condition.
"The war in Europe is playing
havoc with farming over there. Millions of acres of Europe's farm-lands
are idle, and probably will remain idle
for years after the conclusion of the
conflict. This condition puts it up to
America to produce food enough for
all, and she can do it because she has
the land, provided every acre of it is
cultivated and forced to maximum
production. The acres of cut-over
land that now occupy parts of our
country should be included in the cultivated areas.
"Think of what it would mean if the
unimproved land in this country were
put to work producing crops. Beneath
the stumps is concealed a gold mine,
and there is more profit to be derived
fromathe mining of farms than from
the mining of mountains. The ground
occupied by one average stump will
produce from twenty-five to fifty cents
worth of food per year.
"The cost of clearing land must be
paid but once, whereas the profit derived from it will go steadily on
through generations. Cleared land is
virgin soil which for years after the
clearing and 'taming' will yield bumper crops, with minimum expense for
fertilization. Expenditures for landclearing are permanent investments
that will be returned many times
over in profitable crops.
ta
"In Wisconsin there are still thousands of acres of very fertile cut-over
land. With its usual commendable
enterprise, the university set about to ing at this school take courses
see what could be done to get more of
this land cleared and under cultiva- making it possible for them to
tion, and in the spring of 1916, before teach elementary work in agriculthe United States had entered the ture. As a result in every rural
war, sent out an agricultural engineer school
in Marinette County agrito locate points for large public landclearing demonstrations. The univer- cultural subjects are taught. This
sity itself organized a demonstration work has been carried to a
crew and obtained the co-operation of point which has attracted nothree railroads operating in the state
tice throughout
entire
the
to run trains over their roads with a
view to showing the settlers how to country. Already it has proved
t n be the most effective way
clear their land.
"The state I •gisloture of 'V Iseo
e
keeping
boys and
of
it interest a. maeu by,the unidemonstrations, recently
versity's
passed a law making it easier for settlers and owners of stump-land in
Wisconsin to buy dynamite or stumppulling equipment with which to
clear. Under certain conditions, the
state will place orders for dynamite,
usually purchased in carload lots, in
Continued from page 1, column 1.
order to get the lowest price, and permit the settlers to pay the state treas- ed that by 1950 there will be a wheat
urer in easy installments and under shortage of 400 million bushels.
Dean Davenport of Illinois calcuconditions which they can easily meet
lates that by the end of the present
for the dynamite they- use.
"Actuated partially by the same mo- century there will be about 1200 miltives, the congress of the United lion people in this country, against
States enacted laws under which the 111,000,000 today.
ea
ebdatalain
ate
ni e
were orgbanksz
and
t e
1an
eaawnkye land
The Outlook.
these
many
is the basic strength of
then
This,
sbankslocalities,rfor farmers
industry—that population is
dairy
the
funds with which to clear and other- rapidly increasing—that food producwise improve their farms and operate tion yearly becomes more difficult
them more extensively.
and expensive,—that milk is one of
"Probably no more favorable opfoods—that the cow produces
no,dnfe inel the best
thi lasam
satn
utm
rctkmaleeala qtua
portunity
more
of food in the form of milk far
tbe
present
flraeenrsdaea.tn
mesuchvaeard p
abundantly and economically than it
The unprecedented
form of grain
food- can be produced in the
abnormally high and pro- or meat.
products
Keeping in mind that in normal
fitable prices offers the chance to get times the United States produces onwill
that
land-clearing
for
money
the
ly dairy products enough for its own
probably never come again.
t:]. t our population is growing
C..."
"Even the fuel shortage helps land- much more rapidly than the producclearing, for in some cases it is new
tion of milk—that the relative supply
possible to sell stump-wood for as of food in the form of wheat and
costs."
clearing
much as the

DAIRYING BEST
OPPORTUNITY IN
•
SCORE OF YEARS

Marinette County's clover pas- I can produce hogs on land which can
tures, the skim milk from the dairy I be bought at $20 to $30 per acre, inherds, and with corn or peas for fin- ; stead of on land costing $150 to $300
ishing, provide the background for per acre. In the picture above you
the profitable production of pork. see Mr. Race, a well-to-do Marinette
Pork production never
offered • County farmer, who is combining
greater profits than it does today, and dairying and pork production profitit never offered greater profits any- ably.
where than in a locality, where you
— —
think your state is more active in co- I value than in other localities.
operating with its new settlers, and convinced of the fact that you
in showing them how to farm the considerably longer growing
lands the best way. I think Wiscon- ; here than in other localities
sin is more progressive in its farm- lupper part of Wisconsin."
•
•

I was
have a
season
in the

that you have today an excess of
Your president told us that it was
sheep over and above your ability to , an economic crime for us to allow
graze and care for. At least, that you I our lands to lie idle. By the same
have reached the zenith of your busi- ' token, I am going to say to you that
ness, and that henceforward the in- it is an economic crime for you to
ductry is apt to decrease rather than , send your surplus breeding ewes to
increase. At least you will have a ! the shambles when you can send
steady job to hold your own.
I them to Wisconsin.
Wisconsin is distinctively a grazing •
The most solemn duty that constate. Our landed area is 56,000 fronts every man and every citizen
square miles, that is, about one-third today is to assist in winning the war.
the size of Montana, oneshalf the size Wisconsin wants to do her bit. We
of Wyoming and about two-thirds the are not here to urge the sale of lands;
size of Utah. We have a human po- I we are not here to deluge you with
pulation of two and one-half million, landman literature,—we have not a
—but the item that will interest you piece with us as big as a postage
most is that we have a dairy cow stamp, but co-operating with the Agripopulation of 1,750,000 head. We are • cultural Department of our state govthe greatest dairy state in the Union. ernment, we have brought with us an
We manufacture one-half of all the exhibit of the grains, clovers and
cheese made in the United States and • grasses grown in upper Wisconsin.
lead all other states in the production • They are on exhibit in the next room
of butter. When reduced to dollars • and we earnestly invite an inspection
and cents, the dairy products of the Ion your part.
state of Wisconsin for the year 1917
With feverish haste we are prepar
will amount to the enormous sum of • ing to send to the trenches on the
one hundred and fifty million dollars. other side an army of two million
Editor's Note--(Isigures since made men. How many more God only
public by the Wisconsin Dairy Com- I knows, but enough—enough to crush
mission show that the dairy products Kaiserism forever from the face of
of Wisconsin for the year 1917 the earth. Wisconsin is sending her
brought $190,235.814). I simply cite full quota and doing her full part.
these things that you may know that , I am giving that which is nearest
we are not entire- strangers to the and dearest on, earth to me—my only
livestock industry.
boy,—a manly young man, and at this
We have made a start in the sheep I• hour he is on his way to the other
and wool industry. but it is only a side. Hundreds of others within the
beginning. The elements that con- sound of my voice are doing the
tribute to make Wisconsin the great I same. I am not complaining—you
est dairy state in the Union, if pro- are not complaining. On the conperly directed, will make it the great- trary, we thank God he gave us such
est sissep and wool producing state boys, with the courage and bravery
in the Union. We have eight hun- that they will give their lives, if need
dred banks and trust companies, with be, that democracy may live.
To
resources of six hundred million dol- care for them will demand sacrifice
lars. Much of this capital is seeking on the part of all. It matters little
investment, and preferably at home. whether you and I have a cotton shirt
We are near the great markets; we to wear or none at all, but the boys
have the grazing lands and we have that we are sending "over there"
the capital. You have the sheep and must be provided with wool to wear
we "know how," and if your young and meat to eat.
men are obliged to leave your own
And, as we approach these econa
"vine and fig tree" and seek new inic questions, let us do it not with
fields of operations, we wish to ex- an eye only to the almighty dollar,
tend to you a whole-hearted invitatiois but in that spirit of sacrifice that will
to come to Wisconsin.
'win the war.

PAGE THREE

UNIVERSITY HAS Marinette County's Great 1100 e Agricultural School Leaves
MANUFACTURE
No Stone Unturned in lic iping New Settlers to Make Good WOOL IN ADDITION
LAND CLEARING
DEPARTMENT
TO PRODUCING IT
Marinette Count y • Agricultural and
Training School has completed ten years
of work in connection with the development of Marinette Csaaty, and the training pf the young people on the farms.
It has more than proved its usefulness to
the farmers and new settlers.
Not only is it a home agricultural and
training school for the sons and daughters of our farmers and settlers, but the
instructors and field men of this school
are carrying on a wonderfully important
work in helping the new settlers to get
started at'the right forms of farming, in
growing better grains and other crops,
in stocking their founts with the livestock
best suited to their farming operations,

,'s Journal. Springireh 12, 1918.
seseening the settlelands of Upper Wis• is there an increased
coming
• reesteaders
f Illinois, Iowa and
,estors with plentiful
,,esing large tracts of
•0 raise sheep. The
ads of acres in couninela e for sheen ranchmean that the next coumore settlement
k ill
Upper Wisconsin
en.:
is ten years. About
a fifty families from
in the Middle
,IeS.
based land in thelall
eying into Marinette
present time.

VIEW OF
iiSiN'S WEALTH

pportunity'Edition—LANDOLOGY

and

out

in improving livestock of all kinds throughcow) y.

the

Agriculture in Schools.
The scene above shows the main building of
the school at Marinette. One of the other scenes
shOws a class of Marinette county country girls
in domestic science. The school is equipped for
practical work in cooking, sewing, etc., as well as
for training girl students for teaching in the
public schools.
The -third scene shows agricultural students
testing milk with a Babcock tester. The agricultural departments of the school are organized
and equipped equally as well as the domestic
science and training school departments.
All girls who receive their training for teach.,

•

By a contributor to the Feb'y, 1918,
Edition of the American Sheep Breeder.
We have heard of late and will
continue to hear more and more of
the possibilities of developing the
cutover timber lands of Upper Wisconsin into a great sheep and wool
growing section. Nature has equipped
northern Wisconsin with a climate
and soil which make for great productiveness of grasses, clovers and
grains. No better sheep country exists anywhere and great strides are
being made toward getting large
bands of sheep there.
Three great possibilities present
themselves as a result of getting
these unused lands into sheep grazing:
First. There will develop a vast
sheep business—a profitable one in
itself.
Second. Sheep are great land
clearers. As time goes by the land
on which these sheep have grazed
will be in fine condition for agriculture.
Third. The two arguments stated
above are familiar to everyone who
has been reading up on sheep raising
in northern Wisconsin, but one great
possibility, as full of promise as the
agricultural .development, is that of
the building up of woolen mills, knitting mills and factories producing
manufactured goods of all kinds with
wool and sheep skin as their raw material.
There is no sense in shipping the
raw wool to the east and back to Wisconsin in manufactured goods, when
in the heart of the future wool producing section of Wisconsin there
are communities with plenty of labor,
plenty of water power and plenty ot
raw material.

U. S. SENATOR LENROOT
VISITS OUR COUNTY

girls on the farm. It has made
better home life and better community life in the settlements in
Marinette County, and it has
made it a good place to raise
your boys and girls.
The school, however, does not
limit its work to the tra'ning of
the young. The field men are
out practically every day of the
week conferring with the „Rimers
iimie fields and he'

ings
ne7
houses, etc.
work of this
field men at
perts of the
cousin visit
very freque7
thing withi
the lieW sei
and *to earr
c•peratior
,97eate:
,

JO(II
school
• tion to the
!ichool, the
iltural exy of Wise County
do everyT to help
ing right
farmir,g
to tile,

Other Helps for Settlers.
One of the State Experimental
farms is located in Marinette
County at Crivitz. Besides the
very important work of demonstrating tit,- most successful
forms of fining for Marinette
County lands, a pnre-bred Holstein sirkept at this station
for the lienefit of the syttlers in
lief;
.11;t- ;Yed
entr.:,

Speaks at Dairy Celebration and Pee.
diets Great Future for Upper
Wisconsin.
l'xtract from an article in the WISCON.
SIN FARMER of March 28, 1918, in
regard to the "MILLION DOLLAR
DAIRY DAY" celebration held
at Marinette, Wisconsin, in
the Spring of 1918.
dairy farming, and who are not United States Senator Lenroot is
all able to own pure-bred sires. a native of Upper Wisconsin. In his
If you locate in Marinette address he referred to the speech recently delivered in Congress by him
County, and have an average touching upon the development of
amount of means to start with, Upper Wisconsin. In this address at
he said that the soil of
and will at
yourself of the Washington
ismca
onsyinfaw
liacemfotrhte
rm
oulpdrapdru
y

many sources from which you can tUim
iveesi'aW
s
secure the knowledge for the acre. on an average as land in the
western homestead areas.
right forms of farming, you Cd-i1 Marinette
County's great dairy ceTie pre.ct iea 1 1 y t ertain_o_t_S_11..eee_...7. t.;!:
. 1:1370a
;
,rn
r i,
7t,.a...ch le ve:
tilh
,: :40.p:::,
lo
t,r; 1
,

meat which '!it closed was, he sre'' , on-.

or and possibilities ot the nerthern
that county and the editor is always area of Wiscons.ln as a center for the
most kindly received by the farmers economical production of food.
In that section of the state. We
have been invited to attend all of CHICAGO DISTRICT, WHICH IS
MARKET DISTRICT OF MARItheir annual picnics and received an
NETTE COUNTY, SURPASSinvitation last week to be present
ES ANY OTHER MARKET.
again with them at their next annual
Continued from page 1, column 6.
picnic to be held at Peshtigo.
Front
Wisconsin Agricultural Experdher expensive feed, a part of which
. meet Station Bulletin No. 290.
she uses in making cheap cow beef
There are twice as many people in
that the farmer cannot get pay for
unless he kills the cow.
The healthfulness of Upper Wis- the Chicago territory (Wisconsin,
We are very anxious that the dairy consin is testified to by both state Michigan, Illinois, Iowa and Indiana)
farmers shall come to understand the . and government statistics. There is as there are in the entire Dominion
value of the distinct dairy type cow— no more healthy region anywhere in of Canada, and more than live in the
following 15 states combined: Calia cow bred to produce milk only from Uncle Sam's domain.
Government statistics show that fornia, Montana, Oregon, Washington,
the feed that she consumes because
feed produced upon the farm has a the average yield of all farm products Idaho, New Mexico, Arizona, Coloramarket value worth a certain amount are greater in Upper Wisconsin than do, Wyoming, North Dakota, South
of cash in the home market. The in the Middle Western states of the Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri
cow which consumes it is the farm- high-priced land. This is a remark- and Oklahoma.
Realize also that the Upper Wiser's machine for manufacturing that able fact. Pure water is a characterfeed into milk, and the better the ma- istic of Upper Wisconsin.—From Mil- conSin home markets have been proschine the more milk she will make waukee, Wis., Journal, April 8, 1918. perous for generations and will continue to be prosperous. This is no
from the feeds that she consumes.
America's greatest farm progress war time boom. Conditions in the
This is a very great question and
very important to men who milk during the next decade will unques- Chicago territory are rooted in the
cows. We want to see them under- tionably take place in upper Wiscon- soils, dependable rainfall, location
and natural resources.
stand the problem and to cease \fool- sin, we believe.
ing away time and expensive feed
with a cow machine that cannot make
proper use of it because she has not
been bred for that kind of work.
^

beef is steadily declining a nore
and more the consuming public is
learning the food values of milk and
milk products—that throughout the
war Em•ope will continue to straw
heavily on us for dairy products—
that after the war Europe will continue to need our dairy products and
particularly
our
dairy
cattle—it
seems quite clear that no type of
farming has such a bright future as
dairying.
He is then, a true friend of the
farmer who studies this situation
carefuly and makes known these
fasts to farmers who have not yet
awakened to the opportunity.
What the Foregoing Means to You.
There is tremendous significance
in the foregoing to anyone who is
now carrying on any form of farming,
and who is interested, even in the
remotest way, in engaging in farming. It means that there it an opportunity for thousands of people to turn
to dairy fsrming with the almost certain result of splendid returns.
Supposin a you do decide to engage
in dairying, where is the best locality? You 'well know that rich grass
pastures, clover hay, and corn silage
make up the cheapest ration for
milch cows. Naturally, to make the
most at dairying, you would want to
locate where such feeds can be
raised infallibly every year, and
where they can be produced in the
ga
prenaateest quantities at the least ex-

TS S?:dOUS

s come. For
the year
aput of the
county was
This is for
milk and milk
ails; it does
not iticlude ti
cattle sold
from the liesa:
for beef,
and the fertili0
al to the land.
The county
.as thirty-six
cheese factories
e.iimeries, and
is shipping gre
atities of milk
and cream to
tee, the copper
and iron minime
••3 to the north
and to other a
a Five to ten
new cheese fail
ire being established every yeia estimated
that for 1918 dai
.'ducts sold from
Marinette connt
bringno less
than $1,500.000.
county has 750
silos and new o,
so being built at
the rate of 200
Marinette coe
s all the foundation laid for
mai dairy business of $25;000,
Jr the sale of
high grade and
• red dairy stock
to the extent of
0,000 per year.
You can step rig
• o this situation
and by putting y
tue and a little
capital into the
lauds of Marinette counts'
on yourself a
farm home wc
'the way from
$5,000 to $25,(n,
tithe same time
have a good liv
yourseN and
family in a goe.
,gressive American community
•
Breeding up Herds.
Let Us Fre
V hat We Say.
We have talked very seriously to
Investigate!
i't say "It's all Marinette County farmer audiences
right to say Or
lags in the paper, before on this subject and we were
but I know it
Get on a told last week by farmers who have
a."
You nattirally would not choose train and vi
Suede county. listened to us before that they have
$200 per acre land in Iowa or Illinois Come and let. t
to you EVERY been influenced by what we have said
as the place where you could make WORD WE S.
n't buy land if and that they have come to see the
the greatest profits at dairying, and we can't prove
• trip won't cost importance of dairy type's and that
yet great profits at that form of farm- you more than
$30, and if you they are breeding up through the use
ing are being made every day even do decide to 7
1 we will pay of pure bred sires just as fast as possible.
on lands priced as 'high as $250 per your fare.
It was very gratifying to us to
, acre, and when a large part of the ' -We don't saa
•sinette county of, feed must be purchased, because clov- fers you °ppm
: therefore you know that the hard work that we
should buy lane
er is not an assured crop.
.cc." We do say have been doing for many years in
What profits are not possible then instead, "We k
• Slarinette county this direction is bearing fruit here
when dairying is conducted on lands offers you oppc .•.Itityi therefore we and there all over the state. We are
, which can be bought at $25 per aerie, want you to cc s end see for your- glad to know that farmers believe
r,t, you here in Mar- in us, that they pay attention to what
, plus the fact that these lands are not self. We don't
• surpassed for dairy farthing by lands inette county N ...1 us unless you do we say and feel that we are in earnanywhere in the country.
'see opportunits J;ead of you, bet the est in our effort to help them to help
,.e - is to look tUese themselvevs. We also talked about
way to make
Are You Earnest, Sincere?
whi
eere are still good soil fertility, about alfalfa and other
over
lands
,
t
We
• too
h
f the
bat-gait' pries matters of interest to farmers.
•0
great opportunity awaiting progres- selections to b
Senator Lenroot was the last speakes.
sive, earnest, ambitious people who
on the program and made a very
er
of
acres
emends
of
eel
could
We
will come to Marinette county with a
Ty year without earnest and loyal appeal. He was
moderate amount of means and de- land to people
lands over: every very enthusiastically received by an
velop lands on a dairy farming or gen- them looking
audience of a thousand people who
eral livestock plan. You don't need day people wta . buy land on that
riably advise them arose in their seats and cheered him
to start with a fine pure-bred herd. plan. But we
..for themselves, to for several moments.
Start with a few good grades and to come and
In the evening a banquet was ten•. they are buying
build up your herd as the land is de- make certain
Senator Lenroot and the editor
veloped. If you will use common good land ' :- right price and in dered
Could we make a of The Wisconsin Agriculturist by the
sense—just plain every-day common ! the right .aci.
Scandinavian Club of Marinette. A
sense—you are practieally certain of fairer proposi
Don't contin
o be one of those splendid repast was served by the
success, and at the same time the
that there is "no ladies, after which- the Club was adkeeping of dairy cattle on your land
,.).,Pilelcui.)tetintietytkleeftenind dressed by Mr. Lenroot and the writModern high-powered land clearing
will help to develop it and to increase
rld is still full of or.
, its value every year.
devices are 'desirable for those who
Settlers.
of
Class
Splendid
, To judge the future of dairying in opportunities.
can afford them, but the settler With
of the greatest of
11\dilig
:
s:dTak''
h)e
:
tpiwl11(;l:
flecoh
The day was one that will long be
Marinette county, you should be fa- IsPtolue
miller with the results in recent these oppoi:ai :es at this time is remembered by all who were in at- only small means can get results just
years. In 1909 the total output of dairying cia It t:lover lands of Mari- tendance, and especially by the farm- , as effectually, although a little slowissionsin. Come and ers of Marinette County. We cannot er, with the "one-man stump puller."
dairy products in the county was only nette county,
say enough in favor of this splendid
$70,000. The county then had one see!
There is no stump too large for this
demonstration and celebration of the ,
cheese
one
and
creamery
facsturdy,
little machine, and every
$1,000,
splendid
Potato
that
in
on
going
Crop.
work
probably
were
good
75
There
tory.
Potatoes .
he biggest cash crap county, and of the feeling that exists year hundreds of acres of land are
silos in the county. By 1915 the
total dairy output had risen to $255,- in Marillette
V:isconsin and in among the people of the county. They cleared with it in Upper Wisconsin.
000, the county hail seven cheese fac- 1917 the Lim
s sew hree-quatters are all loyal, earnest, sincere, intern- I The cost of this machine is less than
the cost of a horse. Used energetitories and creameries, and about 350 of a minion
'It.. The crop was gent, thoughtful and prosperous.
worth rear',
The farmers of Marinette County cally by its owner, it will clear
silos.
000.--The Chica, go Daily DI'l)
Note This Tremendous Growth.
urnel, March 11, are readers of agricultural papers. We enough land in the spring and fall
With that start the period of tre- 1918.
have a great many subscribers in of any one year to pay for itself a

CONGP'VIOLATE MARINETTE ON LEADERSHIP
IN NEW DEVELOPMENT

A LAND OF GOOD HEALTH

"ONE-MAN STUMP PULLER" SOLVES CLEARING
PROBLEM FOR SETTLERS OF SMALLER MEANS
_

red
You

Clover
Can

and
Buy

Allah
Good

rake

Alfalfa

ManLands
nette
at
CountyCounty
$25

a Great

per

Stork ,
L.

Acre

Le

Country

--------

4

great many times.
There are no hid .eii mysteries
about land clearing processes. In recent years land clearing operations
have been reduced to a simple procedure which anyone can follow who
is willing to work. Over 100,000
acres of land are being cleared and
put into crops every year in Upper
Wisconsin. You can estimate for
yourself how long it will be before
the greatest opportunities in the
best carts of the country will have
passed. There is still time to
get a splendid tract of land at a very
reasonable price if you do not delay,
too long.

LANDOLOGY—Victory and Opp unity Edition—LANDOLOGY

PAGE FOUR

LANDOLOGY—Victory and Op't;

PAGE FIVE

Edition—LANDOLOGY
,

111111•10.•••

Special Victory and Opportunity Edition of

LANDOLOGY
Edited and Published by the Skidmore Land Co., Marinette, Wis.

,
11.MANIVININ
,
414.0.41

',FINN.
.041414

Making $100 per Acre Land From $23 f r Acre Land With the Aid of a Tractor
ts,4ress,e414.41144•04\1041,11.41,01,4,74,04.44,..

THE LAND OF
KNOWN QUANTITIES

FORDSON TRACTOR
MAY MEAN NEW
DAY IN FARMING
HENRY FORD'S MARVELOUS NEW
MACHINE MAKES ITS APPEARANCE IN MARINETTE
COUNTY.

The editor of LANDOLOGY had occasion in August, 1918, to witness a
By the Editor of Landology
demonstration of several of the Fordson trectors. We wonder if you have
Ten to fifteen years ago farm'seen these marvelous little machines
in operation?
ers and city people from the middle west were rushing to the
A Revolution in Farming.
Has it occurred to you what a resemi-arid wheat lands of the far
markable effect they may have on the
west. They went like a herd of
settlement of upper Wisconsin within
Few asked
stampeded cattle.
itire next year or two? For instance,
themselves "Where are we going,
I suppose that there were 10,000 of these
and why?" It was enough that
I machines put into operation in Marinette county. Thousands of addition.
on every hand they saw hundreds
al acres of land would be cleared, all
of others going. The goal, they
crops would be handled and cultivated
reasoned, must be worth the
and harvested better and at less exstake or so many people would
penSe than ever before.
not seek it.
The FordsoX tractor is new and we
of course do not know what its future
It is not necessary for us to rewill be. It will sell now at a price in
view the outcome. The history of
the neighborhood of $850, and will
the years following this great
probably sell at a somewhat lower
price after the war. This is about the
land movement to the far west is
cost of two teams of averagely good
now pretty well known to all midhorses.
The tractor will probadle western people. Today we
bly do the work of four teams and it
wonder how it could have been
will eat only •When it is working. It
possible that literally thousands
will last the working life time of the
average horse or longer.
of people should have rushed to
Its initial cost would in most cases
lands hundreds of miles from
be absorbed in one season. It is as
markets, often fifty and sixty
simple of operation as a Ford car;
shipping
miles from railroad
in fact it is nothing but a larger Ford
ear without the body, and geared
points, and lacking in schools,
lower.
roads, towns, neighbors and pracWill It Double Land Values?
tically all the conditions that
It is our sincere belief that this marmake up a habitable area. Lackvelous little machine will revolution.
ing, moreover, in many years
ize farming in America and we do not
sufficient rainfall to make possiknow of any place where it will have
ble a crop, and in the odd years
The scene.- shows a.;
on a: farm near Crivitz,1 power of the tractor. The deep, wide furrow, cut with a quicker or more extensive effect on
The great "iron horse" walks over the face of the
under land yalues than in localities like Marwhen there was enough rainfall
4cw land. In the distance this huge breaking plow, buries the small brush
land in Marinette County and transforms a beautiful but Marinette County, brea
County.
not inette
will
it
that
effectually
so
for a crop, lacking the highways
it
smothers
and
sod
the
Attildings.
The man who can afford one of these
unproductive woods into a smiling homestead yielding you can see the setller'q
that
market
and the railroads to
bother when the land has been seeded.
machines and will take up 40, 80, 160,
The tractor has inva4
bumper crops from then on until the end' of time.
-,. Alarinette County for keeps,
'
crop at a profit.
The tractor shown in this scene has been used every 320 or any acreage of land in Mariatm- to operate tractors they
It is the way of progress. It is the conversion of the For those who havseason for three years on a 400 acre tract of new land nette county, large or small, and will
They remember now, these peok•'
of
prove
much
to
og and putting new land to east of Crivitz, and already about 200 acres have been farm with just an average amount of
incentive
The
man.
of
needs
the
to
was
it
as
earth
ple who responded to the lure of
good judgment, cannot help but make
fni.lw
the great breaking plows put into crops. The farm supports a splendid herd of ;cod
distance and the unknown, that this great work is the urge within every normal human the uses of the
and have in a few years a farm
w
used
to
necessary
which
be
can
not
is
Ctor, it
blooded dairy cattle, and the lan(i, which was bought at worth $100 per acre from land which
they knew little or nothing of the being to do something worth while to provide for himself
iots, etc., before the break- about $25 per acre, could not be purchased today at $75 lie can buy today at $20 to $30 per
average annual rainfall of the and those dependent upon him, and to hand down to pos- remove many of ti
acre.
ing is done—the brea
throws them out under the per acre.
districts to which they went, they terity a worthy work well done.
The Dreamers Are Winners.
knew nothing of markets, schools,
Have you lost the ability to dream?
highways or railroads—they simWe used to laugh at ,the dreamers,
)0, $10,000 or melts are springing up, and
one sources you banks and bankers' associations, ! a farm
ply knew that the far west was a hundred and
Now we know that it is the dreamers
value,
in
$15,000
of
increase
the
associations,
where
you
-testing
those
to
learn
cow
of of
can learn all there is to
being boomed as a great wheat
f today who are the winners of to.
testimonial of while it probably will not be
before you in- settlers' organizatiOns which bet- i,leave b
Inorrow. If you cannot dream what
country, hundreds of others were Upper Wisconsin
.or in making speolocular, will in all probability
,iou might be able to do with a FordYou can know tef social conditions for .the new-' your w
going, the fever va s spreading vest one cent.
,- on tractor on a quarter eection of do.
com.tur---.-of R, liundred anJ one s'
land ot me411 •Lthe doubling and treb!ing
thou
.....,*
three
are
whether
iria,rke'.,s
they rushed to 't as if gold
t
ai
ver land in Marinette te •i .`v. you, have
• :,.:
4 .>
• - - tLsnr..tt you nese! to reaha • e'
of a gon
in
are practically at your door. You arne by a community'such as } It this
Bushels in One Year—Larger
success in anything you iney try to
The lure that moved them was
we sinceret4hree or five years.
to. You can make a, dream of a farm
can learn whether there are no Marinette county in helping new'mon sens
Acreage in Wheat.
Lacking
as old as mankind.
achy until the
'mine here in Marinkte county come
,iart now and go to our office Front
schools, or plenty of schools and settlers to make the most of their ly urge 3
Milwauk•ee Journal of June 11, :rue, now if you will follow up your
knowledge of real conditions, it
Il o'' opportuni- and hotel at
ldoor to ti
learn whether opportunity.
can
you
ones;
Wausaukee,'
Wis.,
'good
in
.1913
lay dreams with good hustling Amer.
was easy to believe almost any-Tlie Land of Marinette County, on the main
Yes, Marinette county is, in ty has dc
highways do not exist or whether
activity.
Madison, Wis.—The spring wheat
thing that might be said or imag0
s."
In
Known
Mariknown
quanof
land
line of the C., M. & St. P. rail- acreage in Wisconsin
Upper Wisconsin has highways truth, "The
Come to Marinette county before
has
inbeen
ined of the "golden west."
tore a longer way from Chicago. Youiwill find
which as a whole are the equal or tities." It does not hold out to nette cola, .
'11 of the best lands in the best local.
enchantment.
lends
Distance
more nrogres- one of our field men there at all creased 128 per cent over 1917, or a 'ties have been taken by others who
better than. highways in many you the lure of a fortune in one grow- Hg s.'
total increase of 187,000 acres, makSeeing others on all sides of them
eeognized 'a good thing before you
. 'ger population, times. We will have autos ready
older settled localities; you can year; neither does it hide from sive people:
ing 333,000 acres planted to spring
rushing to this supposed "land of
d faster increas- t .1
learn whether the people already you a pitfall like thousands stum- better mark,
theland wifhrni wheat in the state this year, com- did.
promise" they became excited
are bringing in charge, and your full railroad
living and farming in a locality bled into in the far west such as ing land v,,
pared to 146,000 acres harvested in
and convinced themselves they
',her of settlers, ale 0,1 NI a3,s
like Marinette county are ignor- three Or four years of absolutely the greatest
e allowed
, 1917. The total acreage of spring
would lose out if they took
droughts.
of.
the
eatest
because
day
:
t.
of
opportuncrops
you decide to make a purchase.
ant and unprogressive or whether no
and winter wheat in Wisconsin this
the time to investigate before
quickly.
Often
year is estimated at 398,000 acres,
they are of the best quality of cit- You know absolutely that a coin- ities will p
Opportunity-may
have
knocked
they followed the crowd.
compared to 239,000 acres in 1917.
• land' customers often at your door in
izenship under the sun and pos- plete crop failure never happened there are tw
the past; it This makes the largest acreage
in
This little page of history has sibly more progressive than the in the history of the state of Wis- thy
lay. One coung
e,re
may knock often again, .but wheat for the state since 1905, when
not been written to deter people neighbors in the locality where consin.
,be, cannot forrienataas
si
474,000
acres
was
again this may be opportunity's
reported. The con-ants and needs
from going to far western lands. you now live—all of this and
Marinette county does- hold out ever sa tidy
last and greatest call to you. Will • dition of spring wheat June 1 is 96
per
cent
compared to 90 per cent
ieekers.
Ile good and bad points concern- more you can learn by simply to you the promise of a good farm of so many .
you act?
June 1 last year and a ten-year aver,pportunity here
There is
ing those lands are well known to availing yourself of the informa- home if you are willing to work
age, of 93 per cent. Based on the
of the word. We
most people now, and the great tion which is to be had from any to secure such a home; a gradual in the best :
June 1 condition, a total production
From a C. 4- N. W. By.
ie market. at this FOURTEEN CA RLOA DS
of 6,46.0,000 bushels is expected, comtide of settlers has dwindled to number of sources.
and substantial increase in the are placing .
It wculd be unfair to the homeseeker
pared to 3,095,000 bushels harvested
s of land which
almost nothing.
OF WESTERN CATTLE
Then you can learn—if you value of your land; a climate in time 80,000
o
interest him in the Wisconsin cutI
.
"fore shown to a
But we are sure the reader is a care to—of the county agents, the which men and animals are We have lieu
PUT
LANDS HERE, The total production of winter Iver lands without giving him some
- land was
man of reason and we want to ap- county agricultural schools, the healthy and vigorous; a land of land custe:.,
wheat is forecast at 1,090,000 bushels. 'flea of the disadvantages as well as
.:•ket for various From Marinette (Wis.) Eagle-Slur
The total estimated production of Il he advantages.
peal to his reason by drawing a helpful neighborhood agricultur- plenty of sunshine and good peo- held from I
of ,
wheat for the state is estimated at
eases because
You have read something of the pe.
comparison between the rush to al meetings held in the rural pie, a wealth of beauty and con- reasons—in
May 20, 1918.
7.550,0000
bushels,
compared
to suliar advantages which upper Wie
were
ctructing
these far western lands ten or school houses, the co-operative I cut in the sparkling brooks, the we
roads Fourteen carloads of western Ari- 5,329,000
harvested last year. -ensin offers to the man who wants
.qse there were zona cattle, numbering upwards of Reportsbushels
fifteen years ago and the move- plans of buying livestock, the placid lakes and the green slopes, through it ; I
from several thousand in- 'arm and a home for a little money.
rights, etc. But 500 head, past through Marinette' dividual farms scattered throughout nese 'advantages are real and they
ment to the former timber lands credit plan of furnishing settlers and finally, the certainty to those unexpired lisp
to new lands in the state indicated that over two
you land front last Friday enroute
Ire
of Upper Wisconsin which is in with grain, grass and potato seed, who do not shy at labor, of a good today we can
this vicinity. They were on their way farmers out of three are growing ve little short of wonderful. In fact,
believe in all sincerity, that there
not
ly
the
for
and
self
been
which
living
coma
family,
clubs,
progress at this time.
takclearing
land
of community
to "get at" the green pastures in! wheat this year. comnared to less
's no place in America that can offer
VHS and settle- this locality.
by potence for declining years, and en; land W
For the purposes of this editor- of special credits extended
than one out of tht•ee in 1917.
more advantages to the man who
ial let us call the far west—as it
eants to create a home than are offer.
od by upper Wisconsin. But let us
was fifteen years ago—"The land
'Ake a look at the other side of the
of unknown quantities." For all
picture.
the settler knew it might have
lie
l'h?at are the drawbacks? Are they
becould
he
where
been a place
very large and are there many of
come rich in one season or it
The first drawback, the last drawmight have been a place where
hock and elle only real drawback is
drought or lack of markets would
lumps and uncleared underbrush.
sooner or later make him a pauNo man should come to upper WisUpcall
us
let
this
Against
per.
-onsin if he, expects to build a home
and a successful farm without using
per Wisconsin "The land of
both his head and his hands. But no
known quantities."
man who wants a real opportunity,
Then let us answer the queswho i5 not afraid
work,
o
tion "Why is Upper Wisconsin
villing to
a
d big reor
fn
wards, should let the drawback of
the land of Known Quantities?"
etumps and uncleare,d lands
keep him
an
It is a question you ought to be
away from upper Wisconsin.
greatly interested in, if you are
After all, perhaps these stumps are
thinking of getting land in Wisnot a drawback! Perhaps they are the
real reason for the opportunity that is
consin or elsewhere.
offered you today. For land that is as
Upper Wisconsin is "the land
fertile as is tibia in upper Wisconsin
of Known Quantities" because it
—land that will grow crops unexcelled
is only about a night's ride from
anywhere in a climate as healthful as
it
the earth affords; where grasses and
your home and you can visit
forage crops grow almost without efand see exactly for yourself what
fort; where the dairy Cow is almost an
others from your own state have
automatic machine to transmute the
six
or
four
two,
accomplished in
wealth of the soil into money in the
bank; where every possible market fayears; because you can learn
cility is right next door, and. railway
through the United States or
transportation is of the best—lands
Wisconsin state government the
like these would sell at prices beyond
any
average annual rainfall
the reach of any but the capitalist, if
the stumps and the uncleared underlocality in the state, the average
brush were not there.
annual production of any crop,
These lands when cleared become
of
number
the dairy output, the
the equal in productivity of the $250
head of livestock, the average
and $300 an acre lands of Illinois, and
You can buy them now uncleared at
value of each and the profit from
et
$15 to $30 an acre. You can buy these
any class of livestock in any lohave
•
low
fertile
ever
the
on
traveled
than
thru
an
exclusive- cheap lands, add your labor, your fore.w how to farm, anywhere
A group of new settlers' barns built the settlers are making money. Most ern stan.--s,
cality.
priced lands of Marinette County, ly wheat country, or any one-crop
fi value of good Wisconsin. You will agree they must 1country, you will better appreciate thought and your genius and create a
spring of 1918. of them are good American farmers they knee-e land
1917
of
fall
the
in
farm worth in a few years. from now
Moreover, you can learn exley Imow that be making money to put up such im- what improvements like these indi- ten times what you pay for the
these from southern Wisconsin, Illinois, lilt )I'01,-,S911,_91
actly the nature of the soil and When you see buildings like
land
better provements as these farms. If you cate.
today.
ay in
us that Iowa, Indiana and other middle west- goui impre••
what it is best adapted to. From going up, you will agree with




WISCONSiN RAISES
7,000,000 BUSHELS
OF WHEAT IN 1918

I WAS STUMPS
THAT KEPT THIS
LAND FOR YOU

•nor

"HINTS TO SETTLERS"
FROM WISCONSIN "U"
The Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of
Wisconsin has just issued a new official bulletin entitled "Hints for Settlers."
The following statements
are taken from this bulletin:
Wisconsin is surrounded by good
markets.
The state has a desirable climate.
Generally speaking it is not good
policy to rent where land is cheap.
Desirable places to rent may be hard
to find. It is difficult to get ahead
very fast on the land belonging to
someone else.
Other things being equal it will be
of advantage for the settler to locate
In a region where cow-testing associations prevail or are being created.
He may have only a few cows, but
those in his possession at this stage
are worth more to him than a whole
herd to the fellow who has his land
fully paid for and developed, and has
money out at interest. (Marinette
County already has three official cowtesting associations and a fourth is
being organized).
Pork Production.
The greatest increase in pork production in Wisconsin has occured in
upper Wisconsin. Corn has increased
160.000 acres since 1910.
The call of the market is for the
rapidly grown porker. In its production there is the greatest profit. Such
pigs to dress 180 to 200 pounds should
go on the market at eight months.
Feeds to do this are possible in upper
Wisconsin. The point to be considered at this time is that pork making
is profitable for the farmers of that
region.
Peas—A Winning Crop.
Wisconsin produces a variety of
cash
crops—canning peas, sugar
beets, tobacco, and clover seed. The
growing of canning peas makes an important agricultural industry, about
80,000 acres in the state being devoted to this crop. For, growing peas
there ig probably no locality better
than upper Wisconsin. It is safe. It
yields well. The labor iteni is slight.
It is a crop requiring no cultivation
other than the preparation of the
soil.
While field peas are of practical
value in feeding stock, there is also a
good profit in growing them for seed.
The average cost of growing and harvesting the crop, exclusive of seed is
about $9 per acre. An average yield
is 20 bushels of seed.
With tne possible exception of
roots, there are few crops more valuable than field peas to the man who
is opening up a farm and establishing
a dairy herd.
Clover Seed.
Clover seed is one of the most valWisconsin, Illiuable cash crops.
nois and Ohio are the leading produc..?rs of clover seed. The ceases credits
Wisconsin with more seed then any

!

•

ROOT CROPS ARE
OF GREAT VALUE
TO NEW SETTLER
GRAIN
FOR
DEMAND
WITH
ABROAD, FEEDING VALUE OF
ROOT CROPS IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER
BEFORE.

ON NEW LAND
FLOURISH -MARINETTE COUNTY
PROVIDE
HOMESEEKERS WITH FEED
TO WINTER STOCK FIRST
SEASON.
From the Wisconsin Farmer, May 30,
1918.
High in available energy according
to the dry matter they contain, large
in yields to the acre, low in seed
cost, and easy to grow, turnips and
rutabagas are a boon to Wisconsin
farmers in many sections of the
state.
To reinforce corn silage and other
crops sown for succulent feed the
root family is exceptionally valuable.
In upper Wisconsin many a settler
has found his crop of roots to be his
best winter friend, in that the root
crop, properly stored in pits, enabled
him to keep his stock thrifty and productive without the extra expense of
building a silo—something which the
settler badly wants, but often cannot
afford in his first season.
Root crops are called "watered concentrates" by the men who make a
specialty of animal feeding. Stulies by certain experimenters in
Denmark and at Cornell, New York,
lead to the conclusion that for the
dairy cow a pound of dry matter in
roots has the same feeding value as a
pound of dry matter in grain, such
Wing
AS corn, oats, wheat and barley.
and Savage state that mangels can
'eplace half the grain ordinarily fed
n a ration of grain, mixed hay, and
;nage without reducing the yield of
milk and butter.
Good for Swine.
When it comes to swine rations—
here is is where Wisconsin farmers
need the root crop most of all. Roots
not only add great variety to the ration, but reduce the amount of grain
concentrates required. The bulkiness of roots are of great benefit to
brood sows in winter. In fact, it is
an unwise swine breeder who will
neglect to sow succulent root crops
this summer for later hog feeding.

"Settlers, Grow Roots."
working with the
Its scale, and still the business has only I ciation is already
article above from the WisconThe
leading growers in putting out brandut commenced.
pure-bred brand- sin Farmer is supplemented by stateas
well
as
goods,
ed
11
poThe further development of the
,meetc. mar
seeteahdtoa
t„rpm
ed
aiants ny the University of Wit 30II.
tato industry in the next five or six I Potatoes
ill help you to win
yield a, high as 23
'ars will mean fortunes fol a groat
inette County, Wis- tin. Mangels will
'y More who can see the vast pos- consin
per acre, green weight; rut
sugar
tuns
like
38
crops
to
cash
Otiler
,
;ales of special-marketing of this
whIeh , beets, beans, peas and strawberries thagas 2e to 25 tons, and turnips ft.' a
y
no the same
teese crops
• ta pres&e. will also help. Nene of
16 to 24 tcna, The t'-'t of n*
:ea -tree •;)•
•
•
c,/
potatoe •
par-'
e't
'
; qu:tion"ees
not exceed $6.
e. f
The
ttlie.ea
„
area
ticipate in the return from MariPo tatoes, as every9123 knows,
try, and the ca,
Marinette County
County's $1,000,000 crop of po- root crop and the great adaptability
nette
but
help
cannot
,i).
1,1'11(A.(II'
Chose
$1,000.000 worth of p
tatoes for 1919 is up to you. If you
a pro- reae the Lee e fit if Liqi,y- use good busi- want to share in it, we sincerely if the CU in Upper Wisconsin for
Potato production h;
urge you to make a selection of land potatoes is already known far and
now, because with every hour that is wide. With the call during the war
ticked off by the clock of time, the for great shipments of grain abroad,
number of the best farming opportunsoils of Upper Wisities remaining in upper Wisconsin is :he ability of the
diminishing, and the cost is increas- consin to produce enormous root
ing. It means a substantial and very crops, which will to a large extent
real saying to buy while good, lowtake the place of grain rations, is
priced land is still available.
something that any prospective land
purchaser should consider well.
Upper counties. This crop is proving
A circular from Wisconsin Univeritself to be peculiarly adapted to
roots cut
northern Wisconsin conditions, and 3ity states that these big
it is the most important cash crop 'eed bills to a large extent.
for most of• the new settlers. Several
"They are Nature's silo," says this
of the upper counties are establish- ,circular, "and will act as food for the
ing a splendid reputation in the production of seed potatoes for the 3ettlers' stock fOr the first winter. An
southern trade."
icre of roots will winter your stock.
The seed potatoes mentioned above 3ow root crops in the new clearing,
for the southern trade are largely
settler
Triumphs. Erick Mickelson, one of )r among the stumps. Every
potamight
seed
some
of
while
growers
roots
grow
known
can
the well
in Marinette County, has taken lot have land suitable for corn the
toes
IS
MAGAZINE
LAND
THIS
OF
EDITION
THE COMPLETE
the first prize on Trfumph potatoes at
irst season. An acre of roots will
the famous Wisconein state show
years.
feed ten cows through the winfour
help
past
each year for the
1 The acreage of peas grown in Wis- :en Roots will help the settler keep
consin for canning is 43,680. The more cows, and make more money.
This is a substantially bound book fit for any library, no advertisacreage for the United States in the
is
it
'
but
BOOK."
FACT
"LAND
the
it
call
We
etc.
cover,
on
ing
will make
year was 108,748, so that about More cows and more roots
'same
SITUATION.
LAND
THE
OF
machinery.
BOOK
TEXT
THE
is
by
It
more than that.
Practically all labor in connection with potato pr, ,4fon es now done
1 40% of the acreage of peas grown in you money while you are clearing
WHERE
land
the
of
illustrations
It contains over 200 half-tone
everyone knows America are produced in Wisconsin. your farm."
per acre land will yield three times mise of the future-eel- qthe fact of ' ness judgment. As
FARMERS GROW RICH. It is a book that you will be proud to own
sold in In addition to the peas grown in Wisfruits,
wrapped
specially
absolutely
settlers
book
this
an
you
tha:t
profit
today. .Year in and •
the amount of net
and show your neighbors. We will send
The University pamphlet states
dou- consin for canning, there were 53,408
nearly
tternand
cartons,
branded
,
west
tear
'llatddle
sign,
pace,
this
on
asked
land
from other states in
acre of corn on $200 per acre
free if you will answer the questions
fruits. acres of dry, field and seed peas :urther, "that roots will yield 300 to
unbranded
of
price
the
ble
their
of
enclosed.
find
will
you
are (iarning the full e,
will show in Illinois or Iowa.
out and send to us in the self-addressed envelope
100 bushels per acre, that they do
op of pota- The same condition can be brought grown.
Net prolite of as high as $50 per land. with one season
and in I Speaking of corn the report shows sspecially well on new land; that the
industry,
potato
the
in
about
I
made
been
acre, after deducting all items of cost, toes. Many fortunes' lee
rd the pota- fact that day is not far distant, for great gains in acreage in Upper Wis- cost for seed is low, varying from
have time and again been realized by those who
Growers' Asso- cousin. It says, "A remarkable
on new lands in Marinette County by to raising business c'''Orn extensive the Wisconsin Potato
five
they require no
Icrease has taken place in the acreage 51.50 to $6 per acre;
------ _ _
planted to corn since 1909, due no cxpensive tools; the cool nights and
doubt to the general appreciation of elentitude of moisture together with
' the value of silage. The greatest in- :he Upper Wisconsin climate are ideal
have occurred in the northThis places you under no obligation.
ern and northeastern counties. A 'or the production of this crop; they
be noted in Ire relished by all stock; are as diabove says, "The number of milk little correlation will
.3.e00
Many people considering the purRye
Wisconsin has certain counties between the in- testible as grain and act as a tonic
Do you wish to buy for a home or for investment?
of
state
the
in
cows
•
,
S.000
chase of land in Upper Wisconsin
Clover and 'I imoi I;
acreage and the
it
constantly increased since the last crease in the corn
•i
"''' 140
dairy :or all farm stock; they provide wilithink they would be locating in a
Alfalfa
How many acres of land do you wish to buy?
Estimates based on asses- increase in the number of
census.
,
:e0
wild new country. Upper Wisconsin ' Beans
1 sors' reports for 1917 show. an in- cows. The acreage of 'corn in dis- er succulence and take the place of
,
What amount of money have you now or expect to have soon, to pay
5.400
Is still young in its development, but
Potatoes
crease of two per cent over the num- trict No. 3 has more than doubled." the settlers' silo the first winter.
large areas are much better develthe northeastern Pound for pound with the water out
4C
her of dairy cattle on farms a year (District No. 3 is
down on a purchase?
,159.e.70
, oped than most people think. The
Total
section of Wisconsin which includes
most
The
cows.
these
at
1,784,570
look
or
and
ago,
come
that.
could
you
liows
which
5—
they are as valuable as grain. Roots
When is the earliest date on
i increase of the acreage in cultivated
The report furthe :
County.)
13,000 striking increases occur in the north- Marinette
crops in Wisconsin has been 770.000 there were
fipproxi':.:elRlY
vill cut your grain feeding one-half,
counties."
ern
in
County.,
lands?
iacres since the 1910 census. This dairy cows in leiarin,i.-t
that
further
keep your stock in just as good
says
Ind
statement
The
stateforegoing
the
three
Remember,
acres 1917, or about one cow;-e e -ery
I means an average of 110,000
this there has been an increase of about ments and figures are not ours, condition. Roots keep breeding-stock
to
Add
e
Have you any real estate that you must sell before you purchase?
county
; per year. A large part of this new people in the
and 47% in .the number of milk cows in
property,
in prime condition."
acreage represents the land cleared the young stock and 1‘; i cattle,
If so, give on a special sheet detailed particulars of this
the district which includes Marinette but are taken from - U. S. official
head,
000
any.
if
25
approximae.
mortgage,
of
amount
and
price
cash
including lowest
! and put into crops in Upper Wiscon- there are
Tremendous Crops.
ever
an
that
and
1910,
the
since
reporting
14,
County
No.
bulletin
is the land
'
, Inyat the :
sin in the past seven years.
cattle in Marinett(''
Do you own any land at the present time and if so, where
increasing number of good breed- Wisconsin Agricultural statistics
We do not believe there is any
1
of
xclusive
present time. Thle ',.
Our Crop Acreage.
other fartit frig sheep are being shipped into Up- for 1917. The bulletin was writ- 'ocality in any part of the country
Bulletin No. 14 of the U. S. Depart- hogs, AdditionhalorCser:13,
situated?
' • per Wisconsin "where, with plenty
ment of. Agriculture, giving statis- livestock.
1, of pasture, forage, good drainage and ten by W. F. Callander, U. S. offi- where you can get such tremendous
cages.
tics for 1917, presents the acreage of
dry winters, sheep raising promises cial crop reporter. Come to Mar- Tops of maneels, rutabagas red 'e does
above
The acreage of cra
various cultivated crops in Marinette
nips, with such lIttle effort or cost
become an important industry.
to
areasi
large
inette County and see for yourCounty. We believe these figures not take into considera
Do you live on this land or rent it?
Wisconsin Leads.
Eastern
Upper
is you can in Marinette County. What
crops,'
root
will help you to realize that in pur- planted to sugar bet
In speaking of potatoes, the report self.
as and turrue?
others?
means to the settler is very imthis
or
would
yourself
mange's.
you
as
county
such
for
our
in
either
land
chasing
land
sold
ever
largest
Have you
straw- says the crop in 1917 was the
be buying land in a community where nips, peas, small fruitg: oh as
portant. It helps to provide him with
of Wisconsin with the
history
the
in
raspberries,
blackberries
'successful farming has for many berries,
of
What is your business?
exceptionally good feed for the first
devoted to exception of 1914 when a crop
years been a proven success, and currants, etc., and Sr
million bushels was harthirty-seven
,
ds..Neither
winter for dairy cows, beef cattle,
or,
the
all
in?
cherry
practically
interested
apple
and
have
you
you
where
are
farming
Libby, McNeill & Libby Co. of ChiWhat form of
t the hun- • vested. The average yield for the
advantages that you might have in does it take into ace
was 114 bushels, cago, who operate a salting station sheep, or hogs. In Great Britain all
1917
in
state
entire
clover
cared
beef cattle producers make extensive
any older settled community in Amer- i dreds of acres of ricl! .nette
Remarks
County.; while the average yield in district No. at Crivitz, are paying the farmers a
tuerm
paesm
sisints Aa,/;,.:,
ebelrandth
ica. From the following statement I R
cucumbers
northeastern
size
small
the
on
bonus
use of root crops.
the
includes
which
one cOunty ; 3,
you will find the official Government
, Wisconsin. section of Wisconsin. in which Mari- bought during the season. of 1917.
The great production of root crops
of
Ci.,iii,:„'.
acreage
aloneMarinelte
the
'
regarding
figures
. for the year , nette County is located, produced an This is on account of the present in- in Marinette County in 1917 made it
The area of wheal;
various crops in Marinette County
The
NAME
pickles.
these
of
acre.
value
the
to
creased
bushels
144
of
1918 was just about4!crable what it ; average
for 1917:
state. average in any checks are in the hands of Postmas- possible for many of the farmers to
the highest
y
was
a gaecreef500 acres was in 1917. The ,.fare
Corn
TOWN
ter Duquaine who is handing them sell a large part of their grain crops,
IC
section
acreage
'
:
;
trinled..
13,500
age
lifae been
Oats
interesting to note," says the to farmers as they are called for.— and still have a great sufficiency of
44
is
has
also
"It
been
.
beet:
and
350
alfalfa, peas
Winter Wheat
STREET NO. or RFD
ta the Crivitz Advocate, Marinette County,
tatseeee in
re
.,
antreadpidteinpce
t,e"tyllie
rg
ea
ro
p
900
largely increased. .,
the best feed for their stock,
Spring Wheat
March 1, 1918.
61
;'
acreage
report
quoted
official
1,600
The same
DATE
Barley
our settlers the
are not alwae good profits,
acre of tie,
ly certal.
be sue'
by a •
wir

•)

LANDOLOGY-DELUXE

FILL IN, DETACH ON THIS LINE, AND MAIL TO SKIDMORE LAND CO., MARINETTE, WIS.

of

SETT'IR MAKING GOO DSTART.

•441.4•MI.10.4.0.4"..`".?"4"--11.PO4.. '

Throughout the country the pre- are of the opinion that this crop is
eminence of upper Wisconsin in the handled largely by hand labor. This
production of great crops of pure- is not true. The farmers of Maribred, quality potatoes is now well nette County handle t.h.ir potato
known. All farmers in Marinette crop with modern machinery just the
County raise at least a certain acre- same way as they hande a Corn crop.
Planters. diggers,- graders and moage of potatoes as ae cash crop.
In quite a number of instances, dern storage warehouses have tak —e
business Dien have taken over tests the ham* labor out HI the•putatoe
_
oda n
of 1111(1 fo);„
fl:Pre../4
other ..,Ltet.b. • Recent reports intitc-,,to engaging in the business of potato I
A .1 `areat Cash Crop.
a total yield of 215.000 bushels worth production. When they handle, this
about $1,500,000.
Added to this is the fact wte'ifti
crop as a business, rotating with
On many farms in the cut-over clover, yields of 150 to 400 bushels anyone will admit that an acre of
country the settler will be surprised are annually obtained.'
potatoes in upper Wisconsin on $25
at the income from bolts, posts, logs,
Figures prepared by the United
bark and kilnwood.
department,
[The bulletin referred to above States crop reporting
price of potacites the products made of different show that the average
five years back
woods found on the lands on which toes in Wisconsin for
bushel. Potatoes
per
50c
been
has
Wisconupper
in
located
are
settlers
produced profitably
sin. They are: cheese boxes, han- can always be
a price as high as
bring
they
when
staves,
pails,
1
hoops,
dles, heading,
of normal yield,
years
in
fact
50c—in
chair
parts,
trucks, tubs, vehicle
potatoes at 25c
in
profit
good
is
there
cots,
baskets,
veneers,
parts, lumber,
bushel.
crates, cribs, railway shims, Apiarists' I to 35c per
The larger scene above shows a
supplies, piling, berry crates, excelsior, ironing boards, broom handles, farm where potato culture is a busispokes, ties, shingle, grain doors, ness. In 1917 the yield on this farm
pulp, agricultural implements, hubs, was 420 bushels per acre. One of
the other scenes well illustrates the
posts and fuel]
modern handling of the potato crop
machinery.
with
put
can
settler
new
the
No stock
Many Illinois and Iowa farmers
on his place will pay better dividends
than sheep, rightly understood and think they would not want to grow
this crop extensively because they
rightly handled.

or.2

Compare to One-Cr )Country's Buildings

)IE FORTUNES FOR MANY PEOPLE,BUT
POTATOES IN UPPER WISCONSIN HAVE
STILL BIGGER FORTUNES WI; RESULT WHEN POTATOES
ORANGES.
ARE MARKETED ,

The five minutes you spend in answering these quesminutes you ever
tions may be the most valuable
knock
Opportunity's
spent in your life, if you know
when you hear it.

59,370 Acres in Crops in ounty During 19171creases
•

BONUS TO PICKLE GROWERS

1

LANDOLOGY-Victory

LANDOLOGY Vi ctory and Opport,

Jrtunity Edition-LANDOLOGY

PAGE SEVE

Edition-LANDOLOGY

SOME SHEEP FACTS
WORTH KNOWING

##~44141•IMIVNIFSIM#W.O.M.VINP4PO4•414.
P....##

DAIRY PROFITS SHEEP PAY AS
FOR BEGINNERS WELL AS COWS

Ten Thousand -People
Honor Marine

,ually Turn Out at Picnic to
ninty's New Settlers.,

UPPER WISCONSIN COMING TO RESCUE
TO AVERT BEEF FAMINE IN THE U. S.
Beef Caffle Market Expert Tells Why Upper Wisconsin
Farmers Can Now Produce Beef With Greater Profit
Than Ever Before-Market no Longer Calls for
Highly Finished Beef Cattle-Present Conditions
Greatly Favor Production of Beef in Localities Like
Marinette County.

VERY GOOD RETURNS ARE POS. THAT IS STATEMENT OF ONE OF
GREATEST
1
WISCONSIN'S
SIBLE TO MAN OF AVERAGE
BREEDERS-TIME IS RIPE
MEANS AS WELL AS TO
TO START NOW.
SETTLERS OF LARGER
MEANS.
[NOTE-The following article was
When people who are considering written by Frank Kleinheivz, who is'
locating in Marinette county read of himself one of America's.greatest breedsettlers here receiving monthly milk ers of sheep, and is also the author of
checks of $100 to $250 they often say, many books on the subject of sheep. Mr.
"Oh, yes, that may be true of people Kleinheinz is the sheep expert of the
who have thousands of dollars to in- University of Wisconsin, and has made
vest in high-priced dairy cattle, but it an intimate study of what Wisconsin
does not mean much to a man of has to offer to the sheep man. The
article below is reprinted from the Oct.
average means."
That people who make statements 6, 1.917, Edition of the Milwaukee Jourlike the foregoing are misinformed is nal.]
best proven by some figures obtained
All feel proud that Wisconsin is
from a new settlement district in considered the greatest dairy state in
where
•
Marinette county
practically the union.
none of the farmers has been on the
A prominent aheepman, in addressMost of ing
years.
land more than five
a large farmer audience recently,
land
them began developing the new
said that sheep need a little more intwo or three years ago. None of telligent care than some of thee other
these parties had large or unlimited classet of livestock, but when farmers
funds to begin with.
;in Wisconsin have familiarized themIt will be well worth your time to 'selves with the proper care of sheep,
look over the following statement just as the man with the dairy cow,
of milk receipts received by new set- and the woman with the chickens
tlers in a representative new set- have done, sheep husbandry can be
tlement district in Marinette county: carried on, not only more extensively,
but also with much greater success
and profit.
Sheep should again be raised on
e
tc•c:
our Wisconsin farms. One of the
tea
directors of a county farm says that
'
a°
last year a net profit of a little
451
more than $2,000 was realized on 150
$ 13,34
3
7
8
40
14.97 breeding ewes. The land used was
3
2
4
67.21 rough and cost $20 an acre. This
6
10
18
22
10)
29.52 man, after figuring the cost of the
5
20
10
40
46.32
7
20
20
80
43.70 flock, feed and labor, said he had de8
20
25
80
35.88 rived from the sheep a much higher
5
30
SO
20
62.72 net profit than from any other class
,6
10
8
25
80
5
30.99
25
21)
80
42.95 of livestock. Another farmer, on a
7
20
20
80
7
43.05 section of high-priced land purchased
10
ea
80
5
27.47 twenty-four common grade ewes in
5
15
40
2
9
49.27
40
40
120
23.00 1914. These netted him $234 in a
40
4
15
80
14.72 year for lambs and wool. He said
2Q
3
40
5
2
8
44.62 their entire feed had been pasture
80
3
5
60
5
40
3
13.15 during the grass season and clover
7
80
20
20
42.74
25
3
80
20
37.67 hay in winter. No grain or other feed
g.
20
10
13.06 was used. He was trying to buy more
40
20
80
20
30
116.06 sheep and said he was getting far
4
15
4
40
20
22.05
GO
30
60
249.81 more profit from his sheep than from
240
160
6
0
29.05 his cattle and hogs.
50
10
20
8
8a
48.83
Althougei steep atave greatly ad10
59
8
80
41.12
25
8
5
35.44 vanced in price, a man can start a
40
10
15
4
240
00.40 flock with a reasonable amount of
20
10
46
7
38.70
20
120
35
7
3
40.45 money. In the fall, perhaps, is the
23
4U
15
5
24.16 best time to purchase. At this time
13
40
20
5
39.21 the western range men dispose of
10
55
38
6
2
40.41
their surplus breeding ewes, and one
As you probably know, Marinette can get a small flock of from fifteen
county has a Co-operative Cow Buy- to twenty-five head without making
ers' Association, which makes it pos- a large investment. Sheep multiply
sible for settlers to get good dairy fast and by the use of a good, purecattle on deferred payments, paying bred ram, of any of the leading mutThe Marinette County New S
$3 to $5 per month per head, with in- ton breeds, a fine flock will soon be
terest at six per cent. Hundreds of established. A ram in many cases nection with the &velopment gr
our settlers have beeome established can be used by two farmers on small people pre.§(..r.:
over 10,O('
in successful dairy farming throught flocks in one or two breeding seasons, oyounds.
areshw
ram.
'he
of
lowering
cost
the
thereby
he aid of this cow-buying plan. The
A Jiv
taar cf ti
)P
It will pay farmers to think ,'ee matone opportunity is open to you
ter ov
ceedefu'Iv. They w:i!
rnade

to be one of the great,est institutirlis in eon'isconsin. At the last picnic the number of
iced in the fields adjacent to the picnic
.!aces where groups of autos were parked.
thir nionic and those attending it are
71300n5i7 ne.^:fie. who }-Ave tiko

THE PROBLEM

THE REMEDY

Written by Arthur W. Large
and published in May, 1918 edition of "Cut-Over Lands.
The English-speaking nations
have dalways been the greatest
beef eaters in the world and
they have also reached the highest plane of civilization and
have developed the capacity for
the science of government unexcelled by any people, ancient
or modern. Many deep thinkers hay! connected the heavy
meat ea ng habits of the AngloSaxon races with their wonderful achievements. The United
States is facing a beef famine.
We must immensely increase
our beef production or else
change our meat-eating habits.
If we are compelled to give up
our regular meat allowance
over a long period of time, deep
thinkers expect to see a weakened race. We are American
people, and must have what we
need. Therefore, the beef production must be increased.

Published in June 16, 1918, edition of the Chicago Daily Drovers' Journal.
Beef cattle are finding their
way into upper Wisconsin.
Heretofore the dairy cow held
sway because of the quick turnover; but conditions are so favorable for producers of shortfed and half-fat cattle that
farmers in this section are taking to the steer to utilize some
of the luxuriant grass which
otherwise would go to waste.
Clover. Alfalfa and Silage.
With the clover and alfalfa,
which are very plentiful, and
silage, a good grade of market
cattle is being made at a small
cost.
Farmers who have taken to
beef production declare that,
even though feeding cattle may
be high, their land is cheap,
and the production cost is lower than any place in the socalled corn belt, thus enabling
them to make a handsome profit.
Heretofore beef cattle
haven't been made in large
numbers because of the demand
for finished stuff. Not having
sufficient corn to put on the
finish, these men stayed out of
the business. They could make
cattle up to the point where the
finishing process commences,
very cheap, but the final weight
cost too much.
Conditions Favor Beef Making.
radically
Conditions
have
changed, so that this situation
has been eliminated, and the
market calls for the kind of
beef that farmers in upper Wisconsin have been able to make
with a profit.
Men from Iowa and Illinois
who are now farming in that
territory have gone back to
their first love-making beefso that the production of market cattle will show a big inMoreover,
crease this year.
men who have never produced
beef are entering the game, on
account of its fitting so well
with their scheme of farming,
and it enables them to eliminate waste.
Pork Production Increasing.
t Pork peocluetme L
retie for 1918
too. The 13 to
pigs has attracted farmers' at
tention, and with clover paaa
ture and barley and oats good
pork can be made very cheaply.
While this is going on, dairy
production is increasing, too.
There is plenty of feed for all
kinds of stock in that locality,
and the entrance of the farmers into beef production is
merely a step to eliminate
waste as far as possible, and at
the same time make their land
more profitable.

Beef Supply Decreasing.
For the past seventeen years
there has been a constant decrease in the number of beef
cattle in the United States.
There has been an actual decrease in the total number of
beef cattle. This means that
the per capita production of
beef has been greatly diminished. The United States Census for 1910 reports the total
number of beef cattle slaughtered that year as 21.981,637,
and it is doubtful if any larger
number is being slaughtered at
the present time. This would
mean that our actual beef supply per capita amounted to only
one-fifth of a beef per annum.
This covers only our domestic
consumption and does not take
into consideration the enormous demands now being made
upon this country for beef from
Europe. The facts are that
prior to the European war we
were rapidly becoming a great
beef cattle importing country.
For example, in 1914 we imported 868,368 head of beef cattle,
not to mention an immense
••'amount oa dressed and canned
eaef ti,-4.j the Argenline. During the same year, 1914, we exported only 18,376 head, and
these were chiefly high-class
breeding stock.

, r•
• utill Wu....Ine, •
handle •
• •
tioektiiiiOperi.
Ire want
..to. Wct 1:-.11cW
11 Le business of growing Wisc. .in
t you will find the iight class t.,C
pure bred Oa Ins and seeds is not
td,
vihicit
"I;!„ere,
ttAnks
county,
a
so much of its new settlers
•
Rapidly Increas;ng Values.
being. shouted 13 the skies, but neverthat it devot)2s klis great annual ey.,,
them.
by
theless is being carries' forward
The development work done
steadily by one of the greatest of oar new settlers
Marinette Celine:a
Many great organizations, the Wis- Wisconsin, the success of their ef- ca-MINIPMINIVPAININNWINV^.~.44,0414,
POP.ANT.4,4 0,7•41.,
41111
,
,
P4`4,1
,
.04
consin Experiment Association.
forts in dairying and other forms of
Not only have we markets in the . farming, the increase in population,
states, but in all other continents opening of new roads, schools,
Wisconsin seed corn, rye, oats and churches, etc., brings about a conbarley are known.-Wisconsin Agri- stant increase in land values. Land
culturist, Nov. 17, 1917.
sold five years at $18 per acre was
sold the other day as a partly imThe state of Wisconsin has 177,127 proved farm at $100 per acre. Land
• da
farms, average 119 acres, 1,329,540 which can be purchased at from $20
4
,
PMINANNON.4
0
,
4%.d.
,
0
,
eseaasaeseseessessa
farm population, 1,675,000 dairy cows, to $25 per acre today is worth $50 to
The scene shown in the picture was , root. eree k.ncl other winter feeds for , per acre. In other words, by the
1,313,000 other cattle, 2,142,000 swine, $80 per acre as soon as the settler
judicious use of $400 of capital and
644,000 sheep, 712,000 horses, 3,000 has buildings on it and a reasonable taken in the early spring of 1918 at ' stock.
the farm of Earl Johnson in the Waumules,
amount of clearing.
He alse -a.:1 a garden which provid- his own efforts, Mr. Johnson has
saukee district. MI' Johnson former- ed
';. of the family's winter made a good living, built up a splenlargf 41e,.t
ly resided in Vermilion County, Illi- food. TS.. dels feed he raised made did herd of grade dairy cattle, purnois.
It possW
him to winter a couple chased or raised six good horses, had
People Interested in getting land in 'good dal
.;.,s and a team of horses. a good living for his family, has
Marinette County often ask the ques- He deal
are land in the fall and bought 160 acres more of land, and
tion, What can an average man with has bee/ eatinuing to develop his has tripled the value of his land hold; ings in three years.
average experience and ability, and iplace eei s.1:'a:'fie.
1
Nothing that we might say could
with an average amount of capital ex- 1 In the 'a'S:;,.- of 1918 he bought 160
' more forcibly tell the story of what
pect to accomplish on a good tract of acres mc
land ad.oining the ,• any
average man, who is willing to
Marinette County land?" It is a fair eighty wa!SaaShe purchased in 1915.
question, and one that would natural- The fun( :q•eli which he purchased 1 work and who has average means,
can do on the good farming lands of
ly arise in the mind of any person this new
rier section were earned
thinking of locating in Upper Wiscon- from the t t eFghty which he bought, Marinette County, Wisconsin. Make
sin. It can best be answered by the ; because It ever had any funds from a trip here and have a talk with Mr. , s
story of what Mr. Johnson has done I any sourct xcept the $4a0 with which Johnson. Ask him whether or not
every word of this story is true. He F
here.
he began velopment operations on is
only one of many concerning whom r
What an Average Man Did.
his origin: eighty.
the same story could be written.
He was a renter In Illindis. In JanIn the Ater Of 1917-18 Mr. John- •
uary 1915 he purchased an 80-acre son wintet20 head of cattle and six
tract of land in the upper central part horses )?. 1 :,i the feed for this stock WHERE CLOVER REALLY
of Marinette County.' After he had being raiHaAon his original eighty
GROWS LIKE A WEED
made the first payment (one-third of acres of l td. He is located not far
the purchase price) on his land Mr. from the ..,, ese factory, and his dairy , Speaking of Upper Wisconsin, L.
Johneon had approximately $400 to herd brim ithini a monthly return of 1 F. Graber, alfalfa expert of the Unibegin development operations. He from i;d10( t!,? $150. His farming ef- versity of Wisconsin, says: "Where 0
began clearing land just as early in ' forte ha \ tSeen devoted largely to ; clover grows like a weed and is
the spring of 1915 as possible. The', dairying, s 11.,speeial cash crops, such , cheaply and easily established withfirst year he built a small house and , as potato, ! 1'edear beets, cucumbers,'out lime or inoculation or other spebarn. The barn is shown in the ac- beans a •
,')as. In ;he fall of 1917 cial treatment, alfalfa should not be
companying illustration.
He also he built
?v silo, which is shown too greatly emphasized."
1 .ti.
cleared nearly 40 acres of land.
Mr. Graber truly says that Upper
,e above.
in the
Thirteen acres were devoted to po- Holds . I...1 -i'at $75 Per Acre Now. Wisconsin is a locality where "Clover
n paid $25 per acre for :grows like a weed." Alfalfa productatoes. This crop of potatoes on new ; Mr. Jo'.
land brought him $58 per acre, or a • his land,s e was asked recently at tion is spreading rapidly in Marinette
We like to tell the story of the ; To the left you see the cultivated total of $760. The balance of the 40 what pra . a held his land at the county, but it is true that with our
He said it was not for ; bountiful clover crops, raised with
acres, which he had cleared in the present ti:
farming opportunities in Marinette • crops-corn and potatoes, the next
were for sale, he would lalmost no trouble, many farmers re' step in the: development of the land spring, was devoted to corn for sil- sale, but !:
County, Wisconsin, by means of phoa price of lees than $75 fuse to pay much attention to alfalfa.
after the stumps have been removed. age, peas And oats mixed for hay, not consid
tographs. We know that when you The potatoes are a cash crop, providvisit us and see the places shown in ing the farmer with funds for continthese photographs you will know we uing the development of his land, and
have told the truth, and nothing but the corn and hay provide winter feed
the truth. We.. know further that for his stock.
The photograph, in fact, shows a
nothing, can show true conditions in
Upper Wisconsin so well as photo- rational, sensible and well-balanced
graphs taken right on the lands plan of development and farming
which are being developed at the such as has been followed in the best
districts of Wisconsin where lands topresent time.
The scene above, taken not far day are worth all the way from $150
4
from Pembine in the upper central to $250 per acre.
The man who will come to Maripart of Marinette County, tells the
whole story of the development of nette County, and follow a plan of
Marinette County. In the background farming just as shown in this picture
Is seen rather heavily wooded land. -it is nothing fanciful; but just a
In the cutting of the trees and brush plain everyday matter-of-fact plan of
there not only is a lot of valuable sensible farming-will make good
cord-wood, but many other merchant- with a double "o", will have a good
able wood products, such as box-wood, living all his days and will leave to
pulp-wood, posts, bark for tanning, his family a farm which will be a
monument to his foresight and eneretc.
In the foreground to the right is gy.
This opportunity in Marinette Counseen the next step in preparing this
land for agriculture. The trees and ty will not always be open-in fact
brush have been removed, but not the day is now nearer when the best
the stumps. Clover and blue-grass opportunities will be over than most
-tea*eass dase
have been sown, and the land is now people realize. To the man wanting
a splendid pasture. Some dairy cat- the best land at rock-bottom prices,
tle, which will turn this pasture into we can only say "the early bird catch- Starting with 80 acres and $400 of operatin: captt(l
1315 this fornaT Illinois renter now has 240 acres, a herd of 20
money, are also seen in the picture. es the worm."
dairy cattle, Six lust's, a s.!, ana about 30 acres of cleared la ad.

Former Vermilion Coumy, lois, Renter Proves What Settlers I
With Average Means Can On Marinette Canty's New Lands

World Facing a Beef Famine.
The world is facing a great
beef famine and only increased
production can solve the problem. Beef is certain to go higher and higher. It is only the
strong arm of the Government
that keeps beef prices down to
what they are today, although
they are the highest ever
known.

CO-OPERATIVE BUYING
HELPS OUR SETTLERS

THIS SCENE SHOWS YOU ?RACTICALLY EVERY
STEP IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LAAD INTO
RICH PASTURES AND CULTIVATED FIELDS

CID

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X;I•

•#00,41,11,114,004.0"."4"......."41,041,4•4,M14^..

Companies with capital of over
$3,000,000 to handle sheep on the
lands in upper Wisconsin have already been organized. Most of these
!companies are already developing
;their land and several have from 1000
Ito 5000 sheep on their ranches at this
time.
Over 120,000,000 animals in Europe
have been slaughtered thus far during the war, 56,000,000 of which were
sheep. In all of the warring countries with the exception of America,
England, Russia and Australia sheep
have been practically wiped out, or
so greatly depleted as to amount to
wiping them out. In America, England, Russia and Australia there has
been a great decrease in sheep. This
means there cannot help but be a
great shortage of wool throughout
the war and for many years thereafter, because the number of sheep
that have been slaughtered cannot be
made up for many years to come.
This cannot help but mean high prices for mato% and wool and good profits to the producers of these commodities.
There were only about 30,000,000
shearing sheep in the United States
this spring. This means a wool clip
not to exceed 200,000,000 pounds and
we need 750,000,000 pounds if we are
to adequately equip and clothe our
army and navy to protect them fro'm
_Lag
the cold.
Twenty per cent of all the sheep
in the far western sheep states will
have to be slaughtered. This is the
estimate of practical men who are acquainted with the situation. Why?
Because the Homesteaders' Act has
I in the past six or eight months taken
over 50,000,000 acres of land-some
of it the best grazing land for sheep
in the country. They can be saved
1by placing them on the former timber
i lands of upper Wisconsin.

Sheep kill the brush and at the
same time produce profitable mutton
and wool. Investigate sheep! When
fenced in on moderately sized or
small tracts and frequently changed
from place to place they perform service of great value in bringing the
new farm one step nearer its cultivated condition, and they do this at a
profit.

I

Small Grains Produce Great
Crops in Marinette County

paid a
There is a $5 a day job awaiting price now being
hire tlie extea
Little Willy, Little Johnny, or any ,1 ble to
time melee as la
of your children, in a sugar beet field ; same
than or, potatoe
in Marinette County, Wisconsin. Any profits
other .,peeial c
boy twelve to sixteen years old, help- , ly any
he a great
ing his father to raise sugar beets in1 will always
years there
some
in
timel
his
make
can
County,
Marinette
tion, and this causes
worth $5 per day.
certain extent ia the
Opportunity.
Guaranteed
A
no dame
Sugar beet growing in Marinette 1 is absolutely queer
os
County, Wisconsin, has always been ' production
wear, and the farm
it
sua
el ecxaesehpctiroonpa opportunity,
d er
h reuants
a
t
e
lwar
the
hut
tion now in existence. segar Deets :e17 the crop.
OX3STS
provide s downright- guaranteed crop
Under the stimalue of a price of $1.0 :•; ,..ne we ha' an.
per ton for sugar beets-the highest. , sugar factories
Marinette C
ever paid in the history of Americaand the need for America to grow its ; duce from 12 to 24 on.
own sugar during the war, Marinette 'per acre. This means
County is this year growing three of $120 to $240 per 1
times as large a quantity of sugar 1price of $10' per ton.
beets as ever before. In 1919 the 1 sugar beets yield less
acreage will undoubtedly be tripled years, but it is Very
I know that there never
again.
You well know the present critical ure of this crop-even
sugar situation. Sugar beets will, no poorest years it will p
doubt, take their place along side of tons per acre.
Extra Help Pre
the potato as one of the greatest cash
Where a certain aces
crops of Marinette County. Because
ore (Usti
of the fact that raising sugar beets tracted in any
requires more intensive labor, such manufacturing compans
teas
as thinning, etc., many farmers in the special labor at a
•
past have been averse to growing this duringhe time that
gis
crop. But with the new price for this needed. The seed is
credit ha+
crop it is time, however, that all farm- farmers on a
interest. S1
ers awaken to the truth, that the high charge for

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I. pond- d the crop is necessary as in the case of
'es ' potatoes; in other words, you send
the crop to the factory just as it is
dug with the exception that the tops
lle t soffc,k dthese tops make excaerecnut
stock feed.
Sugar beets are wonderfully free of
veather hazards. Frost does not illIre them. They pierce deep ire - 1.he
iii and open up tiny fissures •
tebide moisture and fertilit.
ow
a nd make the ground
.„;ounty
growl,
.11 ry;otesri.m to b
,h

10
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3
5
The accompanying scenes show
fields of wheat, barley, rye and oats
on the Lubke farm. Wausaukee district, Marinette County.
Note the length and size of the
1i d
f heat and the thickness of

With the great growth of dairying thing that if Marinettehad a great d
in Marinette County there has come a ors have
corresponding growth in the areas the past in dairy farmir
comi
devoted to corn, potatoes, small almost as nothing
to
the
of
There
opportunities
crops.
other
and
grains,
has also been a gratifying growth in Prof. Kroege's statemm
the production of pork, mutton, wool, the present situation,
a rem
etc. What this grosath has been is herewith. He is
you
believe
we
and
this
in
well shown by other articles
word
every
read
fully
LANDOLOGY.
of
special edition
says:
Which Will You Choose?
The Dairy St
However, the wonderful future of
Months ago, it -ai• ,.•
Marinette
in
industry
dairying
tAe
28 millions of cattli-d lcd
start slaughtered by ,the mitit
County, with the splendid
r.
which it already has, must not be Europe. This is five
1 than there are dairy ci
believe
We
anyone.
by
overlooked
' United States tons..
no informed person will challenge the
At first when, war le
statement that dairying on a good slaughtered beef animals
for some time pest
tract of land in Upper Wisconsin of- but slaughtering the d;
been
profers one of the safest and surest
' as well.
fit investments in the country 'today. i The United States •Ps
Everyone has heard of fly-by-night in- • Agriculture says: "In Rai
of dairy cattle have been
vestments, from which not one out of
for meat during the last
return.
any
realize
would
a hundred
. "The continental dair
i Compare such an investment against imported much of the'
:the war. The war Inc
the great and ever-growing dairying reduction of such shipn.
'
you
and
Wisconsin,
Upper
of
success
"There wasn't enoughhuna
' nage to be spared for 11
find ninety-nine farmers out of
guns
dred making very big profits on small centrates, because
and human food were tle
investments. Which investment will itary needs.
you choose?
"At the same time, Oh
There are few better money-mak- , civilian populations bad
meat.
ing combinations in the farming
"So dairy cattle were I
dairy
and
clover
than
world better
ply this demand, and b
cows. The greatest living farm au- wasn't feed enough to
thorities are all agreed on this state- alive.
"As the war continue
f ment. Prof. Kroege, who spoke at ditions may be expecte(
i the Marinette County, (Wisconsin) more acute and the slauE
all of these grain crops. You can
Picnic recently, has peen dairy cattle to inc-f
see by the buildings in the back- New Settlers'
Because of thi.; slamh
some dairy informawith
is
us
this
that
the
furnished
of
ecene
ground
lower
,
animals abroad, the des
tremendland
a new farm-it was unimproved
tion which we believe is
country for butter ana
only a (:1w years ago.
ously important. It proves for one condensed milk has groi

THESE ARE THE OFFICES OF
THE SKIDMORE LAND CO.
These two views show the offices of the Skidmore Land Company
Wisconsin, and at Marinette. The view above shows
Wausaukee,
at
the Wausaukee office and hotel of the company and the view below
is the Marinette office.

are html,'
sugar
lands valued at $200 per acre.
°n
there state that it is their
ararnaers
ts greatest cash crop. The manager of
rn the local factory says that Marinette
ne County lands will produce, acre for
fs . acre, as much or more than these
ler 1$200 per acre lands. If sugar beet
to • raising is highly profitable on lands
all-, worth $200 per acre, you can figure
ery- out the profits which can be made on
10 lands bought at from $20 to $30 per
acre.
Don't Delay Too Long.
con-, You most certainly ought to get a
agar tract of Marinette County land right
vide nova and get at least five acres of it
nice (ready to grow sugar beets in'1919. If
p is you don't, you will be passing up one
} the of the greatest price guarantee cash
no , crop opportunities ever offered in this
g of ;country.
lt

-1

GOOD LIVING AND SNUG FORTUNE-I f ANY AMBITIOUS
' V1ING IN MARINETTE
FAMILY WHO ENGAGES IN DA1
COUNTY, WISCONSIN---OUTLOI eAS NEVER SO PROMISING

0

The production of sheep in the
United States has fallen off by 14,000,000 since 1900. This has been.
due to shortage of range in the far
west, because of the Homesteaders'
Act, unusually dry weather in that
part of the country and exceptionally
severe winters. The mutton and
wool from that number of sheep
would this year be worth $150,000,000.
From 2,200,000,000 to 2,700,000,000
pounds of wool are needed annually
for the armies at war.

CD

cr

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•

Geo. W. McKerrow, Wisconsin's
greatest sheep breeder and recognized as an authority among sheep
experts all over the world says that
Upper Wisconsin is one of the best
sheep localities he knows of. He has
a large sheep farm in southern Wisconsin and a sheep farm in upper
Wisconsin. He states that he has already been successful with his sheep
in southern Wisconsin but that his
greatest success has come on the
upper Wisconsin ranch. The land in
upper Wisconsin, Mr. McKerrow
says, costs him less, produces greater
crops of clover and other sheep feed,
-provides better pasture land, the
sheep are healthier and make better
gains, aad have heavier and better
fleeces. Mr. McKerrow believes that
no man of ability with an adequate
amount of capital can fail in handling
sheep in upper Wisconsin. He believes further that exceptionally good
profits will be the reward of such a
man.

DC

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THERE IS A $5.00 PER DAY JOB ER EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY
RAISING SUGAR BEETS IN MAR"):4ETTE COUNTY, WISCONSIN

WISCONSIN FARM PAPER TELLS
OF CO-OPERATIVE LIVESTOCK
BUYING IN MARINETTE CO.
-Front the Wisconsin Farmer, March 28,
1918.
Marinette County owes its present
security as a dairy center to several
things, foremost of which are co-operation between farmers and townspeople, and the natural advantages which
the region possesses.
Livestock buying on a co-operative
plan between farmers and local
banks is a special feature worth noting, as it has contributed in no small
measure to the progress here. Four
banks at Marinette, and local banks
at Peshtigo. Coleman, Pound, Crivitz,
and Wausaukee are joined in the credit movement along this line.
The plan has been in successful
operation for a number of years and
already over forty carloads of purebred dairy cattle of Holstein and
Guernsey breeds have been imported
in this way.

Like the American Army, Cows and Clover
Are An Unbeatable Proposition.

THIS LINE, AND MAIL TO SKIDMORE LAND CO., MARINETTE, WIS.




AGE SIX

At our Wausaukee headquarters we have clean light rooms and
good wholesome cooking, all of which can be had at a very moderate
price. The company's headquarters are just two blocks northeast
of the Milwaukee road depot, at which you alight when you arrive
in Wausaukee.

y farm- , and bounds,-and continues to grow!
Nor will this demand for our dairy
: products abruptly cease with the
--; bael; !coming of peace.
the , When war ends, foreign nations
purposes and
Part ee • can buy grain for seed
' after the first crop has been raised,
, be able largely to take care of themselves as regards grain. There will
ceeert be a great decline in the foreign demand for American grain a year or
two after the war ends.
t
But not so with dairying. It takes
a long time to develop dairy herds
and a still longer time to so increase
the number of .herds as to supply the
• -orld's needs. Europe will look to
'he United States for dairy products
after this war ends.
ODS mare for years
It means too, that when'war ends,
in the
there will be a tremendous need
stock with
Elrepe abroad for dairy breeding
farming over
eipally which to start dairy
countrieg.
Its; a again in the devastated
Our headquarter in Marinette are two blocks east of the NorthThe hundreds of thousands of dairy
nimals
herds destroyed-millions of dairy west ern and Milwaukee road depots, on the same side of the street.
replaced, and the one
- We will be glad to welcome you at our offices at either Wausaucent of cows-must be
million s great market where this stock may kee
Marinette., Ordinarily it is best to go directly to our offices
States.
United
ghtered be obtained will be the
Wausaukee
because you call save time and will be nearer to the
at
of
This gives to the dairy farmers
years.
,:antiles America the greatest opportunity better class of lands which are open for settlement today. All corthat has ever come to them.
respondence should be addressed to our Marinette, Wis., offices.
e Can You Recognize Truth When You
Labboeura
See it?
an tonItois said that all farming is more
ad conpowder or less, of a gamble-the farmer' must
.ut rail- gamble en the weather, market pricevery year. Dairy farming
ice and es, etc.,
e ntore in a locality' Like Marinette county
comes as near to taking the "gamble"
to supof "gambling" as anything could.
there out
them Clover, corn silage and good pastures are assured every year-at
least there has never been a year as
)000ME3
county when these
of m. yet in Marinette
with those essen---and
feeds failed
of da.ry tials and a supply of root crops,
on this
also have never failed in upper
'se and which
)y leaps Wisconsin, you are as certain of sue•

cess at dairying as it is possible to in the history of this country, and
with every indication that these pricbe certain of anything.
es must continue to climb for severYou Must Not Overlook This!
al years, is it any wonder that we
We have taken up a lot of space in
say, time and time again-"Come to
discussions of dairy farming opporMarinette county, Wisconsin, and
tunities in Marinette county, because
make a good living and snug fortune
we do not want to make the mistake
at dairy farming."
of having you overlook the exceptional circumstances in the dairy industry today. No farmer who used Marinette County Farming Towns are
good common sense and had a reaGrowing Fast.
sonable amount of capital ever failed
On October first the Crivitz post
cde was advanced from fourth to
oilru
at dairy farming in Marinette county. ovffi
due to the increasing
With the price of dairy products third class,
me of business handled.-Crivitz
much higher today than ever before I Advocate, Oct. 12, 1917,




OGY

LA

VICTORY AND OPPORTUNITY EDITION

VICTORY AND OPPORTUNITY• EDITION

NEW PROFITS IN THE OLDEST LIVESTOC 4INDUSTRYIN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
'

the former timber lands of the Great Lakes
region in the search for good cheap grass
lands on which to raise the mutton and
wool urgently required by the American
army and people. Largest and quickest
profits in the sheep industry are possible in
a locality like Marinette County, Wiscon,
sin, where corn silage as well as clover and
root crops for winter feed can be produced
in great quantities at very low cost.

Sheep grazed on the slopes outside of
Jerusalem in Biblical times but never before in the history of livestock farming has
the production of mutton and wool offered
such an attractive margin of profit as at the
present time. The United States Department of Agriculture, National Wool Growers' Association, National Sheep and
Wool Bureau of America, and many other
organizations are turning their attention to

HACENBARTH SAYS
BEST LIVESTOCK
REGION IN WORLD
-NOTED
WESTERN
LIVESTOCK
MAN MAKES INSPECTION OF
LAND HERE AND STARTS
GREAT SHEEP MOVEMENT.
NEW

LIVESTOCK

EMPiRE

SAYS NATURE FAVORED FORMER
TIMBER LANDS OF UPPER
LAKES REGION FOR LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION.

tore it is an assured asset and
the carrying out of the plans for
which this favored section was
created. The time is ripe now.
Ycur proposition is now one
arithmetic.
You
of simple
know of the range shortage today in the far west. You know
that the stock must be taken to
some new and suitable fields.
You know that you have a large
acreage available for this great
purpose. Yours is the best
available area for quick and
definite results. Is not the answer a simple one? Stock is
hunting a place to go.• Here is
a place hunting for stock.
One man can take care of
1,000 sheep allowing for extra
work during the lambing season. Sheep raising, I repeat,
is a safe investment and staple
industry under efficient management.
YOU HAVE THE GREATEST LIVE-STOCK COUNTRY
IN THE UNITED STATES IF
NOT IN THE WORLD.
Sheep are better than cattle
as an investment. The returns
from sheep are two to one over
cattle on any area suitable to
both. Sheep are more easily
handled.
They furnish two
crops, to-wit: wool and meat.
If I were twenty years younger I would like nothing bettee
than to come here and show
you what I could do. Our business was an $18,000 proposition
when I was younger. Today it
is a $3,000,000 affair. I could
do even better here.
There is today in this country
a shortage of from 60 to 70 per
cent ,of wool needed for home
consumption under normal, not
wm r condition-, We could pro.
all we --- ------. ,!,4 ivar.45 :•^4,4
hornThe $85,000,0e0
e pay
annieey to Argentina and AW3i traliz. ew wool beionee in the
pocketuook
of
the
United
states.
Stock raising in the far west
has decreased 35 per cent due.
to the shortage of range and
the Homesteaders' law AND
HAS MADE FOR YOU THE
GREATEST
OPPORTUNITY
WHICH EVER CAME TO ANY
SECTION OF THE UNITED
STATES. ,

In the far west every live-sto,:k
man knows Frank J. Hagenbarth. Mr.
Hagenbarth is not so well known in
the middle west and the east but he
is becoming better known in the middle west through his appearance before various Chambers of Commerce,
development associations, etc., in his
efforts to call the attention of the
country to the possibilities of the upper Great Lakes region for sheep and
cattle production.
A Man of Wide Experience.
Mr. Hagenbarth is a striking and
forceful figure. Beginning life as a
western ranch hand, with no capital
whatever, he has built up a fortune of
several million dollars in the livestock business. He iF at present,
president of tht, Nrt tional Wool
Growers' Association. whiph includes
the biggest sheep ranchers in Amer!ea. In addition to cos own privats?
live-stock interests, and his position
as president of a very powerful livestock association, he is assisting
the United States Department of
Agriculture in bringing about a greater production of mutton and wool in
this country.
.
The fact that Mr. Hagenbarth on
his judgment of lands and live-stock
has made a fortune for himself, and
is regarded by the Unitea. States Department of Agriculture as an authority in the sheep business, makes Mr.
When Mr. Hagenbarth left here he
Hagenbarth's opinions well worth
returned to the west and advised
considering.
It was the privilege of the editor sheep and cattle men there to look
of LANDOLOGY to hear Mr. Hagen- over the Upper Great Lakes grass
barth speak on two different occa- lands as he had done. He told them
sions concerning the possibilities of he was sure he had discovered the
the former timber lands of the Upper right place for the expansion of the
Great Lakes region for sheep and cat- sheep and cattle industry.
tle production. Mr. Hagenbarth beMr. Hagenbarth's work has already
fore giving the second address had borne fruit. Several ranch outfits
Upper
Wisconsin
and
spent a week in
of 2,000 to 12.000 head of sheep and
other parts of the upper Lakes region, others of 1,000 to 9,000 head of cattle
carefully looking over the lands be- have already been moved to Upper
fore giving his opinion of their worth Wisconsin and other localities in the
for profitable live-stock production. upper Lake region. One ranch outfit
The address which he subsequently of 12,000 sheep, herders, ponies and
interest runabout cars for use in herding, etc.,
delivered
created
great
throughout' the country and is re- was moved all in one train consisting
garded as the basis on which 100,000 of 43 cars.
sheep and cattle from western states
This is simply the forerunner of a
have already been moved to the for- great new live-stock business for the
mer timber lands in the upper Lakes former timber lands of this locality.
country. We wish that every reader Numerous other live-stock men of far j
of Landology might have been pres- western and middle western states
ent to hear Mr. Hagenbarth's address have already made purchases of land
delivered just afteP he had spent a here and will establish ranches soon.
week carefully looking over lands in
We want the live-stock men of the
this part of the country, but lacking great middle western states such as
that, we are going to present some southern Wisconsin, southern Michiof his most interesting statements, as gan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Iowa
follows:
to realize the importance of what Mr.
You have the best country on
Hagenbarth discovered here. There •
earth fpr live-stock and grazing.
are many exceptionally good locations
It is a well known fact that the
and openings for men with a fair
the
raised
in
are
best sheep
amount of capital who would like to
colder countries and that they
handle from 100 to 1,000 head of
Sheep
produce the best wool.
sheep or cattle. Such men by able
and cattle deteriorate in the
management and industrious work
warmer countries and that is
can not only make very nice profits,
why Texas and other southern
on livestock here, but by their livestates send their young farther
stock farming operations they will be
north to be invigorated and fatdoubling and tripling the value of
tened.
their land.
One of your fourteen months
Marinette •County, Wisconsin, we
old steers would weigh from
most sincerely believe has more to
1400 to 1500 pounds against a
offer in location, increase in value of
weight for a similar steer of
land as it is improved, supply of win1100 pounds in Texas. Nature
ter feed, nearness to markets, popudesigned this upper country for
lation, length of growing season, abillive-stock and favored it in a
ity to raise ripened corn and silage
way it favored no other section
corn, and longer pasture season than
country.
our
of
other localities. We leave it to your
If at the beginning of the
judgment.
new sheep and cattle movement
There is a place here for the stockone-half
and
you put in one
man who wants to handle 5,000 to
half
acre
on
only
sheep to the
100,000 head and for the man who
of your available land with catwould like to handle 100 to 5,000 head.
tle in the low-lying lands, which
We believe when you come to Mariare ideal for that purpose, you
nette County and learn of the progrescan easily take care of 8,000,000
sive farming and ranching life going
sheep and 1,000,000 head of caton here, and of the opportunities
tle. I am as sure this can be
awaiting you, you will agree with us
done as I am that I am here.
that "MARINETTE COUNTY IS THE
BELIEVE
SINCERELY
I
PLACE."
THESE FIGURES CAN BE
DOUBLED. This sounds big
What McKerrow Says.
and it is big.
George W. McKerrow, Wisconsin's
You can add $150,000,000 to
greatest sheep farmer and one of the
the assets of your people in
recognized sheep experts of the world,
this locality and $100,000,000 to
says: "Use good sires, feed well, keep
the gross earnings of the land.
right at the business and sheep will
Isn't that a stake worth going
see you through. There is room in
after?
Wisconsin for hundreds of thousands
Under today's conditions this
more good sheep."
Is a patriotic duty. For the fu-

1

tons
hay
2.46
bought March 5,
1917
36.88
1 ton hay bought
11.30
March 27, 1917
1 car hay, April 6,
1917. 29,240 lbs.,
CONSTANT SHIPMENT OF SHEEP
147.29
at '$12.60
th the Editor of
AND CATTLE FROM FAR WEST56.13
CONSERVATIVE FIGURES SHOW Corn
ERN AND OTHER POINTS TO
47.64
Oats
ndology.
NET PROFIT PER HEAD OF
26.40
UPPER LAKES REGION.
Bran
$6.43 FIRST YEAR.
5.00
Salt
cong
in
Upper
WisFrom Marinette (Wis.) Eagle-Star,
40.00
Roots, 10 tons
WISCONSIN RANCHER SAYS $20
.
July 10, 1918.
for me?"
.ccmsnai
2.18
Accessories
PER ACRE LAND PAYS HIM
THIS
READ
CAREFULLY
hr.
Last night a train of 17 cars loaded . You m
care
2
Summer
_G.; yourself that
$40 PER ACRE AT SHEEP
six
weeks
for
with sheep and the necessary horses question
,5 minute.
We
STATEMENT IN THIS ARTICLE IS months at $0.25
12.50
775.32
FARMING.
and men to care for them arrived.
t your answer in the
want you .
A COMMON SENSE GUIDE TO
This noon a train of 14 cars arrived indepet:Jd
:rrients quoted in
RECEIPTS
DETERMINE SHEEP POSover the Northwestern.
HELP
TO
CLEAR
eieee publications,
LAND
Wool, 1066 lbs., at
these ita
SIBILITIES.
Thoasands of head • of sheep and
586.30
$0.55
nd
eleleeriative
opinions
cattle are now grazing upon lands in
ANOTHER
SHEEP
Wool, 161
/
2 lbs., at
MAN
SAYS
,feert agricultural offithis vicinity. Cloverland is the cat- g
t;10111,:
(Note-The figures presented in this $0.50
8.12
wl:a are in a posiSHEEP COME NEARER PRODUCtie and sheep country of the United "I'S
article are taken from an article pub- Rams sold, 5
120.00
ING AS PER ESTIMATE THAN
States.
ihe opportunities of lished in the -May, 1918, edition of the Old ewes and wethhi e
OTHER FARMING HE TRIED.
American
Sheep
Breeder.)
ers
sold,
88
488.60
ee
are always pre,Upper
5.60
Opportunities for the development 1 lamb
"v,rhat the other
SAYS SHEEP ARE
ferret]
.,A not "What we say." of sheep raising and the grazing indusFront Nov. 8, 1917, Edition of the
GREAT OPPORTUNITY fell
"
1,208.62
as e you abide by try in Upper Wisconsin are exceptionti
tWe
Wisconsin Farmer.
(EsManure
value
oti,er fellow." We al. Very few people have awakened to
Believes no Better Livestock Oppor-thi
i eotp
4
In
connection
with the campaign
at
one'or opinion be- the situation as yet.' Some have dis- timated
flight
tunity Exists Today-Well Suited
now in progress to produce more
lands in Upper covered the wonderful possibilities half) 99 tons .... 198.40
; cause
to Upper Wisconsin.
5.32 1,412.34 sheep in Upper Wisconsin, the Wis; iW econ,,
• 1,..et cannot question ' of this phase of agriculture and have Lamb
consin Farmer has the privilege to
Reprint of a letter which appeared in
tee man who has no proven its success. The experimentthe
the'
um'
',
the Oct. 25, 1917, Edition of
Value of flock after selling the publish some information on this subTi''
ions quoted are al days to prove it a good thing are
land t.) •
ject furnished by F. J. Hogoboom,
Wisconsin Farmer.
about gone. The proposition today is above 95:
/11 pablications.
from in
manager of the 0. B. Parhan & ComTo the Editor-Wisconsin is one of
eeeemeanying articles to scatter the good news and get Breeding ewes, 125,
pany sheep ranch in Upper Wiscon$ 875.00
,s with a open mind.! more people interested. There are at $7.00
the most patriotic states in the Union.
•
sin, which throws some light on the
he skeptics who spend hundreds of acres of good undevel- Ewe lambs, 32 at
But we could give more aid if more ,;7''•
cost of going into the sheep business:
224.00
Ill sn ying "'Taint oped land in Marinette County, Wis- $7.00 ,
sheep were raised. We need all the
"A good two year old ewe will pay
75.00
tinec clie poor because ; consin, ready to grow luxuriant pas- Rams, 2
20 per cent interest on $50 and I am
wool that we can get so that Uncle
1917
spring
in•t3rIL,1
tures,
clovers,
roots,
small grains and
brains to
selling them for $15.
Our sheep
crease on lambs,
Sam can clothe our soldier boys is
silage suitable for sheep success.
545.00 $1,719.00 sheared $5 worth .of wool this year
good warm, woolen clothing. Th'.. We do not charge
The usefulness of sheep in land 109, at $5.00
and they have lambs at side that are
-?,lp them to better stand
e you over the lands clearing has been extensively proven, Interest on investworth from $10 to $12 each and I
w
•:. conditions to which they v:
,i,y. Don't buy land if and they are in use for this purpose ment, $3,266.00, at
195.96 have some that weigh $15 worth and
U-.
eected.
'mditions as re-pre- on many farms every year, as well 6%
they are running on $20 land and
RESULTS
from the, profit
no hesitancy in as for their economy in wool and mutwhen it gets all grazed over well it
1,412.00
,tri=•;nt, because .g.e ton production.
Total receipts
eee ie no animal the'
will carry four ewes and their Iambs
-eeen Theee',
The following is an annual report Increased valuation 653.00
itiOnS as Kew; .
to qv: acre aniI. at that state ?..2r, tend
creaeeezdhe tr,eeility ef the
----repretientgA. ef the slie.T industry on a typical Upwill pay $40 per acre per annum, and
can be, kept on pasture tin
Total receipts
it wruld
per Wisconsin farm from July 1,
as to land clearing there is nothing
stock Will not, eat. With wooree
II you things that; 1916, to July 1, 1917:
TOTAL COSTS
that can beat them.
775.32
fifty cents to one dollar per pourm
Feed, care, etc
ver
were
Value.
rnis-1 Investment
Sheep as Land Clearers.
971.28
and the high price el lambs at fifteen ee
::oot, as you visited Number of breedIncreased valuation 195.96
to twenty cents per pound it is certy. That would destroy ing ewes, 116 ....$ 696.00
"We have been here three years
$1,094.06 and we have about 800 acres cut off
tainly an easy way of getting money. y:
, e and you would • not Number of wethNet profit ....
$6.43 and the sheep have kept it sprouted
I think if there were more sheep kept te
g laud. . We know it is , ers and culls. 49. 245.00
Net profit per head
on the farms there would be less no
'noyour confidence in ' Number of rams. 5 125.00
In looking over the above report, so perfectly that the roots are enor;
sending home to "Dad" for money.
yoti of the oppor- Valuation of buildone will notice that, in order to make tirely dead and anyone can come and
Third, especially in upper Wiscon- tea'
yeu in Marinette . ing
this profit on the investment, the see for themselves and need not take
1,200.00
sin they should be raised. Good cut-, cc':
, we ask is that you Land pastured, 40
present valuation was not placed on my word for it. I figure that 500 sheep
over land can be bought from fifteen cone
.for yourself. If you de- acres (estimated) 14,000.00 $3,266.00 the estimate value of the flock left. are equal to a $40 man and keep the
to twenty dollars per acre; rutabagas cicb,' '
here--as we believe
Instead, they were valued at what man mowing brush all summer and
and carrots can be raised to perfec-Iyou:
railroad fare both
they are worth under ordinary condi- when the sheep get through the brush
COSTS
tion, yielding six hundred to one wa:„
allowed by us.
tions to show that, with average pric- is killed. In this manner a man can
Care through winthousand bushels per acre. Clover
:eons, ambitious, knowl- ter 11
es, sheep are good money makers. handle northern Wisconsin land and
/
2 hour per
will yield from three to five tons per . edge
)1orneecekers are coming ! day at $0.25
None of the above sheep would be make money besides clearing his
67.50
acre. This will make an excellent evevel'he 'so' w-it-alls and the , Extra cost of lAor
sold at the figures given in the esti- land. We have made money every
•• not (:.,roing. The cour- at lambing time
winter ration, while in the summer won:
mate, as market prices were then al- summer here on this ranch and I sup15.00
they will graze and help their °wile, ago..
iie
are build-, Cost of shearing
most double that amount.
18.00
pose we have as rough a ranch as
develop this new fertile land. I be- mug :- ortimes here. The 15 tons hay bought
The net profit shown above is ex- you will find anywhere in the state."
neve there is no better opportunity Hee .
.,Jrici the weaklings will December, 1916
of
the
value
of
the
sheep
clusive
196.75
• G. M. Mashek, residing about sixty
for the young man of today than to urve ,
will always be , 7.36 ' tons
barn, which was in the nature of a miles from Marinette, Wisconsin,
hay
raise sheep and open up a farm in knee
;
permaneft improvement, but its en- claims that new cut-over lands
...taklings. Which bought
January
clee,
upper Wisconsin.
.•
to?
tire cost was deducted from the first will support two or three ewes
31, 1917
92.75
season's gross profits, and still the and their lambs per acre and that afnet profit was a very desirable one. ter it has been pastured for several
Years it will carry five or six sheep
Iper acre.
He places
the
cost
INDIANA MEN START
of winter feed in the average Upper
' Wisconsin country at from $2 to $2.50
BIG SHEEP RANCH
per head and says that lambs turned
IN MARINETTE COUNTY off clover pastures from cut-over
lands will sell at the Chicago stockFrom the Wou.saulree (Wis.) Independ- yards as grain-fed lambs. Mr. Mashek advises starting with western
ent, May 11, 1918.
ewes and says that sheep will develop
Island
Lake
The
Sheep,Co. of Waninto better quality in the second and
saukee is the name of a company re- third
year. In fact, sheep in the
cently incorporated for the purpose Great
Lakes countries are always betof developing a sheep ranch north of ter two or
three years after the origthis village where the company has inal flock is
brought from the West.
purchased 725 acres from the SkidDisease Disappears.
more Land Co. At a meeting held a'
Mr. Mashek had trouble with stomfew days ago the following were
elected officers, of the company: J. W. ach worms in his herd of sheep imShank, president: T. Wm. Hart, vice- ported to Wisconsin, but he says that
president; Corry M. Shank, secre- the best proof he can have that the
The three officers cut-over lands are free from this
tary-treasurer.
comprise the board of directors of disease is that about six months later
the disease had entirely disappeared.
the company.
The ranch will be in active charge The impression that the old timber
of Mr. and Mrs. Shank who came lands of Wisconsin are exceedingly
here from Indiana. A large acreage cold in winter is erroneous. Those
is being cleared and buildings are to who have expetimented with sheep
be erected on the place during the both in Wisconsin and the western
summer. The first sheep will be range country find that the losses
brought to the ranch in tha fall, the are much less in Wisconsin. The
size of the flock depending on the sheep make their best gains on
grass in Wisconsin after the first
amount of feed raised this season.
Several hundred acres of the land frost and until there is two or three
is covered with grass suitable for pas- inches of snow on the ground. Furthturing a large number of sheep and ermore, this snow preserves the pasthe plan is to enclose the entire tract ture and makes early feed in the
spring. Before engaging in farming
with woven wire fencing.
The tract purchased takes in Grass in Wisconsin Mr. Mashek worked out
lake, about two miles north of Wau- a set of figures indicating what the
sauk'ee, and extends into Island lake, food production on various lines
in fact the upper boundary line reach- should be and he says his hopes and
es far enough north to include the profits came nearer being realized
island from which the lake derived in the sheep business than any other
form of farming, he evet attempted.
its name.
A dam is to be built at the head of
the stream w,hich feeds the lake and WHAT WESTERN
MAN
a power plant constructed to supply
SAYS OF WISCONSIN
electric current for operating the
farm machinery and lighting the
buildings.
K. 0. Kohler of the state of WashThe men back of the project have ington handled a considerable numhad experience in sheep raising on an ber of sheep -in Upper Wisconsin a
extensive scale and are confident of number of years ago. In an article in
developing a great and profitable in- the May, 1918 edition of the National
dustry in Marinette County.
Wool Grower he says:
"I never saw a place that grew betSheep Increase Fast.
ter red-clover than northern WisconMary had a little lamb,
sin, and I prefer it to alfalfa for
She gave it every care;
sheep feed. There is a world -of feed
And after several years or so
going to waste in that section which
Thirty-two were there.
will eventually be utilized."

TWO TRAINS LOADED
WITH SHEEP ARRIVE

•FARING YOUR
ITUNITY

170 SHEEP SHOW
PROFIT OF $1,094

•

WESTERN SHEEP A
ON THE 2,100 ACRE
IN MARINET

wane...mom-

LCONSIN PURE-BRED RAMS
OF THE BUSBY-TAFT CO.
irfilf, WISCONSIN

TWO EXPERIENCED
SHEEP MEN TELL
OF POSSIBILITIES